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Names to Run Away from Really Fast which inspire fear because they are fearsome adjectives: Vicious, Grim, Sinister, Nefarious, Horrible, etc.

Or they inspire mistrust because they sound "false", like "honest".


Examples:

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     Anime And Manga  

    Comic Books 

    Film 

  • A common misconception surrounding Star Wars is that Darth is Dutch or German for dark, when neither of these statements are accurate. Dark would be donker and dunkel, respectively. Vader, on the other hand ''is'' Dutch for father, though it is pronounced differently in Dutch, and the intended derivation is from "invader."
  • Darth Sidious of Star Wars. Double points for rhyming with "hideous". There is a certain in-story justification, as Sith 'names' are not technically names, but titles given after they've purposely started down the road of evil.
  • Dr. Evil, Austin Powers arch-enemy, is a parody of both this trope and the Diabolical Mastermind Ernst Blofeld-type Bond villain.

    Literature 

  • Warrior Cats:
    • Darkstripe is the Big Bad's Dragon.
    • Darktail is also a villain in the sixth series, A Vision of Shadows.
  • Divine Comedy: There's a group of devils in the fifth ditch of the Eighth Circle named the Malebranche, which means "Evil Claws" according to the The Dante Encyclopedia. Each of them has a name to reflect their sadistic nature, with their leader going by Malacoda ("evil tail") as he hunts for politicians to hook and flay.
  • In the Harry Potter series, a black dog known as "the Grim" is an omen of death.
  • Grimhild, the Evil Matriarch of the Gjukung clan in the Old Norse Völsunga saga.
  • Horribin the Clown from Tim Powers's The Anubis Gates. An adept of Ancient Egyptian sorcery, who runs a crew of beggars that he crippled himself.
  • Madame Morrible in Wicked.
  • School bully Bugs Meany from Encyclopedia Brown.

     Live Action TV  

  • Avery Schreiber played a villain named "Mr. Evil" on The Harlem Globetrotters Popcorn Machine.

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     Music  

     Newspaper Comics  

     Theatre  

  • Evillene the Wicked Witch of the West, from The Wiz.
  • Evamean the Wicked Witch of the East, from The Wiz. In NBC's adaptation, the Tin Man even exclaims, "They don't call her Evamean for nothing!", after recalling how the witch changed him from a human to a heartless metallic person.

     Video Games  

  • Joe Darke, a serial killer from Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney
  • The Evil "Mr. Dark" in Rayman.
  • Dot A 2 gives us Darkterror the Faceless Void.
  • Pokémon Colosseum: It may be an unwritten rule that the leaders of Cipher have some part of Evil in their name. First was Evice, and second was Greevil. For added evil points, Greevil's Japanese name translates into 'Deathgold'.
  • Prior to its name-change, the Deviljho from Monster Hunter was named "Eviljho".
  • Team Meanies of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team, is a team that is composed of three Pokémon, two of which are commonly associated with dark and/or villainous behavior; Ekans, a snake who was the first Pokémon that belonged to Jessie of Team Rocket in the anime, and Gengar, the final evolved form of the Ghost Pokémon, Gastly.

     Web Comics  

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     Web Video  

     Web Original  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Harald Hardrada the famous Viking. While Hardrada for some reason is not regularly transliterated into history books, it means something like "hard" "ruthless" or "grim".
  • The Brothers Grimm. They might have been perfectly swell chaps themselves, but many of the fairy tales they collected were a bit... well, take a wild guess.
  • MGR-1 Honest John nuclear or nerve gas missiles.

[[/folder]]

     Comic Books  

     Live Action TV  

     MMORPGs 

     Video Games  

    Savage 

     Comic Books  

  • Vandal Savage, DC Comics supervillain. Though he's a terrible person overall, he's not particularly savage.
    • While he may act sophisticated much of the time, he is a caveman, and has engaged in thousands if not millions of acts of murder, torture and cannibalism in his incredibly long life.

     Literature  

  • Globe-trotting millionaire genius super-man "Doc" Savage from the pulp franchise of the same name. Just because he's dedicated his life to using his superior abilities—and his superior fists—for the good of mankind doesn't mean he's not dangerous. Just ask his enemies.

     Live Action TV  

  • Doctor Who: "The Witchfinders" has widowed landowner Becka Savage, who is not only carrying out a vicious Witch Hunt against her own villagers, she's responsible for unleashing the evil plaguing Bilehurst Cragg, and is doing it to punish others for her own sins.

     Professional Wrestling  

  • "Macho Man" Randy Savage

     Video Games  

  • Savage Ruler from the Darius series, an even more difficult variant of Violent Ruler, one of the Final Bosses.
  • As if Deviljho from Monster Hunter wasn't bad enough, there's also its variant Savage Deviljho, who is enraged by default and has another rage state on top of that.

     Real Life  

  • Adam Savage from MythBusters: His job involves smashing, blowing up, or otherwise destroying various items in big and spectacular ways (and he is very enthusiastic about his work). Also, in episodes where the crew play out character roles, Adam often plays villainous characters with "Savage" somewhere in their name (i.e. Baron von Savage, Captain Redbeard the Savage).

    Shady 

     Music  

     Newspaper Comics  

  • Shady Shrew from Slylock Fox. This trope is usually extrapolated to other bit criminals like Reeky Rat or Slick Smitty — it's surprising that name profiling hasn't been implemented yet.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Sid Shady from the riddle game Mind Trap.

    Sinister 

     Comic Books  

  • Sinestro from Green Lantern. It should be noted that he's left(sinister)-handed. It's not clear how his home planet's naming works. That being said Sinestro is his surname, his first name being Thaal.
  • Mr. Sinister from X-Men.

     Literature  

     Music  

  • Synyster Gates from Avenged Sevenfold.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Slick 
Both the meaning and the snakelike pronunciation have connotations of being sly, manipulative, scheming, smug.

     Newspaper Comics  

     Professional Wrestling  

  • The Doctor of Style (and later known as "Reverend" after his Heel–Face Turn), Slick, a shifty manager in the WWF.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

    Strange 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • The Lestrange family, fanatical Death Eaters best known for having tortured Neville's parents into incurable insanity, in the Harry Potter series.

    Vicious 
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[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

  • Vicious, the main antagonist from Cowboy Bebop.
  • The main antagonist of Pokémon 4Ever is named Vicious the Iron-Masked Marauder (Vicious-sama no Kamen). He's also rumored to have been named for Sid Vicious, but evidence is hazy.

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

  • Vishous from J.R. Ward's Black Dagger Brotherhood novels, mercifully shortened to 'V'. Most of her male characters have bizarrely spelled "badass" names, including Torhment, Phury, Zsadist, Rhage, Rehvenge, and Wrath (well, that last one is spelled correctly). John Matthew doesn't fare any better with his warrior name: Tehrror; as does Butch when he's revealed to be a half-breed and gets saddled with a vampiric name of legend: The Dehstroyer.

     Music  

  • Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols. Sid was actually not that violent, nor was he particularly good in a fight; the pose of being a "moral danger" was certainly deliberate.

     Western Animation  

    Vile 

     Comic Books  

  • Early in his career, The Human Torch fought a villain named The Painter whose not-very-subtle real name was Wilhelm von Vile.

     Film  

     Literature  

     Video Games  

    Wicked 

     Literature  

  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has the Wicked Witch of the West, who's become an iconic villain in both the original book and the countless adaptations, including her infamously scary incarnation in the 1939 cinematic musical. On the other hand, Gregory Maguire wrote a novel titled Wicked exploring the witch's own point of view and making her significantly less...well, wicked. She does descend into tragic villainy in the end in Maguire's novel, but the stage musical based on the book gives her an even bigger dose of Adaptational Heroism to go with the generally Lighter and Softer tone.
  • W.I.C.K.E.D. from The Maze Runner and its sequels. It doesn't stand for anything good, either: "World In Catastrophe: Killzone Experiment Department".

    Wily 

     Literature  

  • Dire Wily, the villain to the also significantly named Halcyon Blithe in the series of the same name.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

Other Adjectives:

    Anime and Manga 
  • Several Stand names from Jojos Bizarre Adventure fit in this category, like Killer Queen, Bad Company, Cheap Trick, Scary Monsters...

    Comicbooks 
  • DePrayve from Werewolf by Night, an evil side of a good scientist who chose to go by that name since he is "depraved".
  • Flash Gordon's foe Ming the Merciless.
  • Diabolik's name derives from "diabolico", meaning "devilish" in Italian. Double so because he took the name from a panther that was just that terrible (and the man who gave him the name was the one who, after barely surviving the first encounter, actually killed and stuffed the beast).
  • The full name of Paperinik, Donald Duck's superhero/antihero alter ego from Italian stories, is Paperinik the Devilish Avenger. Anyone foolish enough to earn his wrath has found out it's perfectly appropriate.

    Fan Fiction 

    Film 

    Literature 
  • Vendacious from A Fire Upon the Deep is one letter off from "mendacious". Perhaps not the best name for the head of your intelligence agency.
  • Ras the Destroyer from Invisible Man.
  • Many villains in the Redwall series have such names as Cluny the Scourge, Slagar the Cruel, Ferahgo the Assassin, and Gulo the Savage.
  • Lord Foul the Despiser from The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, who doubles as Titles as well as Narm.
  • Roger Chillingworth from The Scarlet Letter.
  • Skulduggery Pleasant: Baron Vengeous, Mevolent, Auron Tenebrae, Gruesome Krav, Christophe Nocturnal...the list goes on. Justified as they chose the names themselves.
  • How to Train Your Dragon is full of this: Grabbit The Grim, Gormless The Grim, Stoick The Vast, Grimbeard The Ghastly, Norbert The Nutjob, Madguts The Murderous, Murderous The Magnificent, The Seadragons Furious and Merciless, and, of course, Alvin The Treacherous.
  • Spoiler from The Key To Rondo. The kids quickly realize he's bad news, and suspect that he's working for the Blue Queen. Worse, he's actually Leo's Wicked Uncle George, who had given the eponymous Key to the Blue Queen so she could run the world while he lived in luxury.
  • In Vorkosigan Saga Emperor Dorca's dragon is Pierre Le Sanguinaire which means "Bloody Pete" in English.
  • Horus Heresy: In a series based on a franchise absolutely encrusted with nightmarish titles, the high-ranking Dark Mechanicus official Urtzi Malevolus has one of the least subtle; most of the others at least did something violent to earn a title like "Flesh Tearer" or "the Red Angel", Urtzi seemingly joined up with a surname that is "malevolent" with the last few letters changed, then got promoted to a high rank.
  • In Warrior Cats, one villain is named Brokenstar.
  • The Big Bad in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a Battleaxe Nurse named Mildred Ratched, whose surname sounds an awful lot like "wretched".
  • The Last Unicorn, has King Haggard, who rules over a Mordor hell hole, has a Pet Demon, and has 99% of the Unicorn population as his prisoners. Truly his realm is as haggard as his name and character.

    Live-Action TV 

    Mythology 
  • Classical Mythology: Ares titles and epithets include Enyalius (meaning warlike), Miaephonus (meaning blood-stained), Brotoloegus (meaning man slaughtering), Thurus (meaning violent or furious), Aatus polemoeo (meaning insatiate of fighting and war), and Andreïphontes (meaning destroyer of men)

    Videogames 
  • Horrendous, the jock/big chunk of meat who ruled the warrior city from the video game Nox.
  • Iosa the Invincible in Iji. How did she earn her title? By surviving a planet-buster completely unscathed.
  • All of the Soulless Gods of Lusternia get this treatment: Kethuru the Almighty, Illith the Leviathan, Crazen the Greedy, Great Muud and Zenos the Insubstantial. And yeah, they should all be ran away from very fast.
  • BadBad in Secret of the Stars.
  • King K. Rool ("cruel") in Donkey Kong Country.
  • Feral Chaos in Dissidia 012.
    • Whose name in Japanese is Desperado (root word desperate) which isn't any better.
  • In MOTHER 3, we have the Natural Killer Cyborg. And yes, it's just as deadly as its name implies.
  • One of the bosses in Rogue Legacy is a giant Asteroids Monster with the boss subtitle "The Infinite".
  • Bad King Greyghast the Terrible in Embric of Wulfhammer's Castle manages to get "bad" and "terrible" in there, along with "ghast", a sort of monster.
  • If a creature in Ryzom has an adjective in its name like "Lacerating", "Rampaging", or "Massive", then unless you are a fairly high-level player (or even if you are a fairly high-level player) you should be running as far away from it as you possibly can.
  • The virtual reality-warping soldier that serves as Dr. Eggman's Dragon in Sonic Forces is named "Infinite", though how the name correlates to him in any way is never explained.
  • Cutthroat Bill from The Curse of Monkey Island. He introduces himself as just "Bill", and when Guybrush is unimpressed he reveals he's cleaning blood off a straight razor.

    Webcomics 

    Web Originals 

    Western Animation 

    Real Life 
  • Johnny Rotten (real-life: John Lydon), band leader of the Sex Pistols. Given that 'Johnny' is British slang for 'condom', that verges on squick, too.
  • Raoul Vilain (real-life: Raoul Vilain), who killed French president Jean Jaurès.
  • Duncan Ferguson AKA Duncan Disorderly. A Scottish footballer who lives up to his "hardman" image with four convictions for assault (including one on a cop!).
  • Atropa belladonna, better known as Deadly Nightshade. When the name of a poisonous plant actually contains the word "Deadly", it's probably sign that you should stay the hell away!


Names to Run Away from Really Fast, similar to names that sound like adjectives, but these "names" are purely adjectives usually for Eldritch Abominations and really ancient evils, presumably so old their real name is forgotten... or they're from a time before proper nouns existed.

Not to be confused with The Adjectival Man.


Examples:

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    Anime and Manga 
  • In general, if someone (or something) has -mono at the end of his or its name, you want to be somewhere that is not in their vicinity. Translation to English tend to be awkwardly structured, such as "That Which ___" or "The ___ One". Ninjas were originally called shinobi-no-mono, or that which endures (so he can get a chance in killing you in most unexpected situation, such as when you're going to the lavatory).

    Comic Books 

    Fan Works 

    Film 

    Literature 

    Live-Action TV 
  • Angel: Quor'toth is a hell dimension that's so nasty there are no portals to it, cosmic holes have to be punched through to travel back and forth there. The natives of that realm are so terrified of one being there that they know it only by the name of "The Destroyer". When the gang learn it's on its way to Earth, there are several comments from characters commenting that anyone called that has to be someone you don't want to meet. It turns out to be Angel's kidnapped son, Connor.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer:
    • The Master
    • The Anointed One, whom Spike (more accurately) nicknamed "The Annoying One".
    • The Old Ones.
  • Rule of Three: The First Evil.
  • The First Ones, from Babylon 5, though those who weren't Shadows or Vorlons weren't really that bad.
  • Aerys "The Mad King" Targaryen of Game of Thrones, who thought it was a jolly jape to off people by burning them to death.
  • Once Upon a Time gives us Rumplestiltskin, The Dark One.
  • Doctor Who has the Great One ("ALL PRAISE TO THE GREAT ONE!"), the Giantest of the Giant Spiders in "Planet of the Spiders".

    Tabletop Games 
  • Trinités : The Devoured Ones.
  • The Dark Eye: The Nameless One, the god of a secret (and evil) cult.
  • Warhammer 40,000: The Unclean One, The Nightbringer, The Deceiver, The Void Dragon, The Outsider.
  • Warhammer: The other other other ... Old Ones.
  • Magic: The Gathering: The Doubtless One, Nameless One, Soulless One, Reckless One, Heedless One.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh!: Exodia the Forbidden One.
  • In the AD&D 2nd Edition Monstrous Manual, the "Lich" entry states that many ancient liches have abandoned the names they had in life, and now go by pseudonyms like "The Black Hand" or "The Forgotten King."
  • The Spawn of Rovagug in Pathfinder all have a title following this scheme in addition to their actual names. The six that are known are The Unholy First, The Monarch Worm, The Endsinger, The Dance of Disharmony, The Firebleeder, The Armageddon Engine.

    Toys 

    Videogames 

    Webcomics 

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Futurama: The Dark Ones.
  • In contrast, the hero of Mighty Max is called "The Mighty One" by Norman, one of his guardians, as well as "Capbearer" by the Skullmaster.
  • In Total Drama, Mike's Super-Powered Evil Side is referred to as "The Malevolent One", making it clear from the beginning that he's not going to be a hero.
  • In the South Park episode "Make Love, Not Warcraft", a World Of Warcraft hacker managed to gain extreme powers, to a point where no one could beat him, not even the game developers. Cartman's crew decided to try to save the world, and after multiple weeks of solely grinding on boars, the boys headed for battle. The developers had taken notion of their skill improvements. One then developer asks: "Are they strong enough to defeat the Evil One?"
  • One episode of Jackie Chan Adventures features a Living Statue of the ancient warrior who imprisoned Shendu in his statue form. That episode is set before the 1st season's finale and the good guys are unaware of Shendu's existence before said finale. For that reason, the warrior's statue refers to Shendu as "the Ultimate Evil".
  • DuckTales (1987) parodied this with "The Garbled One," an ancient, evil spirit that possessed the unintelligible Donald Duck.

    Real Life 
  • In Ancient Greece, certain soldier types were referred to in this way. Heavy infantrymen were known as "hoplites", which is most accurately translated "the equipped ones".
  • Byzantine heavy cavalrymen were called "kataphraktoi" - "the armoured ones".
  • According to Herodotus' Histories, the Persian army had "The Immortals", an troop of ten thousand elite soldiers named so because as soon as one man died or retired, he was replaced.
  • Ivan the Terrible. He was a good ruler early on, defeating many enemies of the Russians, earning him the nickname which could also be translated as "formidable" or "fearsome". Later on, he became The Caligula, making his name scary but appropriate on a whole different way.
  • Likewise, Krum the Fearsome, Khan of Bulgaria. Best known for establishing state legislation which featured a lot of corporal punishments for various offences (for example, cutting off a hand for theft, or the tongue for slander) as well as making a wine cup out of the skull of his enemy, Nicephorus, Emperor of Byzantium, after repelling his invasion. Not someone you'd want to piss off.
  • Also from Russia, Rasputin the Mad Monk.


