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This is a page for individual series of the Pokémon anime. Help appreciated.


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    Anime/Pokemon Anime Original Series 
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The first Pokémon anime series that ran from 1997 to 2002 in Japan and from 1998 to 2003 in America. This series would have Ash go through Kanto to take part in the Indigo Plateau Conference and Johto to take part in the Silver Conference. Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader and Misty, the Cerulean City Gym Leader are his companions. Between those two regions, he would travel through the Orange Islands which are absent from the games to deliver the GS Ball from Professor Ivy to Professor Oak, also replacing Brock with Tracey, a Pokemon watcher.

English dub:

  • Season 1: Indigo League (Episodes 1-80)
  • Season 2: Adventures in the Orange Islands/Orange Archipelago (Episodes 81-116)
  • Season 3: The Johto Journeys (Episodes 117-157)
  • Season 4: Johto League Champions (Episodes 158-209)
  • Season 5: Master Quest (Episodes 210-273)

Japanese version:

  • Indigo League (Episodes 1-82)
  • Orange League (Episodes 83-118)
  • Johto League (Episodes 117-276)

Specials:

  • Pokémon Chronicles (Episodes 1-19)

The Indigo and Orange seasons have now been rebranded as Pokemon The Series: The Beginning, and the Johto seasons are collectively known as Pokemon the Series: Gold and Silver. These brands are used on the digital streaming websites.


This series provides examples of:

  • Abandoned Catchphrase: Early English dub episodes tried to translate Meowth's Japanese Verbal Tic as "meow" or "Meowth". This was scrapped several episodes in.
  • Aborted Arc:
    • Half of The Birth Of Mewtwo radio drama, meant to go with Pokémon: The First Movie and later animated (though excluding the first portion), revolves around Jessie's Missing Mom Miyamoto and how she's been searching for Mew for twenty years. Outside of the drama nothing has referenced Miyamoto. She has yet to be reunited with Jessie.
    • The GS Ball was a MacGuffin that loosely guided the overall plot for about a season and a half, spanning 60 episodes. A Poké Ball that nobody could open, Ash was supposed to give the GS ball to Kurt, the leading Pokéball expert, in order to discover whatever secrets the ball held. After giving the ball to Kurt, however, neither the GS Ball nor its contents were ever brought up again. The GS Ball was supposed to hold Celebi, a legendary Nature Spirit Pokémon, that would be the focus of the next arc, but the writers later decided to give Celebi a starring role in a movie, hoping that viewers would eventually forget about the GS Ball. They didn't, and haven't.
    • Speaking of Kurt; Ash, Misty and Brock each received two special Apricorn Poké Balls from Kurt, but while Ash and Misty actually ended up using their Lure Balls to catch Totodile and Corsola, respectively, neither ever used their Fast Balls, while Brock never used the Heavy Ball he was given.
  • Actually, I Am Him: In "Fighting Flyer With Fire", Ash and friends have a long conversation with Falkner without realizing he's the Violet City Gym Leader they were looking for.
  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series (which is composed of Generation I and II):
    • Daisy Oak. Gary doesn't have a sister like his game counterpart, since Ash didn't need the Town Map that Daisy provides, nor does he spend much time in Pallet Town, where she resides.
    • Nearly all of Team Rocket's crimes featured in Pokémon Red and Blue never got adapted into the anime, including the Ghost Marowak subplot and the Silph Co. hostage takeover. Same thing with Pokémon Gold and Silver, which is at least justified by the fact that Giovanni is still the Rocket Boss during Ash's journey in Johto and thus the subplot of Team Rocket trying to contact their missing leader is unneeded. In fact, it is easier to list the Rocket events that did make it into the games, and those are usually done by Jessie, James and Meowth rather than the entire organization.
    • The Rival of Pokémon Gold and Silver, known as Silver by the fans, does not appear in the anime aside from a brief cameo in The Legend of Thunder! special where he looks down on Jimmy. And it is never made clear if he is the son of Giovanni. His Character Archetype, however, is used for Paul, Ash's rival in Diamond & Pearl.
    • Koga's daughter (and Gym Leader successor) Janine from Pokémon Gold and Silver. The part of the game she's in requires visiting Kanto to get the region's badges; while Ash did return to Kanto to face off against the Hoenn Frontier Brains, he didn't visit the Gyms due to the fact that he'd already gotten the badges. Koga does get a sister named Aya, who pretty much fills the same role as Janine.
    • While the Kanto Elite Four do make an appearance in the anime (with Agatha appearing in the Advanced Generation series), the two original Elite Four members in Pokémon Gold and Silver (Will and Karen) do not make an appearance.
  • Androcles' Lion: In "A Chansey Operation", when Team Rocket tries to take the Pokémon at the hospital, Chansey stands in the way. Arbok and Weezing refuse Jessie and James' orders to attack because Chansey treated their injuries earlier in the episode.
  • Animorphism: A witch turns Ash into a Pikachu for a short time at the end of the episode "Hocus Pokémon!".
  • Animation Bump: Look for the name Masaaki Iwane or Akihiro Tamagawa on the animation director credits before watching an episode. If they are animating it, chances are the animation would be stellar and above the usual quality of regular episodes.
  • Anti-Climax: The rivalry between Ash and Gary is set up in the show's first episode and establishes that a victory over Gary is one of Ash's important long-term goals. After "Showdown at the Po-ké Corral" has Ash promise Gary that they would finally fight during the Indigo League, Gary is eliminated in a fight against a different trainer in the fourth round of the tournament; Ash goes out in the following round. The later Johto League, however, ties up loose ends with Ash and Gary's Full Battle which ends in the victory of the former.
  • Art Evolution: Starting with "Here's Lookin' at You, Elekid", the anime switches from cel to digital animation. This would last all the way up to the end of the XY series, where it is replaced by more hand-drawn animation style in Sun & Moon.
  • Ask a Stupid Question...: In the episode "Dues and Don'ts" Team Rocket tries to catch a Delibird which throws snow at them.
    Jessie: It's a Blizzard attack!
    James: How do you know it's a Blizzard attack?
    Jessie: Maybe because we're in a blizzard?
    James: Oh. That makes sense.
  • Bail Equals Freedom: At the end of their first appearance, Butch and Cassidy are in jail for their crimes. At their next appearance, they're free and tell Jessie and James it's because their boss bailed them out.
  • Ballet Episode: "The Misty Mermaid" centers on an underwater synchronized swimming show in which Misty gets involved through a series of circumstances. Reinforced by Team Rocket's disguises in the episode.
  • Banana Peel: Misty and Ash's Bulbasaur both fall prey to this prank while working in a beach restaurant in "Beauty and the Beach", courtesy of Meowth. Worse yet, they're carrying trays of food, which go flying everywhere.
  • "Bang!" Flag Gun: Haunter had one in "Haunter vs. Kadabra." (the actual "BANG!" flag appears too quickly to be easily made out though)
  • Book-Ends: Misty began traveling with Ash after he stole her bike and got it destroyed, and in the episode where she leaves the group, she receives her rebuilt bike.
  • Call of the Wild Blue Yonder: "Fly Me to the Moon" is about a Pidgey named Orville who dreams of flying higher then any other Pokémon. Even Meowth was touched by the dream and decided to help him.
  • Child Prodigy: In "The Ancient Puzzle Of Pokémopolis", the trio meets an archaeologist who has earned her PhD at the age of eight.
  • Christmas Episode: "Holiday Hi-Jynx!", which due to two unfortunate circumstances, did not air when originally intended in Japan and internationally.
  • Circus Episode: The episode "It's Mr. Mime Time!" deals with the ringmaster of a traveling circus and her lazy Mr. Mime. When Ash is recruited to take the place of the Mr. Mime in the circus (in order to convince the Pokémon to come back to work) he gets mistakenly kidnapped by Team Rocket.
  • Deadly Doctor: Dr. Proctor, who fought Team Rocket armed with nothing but a labcoat full of scalpels.
  • Elemental Hair: The Eevee brothers — the yellow-haired Sparky having a Jolteon, the redhead Pyro a Flareon, the blue-haired Rainer a Vaporeon, and brown haired Mikey has an unevolved Eevee.
  • Establishing Series Moment: As the first animated adaptation of Pokémon, it went out of its way to make a lasting impression for both the fans and general audiences:
    • The first episode opens with the Game Boy opening of Pokémon Red and Blue, featuring Gengar fighting Nidorino. The scene then shifts to a fully animated Pokémon Stadium match, and quickly establishes the various aspects of Pokémon from their extraordinary powers to their trainers to the various shapes and sizes that they can appear as. And all of this is happening on TV, in front of a young boy wishing to be a Pokémon Trainer himself.
    • In terms of Takeshi Shudō's darker tone that characterize the early anime, that moment is best summed up by Ash protecting his disobedient but injured Pikachu from a flock of vicious Spearow with nothing but his own body, badly beaten but defiant against his odds. It deconstructs the whole Pokémon journey with cynical reality yet still upholds its optimism with Ash's kindness and determination.
  • Feathered Fiend: Spearow are not the pleasant kind of Pokémon to meet in the anime. Aside from their infamous attempt to kill Ash and Pikachu in the first episode, they are also the Pokémon that attack a defenseless Charmander trying to keep its tail lit in the heavy rain in "Charmander - The Stray Pokémon", as well as the flock of Pidgey and Pidgeotto in "Pallet Party Panic".
  • A Fistful of Rehashes: "Showdown at Dark City" is basically Yojimbo...with Pokémon! And two rival gyms going too far with the Serious Business! And rated TV-Y7!
  • Goldfish Poop Gang: The prime example of this trope is the trio of Jessie, James, and Meowth; though it took some time before they went from somewhat competent (as cartoonish villains could be) to a nuisance that Ash and friends can get rid of with little effort.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress: In "Pokémon Shipwreck", Ash wakes up on the ceiling of the capsized S.S. Anne, and stays there until Misty and Brock tell him he's on the ceiling. Only then does he fall to the ground.
  • Human Popsicle: If you count Pokémon, Pryce's Piloswine counts. In "As Cold As Pryce", we learn it was frozen in a glacier for many years, and defrosted harmlessly.
  • Isle of Giant Horrors:
    • After surviving the sinking of the St. Anne, Ash's party and Team Rocket end up stuck on an island made up of malfunctioning giant animatronic Pokémon, separated from their Pokémon.
    • "Bound For Trouble" has Meowth and Pikachu tied together in the middle of Fairchild Island, an island containing giant Rhydon and Pidgeot who attack anyone that comes near.
  • Journey to the Center of the Mind: In "Address Unown!", an Unown puts Ash and friends into Larvitar's mind to help it get past traumatic events.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Mewtwo. While Giovanni is a ruthless villain in contrast to the Team Rocket trio, Mewtwo is the Pokémon that signifies the arrival of darker themes than the show is used to, though this is only fully seen in Pokémon: The First Movie. It's Mewtwo who easily defeats the unbeatable Gary Oak and it's Mewtwo who destroys the Team Rocket HQ, forcing Giovanni to take an extended vacation from his usual business. The radio drama Pokémon: The Birth of Mewtwo that told the backstory of Mewtwo alongside the anime introduces more overt, adult themes such as military, religion, death, cloning ethnics and more.
  • Line-of-Sight Name: In "Showdown At Dark City", Ash tries to hide his real name. When he looks at Pikachu playing with a ketchup bottle, Ash announces his name is "Ketchup" before he quickly changes it to "Tom Ato".
  • Literally Prized Possession: It's revealed in a Kanto episode that Ash's Nice Hat is an official Pokémon League hat he won by sending in hundreds of entries to a sweepstakes (making it clear that he's wanted To Be a Master for a very long time).
  • Mistaken for Undead: In "Pokemon Shipwreck", had Ash's gang and Team Rocket working together to escape the sunken ship. Ash's friends all use water Pokemon to escape, while Team Rocket uses James' useless Magikarp and nearly drown. When Team Rocket wash up unconscious, Ash and co. believe they have drowned and are about to give them a water burial. However Team Rocket awakens and are angry at almost being pushed in the water, while Ash and friends scream out "ZOMBIES!"
  • No-Harm Requirement: During Johto in the episode "Once In A Blue Moon", a Quagsire steals the GS Ball. When Ash gets it back by battling it with Squirtle, the gang almost get arrested by Officer Jenny because Quagsire in the town is a protected species. So when the Quagsire steals the ball again, they have to follow it to waterfall where it conducts its waterfall ritual and wait for it to finish with the ball.
  • Power Trio: Featuring the classic ensemble of both heroes and villains in Pokémon, including but not limited to:
  • Prompting Nudge: In the first-season episode "Showdown at Dark City", Misty suggests making up pseudonyms so the group won't blemish their reputation by essentially taking sides in a gang war. Ash and Misty come up with names fairly quickly, but Misty has to nudge Brock to make him speak since he's too busy gawking at the female recruiter.
  • Sand Bridge at Low Tide: In "The Crystal Onix", Ash and the gang find that the way to the cave where the mythical Crystal Onix lives is a sandbar that only appears at certain times of the day.
  • Sleeps with Both Eyes Open: Misty's Psyduck did this once, making Misty think he was immune to Jigglypuff's singing.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: The male and female Nidoran from the Orange Islands episode "Wherefore Art Thou, Pokémon?", an obvious Shout-Out to Romeo and Juliet. As a bonus, they are named Tony and Maria after the protagonists of West Side Story, a modern take on the original play.
  • Taps: At the beginning of the episode "Pokémon Shipwreck", Officer Jenny and the other survivors of the sinking of the St. Anne are mourning the apparent deaths of Ash, Misty, Brock, Pikachu, Jessie, James, and Meowth, after they were unable to get off the ship. After Jenny tosses a bouquet of flowers overboard, she tells everyone to give a salute while a trumpeter starts playing Taps, as the flowers sink into the ocean waters.
  • Terrible Trio: Jessie, James and Meowth of Team Rocket, of course! The Kanto and Orange Islands arcs, along with Black & White, are the only times where trope is played completely straight, as the accidental acquirement of Wobbuffet in "Tricks of the Trade" along with its Running Gag of popping during the Rocket motto has made the Patient Pokémon an unofficial fourth member to the trio.
  • Third-Option Adaptation:
    • Since the producers didn't want the show to have a particular bias towards one of the three available starter Pokémon (Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle), they decided to have Ash's first Pokémon be Pikachu, an Electric Mouse Pokémon found in the Viridian Forest that has gained popularity among the Japanese children for its cuteness and rarity. And the rest is history.
    • Ash does get all three regional starter Pokémon in both Kanto and Johto later on in the series, likely to promote them equally. Ironically, despite the producers' intentions, the show did end up favoring one of Ash's three Kanto starters with Charizard, who is the only one to evolve all the way to its final form as well as being an absolute powerhouse compared to the rest. It's not surprising to see that when Ash faces Gary Oak in the Silver Conference for their League match, Gary's own starter Pokémon is revealed to be none other than Blastoise, thus recreating the rival dynamic in Pokémon Red and Blue had the player picked Charmander.
  • Too Soon: In-Universe, international dub only, in "The Kangaskhan Kid". After the events of "Hypno's Naptime", Misty reacting to being asked if she was a Pokémon or a person as though she'd just been asked about her rack (as she was in the Japanese version) makes perfect sense, seeing she'd been hypnotized into believing she was a Seel in that episode.
  • Traitor Shot: The Teddiursa in episode "UnBEARable" has five of them.
  • Trouble Making New Pet: The episode "UnBEARable" has Ash and friends come across a cute and seemingly innocent Teddiursa, whom they temporarily take under their wing. However, when Ash, Misty, and Brock are not around, Teddiursa is not as innocent as it seems as it frames most of the Pokemon (Totodile, Chikorita, Psyduck, and Bulbasaur) for eating all the food, which it actually did itself.
  • Unbuilt Trope: The early Pokémon seasons are the first and most famous examples of Mon anime. However they also deconstruct certain aspects of the Pokémon world. At the beginning of Ash's journey, he is an inexperienced child. He gets his food stolen, is disobeyed by his starter, and is nearly killed by a flock of Spearow, all in the first episode. Other early episodes showed other darker issues like Pokémon abandonment, disobedience, the existence of a crime syndicate. Mewtwo's backstory is a tragic and terrifying example of the experimentation that can exist. However, as Ash became more experienced, he ended reconstructing the Pokémon world by showcasing the virtues: loyalty, bravery, teamwork, and love.
  • Vile Villain, Laughable Lackey: Jessie, James and Meowth are a trio of comedic yet lovable buffoons who try (and fail) to steal Ash's Pikachu (or any Pokémon they come across). Their boss, Giovanni, is a ruthless and no-nonsense leader of The Mafia who operates on larger criminal schemes. To a lesser extent, the Team Rocket organization itself is serious crime syndicate like Giovanni, but the Rocket grunts are just as or even less competent than the Team Rocket trio.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: There several villains who tip the scale of seriousness to balance out the comedic Team Rocket trio that Ash and friends usually face:
  • Villain Decay: The Team Rocket trio starts off as threatening and even frightening villains in their debut episode, especially with Pikachu out of commission, forcing Ash and Misty to run several times. But after Ash is able to blast them off for the first time, the trio bicker over their defeat and hastily conclude that Pikachu must be a very rare and powerful specimen. Their obsession of following the twerps and capturing Pikachu proves to be detrimental to their relationship with the rest of Team Rocket as not only did Ash thwart all of their attempts to steal Pikachu, but also their attempts to steal other Pokémon. Giovanni eventually got sick of them bringing nothing to the table, and considers reassigning them far away so he doesn't have to deal with their antics.