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast.

Names based on nouns that evoke terror. But only really scary nouns count: Doom, hunter, death, cage; etc.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

Common Nouns:

    Abomination 

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

  • Sauron, the eponymous The Lord of the Rings, is actually Quenyanote  for "the abomination".

  • The Culture's Abominator class of Rapid Offensive Units definitely count, what with their ability to casually obliterate anything from fleets to solar systems.

  • Animorphs has Visser Three, whom Andalites call "the Abomination" because he's the only case of an Andalite taken over by a Yeerk.

     Webcomics  

    Amity 

     Film  

     Western Animation  

    Bane 

     Comic Books  

  • Bane from the Batman mythos, who is infamous for breaking Batman's back.

     Film  

  • Bane from The Matrix is not actually a bad guy until he gets possessed by Smith, at which point he becomes one.

     Literature  

  • Harry Potter: the centaur Bane, like most of the rest of his herd, does not generally like humans.
  • There's also Darth Bane from Star Wars. Not only was he a Sith, but he tricked the leader of the Sith into wiping out the rest of the order, including himself (that is to say, the leader of the Sith).
  • The Bane, a gigantic Evil Albino rat from The Underland Chronicles.
  • The Death Gate Cycle features one Prince Bane, an Enfante Terrible who enchants everyone in his vicinity to practically worship him.

     Role Playing Games  

  • Dino Attack RPG has Cyrista's Bane, created out of plans made by Dr. Cyrista.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Bane from the Forgotten Realms setting and 4th edition of Dungeons & Dragons, the god of tyranny, hatred and fear.
  • Warhammer 40,000: The Baneblade. Also, in the video game Dawn of War 2, there is a whole mission in which you have to actually run away from one of those monsters.

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Most plants with the word 'bane' in their name are deadly poisonous.
  • Bain Capital.

    Blaze 
A common, if generic, name for fire-type characters.

     Comic Books  

     Folklore and Mythology  

  • Inverted: Merlin's mentor was a priest named Blaise, whose wise counsel kept him from becoming The Antichrist like his demonic father wanted.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

    Blight 

     Film  

  • Honourable mention must go to the commander of the Bounty, who is exactly one crossed t short of this name, and would have (allegedly) more than lived up to it.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Brimstone 
As an archaic word for sulfur, brimstone is often used to describe biblical Hell, especially when combined with fire.

     Comics  

  • Brimstone in DC Comics is an artificial construct designed to turn the people of the world against their superheroes, though it describes itself as a 'Fallen Angel'.

     Western Animation  

  • In Transformers, not every incarnation of Brimstone has been a Decepticon, but all of them have been villains of some kind.

     Real Life  

  • The Brimstone missile used by the British military.

    Chaos 

     Literature  

  • Discworld: Ronald Soak, eternal milkman and Fifth Horseman of the Apocralypse (he left before they got famous). Originally named Kaos.

     Live Action Television  

     Mythology and Religion  

  • Chaos from Classical Mythology. In this case, not even a "being" per se, just a mixture of all the matter that eventually settled into being the first proto-gods like Gaea (Earth), Ouranos (Heaven}, etc.

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • The Transformers: The third-season episode "Chaos" featured the eponymous monster which hails from the planet Dread. Chaos sheds "death crystals", which when weaponized can turn a space station into Swiss cheese.
  • Butters from South Park tries to pull this off with his "Professor Chaos" alter-ego, but fails miserably.
  • Aladdin: The Series had villainess Mirage summon Chaos, a catlike being who's a sort of dangerous version of The Great Gazoo. Admittedly, he's not malicious so much as bored.

    Cinder 
Unless it's a reference to Cinderella — and even then, be on the lookout for Grimmification.

     Literature  

  • Cinderpelt from Warrior Cats is a subversion, as a clearly heroic character.

     Video Games  

     Web Animation  

  • Cinder Fall of RWBY. Who is a Cinderella reference, but is still evil.

    Dark 
Perhaps crossing into colours, 'Dark' in just about any usage. Examples are far too numerous to individually list here.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

     Fan Fiction  

     Film  

  • Parodied with Mr. Furious in Mystery Men, who tries to give his secret identity as Phoenix Dark, among other variations. It doesn't work, and he finally concedes that his real name is Roy.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Death (or "Deth") 
A favored name component of villains and Evil Overlords, although such a name is usually not given to a character at birth, but acquired later once they've reached a certain level of "badassitude". Naturally, the actual Grim Reaper doesn't count.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Arnold Toht from Raiders of the Lost Ark. Toht is an Anglicized spelling for the German word for "dead" ("tot").
  • Todd, which sounds very much like German for "death", is a common name among badasses and horror characters (though in the latter, it's because they die).
  • Jack Deth, the badass protagonist of the Trancers franchise.
  • Dr. Totenkopf in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. Totenkopf is German for "Death's Head" or a skeletal skull.
  • Star Wars: The Death Star.
    • Lampshaded in the novel Star Wars: Aftermath, where someone mentions that it'll be hard to convince people the Imperials were ever the good guys when they had a weapon called "The Death Star".

     Literature  

  • It is the middle name of detective Lord Peter Wimsey, although in his case it is pronounced "Deeth" (rhymes with "teeth"). The Wimsey books also include a psychotic neurologist named Sir Julian Freke.
  • The Discworld novels, despite featuring Death Himself as a prominent good guy, had a villain named Edward d'Eath (no relation) in Men at Arms.
  • There's also a De'Ath in Gormenghast.
  • In Neal Stephenson's The Baroque Cycle, Édouard de Gex takes the alias Edmund de Ath after he fakes his death. Given how many people he ends up killing or causing the death of, it's quite symbolic.
  • Patricia A. McKillip's The Riddle Master Trilogy features a man named Deth whose true allegiance is ambiguous, but eventually turns out to be a good guy, more-or-less.
  • Arawn-Death-Lord of Annuvin, from the Chronicles of Prydain. Apparently Death-Lord itself is a title, as he usurped it from a previous Death-Lord (who wants it back).
  • Death Eaters in Harry Potter. To a lesser extent Voldemort himself (though his name is basically misspelled French for Fly From Death or Lord "I'm terrified of dying" basically).
  • Tiphaine d'Ath from the Emberverse series, especially in the book where she's introduced.

     Live Action TV  

  • Deathgaia from Kankyou Choujin Ecogainder.
  • Deathwalker from the Babylon 5 episode of the same name. Not actually her name; this was an epithet given to Warmaster Jha'dur of the Dilgar people. It's very much appropriate.
  • Parodied in That Mitchell and Webb Look with Professor Death, a man who attracts military attention due to his invention of the Giant Death Ray - which turns out to be the world's first laser bar code reader.
  • Deathrem from Ultraman Mebius, one of the 4 Heavenly Kings and loyal servant of Empera.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Warhammer 40,000:
    • Death Korps of Krieg.
    • Deathwatch.
    • Deathwing.
    • Death Guard.
    • Death Company.
    • Deathskulls.
    • And these are just the more notable organizations or groups with 'death' in their names. There are tons of less known ones like Death Mongers, Death Knights, Death Spectres and so on. Warhammer 40K also has weapons (like Deathstrike Missile, Deathspinner or Deathwind Missile Launcher), vehicles (Death Wheel or Deathstrike Missile Launcher for aforementioned Deathstrike Missile), occupations (Death Jester or Death Cult Assassin), ships (Agonising Death) and locales (Hive Death Mire (conveniently located on planet Armageddon near the River Insane) who fit this trope. And the multitude of Deathworlds in the Imperium.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

  • Old Man Death from Girl Genius is an elderly fellow who rode with the Jägers in his youth and has never lost a fight.

     Web Original  

     Western Animation  

  • An episode of the cartoon Mad Jack the Pirate featured a well-suited man called "Mr. D'eath". Jack remarks that his name sounds French until seeing the man upon which he realises the man is, in fact, Death.
  • Metalocalypse: Dethklok is all about this. Nathan Explosion, William Murderface, and Toki Wartooth all fit (and those are their birth names). Everyone that attends a Dethklok concert is required to sign a pain waiver.
  • The Deathgleaner from The Future Is Wild.

     Real Life  

  • Exception — De'Ath (not pronounced like you'd expect) was apparently a real English aristocratic name. Inspired Terry Pratchett for Edward d'Eath.
  • The Totenkopf—German for dead man's head, or Death's head—is used as an insignia for many military units worldwide. Historically, it is probably most commonly associated with the German military. It's most notorious use, of corse, was the unit which takes its name from the symbol, the SS-Totenkopfverbände: The "Death's-Head Units" of the Schutzstaffel which was responsible for administrating Nazi death camps.
  • The Death Cap, Amanita phalloides, which contains the same deadly poison as the Destroying Angel, and is said to have caused more deaths than any other mushroom species.
  • Death camas.
  • Captain William Death was a famous real-life pirate (or, technically, a privateer.) To make things even better, his ship was named Terrible.
  • To the Russians he's terrorized during the Winter War, Cold Sniper Simho Hayha was known as "Belaya Smert" ("The White Death")...this also somewhat a case of Fluffy the Terrible, as "white death" also a term for sugar.

    Despair 

     Comic Books  

     Fan Fiction  

     Video Games  

    Doom 
Sinister and striking enough to have its own page.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Music  

  • Rapper MF DOOM, whose persona is that of, well, a twisted genius bent on revenge against the industry that destroyed him. Possibly inspired by his real name Daniel Dumile, which is pronounced "Doom-i-lay".

     Video Games  

  • Pokémon: Houndoom is a demonic-looking Dark/Fire canine.
  • Evaccania Doom from Ketsui.

     Western Animation  

    Dread 

     Comic Books  

  • As well as the mutation of the name in Judge Dredd. It's not just his name either; "Dredd" is a surname applied to all of Joseph Dredd's immediate clone brothers (including Rico).

     Literature  

     Tabletop Games  

     Real Life  

    Fear 

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

  • Fear Street, with the nearby Fear Forest and Fear Lake. All of which are named after the Fear family. Plus the town is called Shadyside, which is at least gloomy by itself.

     Real Life  

    Extinction 

     Fan Fic  

  • Pokéumans: Pokextinction. And you can guess what their goal is.

    Fury 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • J.R. Ward's Black Dagger Brotherhood series has a character named Phury. In the series, he is the dark, evil Zsadist's twin brother.
  • In the Clans' mythology in Warrior Cats, Fury is a wild boar - the mate of Rage, who can kill a tiger with a single blow.

     Mythology  

  • In Classical Mythology, the Furies were (usually three) goddesses who relentlessly pursued sinners, sometimes even if their sin was justified.

     Video Games  

    Genocide 

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

  • In Wonder Woman, Genocide is an Evil Counterpart of the protagonist, magically created using soil from five different places where genocides have taken place. And she makes a point of saying that it's not just her name, it's what she does.

     Literature  

  • In the Ender's Game series, Andrew Wiggin is known variously as Ender, the Speaker for the Dead, and the Xenocide.

     Live Action TV  

  • Kamen Rider Ryuki: Kamen Rider Ouja's fusion Advent Beast, Genocider. It's name comes from Genocide, as in wiping out a race or species. And it's every bit as dangerous as its name implies it to be, it has a BLACK HOLE IN ITS CHEST!

     Video Games  

    Gore 

     Anime and Manga  

     Film  

     MMORP Gs  

  • Teron Gorefiend from Warcraft II and World of Warcraft. Also, Razorgore the Untamed from World of Warcraft.
  • Gwen from Guild Wars, going down in Charr history as Gwen the Goremonger.

     Video Games  

  • Combat android Fulgore from Killer Instinct.
  • Gore Screaming Show from the visual novel of the same name.
  • From Undertale we have Asgore Dreemurr, king of the monsters. His surname is also an anagram of 'Murderer', by the way. Subverted in that he's not evil at all, but he's still incredibly powerful and can kick your ass if you let your guard down. And he really does not like the idea that he has to kill you.

    Grave 

     Comic Books  

  • Zebediah Killgrave from above becomes a twofer, so you know he's bad news (of course, Luke Cage beat the tar out of him last we saw of him).
  • And from the DC side of things, we have Lex Luthor's assistant, Mercy Graves (who has no mercy).
  • Also, 100 Bullets' Agent Graves.
  • Gideon Gordon Graves, Big Bad of the Scott Pilgrim series.

     Film  

     Literature  

     MMORP Gs  

  • Svala Sorrowgrave from World of Warcraft. Even though she's a relatively easy boss in a dungeon.

     Professional Wrestling  

     Video Games  

  • Beyond the Grave from Gungrave, who is an unstoppable zombie killing machine. The instruction booklet of the original game also says Grave is often called "Death" by his enemies.
  • The Halo series has the Gravemind.
  • League of Legends has, for a while now, Malcolm Graves. He's a shotgun-toting conman who was betrayed by a fellow conman who he'd made an arrangement with. One of his skills in the game is to fire a cone of three large bullets... but his gun only has two, straight, barrels... This troper has heard the crazy awesome, if impossible, explanation that he spits the third bullet from his mouth without anyone noticing Doesn't explain why the skill is cone-shaped, but eh. Not the gunman you want to meet in a dark alleyway, that's for sure.
  • Hellen Gravely from Luigi's Mansion 3, the owner of the Last Resort hotel who freed King Boo from imprisonment and invited the Mario Bros, Peach, and some Toads to the hotel as part of an elaborate trap.

     Western Animation  

    Hunter 
In fact, the naming of someone as Hunter is apparently so iconic that some "tests" to determine the Mary Sue-ness of characters specifically have a point (or more!) for someone named Hunter. Jäger (German "hunter") likely counts.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Hunter Hearst Helmsley, a.k.a. Triple H, from WWE. Ironically, the name is a leftover from a previous gimmick as a snobby aristocrat, and was not originally given to the sledgehammer-wielding, water-spitting, all-ass-kicking-all-the-time badass we know today.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Hunter S. Thompson.
  • 'Jaeger' is also a certain ominous bird - a kleptoparasite that beats up other birds and steals their food.

    Jade 
When a woman has this name, the chances of four things increase incrementally. One, she's Asian. Two, she's gorgeous. Three, she is an excellent fighter. Four, any combination of those three. When a man has that name, on the other hand, we really don't know what to think.

     Comic Books  

     Fan Fiction  

  • The Great Alicorn Hunt gives us Jade Blossom, one of Rarity's Radiant Guards. She even fulfills all three criteria: Asian (comes from Neighpon (Equestria's equivalent of Japan)), beautiful (possesses delicate, angled features), excellent fighter (as per the entire Guard, since they are former plainclothes security.)

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

  • Jade from Mortal Kombat. Though she's black in the game, she was Asian in The Movie.
    • Altough, she fulfills the latter two criteria perfectly in both the game and the movie. In Mortal Kombat's 2011 reboot for example, she even dresses in a very revealing leotard, thigh-length heeled boots, while possessing that curved figure, and her victory animation even has her using her staff as a strip-dance pole. Whoa.
  • I'll tell you what happens when a man is named Jade. You get Jade the Necromancer, which is a name you should probably run from even faster.

     Web Comics  

     Western Animation  

  • Jackie Chan Adventures. Jackie's niece, Jade. She is too young to be "gorgeous" and that also means her usefulness in a fight is debatable, though she is shown to be able to take down anyone her own size, and occasionally larger foes.
    • Her adult form from the future, however, is quite gorgeous.
  • Jezebel Jade from the original Jonny Quest. Beautiful, tough and smart, wouldn't charge her friends for favors...too much.

    Nightmare 

     Anime and Manga  

  • In Date A Live, Kurumi is given this codename by the virtue of being the most brutal Spirit of all, being the Spirit with the amount of casualties at over ten thousand people, most of which are killed gruesomely by her own hand.
    • It should be noted that she is the only Spirit to kill humans by her own will, in contrast to others who had inflicted casualties either by accident or self-defense. The large amount of lifespan consumption of her own Angel for its incredibly powerful abilities certainly doesn't help the case.

     Comic Books  

  • Nightmare is the demon of dreams who fights against Dr. Strange.

     Video Games  

  • The Nightmare, from Metroid. An extremely creepy-looking cyborg monster that can manipulate gravity and shoot lasers all over the place, and if you blow its faceplate off (which looks bad enough on its own), its actual face is just... eurgh. The "Psycho" Strings that play in its theme song in Other M do not help matters.
  • Nightmare from the Soul Series.
  • Nightmare from the Kirby series.
  • Nightmare from Five Nights at Freddy's 4, an animatronic that you really want to run away from!

     Western Animation  

    Oblivion 

     Film  

  • Brian O'Blivion and his daughter Bianca O'Blivion in Videodrome. While their alligment is very hard to make out due to the unreality of the movie and Brian is a resonant phantom living in the television world, they are engaging in a counter war against the brain-destroying, people-corrupting Videodrome syndicate by reprogramming the "video word made flesh" (an outside innocent, sleazy TV executive Max Renn) for their own sinister purposes.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

    Omega 

     Anime and Manga  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Doctor Who has Omega, whose name is the last letter in the Greek alphabet, thus implying "the end".

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Kenny Omega

     Toys  

  • Omega Supreme, Autobot superweapon.

     Video Games  

     Web Original  

  • Red vs. Blue has O'Malley, originally called Omega.

    Pain 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Naruto villain Pain, who destroyed Konoha Village.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Payne in J.R. Ward's Black Dagger Brotherhood series is Vishous' fraternal twin sister. She's a warrior and shares her brother's resentment for their mother.
  • Dr. Paine from the Wayside School series, though it's only a pseudonym.

     Pinball  

     Tabletop Games  

  • From Planescape, we have the Lady of Pain, enigmatic ruler of the city. Citizens avoid mentioning her name for fear of attracting her attention and for good reason; She's powerful enough bar gods from entering the city at all, and when one tried to usurp her influence in the city, outright killed him.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

  • Master Paine from Girl Genius. He is a good guy, but looks pretty scary.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Thomas Paine wrote the pamphlet that fueled the American War of Independence.
  • Odd real-life example: One of John Wilkes Booth's henchmen, Lewis Powell — a slow-witted, borderline Ax-Crazy brute who had been assigned with killing the Secretary of State — traveled under the alias "Lewis Paine".

    Plague 

     Film  

     Video Games  

    Ravager 

     Film  

     Tabletop Games  

  • The Dark Eldar Ravager in Warhammer 40,000. Though, since the Dark Eldar have the fastest units in the game, running is useless.

     Toys  

     Video Games  

    Ruin 

     Literature  

     Toys  

    Savage 

     Comic Books  

     Professional Wrestling  

     Toys  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Adam Savage from MythBusters, on the other hand, is someone to run with. Chances are, he's either running away from something about to blow up, or towards something he just blew up (in which case you get to see cool wreckage).

    Scourge 

     Comic Books  

  • A minor Dark Judge in the Judge Dredd comics was named Judge Scourge.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

  • Warcraft has the Scourge, a Hive Mind undead army created by the demonic Burning Legion to weaken Azeroth so it would be simple to destroy. While they eventually Turned Against Their Masters, they did it to conquer the world for themselves.

    Storm 

     Comic Books  

  • Storm, the weather-controlling mutant in X-Men. Luckily she's one of the good guys.

     Literature  

  • The Mediochre Q Seth Series has an Arch-Enemy named Maelstrom, which as a word refers to a particularly violent storm, a whirlpool or a scene of chaotic upheaval. Come to think of it, Mediochre's badass Trigger Happy Lancer is named Joseph Carrion. As in "dead meat". The Mediochreverse short story Born to Raise the Sons of Earth features a necromancer named Stormhold Elect, too.
  • In Warrior Cats, "-storm" is a common prefix/suffix in names, but usually the cats with those names are heroic.

     Live Action TV  

  • Doctor Who parodies the trope in the episode Closing Time when Stormageddon, Dark Lord of All is the name a three month old baby wants people to call him by. His actual name is Alfie.
    • Assuming you're a Dalek or other villain, there's the Doctor himself, under the alias/title "The Oncoming Storm".

     Professional Wrestling  

     Video Games  

  • In Warcraft and related media, Malfurion Stormrage actually hits four at once (Mal, Fury, Storm, and Rage). He's actually a good guy, although his brother Illidan not so much.

     Web Comics  

  • The Storm King from Girl Genius is remembered as a heroic and wonderful ruler, and an unequaled fighter but most of those currently vying for his title and throne are backstabbing murderous and brutal. Old Andronicus Valois himself became a horrifying undead abomination in the end and when he shows back up he fits quite well as an incredibly dangerous opponent.
  • In Yokoka's Quest, Hurricane is a dragon capable of Weather Manipulation.

    Tear 

     Video Games  

  • In Tales of the Abyss, Tear is also the name of one of the party members. It's actually short for Mystearica in this case, and she is set up as a rather morally ambiguous figure right at the start. This is subverted once you finally find out why she wanted to kill her brother in the first place.

    Tyranny or Tyrant 

     Film  

  • Count Dooku, the Dark Lord of the Sith leading the Confederacy in uprising against the Galactic Republic on Darth Sidious' orders, is known as Darth Tyrannus among the Sith.

     Live Action TV  

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • Queen Tyr'hanny from Duck Dodgers, the queen of Duck Dodgers' Martian rivals.

     Real Life  

  • Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest dinosaur predators, and certainly the most famous among the general public. The name appropriately means "terrible lizard king".

    Vader 
"Father" in Dutch, and also sounds like "invader".

     Film  

     Music  

  • The Polish death metal band Vader.

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Pro wrestler Vader (known as Big Van Vader in Japan), who is similarly no one to be trifled with.

Other:

    Anime and Manga 
  • Subverted in Darker Than Black: "Havoc" is definitely a run away name, but she's actually The Atoner. It fit before her depower, though.
  • Eureka Seven: As if Anemone's mecha didn't already cue you in with it's black paint job, lots and lots of eyes, and frantic, slasher movie-esque theme song that it's something you should stay far, far away from, there's the fact that it's named the END.
    • Anemone herself could also count, as anemones are linked to bloodshed in Greek and Christian mythology.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist:
    • EVERY homunculus. Come on, they're called after the seven deadly sins. How bad can you get?
      • Greed isn't quite as evil as the rest. Still badass, though.
    • Badass Action Hero Jean Havoc.
  • While other members of the God Hand from Berserk go by science-fictional names such as Ubik, Slan and Femto, their leader goes by the name of Void.
  • Johann Liebert, the eponymous Monster. To say he lives up to this name is a major understatement.

    Comicbooks 

    Fan Fiction 

    Film 

    Literature 
  • General Woundwort from Watership Down; it's a plant (virtually all rabbits in the book are named after plants), but it contains "wound". Also, "General" as a title.
  • Invoked in Artemis Fowl by LEP Officer Trouble Kelp, who chose his first name during his coming-of-age ceremony.
  • The Enemy in the Doctor Who quasi-spinoff Faction Paradox, so-called because giving it a real name would only make you underestimate the sheer scope of its power. Also arguably something there's no point running from unless you have a handy universe stored away.
    • Oh, and the Homeworld. Compassion too, come to think of it, and Antipathy, and... just about all the timeships, really. Then there's the Grandfather. Faction Paradox likes to do this a lot, is what we're saying.
  • Subverted with Killer the rabbit from the Enchanted Forest Chronicles series of books. Despite the implications, he's a perfectly normal rabbit (at first) who is simply the victim of his mother running out of names for her children.
  • Dr. Grief from Point Blanc.
  • The Harry Potter series has Dolores Umbridge as a double whammy. "Dolores" means "pain" in Spanish, and "Umbridge" is a play on the English word "umbrage," meaning "offense."
  • Skulduggery Pleasant: Let's see: Mevolent, Darquesse, China Sorrows, Jaron Gallow, Murder Rose, Argeddion...need we continue?
  • Malazan Book of the Fallen gives us Malice, Envy, and Spite. Again, though, they give no indication of being particularly villainous; they are simply people you don't want to cross.
  • Discworld:
    • The Carter family subverts this, whose daughters are named after virtues and sons are named after vices, so you have daughters with the names of Charity, Chastity, Prudence, and Hope, etc., while the sons are named Bestiality, Jealousy, Covetousness, Deviousness, Anger, and Catastrophe. And, of course, thanks to the Rule of Funny, these immediately become Non-Indicative Names, so Chastity becomes a seamstress (hem, hem), while Bestiality is noted for actually being very kind to animals.
    • In-universe, 71-hour Ahmed is considered this. While it sounds innocuous at first, one must fully appreciate his culture's Sacred Hospitality tradition, where it's valid for 72 hours no matter what. Even a hardened mass murderer who just poisoned an entire village would follow it to the letter, so Ahmed's violation of this sacred rule to get the jump on the bastard makes him The Dreaded in his culture.
  • The Stormlight Archive has Odium, a Piece of God who personifies the cosmic principle of Hatred. He managed to kill several other deities before being somehow trapped, and even with his power restricted, serves as the Big Bad of the series with The Legions of Hell at his command. He also lampshades the name:
    "They call me Odium. A good enough name. It does have a certain bite to it."
  • The Slaughterhouse Nine from Worm, a group of nine serial killer capes who cause death and destruction across North America for seemingly no other reason than shits and giggles. In reality it's to jumpstart the apocalypse.

    Music 
  • Sir Nose D'Voidofunk, Star Child's unfunky nemesis in the George Clinton Parliament universe.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Body Bag, seen in such promotions as CZW

    Toys 
  • Starriors has Slaughter Steelgrave. Interestingly, he is the only Starrior who has both a first and last name; this is never explained.

    Video Games 

    Web Comics 
  • Subverted here.
    Turboman killed a lot of babies before Doctor Apocalypse was able to stop him.
  • Chainsaw from Air Ride Adventures is really scary. However, it's only a nickname.

    Western Animation 

    Real Life 
  • In which case, there's the real-life Mick Jagger — a bad-ass rocker if ever there was one. (The Rolling Stones, in their early days, made a point of not being nice guys like The Beatles.)
  • Nick Cave, as well as a few of his bandmates: Conway Savage, Roland Wolf, Hugo Race, Tracy Pew. Their music is quite often very scary.
  • Any of several warships bearing the name HMS Terror, but especially this one.
  • There was an Austrialian association footballer (soccer player) in the early 20th century whose surname was Conquest, but that's not the end of it. His first name? Norman. Norman Conquest...he was named after a bloody period of history.
  • There is is a Zimbabwean footballer (soccer player) called Danger Fourpence.
  • There is a Serbian officer during the Bosnian War named Pero Colic (pronounced "cholich"). Surely the name isn't that impressive compared to other examples here but consider that he's not exactly spotless when it comes to human rights records which is not all uncommon to that era.
  • The warships known as destroyers were originally known as "Torpedo-boat destroyers"note , later contracted simply to "Destroyer", that not only is shorter but also sounds more menacingnote . In some languages, however, the long version is still used.
  • Giacomo Colonna was best known by his nickname "Sciarra", that in Old Romanesco (the language spoken in Rome during the Middle Ages) and some other Italian dialects means "violent rumble". He's best known for his role in the feud between his family and the Caetani, from which the reigning Pope hailed from, namely holding Pope Boniface VIII hostage in his own family home, slapping him silly just to show off, and trying to murder him (Boniface VIII was saved by a group of French knights. The same that had helped Sciarra capturing him and had orders from their king to drag him to France).
  • Michael Malice writes books on totalitarian states and fringe political movements, but he's not bad for your health.

A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: People and families can have animals, real and mythological, as part of their names, but in fiction it's usually a dangerous sign to meet someone with a predatory animal in their name. Wolf, dragon, lion, tiger, coyote, snake.

Note that animal names can go either way depending on the setting; they can imply evil, or can simply be used to imply that a character is fierce and dangerous, and as such, can be used for good characters or even heroes. Some animals are tipped more one way than others, of course; lions and wolves can imply nobility, but snakes and scorpions usually don't. See Animal Stereotypes for possible reasons for why certain animals have sufficient evil/scary cultural connotations to qualify for this trope.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Alligator/Crocodile 
As we all know, one should Never Smile at a Crocodile, and Naming Conventions reflect that wisdom.

     Comic Books  

  • One of Batman's enemies is called Killer Croc due to his crocodilian appearance. Depending on the Writer, this either comes from a skin disease that makes him look scaly, or a mutation that gives him actual reptilian genes.

     Real Life  

  • Krokodil is an infamous makeshift opioid brewed from codeine in countries like Russia where heroin is harder to come by. The active ingredient (desomorphine) is several times more potent than actual heroin, but crude production methods (similar to those used to cook methamphetamine from pseudoephedrine) leave a lot of toxic byproducts in the brew, not only diluting the potency but also producing infamously gruesome side effects like gangrene. Indeed, the nickname "Krokodil" may be a reference to the scaly skin that develops around injection sites. Users tend not to survive more than a few years.
  • Ray Kroc, who helped expand McDonald's into a global franchise, was nobody to be trifled with.

    Bear 
Most kinds of bear aren't well-known or catchy enough to get their own section, but watch out for anyone who goes by "Grizzly" or "Kodiak". However, Russian bears (as a name, nickname, or title) definitely fit in this trope.

     Anime and Manga  

     Literature  

  • Beowulf: Beowulf's name is usually interpreted by linguists as "the bees' enemy", which in turn is tentatively a poetical expression for "bear".
  • The name of Beorn from The Hobbit means literally 'bear'. He can — guess what? — turn into a bear.

     Live Action TV  

  • Chuck: 'Sugar Bear'.
  • This trope with a twist: in the Red Dwarf episode "Gunmen of the Apocalypse", one of the denizens of Kryten's western-themed dreamscape was named 'Bear-Strangler' McGee.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • Avatar: The Last Airbender has Zuko's mother Ursa, whose name is Latin for a female bear and is quite appropriate for a quintessential figurative Mama Bear. She's a kind and loving mother, but hey, it takes a loving mother to aid an assassination in order to protect her son.
  • The central villain in The Little Mermaid is the sea witch Ursula. The name actually means "little female bear", and the character is more like an octopus than a bear (being an unscaled mermaid with tentacles instead of a tail), but she turns it into a Name to Run Away From anyway.

     Real Life  

  • Machine example: The Russian Tu-95 "Bear" nuclear bomber, designed to reach the United States from the Soviet Union and let loose nuclear armageddon. Later examples served in the anti-submarine and anti-ship roles and were a menace to US submarines and aircraft carriers.

    Bull 

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Theatre  

  • Thady "The Bull" McCabe from John B. Keane's drama The Field. His short-tempered nature is so well-known in the community, it helps him get away with murder.

     Video Games  

     Web Animation  

  • Adam Taurus from RWBY.

     Real Life  

  • Another machine example - the Russian Tu-4 "Bull", a direct copy of the Boeing B-29 and the first Russian nuclear bomber with the range to reach the United States (albeit one-way). When the first one of these turned up, the Cold War started to look as though it was going to get dangerously hot.
  • Corporal Leslie "Bull" Allen of the Royal Australian Army. During the New Guinea campaign in World War II he personally carried no fewer than twelve wounded men out of the line of fire. Possibly a name to crawl toward, in this case.
  • Theophilus Eugene "Bull" Connor, the racist Commissioner for Public Safety in Birmingham, Alabama during the Civil Rights Movement. He is known for having police officers disperse nonviolent protesters with fire hoses.

    Coyote 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Bleach — Coyote Starrk: The Primera Espada.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Crow 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Misaki Yata in K goes by the nickname Yatagarasu (a mythological crow) to sound more intimidating, instead to his real name ("Misaki" means "beautiful blossom").
  • The Karas, supernatural guardians of Japan's human and youkai population, who can turn into and cars and jets and stop time.
  • Karasu from Noein, a badass with ridiculous speed and strength, along with the power to warp time and space.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's: Crow, the Robin Hood-esque, heavily Markered friend of Yusei.

     Comic Books  

  • Ashe Corven from The Crow series also qualifies, as it appears to be derived from 'corvus', the Latin word for 'crow'.

     Fanfic  

  • Karasu (Japanese for crow) from Three of Heart, One of Blood doesn't seem like this at first: He offers to bring Yukimori back to life. Unfortunately, it doesn't hold, as he's a Legacy and can't raise the dead — but he can cast extremely realistic illusions.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

     Web Animation  

  • RWBY: Ruby and Yang's uncle/mentor Qrow Branwen. Bonus points since he was gifted the ability to turn into a crow.

     Real Life  

  • The racist Jim Crow laws of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, designed to enforce segregation in the South in the wake of Reconstruction.
  • Russell Crowe might not look as sinister as some of the other examples listed here, but God help you if you ever edit his poetry!
  • The notorious late 19th-to-early 20th century playboy occultist Aleister Crowley. Not actually a bad guy, but given his reputation at the time (which there's reason to believe he actively encouraged) he might as well have been a supervillain.

    Dragon 

     Anime and Manga  

  • From One Piece, Dragon the Revolutionary. As noted further down, also overlaps with "Monkey."

     Literature  

  • Dracula: Dracul, in Romanian, means "dragon" as well as "devil". Therefore, "Dracula" means "son of the dragon".
  • In The Divine Comedy, a wrathful demon fixated on maiming any in his reach is named "Draghignazzo," which the Dante Encyclopedia translates as "Big Nasty Dragon." That simple and bestial name tells you everything you need to know about this single-minded torturer.
  • Draco Malfoy from Harry Potter.
  • Malazan Book of the Fallen has 'Draconus'. If that doesn't sound impressive enough, given the importance of dragons in the setting, then his title 'Suzerain of Night' surely will.
  • Rand Al'Thor and Lews Therin Telamon from The Wheel of Time.

     Live Action TV  

  • Kamen Rider Ryuki. Ryu is Japanese for Dragon.
  • Count Dregon, the Big Bad from Saban's Masked Rider.
  • You don't have to worry *too* much about Merlin Arthur Pendragon. His father, king Uther Pendragon, however...note 

     Other  

  • Dragin from yerCake.
  • Drago from Rocky IV.

     Wiki/TV Tropes  

     Video Games  

  • Date Masamune, the One-Eyed Dragon of Oshu from Sengoku Basara. It's especially significant since he's referred to mostly by (and is infamous through) this name.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Draco, a lawmaker from ancient Greece, from whom we get the term "draconian" as in "draconian penalties", meaning extremely harsh penalties. His name is similar enough to the Greek word for dragon, and so little is known about the man himself, that it's up for debate whether this is a coincidence, or whether Draco is an assumed name chosen to invoke this trope.
  • Vlad Dracul and his son Vlad Dracula of Wallachia (the bynames meaning "dragon" and "the dragon's son" respectively), who were certainly apt to invoke this trope in their lifetime. The name, however, has a relatively harmless origin story, as it became the elder Vlad's nickname when he joined the the Order of the Dragon, a late-medieval chivalric order.
  • Billy Drago is the stage name of a character actor who generally plays Smug Snake variants. Coincidentally, it's his mother's real surname.
  • Sir Francis Drake works if you're Spanish.

    Eagle 

     Anime and Manga  

     Film  

  • General Orlov from Octopussy ("oryol" means "eagle" in Russian).