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon
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    Anime/Pokemon Advanced Generation 
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The second Pokémon anime series that ran from 2002 to 2006 in Japan and from 2003 to 2007 in America. This region has Ash going through Hoenn to take part in the Hoenn League, and later, the Battle Frontier. May, a Pokemon Coordinator, Max, her younger brother, and Brock, returning from the previous series, are his companions.

English dub:

  • Season 6: Advanced (Episodes 1-40)
  • Season 7: Advanced Challenge (Episodes 41-92)
  • Season 8: Advanced Battle (Episodes 93-145)
  • Season 9: Battle Frontier (Episodes 146-192)

Japanese version:

  • Hoenn League (Episodes 1-131)
  • Kanto Battle Frontier (Episodes 132-192)

Now collectively known as Pokemon the Series: Ruby and Sapphire.


This series provides examples of:

  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series:
    • Professor Birch's child, who would be Brendan if the player picks May as their character, is absent from the series. Brendan does make small cameos in the movies such as Pokémon: Jirachi: Wish Maker and Pokémon Ranger and the Temple of the Sea.
    • Wally is absent here though Drew has aesthetic similarities and is May's rival, while Max covers the Kid Appeal, the student-to-the-Player role, and being close to a Ralts (despite not catching it).
    • While Tabitha of Team Magma and Shelly of Team Aqua appear as the frontline Admins for their teams in the anime, the second set of Admins, Courtney of Team Magma and Matt of Team Aqua, do not appear in the anime.
    • Although "Gaining Groudon" and "The Scuffle of Legends" does emulate the climax of Pokémon Emerald with both Groudon and Kyogre fighting each other, it eschews the subplot of traveling to the Sky Pillar and summon Rayquaza to deal with them. Instead, the crisis is resolved when Groudon defeats Kyogre and knocks the Red Orb out of Archie's body with a Solar Beam.
    • The Hoenn Elite Four do not appear in the anime except the Dragon Trainer Drake. Steven Stone, the Hoenn Champion in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, only appears in one episode of the Advanced Generation series without indicating that he's the Hoenn Champion (though his next major appearance in the XY series implies that he eventually got it) while Wallace, former Gym Leader of Sootopolis City and Hoenn Champion in Pokémon Emerald, does not appear until the next series of the anime, Diamond & Pearl.
  • Arc Villain: Team Magma and Team Aqua serve as the regional villains for Ash and friends to contend along with the inept Team Rocket trio. After the Groudon Vs. Kyogre two-parter, composed of "Gaining Groudon" and "The Scuffle of Legends", ends with the two teams realizing the errors of their ways (and presumably reformed if not disbanded), the Team Rocket organization (not the trio) takes their place during the Battle Frontier arc.
  • Big-Bad Ensemble: Maxie and Archie are the villainous masterminds behind Team Magma and Team Aqua respectively. However, despite the mutual rivalry between the two teams, they only appear in "Gaining Groudon" and "The Scuffle of Legends", which happens to be the finale for the Team Magma/Team Aqua conflict.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • In both Kanto and Johto, Ash caught the three regional starters. Starting with Hoenn, the starters were divided between him and his companions, with the exception of Unova where he did end up catching all three starter Pokémon again.
    • Hoenn is the first series where the core cast is made up of more than three people by adding a Tagalong Kid.
  • Call of the Wild Blue Yonder: In episode "Let Bagons Be Bagons" a Bagon tries to learn how to fly. It eventually does so with a jetpack before evolving into Shelgon.
  • Clam Trap: In the episode "Clamperl of Wisdom!", a Clamperl (an oyster-like Pokémon) bites down on Meowth's tail at one point. This scene currently serves as the trope's page image.
  • Cooking Duel: In "Hail to the Chef", Rhoda and Rhonda face off against each other with their Mr. Mime and Sneasel, respectively, to see who's the best.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: In one episode, Shiftry kidnaps Nurse Joy by hitting her with Sleep Powder. However, the gang keeps referring to it as Stun Spore; a move that paralyzes a foe, not put them to sleep. Whoops.
  • Establishing Series Moment: May's introduction in the very first scene of "Get the Show on the Road!" not only establishes the character of May, but it also firmly cements the anime as the story about Ash and the friends he meets in one region rather than just the Power Trio of Ash, Misty, and Brock traveling across the world.
  • Evil vs. Evil: Team Magma vs Team Aqua, naturally. With the Team Rocket trio thrown in the mix for good measure. To a lesser extent, the Team Rocket trio and their rivals, Butch and Cassidy.
  • Evil Versus Oblivion: After Archie gets possessed by the Red Orb trying to control Kyogre, Team Magma and the rest of Team Aqua form an Enemy Mime to help Groudon prevent Kyogre from sinking the island that they're standing on.
  • No-Harm Requirement: In "You Can Never Taillow", Ash and Pikachu find themselves having to square off against the leader of a fierce Taillow flock. However, is a determined Blood Knight and keeps battling despite taking numerous powerful Electric attacks from Pikachu. Fearing that he may cause it too much damage, Ash ends up capturing.
  • Non-Action Big Bad: Despite being villainous bosses, neither Maxie nor Archie actually battle with Pokémon. This is more prominent with Maxie, who doesn't even get to control Groudon to combat Archie and the Kyogre under his thrall (that ends up being Pikachu).
  • Reassigned to Antarctica: At the beginning of the Battle Frontier arc, Giovanni literally reassigns Jessie, James and Meowth to Antartica, though trio didn't realize what it actually meant.
  • Third-Option Adaptation: Like Pokémon Emerald, the Advanced Generation series treats both regional teams to be evil jerks, and combines the awakening of Groudon and Kyogre into one event where the two titans clash for dominance. There is, however, no Rayquaza to defeat both of them.note 
  • Unexpectedly Dark Episode: Mixed with Bizarro Episode, "Time Warp Heals all Wounds!" fits this, featuring May and Meowth traveling back in time in order to stop a man before he takes the train where he will die before his wife can tell him that she is pregnant.
  • Uriah Gambit: Giovanni has no confidence in the Team Rocket trio actually set up a permanent base in the Hoenn region. But he allows it because having them away in a distant region means he doesn't have to deal with them at home as well as giving him excellent intel regarding villainous teams like Team Magma and Team Aqua.
  • Villain Decay: Excluding Jessie, James and Meowth, who have always been at the bottom of the Rocket hierarchy, the Team Rocket organization has been slipping in terms of efficiency and intimidation.
    • Cassidy and Butch, once competent Rocket agents favored by Giovanni, have been reduced to a bumbling pair who also gets blasted off by virtually everyone, and are only slightly better than their rival co-workers.
    • Giovanni himself does nothing in the series other than occasionally listening to reports from the Team Rocket trio on a blue moon, causing Meowth's Boss Fantasies, which depicts Giovanni as a smiling, muscular figure who uses Pokémon for mundane activities, to likely be the only impressions new fans watching this series first would get out of him.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: Archie's possession of the Red Orb, which allows him to control Kyogre, turns him into a full-blown Omnicidal Maniac, willingly to sink the island where his own men happens to be on. Only when the orb is knocked out of his body that he regains sanity (albeit with no memory during his time with the Red Orb).