     Live Action TV  

     Music  

  • The Eagles were one hell of an awesome band.

     Video Games  

  • Eagle of Advance Wars.
  • Psychonauts, where Eagle is one of the four animal-themed luchadores running around in the head of Edgar Teglee, with Tiger, Cobra, and Dragon making up the rest. His catchphrase: Ca-caw!.
  • From Assassin's Creed III, Connor's ship, the Aquila, was built as a brig, but was incredibly fast for it's size, and was so infamous, it was dubbed "The Ghost of the North Sea" for it's ability to appear from the darkness of the sea, inflict tremendous damage, and retreat as if it was never there.
    • In Assassin's Creed, Altaïr ibn-La'Ahad's whole name: it translates from Arabic as, essentially, "eagle the son of none." He's also one of the most deadly and influential Assassins in the franchise.

     Real Life  

  • The F-15 "Eagle", for the 1970s the most dangerous fighter aircraft in the world, and no less dangerous today.

    Falcon 

     Literature  

  • Merlin from the King Arthur legends, whose name is also that of a small falcon.
  • Faile Bashere from The Wheel of Time is definitely a terror to deal with if you mess with her husband.

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • The F-16 Fighting Falcon, Cool Plane and very dangerous.

    Flamingo 
While obviously not a "scary" animal, the flamingo has nevertheless been used as a name for villains and dangerous characters surprisingly often.

     Anime and Manga  

  • One Piece: Donquixote Doflamingo, a nihilistic pirate and puppet-master who slices people into pieces. He dresses in a pink, feathery coat and dabbles in slave trade, and abandons it because it's become passe (the slave trade, not the coat).

     Comic Books  

  • There's a vampire called Flamingo in Scarlet # 1. Reviewing the comic, Linkara finds it ridiculous.
  • Grand Morrisons Batman gives us the villain Flamingo, Eater of Faces. Which is pretty scary without the "Flamingo" part, actually.

     Literature  

  • Lord Vetinari of the Discworld series often reminds people of a sober flamingo. A predatory one.

     Live Action TV  

  • CJ's Secret Service codename on The West Wing is flamingo. She does not appreciate this.
    CJ: The flamingo is a ridiculous-looking bird!

    Fox (Vixen, Reynard, etc.) 
Variations of "Reynard" — the original trickster-fox from the medieval stories — include, but are not limited to, Renard, Reinhardt, Reineke; possibly even Renfield from Dracula. If somebody in your group has a variation of that last name, avoid him. He's The Mole.

     Film  

  • In the Rush Hour sequels, not one but two villains have names that translate to "Fox" in that character's native language: Hu Li, from 2, and Inspector Renard from 3.
  • After The Fox, starring Peter Sellers as the criminal Master of Disguise "The Fox". Of course, this is a subversion, played for laughs.
  • Renard, the Big Bad of The World Is Not Enough.

     Literature  

  • Le Renard Subtil is the name of the villain in the novel Last of the Mohicans. DEFINITELY traitorous.
  • Zorro. Means, in case you didn't know, 'fox'.
  • August Rommel Taggart, the villain in Mary Higgins Clark's A Stranger Is Watching, calls himself "Foxy" because of his middle name (see the "Real Life" subfolder).
  • Silas Fennec, the villain from The Scar by China Miéville.
  • Foxheart (though not quite a villain, more like an annoying antagonist) from Warrior Cats, whose name in-universe is an insult meaning cruel or heartless.

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

  • Gunnerkrigg Court's resident plush doll-possessing fox spirit Reynardine, a.k.a. Renard.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

    Hawk 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Berserk: Griffith's Band of the Hawk. They were known as the "Grim Reaper of the Battlefield" back in the day, and their second incarnation is even worse.
  • Riza Hawkeye from Fullmetal Alchemist is a scarily good shot.
  • Hajime no Ippo has Takamura Mamoru and Brian Hawk, both violent boxers that used to fight on the streets.
  • One Piece: Dracule "Hawkeyes" Mihawk.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Professional Wrestling  

     Sports  

  • There are a number of boxers who have used "The Hawk" as their Red Baron title, but there are two that particularly stand out:
    • Julian Jackson, who is a near unanimous choice among hardcore boxing fans as the hardest pound for pound puncher in boxing history. Jackson was infamous for routinely turning other fighters into an unconscious, convulsing, heap with a single blow. Even other power punchers were awed by him, for example Mike Tyson once described him as "a middleweight who could knock out heavyweights". A brief video tribute to Jackson.
    • Aaron Pryor, who ruled the 135 and 140 divisions with an iron fist in the early '80s. Pryor was known not just for his power, (he won 39 fights in his pro career, 35 of them by knockout) but also for his endless stamina and being seemingly impossible to hurt.

     Video Games  

     Web Original  

    Jackal 
Pretty much anybody named "Jackal" is either an assassin or a terrorist.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Kurodo Akabane, aka Doctor Jackal from Get Backers is a Transporter who doesn't care how much a job pays, only how interesting it will be. And "interesting" to Doctor Jackal usually involves fighting someone powerful and killing them.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • The otherwise anonymous assassin, from 1973's The Day of the Jackal (an adaptation of the Frederick Forsyth novel), and 1997's remake of the movie, The Jackal.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Infamous terrorist Carlos "The Jackal".

    Lion (Leo, Leonidas, etc.) 

     Anime and Manga  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Lionheart and Lionblaze in Warrior Cats. Neither of them are evil, but you would not want to run into either, and Lionblaze in particular, in a fight.

     Live Action TV  

     Tabletop Games  

  • Lion El'Jonson, in addition to being an homage to a poet. Primarch of the Dark Angels of Warhammer 40,000.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

    Monkey 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Goku from Dragon Ball. In the first series, he has a tail, the cloud that transports him around, and his magic staff, not to mention adapted forms of many of the companions.
  • Saruhiko Fushimi of K (Saru means "monkey")
  • The Monkey D. family of One Piece, which includes main character Monkey D. Luffy, his father revolutionary leader Monkey D. Dragon, and his fearsome Marine grandfather Vice-Admiral Monkey D. Garp.
  • Goku from the Saiyuki series, a Bishounen-looking fellow restrained by the crown from the original stories, who fights with a staff.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • One of the lead characters in the oft-retold Journey to the West, Sun Wukong (or Son Goku).
  • The Baboon Warrior is a post-human 'tagonist (pro-? an-? it's never quite clear) from Shiva 3000. He kills malfunctioning Hindu gods.

    Mustelids (weasels, skunks, badgers, and wolverines) 
They may not be particularly dangerous on the surface, but they will be the sort of person who holds a grudge and will not let go of it.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Itachi from Naruto, whose name literally means "Weasel".

     Comic Books  

  • Years ago there was a comic series starring one Norbert Sikes, who put on a costume and fought crime in the streets as... The Badger. Yeah, he was nuts. It was a great book, though.
  • Marvel's Wolverine.

     Film  

  • Newsies has a character named Weasel.
  • The conniving and malicious Duke of Weselton, from Frozen, is constantly called the "Duke of Weasel Town".

     Literature  

  • The Wind in the Willows: Mr. Badger, who is a badass Jerk with a Heart of Gold. And a badger.
  • The naming of the Weasleys of Harry Potter subverts this.
  • The final one of Tavi's many names in Codex Alera is Gaius Tavarus Magnus. Lord Wolverine the Great. You may now shit yourself.
  • Warrior Cats has a couple characters with names beginning with "Weasel-" and "Stoat-", who tend to be minor characters. There was also a kit who was apprenticed and forced into battle at too young of an age named Badgerpaw; as he died, he chose his own warrior name, Badgerfang.

     Live Action TV  

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Similar to Brock Samson (see below), Brock Lesnar, who inspires dread every time he shows up in WWE.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • The Tu-16 "Badger", yet another Russian nuclear bomber, one that was eventually turned into a powerful anti-ship platform like the Tu-95 "Bear".

    Other wildcat species 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Bleach: The name of Grimmjow's release counts: Pantera.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, which took its memorable signature animal from an area high school football team.

    Raptor 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Rex Raptor of Yu-Gi-Oh! could be a subversion.

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • The F-22 Raptor, the only 5th generation fighter in the world, and the only true "stealth" fighter pending the arrival of the F-35. Simulated battles have given it a kill ratio of more than a hundred to one, so if you're an enemy fighter pilot and your wingmen start blowing up without warning, running away is your only option.

    Raven 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Ravenus from the Linkage mini-comics packed in with the Micron Legend DVD's in Japan. Also a pun on "ravenous", to boot.
  • Raven is also one of many Chains found in the world of Pandora Hearts.
  • Also, Raven from Zoids.

     Comic Books  

     Fanfic  

     Film  

     Literature  
.

     Live Action TV  

  • Ironically, American Ninja Jonathan Raven was played by an actor named Jeffrey Meek.
  • Korax, first officer on the IKS Gr'oth in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Trouble with Tribbles".

     Other  

  • The Baltimore Ravens of the NFL, named for Edgar Allan Poe's poem The Raven. Definitely run, rather than try to get into an altercation with one of them in a nightclub.

     Professional Wrestling  

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

     Western Animation  

    Scorpion 

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

  • Vriska Serket from Homestuck. Her paradox counterpart Aranea also qualifies for both scorpion and spider versions of this trope.

     Western Animation  

  • Hank Scorpio, Homer's 'Bond villain'-esque boss on The Simpsons.
  • Scorponok of Transformers: Beast Wars was an exception. Other Transformers with the name aren't, though. And given the main theme, often were likely to have a form that involves a stinger hanging over their body.

     Real Life  

    Shrike 
A bird that impales insects or lizards onto sharp branches to feed on them. In short, the animal gets shish-kabobed.

     Literature  

  • The Edge Chronicles features "shrykes", vicious and merciless birdwomen.
  • The Hyperion series by Dan Simmons features a Nigh Invulnerable, time-traveling robot assassin known as The Shrike, who is definitely not someone you want to mess with, primarily because it will live up to its name.
  • Shrike the Stalker in the UK release of Mortal Engines (Grike in the US).

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

    Snake (Viper, Cobra, etc) 

     Useful Notes/American Football  

  • Famed Oakland Raiders (among others) quarterback and noted hellraiser Ken "The Snake" Stabler.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Kimba the White Lion: Viper Snakely, the resident Evil Poacher.
  • Orochimaru of Naruto fame. In Japanese, his name is usually written as 大蛇丸; the middle character 「蛇」 means "snake." Additionally, the Orochi (written as 大蛇) is itself an evil snake from Japanese mythology, and that's alongside the fact that "Orochimaru" was the name of the villain of the folk tale that also served as the inspiration for the names of fellow Sannin Jiraiya and Tsunade.
  • One Piece: Boa Hancock, the "Snake Princess". Also Nefertari Cobra, King of Alabasta.

     Comic Books  

  • DC Comics villain Kobra.
  • Marvel Comics has enough snake-themed villains that they formed their own team, the Serpent Squad (later expanded into the Serpent Society).
  • G.I. Joe: Cobra.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • William Makepeace Thackeray had a lovable traitor family named the Crawleys, and Anthony Trollope, who was heavily influenced by him gave the last name to a noble character.
  • It's probably worth noting Good Omens has Noble Demon Crowley originally named "Crawly" (he was the serpent in the Garden of Eden), and whose present name is an allusion to famous Satanist Alastair Crowley. (The demon's first name however, subverting this, is Anthony.)
  • Harry Potter:
    • Slytherin House (whose emblem is a snake, and whose name sounds like 'slithery') and its founder Salazar Slytherin. In-universe, "Slytherin alumnus" is almost a synonym of "dark wizard".
    • Severus Snape comes pretty close.
    • Voldemort's snake Nagini, whose name derives from Sanskrit and Hindi words for "snake."
    • Herpo the Foul, one of the first recorded Parselmouths (wizards who can talk to snakes).
    • Harry's son may be a subversion; his initials spell ASP but he seems like a good kid.
  • Nag and Nagaina, the two cobras from Rikki Tikki Tavi. As mentioned with Nagini from Harry Potter, their names derive from the Hindi and Sanskrit words for "snake." Their names probably were influences for Nagini's name.
  • The Red Viper in A Song of Ice and Fire is a warrior prince who uses Poisoned Weapons, which is why he goes by that title. (Although he's in no way one of the more evil ASOIAF characters. He's one of the many, many badass ones though.)
  • In The Lord of the Rings there's Wormtongue. In this case, worm actually means snake. Or possibly dragon, which in the universe of Middle-earth are Always Chaotic Evil.
  • Snake, Barley's evil brother from Warrior Cats. Also Adderfang, who's a tough warrior (though not evil). A few other characters have names beginning with "Snake-", but they're very minor.
  • Viper and Rattlesnake from Wings of Fire.

     Live Action TV  

  • The title character of Blackadder.
  • Kamen Rider Ohja. His name translates to Snake King.
  • American Gladiators had Viper, and he was particularly known for being a bad guy/having a bad temper.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Spider 
Much like Fox, it's a trickster's name.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Onigumo from InuYasha, whose name is composed of "oni" (a troll or ogre) and "kumo" (spider). And if Kikyo had just run away from him really fast, the whole series could have been averted.
  • Pani Poni Dash!: Tsurugi Inugami in addition to Tsurugi, he is also Inugami — not just an animal, it is a Japanese god.

     Comic Books  

  • Special mention to the various Black Widow villainesses.
  • Transmetropolitan: Spider Jerusalem, rogue journalist.
  • In a rare plant-related example, Bone's Briar and Rose. Guess who's the baddie.
  • Spider-Man, as well as Tarantula and Black Tarantula.

     Film  

  • Dr. Aranya from Mesa of Lost Women, a play on the word araña, which is Spanish for Spider.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Doctor Who has a species of spider aliens called the Racnoss (a play on the word "arachnid").

     Tabletop Games  

  • In the early years of BattleTech, Natasha Kerensky AKA the Black Widow was infamous as the best mechwarrior of her generation.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

  • Justified in the "Lycosa" storyline of Nature of Nature's Art; the core cast are all spiders, and use scientific nomenclature instead of personal names. It's a subtle plot point that the protagonist uses an outdated genus name.
  • Aranea Serket from Homestuck has a spider given name and scorpion surname, doubling up on menacing arachnid names. In Alternian history, she was also known as Marquise Spinneret Mindfang.

     Western Animation  

  • Tarantulas and Blackarachnia from Beast Wars. Both are fierce fighters and master manipulators.

    Tiger 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Benitora/Crimson Tiger from Samurai Deeper Kyo.
  • Aisaka Taiga (yes, it's pronounced pretty much the way it sounds) from Toradora!. For bonus points, in addition to the Spanish meaning of the title, "Tora" means "tiger".

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Tigerclaw/Tigerstar from Warriors is the main Big Bad of the series. His grandson, Tigerheart/star, seems to stray away from this path.
  • In the Discworld novel Monstrous Regiment, Sergeant Jackrum tells William de Worde about a guerrilla leader named Tiger, who doesn't exist.

     Live Action TV  

  • Kamen Rider Tiger.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

     Western Animation  

  • El Tigre takes this trope and runs with it.

     Real Life  

  • Lady of War Caterina Sforza, nicknamed Il Tigre, the Tiger.
  • Machine Examples: The German Tiger and King Tiger tanks.
  • IJA General Tomoyomi Yamashita, the Tiger of Malaya and conqueror of British Malaya and Singapore.

    Wolf (Wolfen, Wulf, Adolf, Lupin, Volk, etc.) 
Though after World War II, naming a villain "Adolf" has become a Dead Horse Trope.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Nicholas D. Wolfwood from Trigun.
  • Black Lagoon: Roberta, aka The Maid and most especially The Bloodhound Of Florencia, tends to destroy everything her path, and is incapable of dying, where even a city of the most powerful mafia lords in the city consider her a very serious threat that almost undermines everything by her mere presence and need to get revenge. She definitely qualifies as a name to run away from really fast. Except you can never run far enough. You can never run fast enough. She's the Bloodhound Of Florencia. Once she is on your trail, you will not escape.
  • Gavrill "the Wolf", from Franken Fran. A nickname she earned thanks to her extreme brutality and shape-shifting powers. To top it off, she's flipping insane, yet also very sly and intelligent
  • Baron von Wolf, Big Bad from First Squad.
  • Adolf K. Weismann is a subversion - he's actually the sweetest, cutest darling. In those few episodes that set him up to look like the bad guy, he was actually body-snatched by the psychopathic murderer.
  • Lupin III has Lupin himself, whose name derives from theword for Wolf. This was lampshaded in the west during a time in the early-to-mid '90s where the Maurice LeBlancnote  estate was threatening copyright infringement suits against TMS and US distributors over the character, with some English-language dubs renaming him "The Wolf".

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

     Web Original  

  • The Lay of Paul Twister has a subversion. Paul becomes very nervous when he is approached by a wizard named Gerald Wolf, who is doing research into the nature of entropy. It turns out that Gerald Wolf is the man's actual name, that he is primarily a healer, and that the endpoint of his entropy research was building a Magitek refrigerator.

     Real Life  

  • The example that Godwin's Law demanded: Adolf Hitler seemed to have had an affinity of some sort for wolves. His first name derives from Athalwolf, Old High German for "noble wolf", and for this reason "Wolf" became his childhood nickname. He later used it as a pseudonym for himself in the 1920s, ostensibly for security reasons. Three of his military headquarters were named Wolfsschanze ("wolf's lair"), Wolfsschlucht ("wolf's chasm"), and Werwolf ("werewolf").
  • The Eighth Fighter Wing is collectively known as "The Wolfpack", named after their most famous wing commander, Robin Olds, who used the callsign "Wolf 01" when he lead the 8th in battle during The Vietnam War. Famous for using F-4C Phantoms to imitate the much slower and more vulnerable F-105 Thunderchiefs.
  • Vladimir Wolfovich Zhirinovsky is a right-wing Russian politician known for extreme electoral promises and utter lack of principles.
  • Dolph Lundgren specializes in playing big, meaty Action Heroes.
  • For most of the Cold War, the second-in-command of the East German Stasi's foreign intelligence division was Markus Wolf, who is widely regarded in the intelligence community as one of the greatest spymasters of all time.
  • Varg Vikernes of Burzum fame, whose first name is Norwegian for "wolf," is a white supremacist and convicted murderer and arsonist.

    Other 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Sylia Stingray of Bubblegum Crisis.
  • Alligator Nichol from Jackals is not to be trifled with.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist has Action Hero Roy Mustang.
  • From Naruto is Hoshigaki Kisame (Kisame means demon shark) and his sword Samehada (sharkskin). It's also very literally a Meaningful Name, since Kisame looks like a shark, uses shark-based attacks and can fuse with Samehada in a shark hybrid.
  • Weevil Underwood from Yu-Gi-Oh!. Not particularly strong, but a sneaky, conniving pest who'll stoop to pretty much anything.
  • The Blackbird in WanganMidnight. It's a Porsche 964 tuned to keep up with the Devil Z, an 800hp-FR classic Nissan S 30 Z that has killed every past owner driving it.

     Comic Books  

  • Batman chose the name and appearance of his alter ego after the bats that scared him as a boy.
  • Doctor Octopus from Spider-Man.
  • Hydra (named after the mythical monster that grew back two heads for every head it lost) serves as the the rival organization to S.H.I.E.L.D.

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Wolfram & Hart (wolf, ram, and hart — a hart is a stag) from Angel.
  • The 38th season of Survivor brought us a man who called himself Wardog.

     Pro Wrestling  

     Video Games  

  • Mega Man 4 brings us Snake Man, Toad Man, and Mega Man Battle Network's Beast Man.EXE (as well as having .EXE versions of the other two). And Mega Man 10 has Sheep Man.
  • King Hippo from Punch-Out!!.
  • Wild Dog, the recurring villain of the Time Crisis series.
  • The DoDonpachi ("mad boss bee") series, and its recurring True Final Boss, Hibachi("fire bee").
  • Golbez from Final Fantasy IV has what must be one of the most awesome name origins in fiction. Aside from sounding fitting, bad ass and like a name you'd want to run away from, it is actually named after a type of fly. A fly that in legends were said to be born from the rotting corpse of a dragon. On top of that he shares his name with Golubaeser, a demon in the book Devils by J. Charles Wall, where several names from the game were taken. Does that mean they just stole the name from somewhere else? No they were entirely aware of the original source as the DS remake not only references it but also manages to relate it to an in game legend with multiple interpretations.
  • War Pig, an Abrams tank in Modern Warfare, which you escort in the mission of the same name.
  • The GDI Predator Tank from Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars. If you are a NOD militia member see one coming at you equipped with a rail gun for a cannon, run as fast as you can.
  • Vera "Granny Rags" Moray (as in moray eel) from Dishonored.
  • Metal Gear Solid has Psycho Mantis.

     Western Animation  


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Usually, this is the extremity they'll hit you with, or the one that's the most scarred. Blood, talon, skull, fang.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Blood 

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

  • Jason Blood, to whom an actual demon from Hell is bound. He's extremely knowledgeable as a mystic and demonologist, and he's also immortal.
  • Sangre, of the Children of the Vault.
  • Bloodsport, the name of three Superman villains.
  • Sebastian "Brother" Blood, immortal human sacrificing cult leader.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Rafael Sabatini's famous pirate, Captain Blood, started his career as Doctor Blood. It works either way! He was not bloodthirsty at all (though he was generally sanguine), and was a complex and sensitive man, so his name had a touch of irony to it... Which was completely lost in the movie, turning him into an uncomplicated badass with an appropriate name.
  • The Bloody Baron from the Harry Potter series, as well as a vampire named Sanguini.
  • The crimelord who forms the main antagonist in Gene Wolfe's Nightside the Long Sun goes by the name of Blood. (In their city men all have single names that refer to animals or animal byproducts, like the protagonist Silk and his student Horn, but Blood is still an alarming name even in context.)
  • Lapblood the rat from The Underland Chronicles.
  • Averted in the second series of Welkin Weasels novels, where one of the main characters is named Bryony Bludd, which is lampshaded by (wouldn't you know it?) a vampiric stoat. It's still a Meaningful Name, though; she's a veterinary surgeon (which within the series actually means a doctor to her fellow Talking Animals).
  • There's a whole evil Clan called BloodClan in Warrior Cats.
  • The Icelandic Sagas describe a brutal killing technique called the "blood eagle", which involved carving the victim's back open and tearing the lungs out like wings. It's uncertain whether this historically happened to anyone, though.

     Live Action TV  

     Professional Wrestling  

  • The evil-sounding connotations of Blood as a name is what led a young, babyface pro-wrestler to switch from his real name, Richard Blood, to the stage name Ricky Steamboat (arguably the only example of a wrestler having a more Badass real name than stage name)

     Tabletop Games  

  • Warhammer 40,000
    • The Chaos God Khorne, AKA the Blood God.
    • The Primarch of the Blood Angels Space Marines chapter was imaginatively named Sanguinus.
      • On the other hand, he was a formidable fighter but not an evil man — or primarch.
    • Another example is the Eldar god of murder/violence/destruction/war Kaela Mensha Khaine the Bloody Handed God, his Avatars also count.
    • The Bloodthirster Greater Daemon of Khorne.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

     Western Animation  

  • Sebastian Bludd, better known as G.I. Joe villain Major Blood.

     Real Life  

  • The Bloods, a notorious Los Angeles street gang and sworn enemy of the Crips.
  • The only person to get close to successfully stealing the crown jewels of England was named Colonel Thomas Blood. His son Colonel Holcroft Blood was a noted military engineer, as well as the commander of the allied artillery at the Battle of Blenheim.
  • Ricky Steamboat and Richie Steamboat are both named Richard Blood in Real Life. They are both faces, but as pro wrestlers, they're still guys you wouldn't want to mess with.
  • Elizabeth Báthory, an infamous Serial Killer of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Hungary, was nicknamed the "Blood Countess".

    Bone, Skeleton, Skull 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • The short story "Satan's Incubator" by Randolph Craig has a main character named Dr. Skull: This initially seems like an aversion, as he's initially portrayed as a kindly, well-respected and elderly doctor... Then it turns out Dr. Skull is wearing makeup and a wig to disguise his appearance, and is but one of two alter-egos of the actually young and agile main character - The other is a heroic but deadly vigilante known as The Skull Killer.
  • In Warrior Cats, the second-in-command of the evil BloodClan is named Bone.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Claw, Finger, Fist, Hand 

In general, "The Fist" or "The Claw" is not here to welcome you with a friendly handshake.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Talon, the killer-for-hire in the Babylon Rising series.
  • In Neal Stephenson's The Baroque Cycle, one of Jeffreys' hired assassins is named Dick Gripp. Thankfully, Stephenson never went into how he kills people...
  • Artery, Vein, Spine and Femur in The Demonata.
  • Logen Ninefingers of The First Law, a barbarian with a Superpowered Evil Side (and his good side isn't someone you want to mess with either).
  • Selena, Morzan's and also Brom's lover from the Inheritance Cycle, is nicknamed "The Black Hand".
  • According to Terry Pratchett, "If your gang consists of two people—if it is, in fact, a gangette—one will be the brains of the outfit and one will supply the muscle and speak like dis. They must both, of course, wear black suits. If there are three of them, this still applies, but the new one will be called Fingers".
  • Tortall Universe: Once Ralon of Malven goes worse in the Song of the Lioness series, he's referred to as "Claw".
  • Sixclaw the rat from The Underland Chronicles.
  • In Warrior Cats, several characters' names end in "-claw", but special mention goes to Tigerclaw, the Big Bad. His mentor, a fierce fighter who was on the villainous side himself, was named Thistleclaw. However, some cats with the name 'claw' are actually good cats, like Thornclaw.
  • In Wings of Fire, Mightyclaws' name is supposed to be this, but he's just an emaciated, mostly kind, secretly bitter dragonet. Six-claws, on the other hand, was formerly a competent, if reluctant general of Burn until his desertion.

     Live Action TV  

     Mythology  

  • The Hekatoncheires ("the hundred-handed ones") from Classical Mythology, who, well...each had a hundred hands (and fifty heads).
    • Subverted with Chiron, the wise centaur who taught many of Greece's greatest heroes. His name means "hand," but it had more the meaning of a hand that guides and assists— a "helping hand."

     Video Games  

  • Deathclaws—Sneaks the "Death" in there as well. They're appropriately named though—you really don't want to screw with these guys.
  • Talon from Devil Kings.
  • Master Hand and Crazy Hand of Super Smash Bros..
  • The Black Hand from the Command & Conquer series. Which may or may not be the same Black Hand that started WWI, and are the most elite forces of the Brotherhood of Nod.
  • The dreaded Dead Hand from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is a zombie-like abomination which, despite its name, lacks actual hands (it only has severed stumps in place of hands). However, it's surrounded by several arms (complete with hands) sticking up from the ground, and they can grab Link to assist the Dead Hand in battle.

     [{Webcomics  

     Web Original  

  • Michelle Clore (sounds like "claw" in the right accent), the Big Bad of KateModern, a pun which was lampshaded on more than one occasion.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

    Corpse, Carcas, Cadaver 
    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

  • Blood+ Corpse Corps, anyone? Although by the time you get to the end, you'd run away from the Chevaliers.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

    Eye 

     Anime and Manga  

  • The Spiral: The Bonds of Reasoning series features a character named Eyes Rutherford.

     Literature  

  • Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody from Harry Potter.
  • In Warrior Cats there are two characters named One Eye/One-Eye; one is a grumpy elder and the oldest cat in ThunderClan, while the other is one of the villains of Dawn of the Clans.

     Mythology  

  • Classical Mythology:
    • The Cyclopes ("circle-eye").
    • Argus Panoptes ("all-eyes," which points to his constantly watchful nature as well as Eyes Do Not Belong There).
      • The "Argus Monitor" is a medium-size lizard with a pattern that resembles eyes, which is why it was named for this mythical character. It's almost a subversion, though, since other monitor lizards are much bigger and more formidable than it is.

     Webcomics  

  • Charby the Vampirate has "Devil Eyes" Quixoto, a vampire that likes to use his telepathy to mentally torture his victims before feeding from them and leaving them to be finished off by wild animals. His preferred food is human children.

    Fang 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Since 'kiba' is the Japanese word for 'fang', Kiba the dog-themed ninja from Naruto and Kiba the wolf from Wolf's Rain also qualify.
  • As does Kiba, though for whatever reason its protagonist doesn't share the title's name, instead he's called Zed. Weird.
  • Also from Naruto, there's Konoha's White Fang, Sakumo Hatake.
  • Hanma Baki from Baki the Grappler, whose name means "Wild Fang".

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Kamen Rider Double: Fang Joker. It's first appearance on the screen has Shotaro trying to stop Phillip from killing Akiko!
  • Averted with Cardinal Fang, possibly the least intimidating Inquisitor in history, in Monty Python's Flying Circus.

     MMORP Gs  

     Other  

     Recorded And Stand Up Comedy  

     Video Games  

  • Final Fantasy XIII's Oerba Yun Fang: Wields a dual headed collapsible spear that can be separated and dual wielded. She's naturally the best attacker of the game Plus she had turned into Ragnarok centuries ago and made that huge hole in Cocoon's shell you always see.
  • Also, the Four Fangs from Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword.
  • Fang The Sniper of Sonic the Hedgehog.
  • Helicopter-chucking Shootfighter Tekken titan Iron Kiba. He's also larger and sturdier than most Hokuto no Ken/Fist of the North Star BigBads to boot.

     Webcomics  

  • Marquise Spinneret Mindfang from Homestuck is Vriska's ancestor and leader of the Gam8ligants, a band of Alternian pirates. She's adept with her mind control powers, using it on her captives and enemies to equal terrifying effect, in particular mind-controlling a mob into turning on and executing a Legislacerator who was about to execute her.

     Western Animation  

    Genitals 
When not played for laughs (à la Biggus Dickus or Long Duk Dong), this tends to indicate either The Vamp or a legendarily virile badass.

     Film  

     Web Original  

  • One of ContraPoints's characters is a Straw Feminist named Abigail Cockbane. To clarify, the video series supports feminism in general, but Abigail is specifically a caricature of certain self-proclaimed radical feminists who disparage trans women as false appropriators of womanhood. Hence Abigail's memorable lines like "Dost thou bleed?" and "That's not a pussy, it's a fuckhole! You'll never know what it's like to squeeze life out of your sacred passage!" Understandably, AS A TRANS WOMAN, the series's creator Natalie Wynn isn't too fond of those sorts.

     Western Animation  

  • In the episode "The Headband" of Avatar: The Last Airbender, Sokka briefly wears a fake Badass Beard and adopts the alias "Wang Fire" (yes, Wang Fire, on a Nickelodeon cartoon) while posing as Aang's father. note  Although not particularly intimidating in the show, Wang Fire has become a Memetic Badass among fans, identified as the god of manliness and beards and as a separate entity from Sokka.

    Guts 

     Anime and Manga  

  • The Anti-Hero of Berserk, who both spills plenty of them in his berserker rages, and has plenty of them in fighting men and demons alike.

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

  • Gutsuck, a demon in the Faeries of Dreamdark series.
  • The titular characters of The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm hail from a slum called the Cow's Guts.

     Live Action TV  

  • GUTS, the defense team of Ultraman Tiga. Also their successors Super GUTS in Ultraman Dyna.
  • Ultraseven has the Guts, a race of bird-like aliens infamous for having defeated Ultraseven and then crucifying him in preparation for his execution.

     Video Games  

    Scar 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Only known name of a revenge-driven serial killer in Fullmetal Alchemist who is out to get every single state alchemist and all those who get in his way via alchemical brain explosion. He's so effective at this that all high-ranking officers temporarily abandon their HQ in Central City when he was spotted there and head out to the Eastern boondocks.

     Comic Books  

     Film — Animated  

     Film — Live-Action  

  • Subverted in John Ford's classic, The Searchers: Cicatrice, aka "Scar", does indeed commit a heinous act in killing a settler family and kidnapping the two daughters...but after that he spends his time either oblivious to (as in, living his life and leading his tribe) or running from the man who spends years hunting him down, Determinator Ethan Edwards.
  • Scarface

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Music  

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

     Western Animation  

    Wing 
For the implications of Death from Above.

     Anime and Manga  

     Literature  

  • The protagonist's badass best friend from the H.I.V.E. Series.
  • All of the dragon tribes in Wings of Fire.
  • In Warrior Cats, "-wing" is an occasional suffix, although it's almost always used for a gentle character (Whitewing, Kestrelwing, Softwing, etc). There's also "Wing Shadow Over Water" (usually called "Wing", for short), a Tribe cat who - like all Tribe cats - got her name from the first thing her mother saw at her birth, and knowing the mountains, it was probably a hunting eagle or falcon.

     Toys  

  • Blitzwing, Thunderwing, Darkwing, Wing Dagger, Wing Saber, and about a dozen other Transformers with "wing" in their name. Although the Decepticon Darkwing's name is less threatening, due to the unfortunate coincidence of being shared with a Disney duck character.

     Video Games  

    Other 

     Anime & Manga  

  • The Primevals in GaoGaiGar are all named after body parts, and each wields a power vaguely related to the part in question (Arm can punch people with gravity waves, Eye has precognition, etc.) Might not sound so scary until you realize that they can turn regular people into Zonders with The Virus, turn famous landmarks and the moons of Jupiter into weapons and fuse into the planet-sized Z-Master
  • Naruto has the Nine Bijuu, aka Tailed Beasts, with immense amounts of power that increase exponentially with each tail. Their names are, in order of tails: Ichibi (a sand tanooki), Niibi (a fire-cat), Sanbi (a genjutsu turtle), Yonbi (a lava-breathing gorilla), Gobi (a dolphin-horse), Rokubi (a slug), Nanabi (an armored rhinoceros beetle), Hachibi (an ox with an octopus behind), and Kyuubi (a Kitsune)

     Fan Works  

  • in the Discworld of A.A. Pessimal, the patriarch of a tough family is one Barbarossa Smith-Rhodes. Granted, he was born Andreas Smith-Rhodes. But only his wife calls him that these days, usually when she's annoyed with him. Barbarossa is a huge bear of a man and got his nickname when his beard began growing. And didn't stop growing. It may be more grey than red, now he's a grandfather. But he is still capable of beating Mustrum Ridcully one time in two at arm-wrestling. And can match him drink-for drink when quaffing. His name, to the Zulus across the river, is something like Roaring Silverback Gorilla. They should know. He's fought them on enough occassions. In his sixties at this point on the timeline, he is still capable of pitching into a fight, especially if one of his daughters is threatened. Anyone doing the threatening is advised to run away very fast while they still can.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • The Right Arm from The Death Cure. It's a rebel organization devoted to fighting WICKED.
  • The titular characters of Nancy Farmer's The Ear, the Eye and the Arm.
  • Mange the rat from The Underland Chronicles.

     Live Action TV  

     Webcomics  

  • An honourable mention must go the Hyena People from Digger, whose females have the following, friendly, lovable names; Grim- Eyes, Blood-Eyes, Blood-Tail, Shadebones... most female hyenas seem to have them. Even the benevolent ones have names like Boneclaw Mother, and the smaller less aggressive males names like Owl-Caller.
  • Pirate Captain "Blackheart" Robert Black from Charby the Vampirate who treated Charby like a slave from infancy forcing him to fight with dogs for scraps of food and regularly beating him. Black was also a skilled swordsman and notorious for his cruelty.

     Western Animation  


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast.