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon

    Anime/Pokemon Diamond And Pearl Anime 
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The third Pokémon anime series that ran from 2006 to 2010 in Japan and from 2007 to 2011 in America. This region has Ash going through Sinnoh to take part in the Sinnoh League. Dawn, a Pokemon Coordinator, and Brock, returning once again from the previous series, are his companions. Along the way, they foil the plots of Team Galactic and Pokemon Hunter J.

English dub:

  • Season 10: Diamond & Pearl (Episodes 1-52)
  • Season 11: Diamond & Pearl: Battle Dimension (Episodes 53-104)
  • Season 12: Diamond & Pearl: Galactic Battles (Episodes 105-157)
  • Season 13: Diamond & Pearl: Sinnoh League Victors (Episodes 158-191)

Japanese version:

  • Sinnoh League (Episodes 1-191)

Specials:

  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon (Episodes 1-3)
  • Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs
  • Dawn and Brock After Sinnoh (Episodes 1-2)

Now collectively known as Pokemon the Series: Diamond and Pearl.


This series provides examples of:

  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series:
    • Cynthia's sister is a minor character who doesn't have a sprite of her own, however she still appears in the games. In the anime, however, only Cynthia and her grandmother appeared.
    • Sinnoh and Johto's Frontier Brains other than Palmer do not appear. Caitlin does appear in the Black & White series albeit in her Unova Elite Four incarnation.
    • While Cyrus summoning both Dialga and Palkia is the climax of Pokémon Platinum, Giratina does not show up to abduct Cyrus and take him back to the Distortion World (or Reverse World in the anime's case). In fact, Giratina doesn't show up in the Diamond & Pearl series beyond a quick illusion casted by a Mitchell's Murkrow in "Try for the Family Stone!" and a boss fantasy by Meowth in "Dealing With a Fierce Double Ditto Drama!".
  • And I Must Scream:
    • Hunter J captures Pokémon by turning them into statues.
    • "Sandshrew's Locker!" features Mira who has lost her Sandshrew after her town was flooded. The Pokémon was in the Poké Ball for decades deep under the water. If Ash and friends hadn't rescued it, who knows how much longer it would have stayed there.
  • Arc Villain:
    • Pokémon Hunter J serves as a recurring villain for Ash and friends in the absence of Team Galactic, first appearing in "Mutiny in the Bounty!" and then goes on to appear in more several episodes hunting down special Pokémon like an Aura Sphere Riolu and a Regigigas at Snowpoint Temple. Her last appearance coincides with Team Galactic finale, where she is hired by Jupiter to capture the Lake Guardians for them, a bounty that proves to be her last.
    • Team Galactic did not make its presence known until "A Secret Sphere of Influence!", 36 episodes into the series. Despite this, they become a recurring antagonistic force for Ash and friends starting with "Enter Galactic!" and continue to make major moves in Celestic Town, Iron Island and of course, Mt. Coronet where they attempt to control Dialga and Palkia.
  • Art Evolution: Starting with "Following A Maiden's Voyage", all episodes of Diamond & Pearl are done with 30 frames per second animation instead of the usual 24. This trend continues to future series until Sun & Moon, which reverts back to the 24 frames to better accommodate the new art and animation style.
  • Big Bad: Cyrus is the mastermind behind Team Galactic's activities, plotting to capture the Lake Guardians and forge Red Chains to control Dialga and Palkia for his bid of remaking a world without emotions. Not only is he the boss of Team Galactic, but he also firmly establishes himself to be at the top of the villainous hierarchy in Sinnoh by hiring fellow recurring villain Hunter J to capture the Lake Guardians for him.
  • Breaking Old Trends: Ash finally catching a pseudo legendary Pokémon, or at least a member of its line, rather than simply befriending it and then letting it go.
  • Diabolus ex Machina: Tobias, the trainer ultimately defeats Ash in the Lily of the Valley Conference, uses Darkai and Latios at his disposal. No explanation is given as to how he got these rare and powerful Pokémon or who he is exactly. He's simply there to quickly knock Ash out of the tournament in a blaze of glory (as Ash is the only trainer who is able to defeat two of Tobias's overpowered team where everyone else couldn't even defeat one).
  • Establishing Series Moment: The first three episodes of Diamond & Pearl (which initially aired together as a TV special) establish the character arcs and dynamics that define the rest of the series. More specifically:
  • Evil Poacher: J is a cutthroat Pokémon hunter who tracks down and captures Pokémon for her clients at the black market, not caring if the Pokémon target in question already has an owner. What makes her unique from the other poachers is her advanced technology (which includes a blaster that can turn living things into statues) that puts Team Rocket to shame, and her sociopathic personality.
  • French Maid Outfit: The "Tanks for the Memories!" episode sees the gang helping out at a Maid Cafe because the joint was temporarily understaffed (Brock was training one of the maids working there). This results in Dawn, Ash (again!) and even some of their mons dressing up in these outfits.
  • The Heavy: Pokémon Hunter J is technically a poacher hired by rich clients to capture rare Pokémon for them but her frequent encounters with Ash and friends has made her into one of the more personal enemies that our heroes have faced, perhaps more so than even Team Galactic.
  • Knight of Cerebus:
    • Paul is Ash's rival in the Sinnoh region, and the one who causes Ash and his Pokémon the most grief. He is the polar opposite of Ash in terms of ideals and methods, especially when it came to Chimchar, and his strength as a trainer enables him to give Ash his most devastating defeats in the entire series. Even Ash's personal rival, Gary Oak, was only a friendly Smug Snake compared to the soul-crushing battler that is Paul. It is because of Paul that Ash treats the Sinnoh League as something more than just a casual opportunity for the championship unlike the other Leagues he has partaken.
    • Pokémon Hunter J may have appeared early in the series, but her sociopathic personality and ruthless methods signify that Diamond & Pearl is not playing around with tame villains like in the previous series; an appetizer for the more serious, impeding Team Galactic conflict.
    • Cyrus's debut in the Team Galactic two-parter, "Losing Its Lustrous!" and "Double Team Turnover!", marks Team Galactic formally transitioning to Arc Villain status. Ash and friends lose the Lustrous Orb to them, and they worry of what Team Galactic is going to do next. It is also made clear by the end of "Double Team Turnover!" that Team Galactic is hiring Pokémon hunters to go after the Lake Guardians, elevating the unaffiliated J into a major player of the Team Galactic finale.
  • Myth Arc: Based around the region's Time-Space Legend featuring Dialga and Palkia, the Legendary Lake Trio Pokémon and their mysterious connection to Ash, Dawn and Brock, and the machinations of Team Galactic as it attempts to use this legend and its Pokémon to create a new world for themselves that will replace the old one. Strangely, despite starting in the first episode (where Dawn catches sight of Mesprit), it concludes in episode 151, leaving 40 episodes still left to go.
  • No-Harm Requirement: The gang had to deal with Hunter J who was an Evil Poacher that poached Pokémon, whether they were owned or rare, and sold them clients via a black market. To ensure maximum pay for her quarry, she would zap the Pokémon with a petrification ray and seal them in clear pods.
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: This saga did this a few times, playing absurdly epic and dramatic music as the backdrop for chasing Pachirisu around for several minutes, or Team Rocket's evolution machine sputtering out repeatedly.
  • Textual Celebrity Resemblance: The episode "Arriving In Style" is about dressing Pokémon in costumes. The "famous fashion designer Hermione" looks a lot like iconic costume designer Edith Head.
  • Third-Option Adaptation: Like in Pokémon Platinum, Cyrus aims to summon both Dialga and Palkia to remake the world in his own image. Unlike that game, however, Giratina does not show up to take him to the Distortion World. Instead Cyrus jumps into the small universe he has created, disappearing before Dialga and Palkia destroy it out of rage. Meanwhile Ash and friends team up with the Lake Guardians to calm down the Temporal and Spatial Pokémon before they could destroy the Sinnoh region.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show:
    • Pokémon Hunter J is perhaps one of the most ruthless villains that ever debuted in the anime, capturing Pokémon with her petrification ray instead of the usual nets and cages, as well as being willingly to kill anyone to accomplish her goals, including children and her own men. It is telling that she is one of the few characters that is implied to have been killed off in her final appearance because of how horrible she is by the show's standards.
    • Team Galactic may seem to be your standard villainous team at first glance, but their goal of deliberately destroying and remaking the world through Dialga and Palkia puts them above all their predecessors; especially with their cold-hearted boss, Cyrus, who is more than willingly to abandon them once he obtains his world.
  • Worst. Whatever. Ever!: The Japanese title for one episode translates to "The Worst Togepi Ever!" The English dub changed it to "Where No Togepi Has Gone Before".

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon

    Anime/Pokemon Black And White Anime 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pbw650488.png

The fourth Pokémon anime series that ran from 2010 to 2013 in Japan and from 2011 to 2013 in America. This region has Ash going through Unova to take part in the Unova League. Iris, a young Dragon type user and Cilan, the Grass type Striaton City Gym Leader, are his companions.

English dub:

  • Season 14: Black & White (Episodes 1-48)
  • Season 15: Black & White: Rival Destinies (Episodes 49-97)
  • Season 16 (Part 1): Black & White: Adventures in Unova (Episodes 98-122)
  • Season 16 (Part 2): Black & White: Adventures in Unova and Beyond (Episodes 123-142)

Japanese version:

  • Best Wishes! (Episodes 1-84)
  • Best Wishes! Season 2 (Episodes 85-108)
  • Best Wishes! Season 2: Episode N (Episodes 109-122)
  • Best Wishes! Season 2 Da! (Decolora Adventure) (Episodes 123-142)

Specials:

  • Mewtwo Movie Prologue
  • Cilan and Iris After Unova (Episodes 1-2)

Now collectively known as Pokemon the Series: Black & White.