Villains often favor certain colors of clothing and weapons, so it's not surprising that such colors should be in their names as well. Black and Red are by far the most popular, as they are seen as the most evil colors around; see Dark Is Evil and Red and Black and Evil All Over.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Black 
Especially popular. (Blackguard, Blackheart, Blackthorne, Blackout, etc...)

     Anime and Manga  

  • The morally ambiguous contract killer who stars in Darker Than Black is codenamed Hei - Chinese for "black". Hei also has a Red Baron-style nickname, "The Black Reaper."
  • Schwarz (German for "black"), the Slave-summoning villains from Mai-Otome.
  • Black☆Star from Soul Eater.
    • And his father, White☆Star.
  • Akuha Shuzen, infamously known as the Black Devil from Rosario + Vampire.
  • Blood Knight Omnicidal Maniac Karasuba (who's name translates literally to "raven feather") is known as the "The Black Sekirei".
  • The eponymous Black★Rock Shooter and her/its supercharged form, Insane Black Rock Shooter.
    • Her arch-nemesis Black Gold Saw (who is actually red).
    • Also, the rarely mentioned Black Matagi.
  • Kokushibou from Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba, one of the series' most powerful demons and his name literally means The Black Death.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Lord Blackwood from Sherlock Holmes (2009) featuring Robert Downey Jr. .
  • Discussed in Reservoir Dogs. Joe assigns the robbers their color-coded aliases himself. When they ask why they don't get to choose, he explains that he tried that before but it didn't work, because most of the guys were arguing over who got to be "Mr. Black".
  • Most of The Wolfman (2010) takes place in sleepy little English hamlet of Blackmoor, that's not ominous at all!
  • Kurogane from Ran: The name literally means "black steel" in Japanese.

     Literature  

  • Dr. Raven Sable.
    • All the Horsemen are this, named for the colors of the horse's they ride according to the original Biblical lore. Along with Dr. Sable (Famine) there's War, who goes by the names Carmine and Scarlett (both shades of red) and Pollution/Pestilence who has gone by such names as White, Blanc, Albus, Chalky, Weiss and Snowy (white in four languages, and two slang terms for white). The only exception is Death, who has no human identity and is just

     [[The Grim Reaper Death  
]].
  • Sirius Black, although this turns out to be somewhat misleading. It definitely applies to most of the rest of his family, though. His family attempts to deliberately invoke this trope with astronomical names multiple times. Sirius, Andromeda, Regulus, Draco, probably several of the others do this also, but I don't know astronomy well enough to tell you for sure.
    • Bellatrix is also named after a star.
      • Bilingual Bonus (of sorts) overlapping with Meaningful Name: Bellatrix is a Latin name meaning "warlike".
      • To be honest, almost every character or even the spells fit into Meaningful Name: for example, Malfoy is quite similar in pronounciation (when you delve into Latin languages) to "the one who was bad" - more specifically, the "was bad" part.
  • The Laundry Files is home to the Black Chamber, the rather...morally unsound US paranormal agency.
  • Black Dow. Among an entire nation of Named Men, he's still infamous.
  • Parodied and subverted in Grunts!, when the various orc squads pick names. There are an over-abundance of black, sable, ebony, etc...And then Pink Squad. They're kind of worried about Pink Squad.
  • The Big Bad of the first Faeries of Dreamdark book is commonly known as "the Blackbringer". If that's not sinister enough for you, his real name is the Astaroth.
  • Randall Flagg goes by the name of The Black Man in The Stand.
  • The Dresden Files features the Knights of the Blackened Denarius. Actually much, much worse than they sound.
  • The Dark Sisters; Mrs. Dark and Mrs. Black from The Infernal Devices.
  • The largest and most dangerous dragon ever seen in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien was Ancalagon the Black, who was bred by Morgoth himself in the First Age and was so big that when he died he broke two mountains.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire:
    • The most infamous of all the Targaryen dragons was Balerion, aka The Black Dread. His teeth were the size of large swords, it was said that he could swallow a mammoth whole, and entire towns would be in his shadow when he flew overhead. And supposedly his flames were also black.
    • The Ironborn, who are basically Viking raiders and pirates taken up to about 23, managed their greatest conquests on the mainlands under House Hoare, which was also frequently called "the black line" or "the black blood" for their cruelty and tyranny. While many members of the House had interesting Red Baron titles like Priestkiller, Demonlover, the Redsmile, etc., many simply went by "The Black". It took Aegon Targaryen and the infamous Balerion described above to put an end to them.
  • In Warrior Cats, Blackstar began the series as a villain.

     Live Action TV  

     Music  

     Radio  

  • From Adventures in Odyssey, the evil Dr. Regis Blackgaard. Arguably subverted in that he has a twin brother, Edwin, who shares the name but is only guilty of being a Large Ham.

     Tropes  

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

  • Jack Noir of Homestuck. On the other hand, his name is technically "Jack Black", rather than Black Jack.

     Western Animation  

  • The Simpsons
    • In the episode "Bart Gets An Elephant", Stampy the elephant is nearly sold by Homer to an ivory dealer (and onetime whale hunter, seal clubber, and president of the FOX network) named Mr. Blackheart.
    • In "Kamp Krusty", there's Mr. Black, the evil camp councilor who torments Bart, Lisa, and the rest of the kids attending the eponymous camp.

     Real Life  

  • The All Blacks, New Zealand's national rugby union team. They are currently ranked #1 in the world and are the World Cup champions. The name came from a typo; one writer called them "the all backs", meaning they all play fast, running games typical of the backs, but it was misprinted and the name stuck. Black is now the country's national colour, with many other sports teams being named "X Blacks" or "Black Xs".
  • Bubonic plague, also known as the Black Death which was so named because it was carried on the black-rat species.
  • Edward "Blackbeard" Teach.
  • Emperor Nero's name means black in Italian.
  • The Black Panther Party.

    Red 
Or any variation. Crimson and Scarlet sound especially badass. Vermillion, less so, but you can work with it. See also Red Baron.

     Anime and Manga  

  • For High School DXD, there is the Crimson-Haired Princess of Ruin. We know her best as Rias Gremory.
  • The Red Comet. Also the Crimson Lightning, but he often gets confused with the other guy.
  • Rezo the Red Priest of Slayers has a piece of the Dark Lord of his world sealed in his eyes, making him steadily more evil through his life. Lampshaded by Lina when she comments that his name sounds like a villain's after they meet and he tries to play her into giving up a powerful artifact.
  • Porco Rosso is just a badass.
  • Erza Scarlet is one of the few character who can discipline Natsu.
    • Now we also have Mavis Vermillion, Fairy Tail's first master, who might be joining Makarov and Gildarts as the Big Good.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist: Solf J. Kimblee, the Crimson Alchemist, could be considered this, especially considering what he did in the War of extermination in Ishval.
  • The Red King, Suoh Mikoto of K also qualifies. While he's usually pretty laid back and downright lazy, once he gets down to business there is no stopping him. He is more than once described as violent and a berserker, blows up whole buildings and takes down an elite team without even blinking. Just ask Awashima how dangerous he is.

     Comic Books  

     Fan Works  

     Film  

  • Red Sonja is definitely someone you tread carefully around, unless you're Ahnuld.
  • Red Mist from Kick-Ass.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     MMORP Gs  

  • While not a person's name, the Scarlet Crusade from World of Warcraft. Originally devoted to slay undead, but turned into an army of insane religious zealots bent on killing anyone who's not one of them. Also, their leader is a demon/vampire in disguise.

     Music  

  • King Crimson. The name sounds much more intimidating than the actual sound/image of the band, however.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

  • A very bad example is Scarlet Foxfire, which has a color, animal, and fire, from the webcomics of David Gonterman. Gonterman probably does actually intend her to be a badass, but seeing as how she's some sort of superpowered vixen fursuit (worn by a guy), well, her status is dubious, at best.
  • Redcloak from The Order of the Stick.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • The Red Scare.
  • The very, very obvious The Red Baron.
  • Scarlet fever.
  • The Humboldt Squid, which is sometimes known as "diablo rojo" or "red devil" in Spanish.

    Yellow 
The Victorians and Edwardians loved to associate this with madness and decay as the symbol of the plague is a yellow flag with a single black spot flown above an infected vessel or building. In other cases, it might just be related to inherent abilities of lightning and/or awesome reflexes. If the word "gold" is used instead, it may simply be a reference to wealth and/or greed.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Minato Namikaze A.K.A. the Yellow Flash. The ONLY Ninja listed in the Black Book with a "Run On Sight" tag...
    • ...Not that it would help much if he was after you.

     Film  

  • The eponymous villain Auric Goldfinger. Bonus points for his first name meaning "gold" in Latin.

     Literature  

  • The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers more or less launched the idea of the Brown Note to the modern world with "the yellow sign"
  • The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • H. P. Lovecraft also had a King in Yellow and the Yellow Sign
  • Emmanuel Goldstein from Nineteen Eighty-Four—we don't know what he's really like, or if he even exists, but the Party portrays him as a Satanic Archetype opposed to the godlike Big Brother.
  • In Warrior Cats, Yellowfang is a grumpy elderly medicine cat who was a warrior before becoming a medicine cat. However, she has grown close friends with some of the cats in her life such as Runningnose, Cinderpelt and Firestar.
  • The mysterious villain in Tuck Everlasting is only known as "the man in the yellow suit"; author Natalie Babbitt went with that colour simply because the phrase "the man in the yellow suit" flows so well. She also deliberately avoided red and black because she didn't want readers assuming the villain to be Louis Cypher or The Grim Reaper.

     Live Action TV  

     Tropes  

     Real Life  

  • Yellow fever, which could make a sufferer adopt yellow-tinged skin due to liver failure.
  • In North America, certain wasps are popularly called yellow jackets.

    White/Light 
Occasionally used as a subversion. Bonus points if the guy in question is an Evil Albino, and/or if Light Is Not Good comes into play.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Light Yagami of Death Note is a variation.
  • The manga of Cowboy Bebop featured a reporter following the crew as they chased the White Siblings, Ash and Blanche, who preyed on the elderly.
  • The White Devil, Nanoha Takamachi. Well, it's a name to run from if you have done anything to incur her wrath. Okay, so she won't cause any lasting damage, but you are going to be in one hell of a lot of pain...
  • White Devil already spread fear since 1979 as the nickname Zeon forces gave to the RX-78-2 Gundam and his pilot Amuro Rei.

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Albert "Chalky" White, from Boardwalk Empire is either a Villain Protagonist or an Anti-Hero, but he's most definitely someone you do not want to cross. Extra irony points for Chalky being a black man with three names meaning "white".
  • Lucien Lacroix from Forever Knight...granted, his original Roman name was 'Lucius', but he still gets points for being a villain with a name that means 'white' or 'light'.
  • Sociopathic meth cook Walter White is the Villain Protagonist of Breaking Bad.

     Music  

     Theatre  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Simo Häyhä, AKA The White Death. With the total kill count of 700 in 100 days, he is the most deadly (identified) soldier in the history of warfare.
  • The great white shark, once also known as "white death".
  • Tuberculosis, the disease likely responsible for killing more people than any other in history, (it's been with humanity since pre-historic times and at certain points in European history it may have been responsible for as many as 1 out of every 4 deaths) has had many nicknames over the years, including the great white plague and the white death.

    Gray/Grey/Silver 
Often used for characters whose morals or motivations tend to come in, well, shades of gray, or just generally to connotate people with powers or badasses.

     Anime and Manga  

  • Various versions of Greymon from Digimon (And BlackWarGreymon has two of the colors on this list, so you know he's a force to be reckoned with)
  • D.Gray-Man

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Tabletop Games  

  • The Grey Knights from Warhammer 40,000, a Space Marine chapter tasked to fight the Warp daemons with specialized weapons and psychic powers. Also kills any bystanders for fear of Chaos corruption.

     Tropes  

     Video Games  

  • Silver from Pokémon Gold and Silver and the remakes. One of the most Jerkass rivals in the franchise, at least until the end of the game.
  • The Grey Wardens of Dragon Age are usually good guys, but they are also singularly focused on stopping the Blight, at the cost of all else.
  • In Fable I, Lady Elvira Grey is the Vampish Mayor of Bowerstone, who murdered her sister to get the position. The fact that her family estate is a ((Mordor}}-esque ruin crawling with undead somehow doesn't ring any alarm bells in her citizens.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Grey DeLisle is a subversion. She's voiced numerous villainesses and morally ambiguous characters (Mandy, Vicky, and Azula, to name a few), but in real life, she's pretty sweet, and an example of a Genki Girl and The Pollyanna.
  • Silverback gorillas.
  • Grey wolves.

    Blue 

     Anime and Manga  

  • The deadly, vain pedophile General Blue from Dragon Ball

     Literature  

  • Possibly subverted by Sonja Blue in the Midnight Blue series of stories. Though blue is often associated with sadness, Sonja is depicted as the preeminent badass of the story universe.
  • In Warrior Cats, Bluestar is the leader of ThunderClan, and a strong warrior. She is a benevolent leader for the most part, until she goes insane thanks to Tigerclaw. She gets better before her Heroic Sacrifice though.

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • The cold and ruthless Azula from Avatar: The Last Airbender is named after the color of her flames (blue — which is more intense than normal red and yellow). Then there's her brother Zuko's "Blue Spirit" alter-ego, in which he dons a blue mask and ninja garb and carries twin swords.

    Pink 
Not generally a colour considered associated with dangerous or villainous characters.

     Anime and Manga  

     Film  

     Live Action TV  

  • Pink doesn't seem scary until you remember that in Power Rangers Lost Galaxy it was the Pink Psycho Ranger that was not only the last to be killed, but also caused the death of the first ranger in Western Power Rangers history. Seven seasons in, and it was an elite mook that was pink nonetheless, that finally killed one off.

     Music  

     Real Life  

  • "Pinko" is a nickname for a Dirty Communist. Sometimes it refers to Lighter and Softer communists or communist sympathizers, as pink is a lighter shade of red.
    • In Russia, more hardcore communists sometimes call those whom they deem communists in name only "white-pinkies" (belo-rozovy), combining the former use of "pinko" with white, the color of anticommunism since the Civil War.
  • Pink eye.
  • Pinkerton detectives were infamous for their strikebreaking work and their generally ruthless tactics.

    Green 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

     Real Life  

  • The Green Berets.

    Purple/Violet 

     Comic Books  

     Real Life  

  • Purple drank, a narcotic cocktail made from cough syrup which claimed lives of several prominent hip-hop artists like DJ Screw, Big Moe, and Pimp C.
  • Detroit's infamous Purple Gang, mobsters connected to Al Capone's Chicago Outfit during The Roaring '20s.

    Others 

     Anime and Manga  

  • K's Colorless King. Well, every King would qualify to some degree (what with their incredible psychic powers) but he takes the cake as far as Ax-Crazy and ruthless goes.

     Film  

  • The entire cast of Reservoir Dogs, with some names acting as subversions.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Clear World and Clear Vice Dragon in the Yu-Gi-Oh! card game are clearly dangerous. The first inflicts a harsh penalty on each player for each Attribute of monster they have on the field, while the second renders its controller immune to the penalties of the first and attacks with twice the attack power of whatever it's attacking.

     Video Games  

  • In the Touhou series colors can be associated with power. The color purple usually represents power. It stands to reason that the most powerful being/Youkai in Gensokyo, Yukari Yakumo's name is Japanese for Purple. Also her shikigamis, Ran and Chen, have names that mean Indigo and Orange, respectively.
  • The color-themed Sages of Team Plasma in Pokémon Black and White.
  • Monster Hunter likes to assign color-based prefixes to subspecies and Deviant monstersnote . Examples include Azure Rathalos, Ivory Lagiacrus, Black Diablos, and Silverwind Nargacuga.


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Weapons (and usually melee weapons, at that) often indicate a character's Weapon of Choice, or imply that they're as dangerous as their namesake.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Any notable firearm manufacturer 
Colt, Winchester, Ingram, Glock, Mauser, etc. You're not likely to meet a Alexander U.S. Repeating-Arms, but if you do you should probably run very fast. Zig-zagging. Preferably a very short distance to some sort of solid cover. If behind that solid cover you should happen to find an RPG launcher and a stock of rounds for it, so much the better..

     Anime and Manga  

  • Soul Eater has Patti and Liz Thompson, equippable allies who turn into, well, guns.
  • Subversion: In the anime Scrapped Princess, the Casull family is on the run from the church of Mauser and any last name for any character is a weapon manufacturer. There's enough characters to go from obvious ones like Winya Chester, Barrett and Steyr to more obscure ones such as Galil, Giat, Socom, Scorpse and Peters-Stahl.
    • Mauser's nemesis, Browning. Also, Mauser's servants are called the Peacekeepers, and Browning's are the Dragoons.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Monster Hunter International: Owen Zastave Pitt (the Owen submachine gun that his father used in Vietnam, along with Zastava, the main small arms manufacturer in Serbia). Subverted in that Word of God confirms that he's named after the place in Serbia that is also the namesake of the manufacturer, it's just a nice coincident for an author and a character who many people would put under the Gun Nut trope.

     Live Action TV  

  • The Winchester brothers on Supernatural. In the episode "The Benders," a county police officer asks, "Like the rifle?" and Dean answers, "Like the rifle."
    • In the season 4 episode "It's a Terrible Life," the bewitched brothers believe their names are Dean Smith and Sam Wesson.
  • Thomas Magnum of Magnum, P.I.
  • Tony Beretta, the cop from the '70's TV show, Beretta.
  • Remington Steele

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Oficial AK-47 from the International Wrestling Revolution Group

     Video Games  

  • Ingram Plisken from Super Robot Wars. Bonus points for sharing the surname of a dude called Snake.
    • There are a lot of Banpresto Original characters named like that. There's Kyosuke Nanbu, Excellen and Lemon Browning, Lefina Enfield, Sean Webley, Ingram Prisken, Calico and Spectra among others...
  • Death Jr. has Smith and Weston, but in an odd subversion they're just Siamese twins with little to perceivably do with guns. We expected better from a series containing the word, "death."