This series provides examples of:

  • Aborted Arc: In this case, an aborted conclusion to a near-finished arc. The subplot with Team Rocket and the "Meteonite", a space rock with special destructive powers, is built up for several episodes and just as the epic two-part conclusion to this subplot is about to air, an earthquake devastates Japan and the episodes are pulled from rotation and never referenced again. Various trailers and a synopsis based on leaked information show that it went pretty much how one would expect it to go - with Team Plasma stealing the Meteonite from Team Rocket, the two teams fighting over it, and Ash intervening and having Pikachu destroy it to end the conflict. Though even if they did air, the announcement of sequel games as opposed to the usual Updated Re-release third version caused such a shakeup that the rest of the Plasma plotline was excised from the main story, completely separating it from the whole Badge quest and Tournament Arc.
  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series:
    • The original Team Plasma (aka the self-proclaimed liberators of Pokémon led by N) never made its proper debut thanks to the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011, which postponed the Team Rocket vs Team Plasma Arc Finale indefinitely. The new Team Plasma led by Ghetsis did appear in the anime, but with no hints of an older incarnation thanks to the anime reworking the story to accommodate the new story elements from Pokémon Black 2 and White 2. Consequently, nearly all of grey morality surrounding Team Plasma's goal has been watered or relegated to N, who has received a good dose of Adaptational Heroism thanks to the rewrite.
    • Due to the aforementioned situation above, the Shadow Triad do not appear in the anime. While the Seven Sages do appear, they had their distinct, individualistic appearances and personalities removed (except Ghetsis, of course).
    • Lentimas Town and Black City are the only towns and cities in the Unova region not to be featured in the anime. Same for White Forest.
    • Aside from Caitlin and Champion Alder, none of the Unova Elite Four appear in this series.
  • Amateur Film-Making Plot: Two of them in the Black & White era, thanks of recurring character Luke: the first one (which also marks Luke's debut) is "Movie Time! Zorua in 'The Legend of the Pokemon Knight'!", where Ash and pals join in the cast of Luke's amateur movie after he failed to do it using only his Zorua as every character in the film (since Zorua is a female and she wants to do only the female characters), and later "An Epic Defense Force!", where Ash and pals join Luke in a amateur movie contest at Pokestar Studios, making a film that is hogged with references to the Showa Era Godzilla films.
  • Arc Villain:
    • For the first time since the original series, Giovanni and the Team Rocket organization take center spotlight as villains for Black & White rather than letting Jessie, James and Meowth do their own thing. Originally, they were intended to cause enough ruckus to draw out Team Plasma and fight them for dominance that never came to pass thanks to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. The arc was later reworked for in a later arc featuring Meloetta and the Forces of Nature.
      • Immediately after the aborted-Team Rocket vs Team Plasma finale, Giovanni takes a leave of absence and the Team Rocket trio are placed under the supervision of Dr. Zager, who assigns them to various missions such as capturing the Forces of Nature and resurrecting a Tirtouga fossil.
      • Once it becomes clear that Meloetta is the key Pokémon needed to control the Reveal Glass for Operation Tempst, Giovanni returns to the field and even battles Ash for the first time. When his attempt to control the Forces of Nature through the Reveal Glass is thwarted by Ash and friends, Giovanni orders Team Rocket to retreat back to Kanto, ending his involvement with Unova for the rest of the series.
    • The Episode N arc features the proper debut of Team Plasma (albeit the more malevolent Team Plasma from Pokémon Black 2 and White 2) under Ghetsis and Colress. They seek to find and control Reshiram for their own nefarious ends. The former Team Plasma member, N, is trying to stop them from doing so.
  • Art Evolution: For the first time since the original series, the characters all received a physical redesign to better match Ken Sugimori's latest art style, specifically rounder eyes with larger irises and visible pupils. Many attacks such as Flamethrower and Hyper Beam also had their visual appearances changed, now rendered with CGI instead hand-drawn animation. These changes are later brought over to the XY series with the exception of physical Steel-Type moves; in that case, the steel-colored body parts had reverted back to the plain white.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • Ever since their introduction in the 2nd episode of Kanto, it was a given to have the Team Rocket trio make an appearance in every episode, even if it's just a small 30-second cameo. This trend is finally broken in the 16th Unova episode where they don't make any appearances whatsoever.
    • Since Kanto, Ash either had Misty or Brock traveling alongside him, with Johto being the only other region he had both. Unova was the first region where neither of them were his amongst his companions.
    • Unova was the first region where Ash doesn't encounter the regional villain team until completing the league, where they got a short arc dedicated to them.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Team Rocket escaping through a Smoke Out rather than their classical Twinkle In The Sky blast off in "Enter Iris and Axew!" cement their new status as serious villains, leaving their Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain days behind until the "Episode N" arc, which gradually brings them back to their old roots again.
  • Establishing Series Moment: Acting as somewhat of a Soft Reboot to the anime, the first few episodes establishes the new status quo for better or worse:
    • The most infamous moment happens in the first episode "In the Shadow of Zekrom!" where Ash's Pikachu temporarily loses his electric powers to Zekrom upon arrival to Unova, and later gets defeated by Trip's newly obtained Snivy. This, along with the narrator directly confirming Ash to be 10 years old again at the beginning of the episode, is why Black & White is considered to be a Reset Button for Ash's journey to better accommodate the new generation of kids watching the show.
    • How do you reestablish Team Rocket as a serious threat after years of being incompetent buffoons? Give them black uniforms, leave Wobbuffet and their Sinnoh team behind at HQ, and have them receive real orders from Giovanni in person. All within their first scene. And if that's not enough to convince skeptical viewers, their Smoke Out getaway instead of being blasted off after their first battle with Ash and Iris will.
  • Funny Afro: Everybody wears afro wigs in "Baffling The Bouffalant!", because the Bouffalant won't attack anybody who has a similar hairstyle to their natural afros.
  • Myth Arc: Based around the legend of the Black Hero and White Hero representing Ideals and Truth respectively, their Pokémon companions Zekrom and Reshiram, the new "chosen ones" Ash (with Pikachu) and N, and Team Plasma attempting to use this legend to advance its plan for world domination. While starting in the first episode, it only resurfaces in episode 64 and the Episode N story arc near the end of the series. It was supposed to have progressed through more episodes more routinely, but some real-life factors got in the way and changed this.
  • No-Harm Requirement: In the episode, "A Home for Dwebble", the gang help a Dwebble get its home back from a bigger, bully Dwebble that attached its shell to its bigger one. Eventually, Dwebble gets to fight it mono-et-mono, but it has to restrain itself out of risk of damaging its own shell. Eventually it's able to use Shell Smash to destroy the rival Dwebble's shell and send it packing while leaving its own shell unharmed.
  • Noodle Incident: Cilan is terrified of Purrloin because of an incident in his past involving one that he refuses to talk about until the voyage across the Decolore Islands. And even then, it is never explained to the audience, with only Ash and Iris's shocked reactions to go off of.
  • Punny Name: Best Wishes is both initialized "BW" (Black and White), and in Japanese "Wishes" would be pronounced similar to "Isshu", the Japanese name of Unova, the region the series is set. Also, the Gratuitous English is - goes without saying - a totally Justified Trope in this series given that Unova is based on North America rather than Japan.
  • Saw Star Wars 27 Times: In "Guarding The Guardian Of The Mountain", Cilan meets Brycen and says he's seen the film Brycen starred in, "Enter The Beartic" at least 25 times.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: Team Rocket's Pokémon from Johto to Sinnoh are Put on a Bus to Team Rocket HQ for this series, partially to avoid attracting attention from Unova residents for being foreign Pokémon but most likely to get rid of the comedic association from the past series in order to sell Team Rocket as super competent baddies. When Wobbufett returns to the team in the last episode, it signifies the bumbling Team Rocket fans know and love is here to stay.
  • Third-Option Adaptation:
    • For the first time since the original series, Ash has gotten all three Unova starters instead of just one, though when it comes to the first Gym, Oshawott vs Pansage is the only match up that actually happen in the games.
    • In Pokémon Black and White, the first and last gyms each have multiple leaders, of which the player only fights one. In the anime, Ash fights all three leaders in the first gym and neither of the last gym leaders - instead the two leaders from the last gym, Iris and Drayden, face each other (Iris being a regular supporting character and proving herself against her mentor Drayden) and Ash gets his eighth badge from one of the new leaders from the sequel.
    • Subverted with Episode N in regards to the cover legendaries. Ash is closely associated with Zekrom while N is associated with Reshiram, with Team Plasma trying to find and control the latter. However, it is unknown if the story would be have different had the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami not postponed (and eventually retconned) the original debut episodes of Team Plasma.
  • Unsettling Gender Reveal: The titular Purrloin in the episode "Purrloin: Sweet or Sneaky!" caught the attention of Oshawott and Meowth (confirmed to be male in earlier episodes) and both of them competed to see who would be Purrloin's boyfriend. Only for that Purrloin's owner to point out that it was male and the whole act was just a ruse to steal stuff.

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon

    Anime/Pokemon XY 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/xyposter488.png

The fifth Pokémon anime series that ran from 2013 to 2016 in Japan and from 2014 to 2017 in America. This region has Ash going through Kalos to take part in the Kalos League. Serena, Ash's childhood friend, Clemont, Lumiose City's Gym Leader and inventor, and Bonnie, Clemont's younger sister, are his companions. Along the way, they get involved in a battle with Team Flare.

English dub:

  • Season 17: XY (Episodes 1-49)
  • Season 18: XY: Kalos Quest (Episodes 50-93)
  • Season 19: XYZ (Episode 94-140)

Japanese version:

  • XY (Episodes 1-93)
  • XY & Z (Episodes 94-140)

Specials:

  • Mega Evolution Acts (Episodes 1-4)
  • Diancie Movie Prologue
  • Hoopa Movie Prologue
  • After XY Specials (Episodes 1-2)

This series provides examples of:

  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series:
    • Professor Sycamore's recurring assistants Sina and Dexio didn't appear in the anime. Instead, Alain takes up the role as Sycamore's assistant.
    • AZ and the Ultimate Weapon do not appear in the anime despite Team Flare's major role in the story. As a result, Xerenas and Yveltal are Demoted to Extra since they are no longer needed to power up the ancient doomsday device. To make up for that, Team Flare instead uses Zygarde and the Megalith Stone (aka Giant Rock) as the substitute means to destroy the world.
    • Drasna is the only Elite Four member of the Kalos League to not make an appearance, not even for a cameo (Wikstrom, the only other Elite Four member to not have a major role in the series, makes a small cameo appearance in Pokémon: Diancie and the Cocoon of Destruction).
    • The postgame in X and Y features Xerosic being investigated by Agent Looker and finding redemption with the help of a young girl named Emma. Neither of these happen in the anime.note 
    • Kiloude City in the Kalos region has never been featured either.
  • Animation Bump: It goes without saying that the animation of XY always peaks for Gym Battles, Showcases and any other important event in the series. It's most prominent during the XYZ series, where the important episodes are stacked back to back.
  • Arc Villain:
    • Florges serves as the Big Bad for the Wetlands Arc, the driving force behind the conquest of the wetlands and Goomy's exile from its home. The climax of Goodra's Character Arc is to defeat Florges and make her see the error of her ways.
    • Lysandre, Boss of Team Flare, serves as the Big Bad for the majority of the XY series (and taking a more active role during XYZ arc), responsible for Alain's Mega Evolution energy quest and the hunt for Zygarde which eventually culminates to a world crisis on Kalos that everyone has to partake in.
  • Art Evolution: Coming at the heels of the well-received mini-series Pokémon Origins and Pokémon Black 2 and White 2: Introduction Movie, which feature Pokémon battles with little to no speedlines or effect panels as backgrounds that the main anime was infamous for, the XY series standardized their animation style for its weekly episodes thanks to the advent of 3D backgrounds and rotating camera, which allowed the animators to focus on the foreground animation and not worry about what's happening behind. This not only led to more dynamic and visually pleasing battles (especially when it came to the Kalos League), but it also allowed more details to the character models, most notably with the addition of fingernails.
  • Big Bad: Lysandre is the main villain of the series, being responsible for the events behind the Mega Evolution Acts arc as well as leading Team Flare to capture Zygarde for his plans of world destruction during the XYZ season of the series.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • First region where Ash doesn't catch the Grass-type starter.
    • First evolution of a Water-type starter, as well as a Water-type Pokémon finally evolving ever since way back in Kanto when Krabby evolved.
    • First generation where Ash doesn't cross-dress. Instead, Serena cross-dresses as Ash.
    • Talonflame did not learn Flamethrower like all the rest of his Fire-types.
    • First region where all of Ash's Pokémon (save for Pikachu, of course) fully evolve.
    • First region where Ash does not reunite with an old companion from the previous region's journey. Cilan did appear, but it was in a post-epilogue episode meaning he only met Clemont and Bonnie.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Though the first two episodes establish that XY is not your usual Pokémon series, the journey through Kalos is a standard lighthearted affair akin to Diamond and Pearl. Then Sawyer is introduced, giving Ash a rival and subtly shifting the tone. Soon after, in quick succession, Olympia gives a prophecy that the region will be in great danger, Chespie falls into a coma at the end of the Mega Evolution Acts specials, Team Flare takes open action, Alain is introduced to Ash and sets him on a spiral; and all of this doesn't let up the darker tone until after the climax of the XYZ season when the conflict is resolved for the most part. It's notable because of just how dark the series gets, and how gradual the process actually is.
  • Establishing Series Moment: The first two episodes (initially aired as a one-hour special premiere) establish the XY series to be quite different from the previous series, especially the Black & White series:
    • "Kalos, Where Dreams and Adventures Begin!" showcases the first Pokémon battle Ash and Clemont, using Pikachu and Bunnelby respectively, which sets the style of future XY Pokémon battles to come. The Speed Stripes that characterized Pokémon battles in previous series are gone, replaced by a 3D battlefield background and a rotating camera.note  It also establishes Ash and Pikachu, who had previously suffered a Reset Button in Black & White, to be smarter and more powerful than they ever been before in the past series, with the highlight of them turning Bunnelby's powerful ears into an opportunity to maximize the damage potential of Electro Ball.
    • "Lumiose City Pursuit!" features Ash calming down a rampaging Garchomp on the Prism Tower, watched on TV by everyone including an awed Serena. This sets the action-packed and darker tone that the series would be well-known for, while also establishing Serena's recognition of Ash Ketchum on TV, starting up a romantic subplot with Ash on a level not seen since Misty's less-than subtle interactions with Ash during the Orange Islands arc.
  • Everyone Can See It: Much to her embarrassment, Serena realizes that her feelings for Ash are very obvious to just about everyone (except for the boys, of course) they meet in their adventure. Alexa, Miette, Bonnie, Shauna and Nini have noticed it; Miette even pretends to be a romantic rival to help push Serena into confessing, while Shauna rolled her eyes when she sees that Serena wants to keep Ash in the dark about it. Bonnie noticeably doesn't try to pair Serena up with her big brother Clemont despite doing it to every other girl they meet, and snickers that both Ash and Clemont are oblivious to the obvious.
  • Funny Afro: Whenever Clemont's inventions explode, they usually give anyone caught in the blast a sizzling afro.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Lysandre and his organization, Team Flare. His cameo at the end of the first Mega Evolution Acts episode is already enough to inform the audience that Alain's story is going to be Darker and Edgier than Ash's. And Team Flare's proper debut in the main series marks a gradual transition in tone from the typical League quest to a world crisis where nothing else matters.
  • Laugh of Love: In the episode "Under the Pledging Tree", when Ash asks Serena what gifts she's planning to get while she's thinking that the two of them are on a date, she quickly replies "I'm not sure yet!", while chuckling nervously.
  • Maybe Ever After: XY ends the same as all other seasons end before it, with Ash and his companions taking different paths. But Serena, while she hasn't changed her mind about going to Hoenn and parting ways with Ash, makes it clear that she hasn't given up on her feelings for him, hoping to "become a more attractive woman" when they meet again, and it's subtly implied that Ash finally reciprocates.
  • Mirror Universe: Ash travels into one in the episode "The Cave Of Mirrors". As expected, the inhabitants have opposite traits of their normal selves (i.e., Ash is timid and is shown to be a crybaby, Team Rocket are heroes who supported Ash from behind, Clemont is athletic and is into magic, etc.).
  • Myth Arc: Based around the phenomenon of Mega Evolution, its origins and the characters who utilize it in the present day, and Team Flare desiring to use the energy of Mega Evolution and the Legendary Pokémon Zygarde to wipe out most of the world's population and preserve its "beauty". This arc not only progressed through many episodes but also through four "The Strongest Mega Evolution" side-story specials starring Alain (who would later become Ash's friend and rival in the actual anime), and concluded at the very end of the series.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • A Fletchling wakes Serena up at the beginning of the XY series, just like in Pokémon X and Y when a Fletchling wakes up the Player Character.
    • Ash Ketchum's XY character model is trifled with references, thanks to the XY series director and long-time Pokémon fan, Tetsuo Yajima, who personally designed it:
      • His Kalos outfit is a fusion of Calem's default outfit and Red's FRLG outfit; the overall design being primary based on Calem with the incorporation of Red's hat, sneakers and T-shirt into the mix.
      • Ash's new hat that is red with a white brim and a white semicircle across the front, reminiscent of Red's hat from FireRed and LeafGreen with only minor cues from Calem's hat. Noticeably, Ash tends to adjust his hat more often than flipping it backwards, something that his game counterpart Red is known to do during battle.
      • Ash's sideburns are now overlapping his ears like Red's rather being tucked behind like in the other series. This was confirmed by Yajima to be taken from Red's design.
    • In "Showcase, Debut!", Serena gets her Important Haircut and changes into her new outfit to not only reflect her Character Development in that episode, but also highlight the fact that Pokémon X and Y games first introduced Character Customization, including haircuts.
  • Omnicidal Maniac:
    • The evil Malamar and its associates plan to use the devices they had stolen to alter the entire Earth into a paradise they can enjoy. Said paradise is a toxic wasteland that would be harmful to any other creature except the Malamar species.
    • Team Flare, like in the games, plan to wipe out entire populations of humans and Pokémon that are not worthy by their standards in order to clear the living space and start anew. Instead of Xerenas or Yveltal, however, they capture Zygarde (specifically Z-2) instead and use Mega Evolution energy to amplify its contempt for humanity into a full-blown misanthropic rampage upon Lumiose City. And if that doesn't work, they have a Megalith Zygarde aimed towards the Anistar Sundial which would cause a world extinction event should the two ever collide.
  • Shipper on Deck: Those who notice Serena's feelings for Ash also try to have her act upon them before it's too late. Miette by playing herself to be a romantic rival who would steal Ash's heart if Serena does nothing; Shuana by openly discussing it with Serena; and Bonnie by not proposing Serena to be her brother's keeper, and would later give her a fist bump after Serena finally kisses Ash on the last episode.
  • Sigh of Love: In one of many Ship Tease moments between Ash and Serena, in the episode "The Cave of Trials", the group has a photo taken, with Serena standing really close to Ash. Serena is later seen looking at the photo and sighing happily before Ash calls for her.
  • Skeleton Government: Episode "Awakening the Sleeping Giant!" shows that Kalos has monarchs present in the form of Princess Allies of Parfum Palace and Lord Shabboneau of Shabboneau Castle, however there is no evidence of them holding any sort of governing power. Other characters with royal titles have appeared plenty of times in the series but again, nothing about politics is mentioned.
  • Starter Villain: The evil Malamar from "A Conspiracy to Conquer!" serves as the first recurring antagonist for the early days of the XY series, hypnotizing people to do its bidding and later conspiring with other evil Malamar to alter/destroy the world to best suit their needs. Despite having similar goals to Team Flare, there are no connections between these groups.
  • Story-Breaker Power: The introduction of Mega Evolution greatly affected on how the story of XY was going to play out.
    • In the games, Mega Evolution is powerful, but only a select few Pokémon benefit enough from it. The mechanic as a whole is balanced out by the fact all Mega Evolved Pokémon (except Rayquaza, who was so powerful, Smogon had to ban it from their banlist) have to give up their held item to hold a Mega Stone. In the anime, where held items are nonexistent, Mega Evolutions are a free powerup, and the only Pokémon qualified to fight them are other Mega Evolved Pokémon, the above-mentoined Legendaries, and Ash's Pikachu. This sheer level of power is the reason why series director Tetsuo Yajima believed that a regular Greninja would not stand out and thus asked Game Freak for a solution. Their solution led to the creation of Ash-Greninja, which is listed below as its own example.
    • Ash-Greninja, the unique Mega Evolution-like transformation exclusive to Ash's Greninja. It provides a power boost on par with a Mega Evolution, perhaps even stronger, and allows Ash to see the battle from Greninja's POV, which is an immense tactical advantage. At first, Ash and Greninja still had some trouble with it and tended to pass out from fighting too hard. However, as their proficiency with the form improved, they were able to challenge Diantha to a close fight, and upon completing the forme, not even Wulfric's Mega Abomasnow, which had a massive Type Advantage, had much of a chance. The only real drawback is that Ash shares Greninja's pain, but even this becomes manageable after mastering the form. Near the end of the XY anime series, Ash releases Greninja so it, alongside Squishy and Z2, can destroy the out-of-control vines left in the wake of the Kalos crisis.
  • Super Mode: Since Generation VI introduced Mega Evolution, the XY series is filled with showcase episodes of Pokémon Mega-Evolving their new, powerful forms. There's even four special Mega Evolution Acts episodes dedicated to Alain trying to beat every Mega-Evolved Pokémon with his Mega Charizard X. The anime goes further with the concept by introducing Ash-Greninja, a unique and powerful form that is achieved when Ash and Greninja's battle bond synchronize completely.
  • Sweet Polly Oliver: In "Battling At Full Volume!", Jimmy wants to have a Pikachu vs. Pikachu battle with Ash. Ash is sick and sleeping, so Serena dresses as Ash to battle in his place.
  • Third-Option Adaptation: Pokémon X and Y has no third version to reconcile whether Team Flare was going after Xerneas or Yveltal, so the anime instead has Team Flare only target Zygarde and not bother with the cover legendaries. It also serves to debut new forms for Zygarde ahead of Pokémon Sun and Moon.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show:
    • The evil Malamar are wicked villains with no sense of humor when they show up. Since they only appear for the first half of the XY anime, where the journey is light-hearted with no serious stakes, the episodes featuring them stand out from the rest.
    • Team Flare, of course. If not for capturing and torturing Z-2 for their schemes, then certainly for unleashing the enraged Zygarde upon Lumiose City and causing massive devastation in its wake. Lysandre in particular is a serious, nihilistic villain who stands out in the XY series, even among his Team Flare cohorts. He is never Played for Laughs even once unlike his five main scientists, and his actions carry out the gravest consequences as poor Alain finds out in the climax.
  • Will They or Won't They?: Serena's crush on Ash is so prevalent throughout this series that the question on everyone's mind (In-Universe and out) is whether or not she will confess her feelings to him instead of keeping it to herself. Many episodes tease on the possibility of Serena having a romantic moment with Ash, only for something to go in-between them before she can actually do so. By the final episode of the XY series, Serena only confesses to Ash that he is still her goal before they have to part ways. But at the very last minute, she finally musters enough to courage to give her first kiss to him, pleasantly surprising our Chaste Hero.
  • Wrong Context Magic: Ash's Greninja is capable of attaining a Super Mode that is as strong as Mega Evolution, but the exact mechanics (apart from involving a form of Synchronization between Ash and Greninja) are unexplained. It's an alien concept that didn't exist in the games (save a unique Greninja that comes with the Sun and Moon demo, meant to emulate the anime) and many people In-Universe wonder if it counts as a Mega Evolution or not.