     Visual Novels  

  • Umineko: When They Cry's Chiester Sisters are each named after the make number of a given gun. Thus far there are Chiester 45, 410, 00, and 556. 00 refers to the 00 shotgun shell; 410, the .410 shotgun round; 45, the .45 Colt round; 556, the 5.56x45mm NATO assault rifle round. In the fifth book, two additional Chiester Sisters are mentioned: Chiester 20 and Chiester 127. 20 refers to 20mm rounds fired by a M61 Vulcan Gatling Gun, while 127 refers to 127mm shells fired by a 5-inch deck gun.

     Webcomics  

  • Subverted in Loserz — Ben Winchester, Jodie Beretta, and Eric Remington are all fairly ordinary high school students (although Jodie is a massive slut and is revealed in the sequel strip, Quarter Life Crisis, to have grown up to be a stripper, she's not someone you would exactly run from).

    Blade 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Tekkaman Blade. Most of the other Tekkamen have weapon names too (Dagger, Axe, Sword...), and if that isn't enough indication you should run, there's Tekkaman Evil. Then Tekkaman Blade II has Tekkaman Dead.

     Comic Books  

     Fan Fiction  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • In Survivor Dogs, the leader of the Fierce Dogs pack is named Blade.

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Bloody Knife, a Native American scout who fought for Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer during the Great Sioux War of 1876. He died along with Custer at Little Bighorn.

    Bullet 

     Film  

  • Bullitt, from the movie of the same name

     Literature  

  • Bullet, the protagonist of Cynthia Voigt's The Runner, though it's technically not his real name. He's a very fast runner. It proves a tragically appropriate name, as he is killed in the Vietnam War.
  • One of the Fierce Dogs in Survivor Dogs is named Bullet.

     Live Action TV  

  • Subverted in the Red Dwarf episde "Back to Reality", where Kryten tries to sound tough with the name Jake Bullet ... only to discover that his Badass-sounding 'Cybernetics Division' is traffic control.

     Newspaper Comics  

  • Calvin and Hobbes: One of Calvin's imaginary alter egos is the hard-boiled private eye, Tracer Bullet.

     Video Games  

    Gunn 

     Anime and Manga  

  • In Sword Art Online's second season, we have "Death Gun", who is actually two murdering brothers.

     Film  

  • Tommy "The Machine" Gunn from Rocky V.
  • Subverted in Snatch., where Tommy tells people he was named after the gun when he was actually named after a famous ballet dancer.
  • Gunn, the chief of security in The Return of Swamp Thing.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

  • In Mass Effect 2, the protagonist is given the alias Solomon or Alison Gunn (depending on their gender).

     Live Action TV  

  • Peter Gunn
  • Charles Gunn, the muscle on Angel.

     Real Life  

  • Subversion: Tim Gunn of Project Runway, consistently the nicest person on the show.
    • Funnily enough, the tenth season of the very same show featured a Designated Villain named Gunnar. Gunnar Deatherage. It's almost hard to believe that's someone's actual name.

    Hammer 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Star Wars: Darth Maul, anyone? This can actually work as a verb too.
  • Thir13en Ghosts has The Hammer as one of the ghosts of the Black Zodiac. Said ghost is a Scary Black Man with railroad spikes embeded in his body and his blacksmith hammer in place of his hand.

     Literature  

  • Jack Vance has Villain Protagonist Cugel the Clever, a homophone for cudgel. Also a jab at the character, since a cudgel is the exact opposite of his attempt to be clever and subtle.
  • In the Warrior Cats series, the main villain was named Hammerclaw in drafts of the first book. Someone pointed out that the cats wouldn't know what a hammer is, and his name got changed to Tigerclaw (the cats know vaguely what Big Cats are).
  • Roran Stronghammer from the Inheritance Cycle.

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

  • The Maulotaur (episode 2 boss) from Heretic, named after the huge maul (sledgehammer) which is his weapon.
  • Sister Hammer, from Fable II
  • Orgrim Doomhammer from the Warcraft series, a double whammy.
  • Subverted by Hammer in Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow, a scary-looking American army man who, upon finding himself in Dracula's castle, starts collecting weapons... to open a shop. Mina is spooked; Soma is just perplexed.
  • The Mjolnir (after Thor's hammer) cyborgs in the Marathon verse, and the Mjolnir armor of the Spartans in Halo. Also, Foehammer, the dropship pilot from the first installment of the latter series.

     Web Original  

     Real Life  

  • Vyacheslav Molotov is a double-whammy - the incendiary bomb is named for him, and molot is Russian for "hammer".
  • Charles Martel, illegitimate son of Pepin of Herstal and de facto ruler of the Franks from 718 to 741 CE. If you're curious, his last name was actually a cognomen, meaning "Hammer", for the way he crushed his enemies on the battlefield.
  • The Malleus Maleficarum, or "Hammer of the Witches" in Latin, was a witch hunting manual that aided in the frenzied wave of executions responsible for tens of thousands of deaths during The Renaissance and The Cavalier Years.

    Hook 

     Literature  

  • Peter Pan: Captain James Hook, though it's revealed to be an alias.

     Theatre  

  • Peter Pan: Captain James Hook, "Mrs. Hook's little baby boy."

     Western Animation  

    Icepick 

     Toys  

     Video Games  

  • Icepick is also a bad guy from one of the Double Dragon games and one of the Skate Or Die games.

    Knives 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Evil brother Millions Knives from Trigun
  • Shanks from One Piece. Subverted in that he's really a nice guy, and not in an Affably Evil way. Then double-subverted when it's revealed he's one of the Four Emperors, one of such power that not even the Marines, Warlords, nor other Emperors want to antagonize directly. When the Marineford War was about to devolve into a Mêlée à Trois, his appearance and threat to join in the brawl stopped the war right there and then.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Tough-looking character actor (and real-life ex-con) Danny Trejo often plays characters named after edged weapons. He's been Navajas ("knives" in Spanish), Razor Eddie, Razor Charlie, and Machete no less than four times.
  • Flight of the Intruder features resident Ensign Newbie "Razor", so dubbed because he doesn't look old enough to shave. When he proves to be very bloodthirsty when defending downed pilots from enemy ground forces, he is renamed "Straight Razor".
  • Shank, the gang leader antagonist in the ultra-violent Slaughter Race game in Ralph Breaks the Internet. Though, like most Wreck-It Ralph video-game villains, she's a decent person once you get to know her.

     Literature  

  • The Nightside's Razor Eddie, punk god of the straight razor.
  • Andy Shank, who has a posse mainly because 'it was safer to be beside Andy than in front of him.' His favourite weapon was cutlass.
  • In Survivor Dogs, one of the dogs in the Fierce Dogs pack is named Dagger.

     Music  

  • Mack the Knife, the character from the song of the same name.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Not sure if it fits here, but Tezzeret is actually a term for any improvised weapon (at least, in his native tongue. He got his name after he used a crude knife to take down an older boy who had been bullying him. He takes the name to heart, as he sees his intellect as a great weapon that many take for granted.

     Video Games  

     Webcomics  

     Western Animation  

    Mace 
So badass it actually got two weapons, a spiky club and a tear gas, named after it. It thus can be an incredibly tough-sounding name for both men and women, and so can certain sound-alikes such as "mason"—after all, it's somebody who cuts rocks. On the other hand, "Macy" isn't a good, tough name, as naming tough people after department stores is a no-no.

     Comics  

     Film  

  • Mace was also the name of the Jerkass hero of The Ewok Adventure.
    • Also from the Star Wars universe is Mace Windu. Given that he beat Sidious in a lightsaber duel, is one of the only Jedi to freely draw upon anger, aggression, and dark side of the force, has torn apart droids with his bare hands and is played by Samuel L. Jackson, yes, you should run away really fast.

     Literature  

  • In the David Gemmell novel Morningstar, the main character has two of these, his real name being Jerrik Mace and his title being Morningstar.
  • In Survivor Dogs, one of the dogs in the Fierce Dogs pack is named Mace.

     Live Action TV  

  • Colonel Mace of UNIT in Doctor Who. When confronted with a Sontaran invasion, changes the bullets to steel jacketed, nullifying the Sontarans anti copper jacketed bullet field, calls in the Valiant, a flying aircraft carrier with massive fire power, gives a rousing speech, then proceeds to kill the Sontaran field Commander with a revolver, after saying "You will face me sir!"

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • Mike Morningstar again, as a morning star is also the name for a mace with spikes.
    • The Morningstar is also a common nickname for this guy named Lucifer, ever heard of him?

    Needles 

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

    Scourge 

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

     Tropes  

     Video Games  

    Spike 

     Anime and Manga  

     Fan Fic  

     Live Action TV  

  • Spike the vampire from Buffy the Vampire Slayer starts as a villain, and being a hundred-and-twentysomething he poses a far bigger threat than most regular vampires. He also has a unique record (as far as we know) of having killed two Slayers. Interestlingy, a 'Beware Dog' sign is regularly shown in the background in his scenes.

     Pinball  

     Western Animation  

  • Spike the bulldog from Tom and Jerry, who is strong, dangerous, and imposing. While Jerry was generally on his good graces, Tom was frequently disposed of by him.

    Swords 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Motoko Kusanagi. Admittedly a pseudonym, but still...
    • Given that it would be like a westerner calling herself "Mary Excalibur", yeah...
  • The Ten Espada from Bleach.
  • Tsurugi Inugami, is named after a sword. He's also named after a Japanese Mythology god as a bonus. The thing is, he is not one bit of a badass. In fact, he is a downright pushover to Misao Nanjo.
  • The legendary assassin of the Bakumatsu, Hitokiri Battousai, which practically translates as "the assassin quick at drawing swords."

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Toys  

     Video Games  

  • Durandal of Marathon.
  • Durandal from Fire Emblem Elibe.
  • As well as Cortana from Halo.
  • Jerkass antihero of Climax's Dreamcast Timestalkers game, simply named Sword. Actually, everyone playable has a simple object name like the puppet being named Marion, except the elf Nigel, who was a hero from a previous game (though Sword is the only one people want to get away from for being such a smug Ahole). Lady scares the three mobster bad guys a lot, but that's because they're really just bluffing blustery types who are used to others doing their work.
  • The Wario series has Kat & Ana, twin ninja girls. They also have a pet bald-eagle and monkey named "Shuriken" and "Nunchuck" respectively.
  • Bayonetta. Not necessarily evil, but you're sure going to want to run very fast if you ever bump into her.
  • Fate/stay night. Any Servant called Saber. Especially King Arthur. SHE's badass. Their Masters have canonically won every Grail War that has happened. (Technically, no Servant has won the War.)
  • The Kusanagi Unit.

     Real Life  

    Weapon 

     Literature  

     Webcomics  

    Others 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Just about every character in Soul Eater was named both after their weapon or weapon form and a famous musician. Examples: Maka Albarn, whose first name is an anagram of the Japanese word for scythe, "kama". She wields a Sinister Scythe and is one, in the anime. Black Star uses a giant shiruken, the Thompson sisters turn into Thompson Eagles, Jackie O'Lantern Dupre is a flamethrower, and Harvar D. Eclair is named after the French word for "lightning", conciding with the fact that he is an electric lance.

     Comic Books  

  • Empowered: Willy Pete gets his name from the military lingo for white phosphorus.

     Fan Works  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Citizen Admiral Esther McQueen from the Honor Harrington series - aka "Citizen Admiral Cluster Bomb".
  • Snaga the Sender, The Blades of no Return. Druss the Legend's axe
  • Simon Green's Nightside gave us "Shotgun Suzie," aka "Suzie Shooter," aka "Oh Christ, It's Her, Run!"
  • Heinz Axmann, Stasi officer from Schwarzesmarken

     Live Action TV  

  • Ryan Laserbeam from True Jackson, VP, who overlaps with Awesome Mc Coolname. He's a good guy, but still, damn!
  • Chuck has Hugo Panzer, who is actually a skilled swordsman. However, since he's played by Steve Austin, he is built like a German tank.
  • Lost Girl has The Glaive, said to be the attorney general for all Faekind.
  • Laser and Nitro on American Gladiators.
  • One episode of Blackadder the Third has Edmund Blackadder and Baldrick taken captive by French revolutionaries and handed over to a female torturer/executioner named Madame Guillotine.note  Fortunately, she turns out to be The Scarlet Pimpernel in disguise. Unfortunately, this only becomes apparent after Edmund poisons him.

     Tabletop Games  

     Toys  

  • In certain Transformers continuities, there is Bludgeon, a ruthless Decepticon martial artist who, in most incarnations, has a skeletal samurai motif. Ironically, he doesn't wield a bludgeon at all, favoring swords and/or Metallikato techniques for close combat.

     Real Life  

  • Eric Bloodaxe, King of Norway and Northumbria.
  • Henry Shrapnel. And by his own doing: the reason he's got a name to run away from really fast is because shrapnel was named after him.

     Video Games  

  • Duke Nukem. Or does that count as a verb?
  • Mocked in Dragon Age II in the Mark of the Assassin DLC; the party gets ambushed after speaking to a contact named Edge, and your party members point out either that the name is ridiculous ("Edge? That's his name?") or that they shouldn't have trusted a guy with a name like that.
  • The Iron Knuckles enemy from The Legend of Zelda series.

     Western Animation  


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Names that can also function as verbs (usually of the pain-inducing variety). Often overlaps with R Names.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

Common Verbs:

    Burn 

     Film  

     Live Action TV  

  • Frank Burns from Mash

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

    Destroy 

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Confessions: Vandals responsible for torturing freshmen at law school call themselves "eversores" (roughly "destroyers.") Augustine finds the nickname fitting due to the damage they do to their own souls by their violence.

     Professional Wrestling  

  • The legend who shaved, then retired Gorgeous George and teamed with Giant Baba, The Destroyer.
  • Danger Bone Destroyer, Welterweight Champion of NWA Nigeria in 1993. It may have been the lightest weight division of the promotion, after Middle, Light Heavy, Junior Heavy, Heavy and Super Heavy but can you imagine him being the least intimidating? Also, Tony Destroyer, Heavyweight Champion of the same promotion in 2010.

     Video Games  

  • The Shivans from FreeSpace. Not only were they named after Shiva, the Hindu God of Destruction, but they were also dubbed as "The Destroyers" by the Ancients.
  • The final boss of the storyline in Borderlands is named the Destroyer. Amusingly, the mission where you fight it is named "Destroy The Destroyer".
  • The overarching threat in the Eye of the North expansion in Guild Wars is a race known as the Destroyers. Their boss is, fittingly, known as The Great Destroyer.
  • The Destroyer, a massive mechanical worm from Terraria.

     Real Life  

  • The Star Destroyers most likely draw their name from Destroyers, a type of warship which in modern navies is smaller than a Cruiser and bigger than a Frigate. Originally, the name referred to their role as Torpedo Boat Destroyers, with the ships being designed to screen battleships and cruisers from swarms of torpedo boats. As naval warfare evolved, so did the Destroyers, with their roles gradually shifting to focus on anti-submarinenote  or Anti-Airnote . Modern destroyers, armed with dozens of guided missiles giving them a reach and punch equal to any other warship on the battlefield, are essentially modern day Battleships, being distinguished from modern cruisers only in tonnage rather than role.

    Dominate 

     Comic Books  

  • A DC Comics alien race were also called the Dominators. Naturally, they tried to conquer the Earth.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Doctor Who had an actual race calling themselves "The Dominators". (They come with dwarves in suits Creepy Monotone killer robots, of course.)

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

    Fuck 

     Literature  

  • The GCU Grey Area - AKA Meatfucker - from Iain M. Banks's The Culture. A sentient spaceship that kills aging despots by making them die repeatedly while they sleep. He also reads your mind, and contains a museum of torture. He doesn't get many visitors...

     Live Action TV  

  • It's only a nickname, but by God does Cal Richards from The Thick of It live up to it.

    Hack 

     Comic Books  

  • Cassie Hack, the slasher hunter from the series Hack/Slash.

     Film  

     Western Animation  

    Kill 
By itself is actually kind of silly, so expect variations.

     Anime and Manga  

     Comic Books  

  • Killgrave (a Daredevil villain unfortunately known as The Purple Man. Shoulda just stuck with his real name...).
    • His live-action version in Jessica Jones (as he's prevalent in the original comic, Alias) is actually Kevin Thompson, who chose Kilgrave (with only one L) during his Evil Makeover.
    Jessica Jones: Kevin. I know it's mundane, but "Kilgrave"? Talk about obvious. Was Murdercorpse already taken?
  • A Black Panther villain named Erik Killmonger.
  • Arkillo of the Sinestro Corps

     Fan Works  

     Film  

     Live Action TV  

     Professional Wrestling  

  • Ron Killings of NWA-TNA. Known as R-Truth in the WWE. Another one who should have stuck with his real name.

     Tabletop Games  

  • The pirates of WarMachine's Mercenary faction has Doc Killingsworth. The mere threat of treatment is enough to make the wounded get up and back into the fight.
  • Ax-Crazy troll gang member Shoot-to-Kill from Shadowrun, most notable for winning her boyfriend back by leaving him a love letter, alongside the head of her love rival, in the fridge.
  • Gray Norton, a champion mechwarrior in the BattleTech universe named the Rifleman he piloted as Champion of the Solaris VII tournaments Legend-Killer.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

     Web Original  

  • Parodied in Homestar Runner; as seen in the main page, Strong Mad (sometimes an example of this trope himself) plays the character of "KillingYouGuy" in the Dangeresque series.