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon

    Anime/Pokemon The Series Sun And Moon 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/psmposter488.png

The sixth Pokémon anime series that premeried on 2016 in Japan and on 2017 in America and is currently ongoing. This region has Ash going to a school in Alola, with Lillie, a young girl; and Mallow, Lana, Sophocles and Kiawe, originally Trial Captains as his companions.

English dub:

  • Season 20: Sun & Moon (Episodes 1-43)
  • Season 21: Sun & Moon: Ultra Adventures (Episodes 44-??)

Japanese version:

  • Sun & Moon (Episodes 1-??)

This series provides examples of:

  • Adaptational Heroism: Lusamine receives one of the more significant cases of this, going from Pokémon Sun and Moon's controlling, emotionally abusive and borderline insane Big Bad... to a bubbly, embarrassingly-affectionate womanchild with no overpowering obsession with Ultra Beasts/stopping Necrozma.
  • Adaptation Distillation: Ash is only required to defeat one Pokemon per island in order to face the Kahuna, so that he doesn't receive Z-Crystals he can't use (he receives a Fightinium Z from Hala, but Tapu Koko swaps it out for the Electrium Z since none of his current team know any Fighting type moves, and Lana is the one to take the Water Trial due to Ash having no Water types).
  • Adapted Out: There's enough here for the overall anime to have its own page, but here are some specific examples for this series:
    • Team Skull's involvement with Lusamine and Aether Foundation is virtually zero in anime, unlike in Pokémon Sun and Moon where the two organizations team up to open Ultra Wormholes for their own gain. This even extends to Gladion, who is Team Skull's enforcer in the games but is unaffiliated and even hostile towards the villainous gang in the anime.
    • Necrozma's backstory makes no mention of Ultra Megalopolis, the ancient populace of which were the catalyst for the Legendary Pokémon's vicious nature and pillaging of light. Instead, Necrozma lost its light when it exhausted its power protecting Poipole and Naganadel's world from a meteor.
  • Art Evolution: Sun & Moon has the most drastic change in animation and art style compared to all of its predecessors. To better accommodate the new Slice of Life format and easing the burden of producing consistent quality episodes on time, OLM simplified the character designs and teamed up with a leader in animation software, ToonBoom Animation. As a result, the animation is far more frenetic and expressive than previous series, with the art style being more streamlined or made Off-Model as a necessity to allow a much greater amount of characters and movement per shot.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • Alola changed up the overall series formula where instead of being an ongoing adventure around the region, it's now more of a Slice of Life series where Ash goes to school.
    • After six regions, Alola is the first where Ash doesn't catch the regional bird Pokémon.
    • Alola is the first region where Ash doesn't catch a Water-type Pokémon.
    • Ash's outfit is also different from all previous versions. Shorter pants, no jacket/sweatshirt, and no Fingerless Gloves.
  • A Death in the Limelight: "One Journey Ends, Another Begins..." heavily focuses on the old Stoutland, Litten's caretaker, who is stricken with an Incurable Cough of Death throughout the episode and is constantly compared to a tree losing its leaves, and is taken to a Pokémon Center by Ash after Litten drags him toward their home after Stoutland collapses. Despite being discharged the next day, Stoutland fails to recover and leaves Litten to pass away on its own.
  • Establishing Series Moment: The very first scene of Sun & Moon is Ash and Pikachu on vacation, riding on a Sharpedo and enjoying the vast scenery of Alola's wildlife before being surprised by Bruxish, which causes them to topple into the water. This sets the tone of Sun & Moon being more akin to a Slice of Life show rather than a To Be a Master quest that characterizes the rest of the series.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: An In-Universe example. Pikachu, a Kanto-native Pokémon, is quite popular in Alola.
  • Goldfish Poop Gang: Team Rocket returns, of course. But this time, they have a new competitor for this loser status: Team Skull. This delinquent gang wants to be intimidating as their name implies, but they are easily repelled by anyone who has a Pokémon. They are mostly represented by a Terrible Trio composed of Tupp, Zipp and Rapp, and they are so incompetent as villains that they end up making Jessie, James and Meowth look excellent. The last part is not an exaggeration as Team Rocket has always come on top every time they compete with them.
  • G-Rated Sex: Though the occasional egg pops up, the game's Breeding mechanic hasn't really been covered in the anime. That probably has to do with the fact the anime is made for kids. Then, all of a sudden, "A Dream Encounter!" features the legendaries of Alola, Solgaleo and Lunala, pretty much procreating a brand new Cosmog. Right in front of Ash. Of course, the way it comes about involves both Legendaries dissolving into space dust and mixing together to instantaneously form a brand new Cosmog.
  • Myth Arc: Based around the region's ancient mysteries and how they affect Ash and his friends in the present day: mysteries such as Z Crystals, the "Tapu" Guardian Pokémon, the legendary Solgaleo and Lunala, and the Ultra Beasts that come from Ultra Space.
  • Mythology Gag:
  • Never Say "Die":
    • While the episode doesn't outright say it, it's made very clear in "One Journey Ends, Another Begins..." that Stoutland has died.
    • "Showering the World with Love!" reveals that Minior don't really last very long in their core form. They disintegrate into space dust after a day or two after breaking out of their shell. The Minior dust becomes food for other Pokémon like Rayquaza.
  • No-Sell: In the Sun and Moon episode 43, Sophocles tells Togedemaru to use Zing Zap on Brock's Geodude. Togedemaru's attack hits Geodude straight on, but Sophocles is shocked when Brock's Geodude simply grins and flexes it's biceps. Sophocles forgot that that Kanto Geodude is Rock and Ground-type, and is immune to Togedemaru's electric type attacks.
  • Sentai: In the Sun and Moon anime, Ash and his Alola classmates are tasked to protect Alola from the Ultra Beasts as the "Ultra Guardians". They also wear uniforms that resemble Sentai uniforms.
  • Slice of Life: Unlike previous series, which primarily focuses on traveling across the region seeking new Gym Battles, Sun & Moon has Ash stay in Melemele Island (specifically the Pokémon School and Kukui's residence house) and often has episodes focus on his daily life with his fellow classmates and neighbors. Anytime Ash travels to another island, it is treated like a one-day field trip event. Consequently, battles are downplayed in favor of comedic shenanigans with expressive animations, and important events like a Grand Trial only happening once in a blue moon.
  • Story-Breaker Power:
    • In a similar vein to Mega Evolutions, Z-moves are extremely powerful techniques that a Pokémon can perform if its trainer has the appropriate Z-crystal. Z-moves can very easily turn the tide of a battle if performed correctly, but using the powered-up move leaves the Pokémon exhausted. Like Mega Evolution, the limits in the anime aren't the same as the game - The only limit on Z-moves appears to be how much energy the Pokémon has, while in the games Z-moves can only be used once per battle and require it to be holding a Z-Crystal.
    • Woah! Ash and his friends manage to catch an Ultra Beast! That'll surely help him in his Island Challenges right? Oh wait, they released it so it can go back to its home dimension…
  • Team Rocket Wins: The Sun & Moon series may have been their best record of success yet (at least when not in disguise). That's not saying much, but one step at a time:
    • The most literal example of this trope happens in "The Sun, the Scare, the Secret Lair!", when Team Rocket finally manages to defeat Ash in battle. Jessie's Mimikyu even tries to attack Ash's Pikachu while it's down, and the only thing stopping Team Rocket from making off with it is the wild Bewear that was following them around.
    • "A Team-on-Team Tussle!" had Team Rocket successfully obtain a Darkinium Z-crystal by defeating a Totem Raticate.
    • Z-Crystals are useless on their own though, so how do they remedy this? Not only do they manage to obtain a Z-Ring from Nanu, but James's Mareanie learns a Dark-type move (Knock Off) and successfully preform Black Hole Eclipse. They also obtain a Mimikum-Z so Jessie's Mimikyu can preform its species exclusive Z-move Let's Snuggle Forever.
  • Third-Option Adaptation:
    • Averted, surprisingly. After previous series have either merged the two versions of the games or created a new story altogether in the past, it is almost surreal to see the Sun & Moon series choose Pokémon Sun as its primary storyline to adapt; such as Ash facing only Totem Gumshoos for the first island challenge, Nebby evolving into a Solgaleo, and our heroes gathering at Altar of the Sunne with no hints of an Altar of the Moone. While Lunala does appear, it's long after Ash and friends have rescued Lusamine from the Ultra Space.
    • Subverted with Totem Raticate; while Ash didn't fight this Moon-exclusive Totem Pokémon, Team Rocket did in a Mêlée à Trois, fighting fellow Goldfish Poop Gang Team Skull (loosely adapting an event in the middle of the same trial) over who gets to fight Totem Raticate. And they actually win, with their reward being Darkinium Z.
    • Played straight with Ash's Lycanroc. Instead of Midday or Midnight Lycanroc, Ash's Rockruff would evolve into a third evolution, Dusk Forme Lycanroc, way ahead of its debut in the remake, Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon.
  • Troublemaking New Pet: An Alolan Meowth plays around with this when it joins Team Rocket in an Alola episode. While it maintains the trope's usual Bitch in Sheep's Clothing act, it is smart enough to only pick on their original Meowth and be genuinely helpful to Jessie and James, bewildering them into thinking the latter is paranoid. When it finds better digs at their boss Giovanni's headquarters however, it quickly drops the act and abandons them, and mocks all three of them through communicator.
  • Unexpectedly Dark Episode: While the Sun & Moon series is seen as the most light-hearted the anime has been in a while, it also has "One Journey Ends, Another Begins...", which can be considered one of the bleakest episodes in the series, as it features The presumed death of an old Stoutland who was Litten's primary caregiver.

Indexes: The Anime of the Game, Fighting Series, Franchise.Pokemon
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YMMV pages:

    YMMV/Pokemon Anime Original Series 
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • In "Ditto's Mysterious Mansion", Team Rocket take Duplica's Ditto and say that they'll "have some fun [with it] before we hand it over to the boss!" Ditto is notorious for being able to breed with any Pokémon than can lay eggs. Then again, this episode was released before breeding became a mechanic.
    • In "It's Mr. Mime Time", there's a scene where Brock grabs Ash, asks him to "help" him, and then caps it off with Ash screaming when the screen cuts away.
    • In the Johto Journeys, the episode with the Ursaring explains near the end that the reason they've been aggressively attacking the characters is that it is their mating season and are trying to scare off anyone who gets in the way. Cue a pan up to the forest, where Ursaring are shooting Hyper Beams into the sky. Note that Hyper Beam from these Ursaring are massive beams of white shooting into the sky.
  • Applicability: Go West, Young Meowth can be interpreted as a transgender allegory. Meowth defies the expectations of his species by learning how to walk and talk like a human being, only to be shunned as a freak by the one he was trying to impress. In the end, one of the reasons he sticks with Team Rocket even though they're not only criminals, but loser criminals, is because they actually accept him for who he is. Notably, this episode was reportedly the reason why the late Maddie Blaustein came out as transgender.
  • Arc Fatigue: Johto took 160 episodes. Compounded by the fact that there was only one main quest (Contests and the like would not be introduced until the next season). Some contend that the Whirl Islands Tournament and Special Guest arcs could've been removed, but that would have had the tied-for-4th longest gap between badges (27 episodes) succeeded by what would have been the shortest gap (1 episode, usurping Kanto's Boulder-Cascade's and Marsh-Rainbow gaps of 2).note 
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The Johto episode "Hocus Pokémon". The gang helped a magician, Lily, find ingredients in order to help her complete a spell that would allow her to understand Pokémon speech. Ash volunteered to be the guinea pig, but the spell ended up turning him into a Pikachu instead. The spell carried over into the beginning of the next episode As Clear as Crystal, but wore off after a few seconds.
  • First Installment Wins: Older fans tend to defend the first season (and occasionally the Orange Islands/Johto seasons that are a part of the same series) as legitimately good or at least an enjoyable Guilty Pleasure compared to the later seasons, due to them not having as strict of an adherence to the formula. The formula is still there, just not as blatant as later on in the show's lifetime.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: In "Battle Aboard the St. Anne", the captain decides to "test out one of the life boats". Then take a look at what happened in Korea in 2015.
  • Mis-blamed:
    • The Anime version of Erika has been widely disliked for her perceived unprofessional ban towards Ash challenging her Gym just because he didn't like perfumes. However, in the episode proper, at no point is it said that Erika approved of the ban: while she did approve having Ash rather aggressively kicked out from the perfume shop, this was in response of him insulting her shop and merchandise (which his friends made no objection of either). It was her staff that denied him permission into the gym over his earlier slight, and when Ash does manage to sneak into the Gym, Erika never mentions the ban at all and agrees to battle (even flat out saying that as a Gym Leader she's required to accept any challenge right before facing Ash), which all point out to her not having been involved in what happened. At worst Erika can be blamed for being a Clueless Boss who doesn't keep check on her overeager employees.note 
    • Poor, poor, Porygon...the only reason it and its evolutions have been banned (aside from a cameo here and there) from the show all together is because they were the Pokémon-of-the-week in the infamous seizure episode when it was actually Pikachu's thunderbolt that caused the flashing red-and-blue images. What really rubs the salt into the wounds is that Pikachu has been featured in almost every episode since.
    • Fans who hate the way Ash lost the Indigo League often foist their anger on Ritchie. Opinion on Ritchie himself is certainly up for debate, but in this circumstance, the blame should be pointed at just about everyone else: the judge for ruling "fell asleep" as "knocked out", Charizard for disobeying, Team Rocket for capturing Ash, and Ash himself for not requesting a chance to let his Pokémon rest from said capture (most fans agree that having been kidnapped should be considered a circumstance worthy of delaying the battle, and his Pokémon being worn out is definitely a big reason he lost), and not having a full team of Pokémon to use (had Ash had six Pokémon on him, he'd have had another choice besides Bulbasaur and Charizard). Heck, all Ritchie actually did was happen to be Ash's opponent and not go down easy. These fans also forget that it was Ritchie who convinced the referee not to award him the match by forfeit.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy: The episode "Electric Soldier Porygon", which has the notorious status of "that Pokémon episode that caused hundreds of kids in Japan to have seizures" rather than "the first (and only) time Porygon appeared in the anime".
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: Kanto gets the most praise of any region and many feel the show has declined greatly since then. However, others find that it hasn't aged well due to the Early Installment Weirdness. Others still also note that many of the problems later sagas have had their roots in Kanto.
  • Strawman Has a Point: The episode "A Chansey Operation" introduced Doctor Proctor, a callous, lazy physician who would rather flirt with Nurse Joy than lift a finger while off duty. When Team Rocket causes a traffic accident that injures a literal truckful of Pokémon, Nurse Joy essentially commandeers him and his hospital into helping treat the monsters, a decision which he protests strongly. While the episode treats this decision as bad (and his casual attitude is admittedly cruel), he's absolutely right - he's a physician, not a veterinarian (or the Pokémon equivalent). He has little knowledge about their reactions to certain medicines or proper temperatures, if he had to do a major operation there would be no guarantee that he would have the faintest idea which major organs did what, never mind that a large number of the Pokémon are very dangerous and hard to control (many were severely agitated to the point that Ash and company had to use their own Pokémon to subdue them and one of them, an agitated Dodrio, ended up accidentally sedating the doctor in question). If anything, he's being more responsible than the trio or Nurse Joy. She never seemed to consider just using the clearly established Pokémon teleportation technology to send them to another Pokémon Center.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: During the Johto journey, Ash obtains a Sun Stone for winning the Bug Catching Contest. Perhaps this is hinting that somewhere down the line, Ash will capture a Gloom or Sunkern to perform a stone evolve? Nope. It turned out that the Sun Stone gets wasted in a Filler episode on a wild Sunkern that never appears again.

    YMMV/Pokemon Advanced Generation 
  • Ass Pull:
    • During the battle against Tate and Liza, Pikachu uses "Thunder Armor", an improvised move that has him use Thunder on himself and Swellow to increase their power and speed and let them beat Lunatone and Solrock. It comes out of nowhere with no real foreshadowing, and the technique is never used again.
    • At one point May had Bulbasaur use a Razor Leaf to divert an incoming Fire Blast. No explanation is given for how this works, as the leaves should burn up due to the fire.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Harley is often softened up because he's extremely popular and over-the-top, to the point that James even said he wore leather pants in the PUSA Dub. His sheer flamboyancy garners him quite a fan base, even if in-universe, most attempts at being pleasant are purely manipulation to fulfil his vindictive (and hard to define) obsession with destroying a ten year old girl.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The episode "Shaking Island Battle! Dojoach VS Namazun!!" had a Whiscash cause an earthquake, trapping Ash and his friends. One week before the episode was set to air, the Niigata region of Japan was struck by an earthquake and the episode was permanently shelved. A month and a half after that in the Indian Ocean...
  • Never Live It Down: The Trainer's Choice segment where the English dubbers claimed that Arbok evolves into Seviper. 4Kids Entertainment will perhaps never escape the constant ridicule they receive from the fandom for such an obvious mistake.
  • So Okay, It's Average: In time, a consensus has formed that this was a decent season held back from being among the show's best by a few glaring flaws. Pluses include strong development for Ash, several memorable characters (May, her rivals, Ash's Sceptile and Corphish), making the regional bird more reliable with Swellow, and the Battle Frontier arc, but cons include Ash's lack of a rival, the mishandling of the Team Magma & Team Aqua arc, and an abundance of formulaic filler.

    YMMV/Pokemon Diamond And Pearl Anime 
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • In the second episode ("Two Degrees of Separation"), Brock says "These two men are gonna do it with or without a beautiful woman at their side!" with Ash's approval.
    • In "Ancient Family Matters!" Byron responds to his son Roark about how he loves how a hole was dug. It's easy to take out of context.
      Roark: Somebody dug this hole!
      Byron: I don't believe it! [long pause] I love this hole! [In response, everyone else facefaults]
  • Arc Fatigue: Sinnoh lasted 191 episodes note , and is to date still the single longest arc in the anime. It also holds the record for both the longest and second longest gaps between Gym battles, with 31 episodes between Gardenia and Maylene and 52 episodes between Candice and Volkner.note  Granted, in these gaps we had the buildup and resolution, respectively, of both the Contest and Team Galactic arcs, and the first further justified by the distance between those two Gymsnote , but that still meant that the main quest was demoted to C-Plot status twice.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The evil Togepi episode "Where No Togepi Has Gone Before!" that had the main cast randomly sent to space for a few minutes (which included a cameo from a Rayquaza).
  • Creator's Pet:
    • Dawn's Piplup. He's a whiny, spoiled toddler and a high and mighty Control Freak Spotlight-Stealing Squad that took over Pikachu's turf by staying out of his Poké Ball in almost every single episode. What contributes is the fact that it got at least twice as much Character Focus as any other Sinnoh Pokémon of the main cast in the DP saga, besides Chimchar.
    • Paul. You could easily tell where in the story the writer took a sudden shine to him because his Moral Event Horizon suddenly started getting Jerk Justifications and the Character Shilling started pouring in.
  • Creepy Awesome: Conway remains an Ensemble Dark Horse well after the end due to his hilariously disturbing demeanor (A Badass Bookworm strategist frequently framed in Scary Shiny Glasses while speaking in a Creepy Monotone) and equally creepy awesome Pokémon.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Paul is easily the biggest Jerkass among Ash's rivals, releasing any Pokémon that don't meet his standards, insulting Ash at any given opportunity and acting cold toward everyone else he meets, and most notably having his entire team gang up on his Chimchar in an effort to force it into activating its Blaze ability (which is unusually powerful) and then rage-quitting on it and releasing it, effectively abandoning it out of disgust (everything that happened that day and the night before really soured Ash's opinion of Paul). Despite his jerkassery, he has a sizable fanbase that are willing to ship him with Dawn.
  • Even Better Sequel: You can't get a universal sentiment with this fandom, but a fairly common opinion about Diamond & Pearl is that it took everything Advanced Generation did right (Ash being Older and Wiser, a secondary female protagonist whose quest alternated with Ash's, a more balanced focus of Ash's regional team including better handling of the regional bird, a subplot with the regional evil team, etc.) and combined them with more serialized storytelling and a true rival in the form of Paul, resulting in an even stronger season in the process.
  • Misaimed Fandom:
    • Paul. The way he's written and how the writers treat him encourage this somewhat. More specifically, Paul is written as a criticism of some competitive players, as he demonstrates a total Lack of Empathy, loves to gloat, and is strong enough to get away with it. A few of the less savory competitive players who otherwise cannot stand the show or its characters love Paul because they emotionally connect to him and see him as a role model, though how much of this is joking around is uncertain.
    • Similarly, Conway, who was intended to be a case of This Loser Is You. But again, it's rather botched in writing: if Conway's creepy attitude toward Dawn is meant to be bad and thus fans like him are bad too, then why does the anime staff go out of their way to show Dawn off?
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Paul's treatment of Chimchar in the Tag Tournament arc, from using him in every match despite clear exhaustion, to ignoring Nurse Joy and Brock's warnings, beating on him in an effort to bring out his insanely powerful version of Blaze, refusing to give commands later in the tournament and then outright releasing him.
    • Pokémon Hunter J is always evil in all of her appearances, but in the "Pokémon Ranger and the Kidnapped Riolu" two-parter she really shows her cruelty when - besides her pursuit of the titular Riolu - she tries to kill Ash several times. First she orders her Salamence to burn the surrounding forest and fire Hyper Beam point blank; then she has her Drapion attempt to crush him (leading to one of the few times Ash ever directly attacks a Pokémon); and finally, she ejects him from her ship at great height. She also says that she wanted to punish Ash personally and took pleasure in trying to kill him and everytime she attacks Ash she is shown with a Slasher Smile.
    • Team Galactic's (and Cyrus' in particular) comes when Cyrus ordering Mars to blow up Iron Island (full of people and Pokémon) after Team Galactic have finished scanning Mt. Coronet. And he sported a Slasher Smile when he gave that order. And the reason behind this order? Just to make a statement about Team Galactic and the "new world". The guy's an Omnicidal Maniac par excellence, after all. Cyrus' plan to destroy the universe and create a new world in his image qualifies too.
  • More Popular Replacement: Dawn is this to her immediate predecessor, May, who was deemed a Replacement Scrappy to Misty for being too similar in personality while not living up to the original. In contrast, Dawn had a more refreshing straight-up Nice Girl personality and lacking the previous girls' tsundere side. While Dawn doesn't quite surpass Misty's popularity, she is still held in quite high regard by the fanbase.
  • "Stop Having Fun" Guys: Paul, who was created as a Take That! toward those types of players, but developed a Misaimed Fandom (thanks in due part to the head writer's apparent favoritism toward him).
  • Strawman Has a Point: Barry keeps praising Sunyshore gym as one of the best, while Paul hates it. As Ash and company would later see for themselves later in the season, the Sunyshore Gym leader was so disinterested in battling that trainers can merely take a badge without any challenge of any sort. This is one of the few times that Paul has a legitimate reason to demean the Gym and its leader.

    YMMV/Pokemon Black And White Anime 
  • Accidental Innuendo: In the second episode ("Enter Iris and Axew"), there's the line "You can't find anything this jiggly in Unova!" that reads like an advertisement about the bounciness of Unova's women. This was also a TPCI English Dub dialogue change.
  • Amateur Film-Making Plot: Two of them in the Black & White era, thanks of recurring character Luke: the first one (which also marks Luke's debut) is "Movie Time! Zorua in 'The Legend of the Pokémon Knight'!", where Ash and pals join in the cast of Luke's amateur movie after he failed to do it using only his Zorua as every character in the film (since Zorua is a female and she wants to do only the female characters), and later "An Epic Defense Force!", where Ash and pals join Luke in a amateur movie contest at Pokéstar Studios, making a film that is hogged with references to the Showa Era Godzilla films.
  • Ending Fatigue: The quick pace of the Unova season plus the Executive Meddling that surfaced during the development of Black 2 and White 2 resulted in the last 5 months prior to the release of the Gen VI games having an Orange Islands/Battle Frontier-style round of pure, aimless island-hopping filler, only without a pseudo-tournament like those arcs had. The subsequent ratings drop shows the extent of the wear and tear.
  • Memetic Psychopath: Cilan is often depicted as a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing who murders and eats his Pokémon, due to his catch phrases, "It's tasting time!" and "I caught a/n [X POKÉMON] with good taste!". Episode 19 introduced his rival, who claimed that Cilan was a monster when she battled him, complete with Slasher Smile. Naturally, this got more notice from the fandom: when he's not portrayed as her rapist, he's thought of as a psychological torturer.
  • Mis-blamed: The 2011 Fukushima earthquake and nuclear disaster catches the blame for pushing Team Plasma into an arc after the badge quest, as well as for some fans, dramatically changing (for the worse) a saga that started off strong, or at least decent. In reality, the production of sequel games instead of the usual third version is what caused the Plasma arc to be temporarily aborted and the series to change so dramatically. This also made the aforementioned two-parter a Morton's Fork, in that, if it did air, the fans would be on the writers for giving Team Plasma as short of shrift as they gave Teams Magma and Aqua. That said, it certainly didn't help matters.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Shamus the former trainer of Ash's Tepig (and a Damian Expy), already had a huge Kick the Dog to his name when he abandoned Tepig in Accumula Town by tying it to a post, but went over the Moral Event Horizon when we learn that when he did so, he actually acted remorseful for having to do it and told Tepig that it was for the best, making Tepig think that he still loved him...except that when he was far enough away, he smirked and laughed about being free of his useless Pokémon! And he gloats about this to Tepig during his and Ash's battle, painfully shattering Tepig's view of him. Karma caught up to him when Tepig evolved into Pignite, took out both Shamus' fighters down and roasted Shamus' face at the end. What really makes the guy worse is that he was showing that he enjoyed Tepig's anguish at being abandoned and later fighting him. While Paul wasn't much better in training methods, at least he doesn't take sociopathic glee in torturing Pokémon long after they were abandoned like Shamus does.
    • If Team Plasma's lord Ghetsis wasn't already on the other side of this after raising N, Anthea, and Concordia just to suit his selfish ambitions and lying to them about Team Plasma's true purpose for most of their lives, then he certainly crossed the line when he ordered the mind controlled Reshiram to attack and possibly incinerate everyone at the White Ruins with Fusion Flare attacks, including his own minions! Team Rocket even makes note of this, seeing that this Bad Boss makes Giovanni look like much better in comparison.

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    YMMV/Pokemon XY 
  • Accidental Innuendo: Serena wearing Ash's clothes. Where Serena's clothes went is never shown, leading it to either be a case of Dressed in Layers, or she changed into them while in Ash's tent.
  • Critical Backlash: After the huge backlash stirred up by Ash's loss at the Kalos League, some fans who saw it as a Foregone Conclusion were confused by the amount of vitriol it stirred up, and found it ridiculous that some people claimed that it retroactively ruined the whole Kalos series.
  • Even Better Sequel: While technically the same series, the XYZ season arc of the XY series was an improvement over the previous two years of the series in terms of momentum of an ongoing Story Arc and paying off elements that were getting slowly built up before, with the writers going out of their way to also avoid the pratfalls of the third year of Best Wishes: Season Two.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: During the penultimate episode of XY, Olympia predicts that Kalos will be facing a great crisis. She's actually referring to the events of XYZ, but one real life month later, Paris was struck with terrorist attacks.
  • Memetic Psychopath: Serena. One of the memetic depictions of her is nicknamed Yanderena. While this depiction is quite common among fans (from things like wanting to murder anyone who tries to get in Ash's pants), it exploded when a certain VA retired from voice acting. Said VA, Saori Hayashi, provided voice for Miette/Millefeui, Serena's rival who knows about Serena's crush on Ash and teased her repeatedly to the point that she threatened her that if she doesn't make a move, she will steal Ash from Serena. Prompt an image of Yanderena superimposed against the news.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Lysandre was already touching upon the line with torturing Zygarde 2 and extracting it's cells to fuel his weapon and use it for his plans to desecrate Kalos and wipe out most of it's population who weren't chosen by him to be spared. But he at least believed he was acting for the greater good and ''was'' going to spare some people and Pokemon at all. But he officially soars over the line when, after Z2 has been freed and his weapon has been dismantled, he opts for a contingency plan to have a Zygarde shaped Megalith rock, powered by Mairin's infected Chespin (coldly subverting Lysandre's previous Pet the Dog moment where he agreed to look after it and keep it alive) act as his new weapon and have it eat up all the power of the Anistar Sundial so that it would unleash energy that would eradicate all life on the planet, and he's willing to do this solely out of spite and resentment for the world and the people who obstructed his genocidal plans.
  • Spoiled by the Format: You could tell Ash's Kalos League defeat a mile away just from the fact that the theme song already played in full for Ash's fight with Shota, thus there'd be no way for it to repeat for the very next battle.
  • Strangled by the Red String: A complaint of Ash/Serena, which is completely unsubtle in its Ship Tease and originates in a Retcon to Ash's backstory (though in its defense, it is one-sided on Serena's part, as the retcon to Ash's past doesn't affect him at all).

    YMMV/Pokemon Sun And Moon Anime 
  • Accidental Innuendo: Episode 8 ("Lillie's Egg-xhilirating Challenge") has Ash asking Lillie if she wants to do some "practicing". He's talking about touching Pokémon, but Lillie's tone of voice and the look on her face afterwards make it look like she thought Ash was suggesting something completely different.
    Ash: Hey, Lillie!
    Lillie: Hm?
    Ash: How about doing some practicing?
    Lillie: Do you mean what I think you mean?
    Ash: Yeah! Let's practice touching Pokémon!
    Lillie: (mouth wide open) Uh...
  • Arc Fatigue: The trials. With huge gaps in between each of Ash's trials (albeit to deal with other plot points), it makes what most consider the main plot feel relegated to C-Plot status. note  Its a bit more glaring then in previous series due to the fact that Ash isn't Walking the Earth and normally stays put on Melemele Island where he attends school (with occasional visits to Akala). Basically Ash will advance his Island Trails when the writers felt like they showcased the newest game plot point and tie-in long enough.
  • Audience-Alienating Premise: This series has Ash attend school as opposed to travelling across Alola, being more of a slice-of-life comedy as opposed to an action adventure series. Aside from raising the question of what school can possibly teach Ash that experience across six regions couldn't, the more comedic tone and almost completely different premise can be jarring to longtime fans, particularly off the heels of the XYZ series. In addition, the series takes several liberties with the characters from Pokémon Sun and Moon, such as rewriting Lillie's entire backstory to be incompatible with her game self. With that said, the series has still garnered many fans, especially from those who thought the original formula had run stale or that XYZ itself applied for the trope due to it's Mood Whiplash and own occasional development flops.
  • Creepy Awesome: Mimikyu in the anime runs off the sheer hatred and contempt of Pikachu because of how much love he gets. Fans love this for being somewhat of a Take That! to the species while being highly disturbing, especially the animation of the disguise ability.
  • Critical Backlash: When the anime trailer was first shown, there was a massive Tainted by the Preview among the fanbase, due to several factors such as the overly "gag show"-ish nature, Ash's apparently hideous face, the removal of Serena, the much more "rounded" animation style, Ash's apparently hideous face, the fallout and resentment against the anime due to the Kalos league, the school setting, and Ash's apparently hideous face. Then when the first episode was released, many fans retracted their opinion, as while Ash did become more wacky, he still was competent. Despite this, the show was still very controversial due to the other reasons above.
  • Designated Monkey: Ash in this series is seen as this for some people. While past series did give him some Butt-Monkey qualities, the comedic and slapstick tone of Alola means that he ends up receiving far more comedic abuse than even his co-protagonists, such as in episodes like the Ride Stoutland (where his Stoutland ate his pants while the others were all serious) or the Pokemon Center episode (where Ash is forced to crossdress while Kiawe and Sophocles are not for seemingly no reason other than humor). Given that Ash is still the usual Nice Guy he's always been for the most part in SM and rarely deserves such punishment, treating him like a punching bag feels undeserved for a part of the audience.
  • Memetic Psychopath: Mimikyu, particularly since Meowth is constantly terrified of what it's saying and unwilling to translate it for anyone since he finds it too disturbing to repeat.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Viren from Sun and Moon proves himself to be an irredeemable scumbag when he orders his Electivire to launch a Thunder attack on Mimo, Kiawe's little sister, for the family protesting against turning their ranch into a resort hotel.
  • Nausea Fuel: For some, many of the odd faces made by Ash and co. This is especially evident with a shot of Ash screaming with his mouth wide open, which among other things, shows his uvula screaming alongside him!.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Kukui and Burnet fall under this for some fans: while in the games and Pokémon Adventures they're a married couple from the beginning, the Anime opted to show them fall in love and get married during the show starting with Burnet's introduction during the Aether Foundation arc. However, they only shared four to five significant scenes that could be classified as romantic throughout the arc, before the final episode of it features their wedding after very little hints towards it. For some, this comes across as them ending up together because canon dictated they should.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Sun & Moon sees Ash having his largest group of friends yet with, including him, a group of six. However, it seems clear that the writers either have their favorites or simply can't handle that many characters at once. As a result, some of them tend to be Out of Focus. One of the worst offenders is Mallow who, after her Bounsweet evolved into Steenee, seemed to have been left aside, not having much Character Development and being the only of the Akala trio not to have Z-Ring, as the Grass Trial was taken by Ash so that his Rowlet could have a Grassium Z. Sophocles doesn't fare much better, either, having little more Character Development than Mallow in spite of having more episodes focused on him than she does. While Lana and Kiawe fare better, they're both outshined by Lillie, who is the only one to receive a fair amount of presence to the story as the Deuteragonist.
    • Team Skull has so far only been a mere nuisance. While many in the games saw the Team as such, the anime almost makes them look like total pushovers who were Demoted to Extra compared to their game counterparts, with most of the stuff they would be expected to do done by Team Rocket instead. It doesn't help that, even after two years of the Sun & Moon series and both Motherbeast Lusamine and Necrozma receiving arcs in the series (the former of which happened without their involvement), Guzma is still a no-show, with Team Skull usually represented by only the three grunts we see the times when Team Skull appears with very rare exceptions, and even then not doing much. The fact that Plumeria's long awaited debut only happened in SM104'' of the series and consisted of only appearing for a few seconds without being named or doing anything only fanned the flames further for some fans.
    • In "Mounting an Electrifying Charge!", many fans were displeased that Charjabug was in a go-cart race rather than the trainers themselves. It would have been fun to see something like Wacky Races.
  • Unexpected Character:
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit!: Sun & Moon, with its Genre Shift towards slice-of-life comedy as opposed to action and adventure, and its Denser and Wackier animation, is often seen as an attempt to ape Yo-Kai Watch, which in Japan rivals and even outdoes the success of Pokémon (especially the movies, of which Pokémon has suffered diminishing box office returns).


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