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • Perhaps not a direct example, but there's a lot of people who would rather avoid Eduard Khil if they could help it.
    • Actually a subversion: "Khil" translates as "Hill."
  • Anthony Perish.
  • Subverted with Killer Kato; it's a nickname referring to how he (Masao Kato) played Go very aggressively, and as a top-level player (he once held four of Japan's big seven titles simultaneously, as well as being the oldest Honinbo champion in history), many "safe" groups of stones fell before him.

    Murder 
    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

     Fan Fiction  

     Film  

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

  • RuneScape has the boss monster Nex (Latin for "murder" or "violent death").

     Webcomics  

     Real Life  

  • Rapper Corey Miller, better known by his stage name, C-Murder. He is currently serving a life term for guess what.

    Pierce 

     Comic Books  

     Live Action TV  

  • Aaron Pierce in 24, although he is a good guy with a heart of gold, he is still a complete and utter badass.
  • Alien-hunting unit head Daniel Pierce of Roswell.
  • Pierce in Community is a complete Jerkass.
  • Though not a guy you'd want to run away from, unless you're Frank Burns or the Colonel Kilgore of the episode, but there's Capt. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce, from Series/MASH.

     Real Life  

    Rampage 

     Fan Fiction  

     Western Animation  

    Ravage 

     Toys  

  • Ravage in Transformers, though he was rarely a threat to other Transformers, was not someone humans wanted to deal with.

    Raze 

     Comic Books  

  • Ra's Al-Ghul from Batman sounds like this. For extra running bowel-trembling terror-ness, Ra's al Ghul means "the demon's head" in Arabic.

     Literature  

     Web Original  

  • From Killerbunnies, we have Razelle Anne Serchendistroy. Interestingly, her name is an actual but uncommon name and, ironically, (along with being a variant of the name "Rachel), despite it's spelling, her name means " ewe, lamb daughter", not what you'd expect.

    Rip 
See also Names To Run Away From: Notorious Killers for characters named after the most famous example of this one, Jack the Ripper.

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Giles used to go by "Ripper".
  • Babylon 5 had a one-shot character named Sebastian, who was revealed to be a cryogenically preserved (and quite repentant} Jack The Ripper.

     Music  

  • Rivfader, King of Trolls in many of Finntroll's songs. His name means "Rip-father" in Swedish.

     Real Life  

     Video Games  

    Slash 
    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

  • The surname Kurosaki comes from putting kuro (dark) on kirisaki (slasher). Essentially, Dark Slasher.

     Comic Books  

     Literature  

  • Slash is one of the villains of the Warrior Cats Dawn of the Clans arc.

     Video Games  

     Web Original  

  • Worm has Jack Slash, the Big Bad of the Slaughterhouse Nine arcs.

     Western Animation  

    Slaughter 

     Comic Books  

  • Judge Dredd: "Mandroid" had as its protagonist a vigilante cybernetic super soldier by the name of Nate Slaughterhouse.

     Film  

  • The Hong Kong martial arts film Yellow Faced Tiger features Chuck Norris as a ganglord named Chuck Slaughter. Hence the movie's alternate title in the U.S., Slaughter in San Francisco.

     Live Action TV  

  • A Law & Order episode features Jonas Slaughter, played by Malcolm McDowell.
  • Detective Slaughter on Castle is a Cowboy Cop whose nickname is "the Widowmaker". He earned it based on his partners' life expectancy. Not that gangsters fare much better with him around...

     Professional Wrestling  

     Tabletop Games  

     Theater  

  • In Larry Gelbart's Mastergate: A Play on Words, the devious mastermind behind the whole scandal is the late CIA director, Wiley Slaughter.

     Real Life  

  • Karin Slaughter. She writes thrillers.
  • A.J. Slaughter, Western Kentucky Hilltoppers.
  • Tod Slaughter, known for his roles in film adaptations of Victorian horror melodramas and is particularly known for his portrayal of the original Sweeney Todd from the penny-dreadful "The String of Pearls".
  • Former Cleveland Browns wide receiver Webster Slaughter.
  • Baseball Hall of Famer Enos Slaughter, particularly if you were a pitcher in the 1940s.
  • Alvin Slaughter. Gospel musician.

    Stab 
    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

  • In a strange case, we got Mobile Suit Gundam 00's Bring Stabity. The thing is, his name is a corruption of the phrase "bring stability". It doesn't help that his Mobile Suit, the GNZ-005 Garazzo, is outfitted with the GN Beam Claws, which are finger-mounted beam sabers.

     Animated Films  

  • The Stabbington brothers from Tangled are probably a parody, although they are rather scary.

     Live Action TV  

  • "Stabby Joe" from Friends. Phoebe warned Ross not to walk down a certain alley to avoid meeting this character.

     Western Animation  

Other Verbs:

    Anime & Manga 

    Comicbooks 

    Film 

     Literature 
  • The Bully in Dinoverse is named J.D. Harms. There's a little more going on than it seems, but it takes a lot to bring it to the surface.
  • The name applied to the title character of The Skinner pretty much says it all.
  • The Skinners from The General Series are tribesmen who spend most of their time hunting dinosaurs and the rest wrecking up civilization.
  • Worm: even before learning anything about them, readers knew that things called "the Endbringers" had to be seriously bad news. The reveal that they are civilization destroying monsters wasn't too surprising.

    Live-Action TV 

    Professional Wrestling 
  • The notorious 187, Homicide.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Though not truly a verb, Rapine Storm of CthulhuTech still qualifies as something to run away from. Pity that doing so will probably mean you run into something worse, given the setting.
  • While a bit iffy as to whether or not it's a verb or a noun, the character of Spite in Sentinels of the Multiverse, a psychopathic serial killer who is later killed and resurrected by a demon god, has a very evocative name that you definitely want to run away from very fast.

    Theatre 

    Videogames 

    Webcomics 
  • Goblins spin-off Tempts Fate has a minor villain called Suffer.
  • Sluggy Freelance: You'd think someone whose first name is "Kitten" wouldn't sound intimidating or bad, but her last name is "Stranglir", which is a mildly disguised Punny Name version of this trope. The character in question is a hyper-muscular bodyguard to a rich criminal.

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Xiaolin Showdown's Chase Young. Meaningful in that he traded his soul for eternal youth.
  • The Fairly Oddparents: Jorgen von Strangle, Crusher McPersoncrusher, and Princess Mandie (pronounced Man-Die, if you didn't get it).
  • Rocko's Modern Life: Really, would you trust a doctor named Dr. Bendova?
  • Ugly Americans: almost all the demons have an intimidating name, but Twayne Boneraper takes the cake. Subverted because he is scary just in the first couple or so of episodes, then he is flanderized into a whiny, clueless, neurotic momma's boy.

    Real Life 
  • Louis the Pious had three sons, Pepin II, Charles the Bald, and Lothair. Guess which one tried to take over the Holy Roman Empire...
  • Apparently, a man in Britain named Rob Banks was accused of bank robbery. The court subsequently granted him the right to be tried under a pseudonym on the grounds that his name might, in fact, influence the jury.
  • One of the infamous nicknames given to Vlad Dracula: "Vlad III The Impaler."
  • Those Wacky Nazis had an infamous Mad Doctor named Josef Mengele, whose surname sounds an awful lot like "mangle". Considering what he did to prisoners in Auschwitz (unspeakably sadistic experiments For the Evulz), that's not too much of a stretch.


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Certain military ranks, Nobility titles, and plain old titles carry tinges of evil all by themselves. Avoid anyone with the following ranks:

Subtypes with their own pages include The Baroness and The Emperor.

Compare Meaningful Titles.

See also Morally Ambiguous Doctorate and Aristocrats Are Evil.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Baron 
Ever since Manfred von Richthofen became the terror of the skies against the Entente in World War I, every Baron automatically catches his tinge. See also The Baroness.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Baron Vladimir Harkonnen from Dune.
  • Baron Soontir Fel of the Star Wars Expanded Universe is a borderline case. He serves the Empire, and from his last name you'd expect him to fall from grace—indeed, it's not clear for a while where his loyalties lie. He defects from the Empire, partly out of disgust about what Ysanne Isard and s have turned the Empire into, and joins the Rogues, but there are various hints that he may or may not turn again. After the comics didn't end, he vanished, captured by Isard... and, as it turns out in the Hand of Thrawn duology, captured because Grand Admiral Thrawn wanted him (though it wasn't revealed exactly what Thrawn gave Isard in return, since she really wanted to kill Fel for his defection). Thrawn showed him something, implied but never stated to be the oncoming Vong invasion, and Fel joined Thrawn's Empire, which wasn't part of Palpatine's Empire at all. Ultimately Fel is one of the good guys, just not the kind to wear New Republic colors.
  • The Bloody Baron, the scariest ghost in Hogwarts, who murdered his lover out of jealousy. He remains the only being capable of keeping Peeves in check.
  • Baron Vengeous from Skulduggery Pleasant. Gee, d'you think he might be evil?

     Tabletop Games  

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

  • Girl Genius: Don't make Baron Klaus Wulfenbach come over there.

     Web Original  

     Western Animation  

  • Baron Otto Matic from Tom Slick, etc.
  • Baron Dark from Skeleton Warriors. Turning people to skeletons bolsters his forces. He rather enjoys it too.

    Bishop 

     Live Action TV  

  • Monty Python's Flying Circus did a parody of James Bond called "The Bishop."
  • Blackadder: The baby-eating Bishop of Bath and Wells, who drowns babies in the font and eats them in the vestry. He is a colossal pervert, and enjoys the more violent parts of his work far too much. Such as putting red-hot pokers up the backsides of people who can't pay back their debts.

     Literature  

     Western Animation  

    Boss 

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Vodzh, one of the titles attributed to Josef Stalin, translates out to "boss".

    Commandant 

     Video Games  

  • The name of Lucien's top commander in Fable
  • A recurring theme throughout the Tales Series.

    Commissar 
Also has a particularly nasty history associated with it, particularly if preceded by the modifiers 'Political,' 'Military,' or (especially) 'People's'. In the Soviet Union during The Great Patriotic War the Commisars were the ones authorized to order the killings of Soviet troops who retreated, deserted or in ways "sabotaged" the Soviet war effort.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Warhammer 40,000 has the Commissariat: an organization made up of many different kinds of people, from those that shouldn't be feared (except by the enemies of the Imperium of Man), like Ciaphas Cain, to villains whose men would stop rebelling if he just stopped flogging them.

    Count 

     Film  

  • Count Dooku in the Star Wars prequel trilogy. The ostensible leader of the systems rebelling against the Galactic Republic leading their forces in the ensuing Civil War, he's also a Sith Lord, and Palpatine's latest minion.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Count Wolf-Heinrich von Helldorf, Berlin SA leader, who also has a suitably foreboding surname.
  • Countess Elizabeth Báthory was an infamous Serial Killer in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Hungary.

    Director 
The title of choice for someone involved in a Corrupt Corporation's Mad Science department, or a secret government program. May also have a Morally Ambiguous Doctorate that they're putting to use in the program they're directing, possibly for the creation of The Virus or Super Soldiers. It's also worth noting that this kind of Director is likely the person in charge of a number of people with Morally Ambiguous Doctorates, whether they themselves have a degree or not.

     Anime  

     Film  

  • The Director running the covert program releasing the monsters in The Cabin in the Woods, played by Sigourney Weaver. Given that the film is in large part a satire of the horror film industry, she also serves as a metaphor for the other kind of "director".
  • Director Orson Krennic, the head of the Imperial Death Star Project in Rogue One.

     Web Original  

    Doctor 
If you get an M.D. or a Ph.D., you might as well grow a handlebar mustache and start practicing your Evil Laugh. Bonus points for insanity. See also Morally Ambiguous Doctorate. However, if "The Doctor" is the entirety of your name (that we know of) there may yet be hope...

     Anime and Manga  

  • The Doctor from Hellsing. Creator of artificial vamps. Snazzy glasses. Complete insanity. Winning trifecta.
  • Yu Yu Hakusho:
    • Minoru Kamiya, alias Doctor. Believed the human race was diseased, paralyzed a character, attempted mass murder -running away from him was a good thing.
    • Dr. Ichigaki from the first Demon World tournament arc. He offered to cure a wise old teacher if three of his students fought for him. He'd made the teacher sick and used the students as guinea pigs.

     Comic Books  

  • Doctor Doom. Some fans call into question Doctor Doom's academic credentials since he was kicked out of State University after the accident that disfigured his face. Still, as ruler of Latveria he presumably had time to finish his thesis at Doomstadt University or have them award him an honorary one...
  • Doctor Cyber, Doctor Death, Doctor Destiny, Doctor Light, Doctor Moon, Doctor No-Face, Doctor Phosphorus, Doctor Psycho... DC seems to like this.

     Film  

  • Doctor Evil of the Austin Powers movies. A parody of Blofeld from James Bond, he's a stereotypical "hold the world ransom" villain.

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

  • Then again ... there's been a few times when The Doctor has kindly suggested that the Monster of the Week run away. And in-universe he's made the living incarnations of Space Nazi hate-hate-hate flinch. With words. Or as the Eleventh Doctor put it when facing down alien of the week . "Hello, I'm the Doctor. Basically, run". They wisely did. Though this trope only applies if you are evil, otherwise The Doctor falls under Names to Trust Immediately.
    • In "A Good Man Goes to War," The Doctor finds out this reputation is slowly changing the meaning of his name across time from "healer" to "warrior."
    The Doctor: Imagine you were dying. Imagine you were afraid and a long way from home in terrible pain. Just when you thought it couldn't get worse, you looked up and saw the face of the Devil himself. Hello, Dalek.

     Video Games  

  • While Team Fortress 2's Medic is a boon to his team-mates, his background ("From Stuttgart, at a time when the Hippocratic Oath was downgraded to a Hippocratic suggestion") and lines ("Ze hurting is more rewarding than ze healing!") suggest he's no more kind-hearted than them.
  • "Doctor Loboto" from Psychonauts likes to extract children's brains, the name an allusion to lobotomies (which would be the destruction of part of said brains, which is almost as creepy as what he does with them).
  • The Doctor from Cave Story.
  • Hello, Dr. Iwamine Shuu.
  • Dr. Zed from Borderlands and Borderlands 2.
  • Dr. Eggman from Sonic the Hedgehog.
  • Dr. Neo Cortex from Crash Bandicoot.

     Web Comics  

     Web Original  

  • The Spoony Experiment: "All I had to do was run for president?! I wasn't even really taking this all that seriously! I even used my real name! You voted for a guy named DOCTOR INSANO!!"
  • Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog gives us the title character. He has a Ph. D. in HORRIBLENESS.

     Western Animation  

    Duke 

    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

     Literature  

  • Tortall Universe: Duke Roger of Conte, so terrifyingly powerful a sorcerer no one in Tortall would dare face him except a Determinator Action Girl protecting her prince—and he even orchestrates his return from the dead.
  • In Warrior Cats, Duke is a minor antagonist who appears in the first Graystripe manga.

     Music  

     Video Games  

     Western Animation  

  • Avatar: The Last Airbender has The Duke, the nickname of one of the Freedom Fighters (we never learn his real name). It's ironic because The Duke is a tiny kid who was orphaned by the Fire Nation. The Ironic Nicknaming of his Gentle Giant friend Pipsqueak makes things even funnier.
  • G.I. Joe: When one captures one Sgt. Conrad "Duke" Hauser, it usually does not end well. He comes back. With Friends. And tears your fortress to the ground.
  • Captain Planet and the Planeteers: Duke Nukem (no not that one...that's another entry.) This one loves radioactivity, Hollywood style.

    Führer 
The title "Führer" (leader, guide) has been taken out of the German lexicon due to...you know who. No self-respecting German leader would dare allow the word to be applied to them these days. Any title that would have used the word prior to 1946 now uses the word Leiter in its place. A character with this title in any modern work is almost certainly a Nazi.

    open/close all folders 

[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]

     Real Life  

  • There's Hitler himself of course, but stylizing themselves as some variant of "leader" was very popular with the Fascist collaborators in the countries Germany occupied during the war. Vidkun Quisling, the puppet ruler of Norway, even used the closest Norwegian cognate, Fører.
    • Officer ranks and NCO within the Nazi SS all consisted of "-führer" with a prefix denoting what level of "leader" they were. Hitler as simply "führer" with no prefix denoted that he was the leader of everything in Germany.
  • There are also Italian and Spanish equivalents, Duce and Caudillo, respectively used by Hitler's fellow fascists Mussolini and Franco. While "duce" simply translates as "leader" and could theoretically mean any type of leader of any type of group (and did, prior to it becoming as associated with Mussolini as führer is with Hitler), "caudillo" refers to a specific type of leader: an authoritarian dictator with a military background.

    General / Generalissimo 
While the lower officer ranks may have their share of heroes who risk their lives on the front lines, your average General sits in his cushy headquarters plotting the destruction of all who stand in his way. Expect them to be sinister General Rippers. General is also something of a toss-up, as the title has a roughly equal chance of instead applying to a morally good and skilled Four-Star Badass who is a true Father to His Men instead. Generalissimo however is almost always indicative of evil, at least in Anglophone fiction.

     Anime  

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Revenge of the Sith has General Grievous, and The Force Awakens has General Hux.
    • RedLetterMedia's Mr. Plinkett mocks the fantastic unsubtleness of Grievous' name thusly:
      "Also on this ship is Commander Nefarious, Captain I'm-A-Bad-Guy, and Admiral Bone-to-Pick. But they don't mention them."

     Literature  

     Video Games  

     Real Life  

  • Both in fiction and in real life, you should run away from anyone holding the rank of Generalissimo.
    • Especially if you're in Taiwan during the White Terror, and dealing with a extremely angry "president" who still likes to wear military uniforms in public and takes his anger at losing mainland China out on the local Taiwanese.
    • Except Foch, if you're not German.
  • When he wasn't going by Caudillo, this was the title Francisco Franco preferred.
  • Stalin too took on this title during World War II, in order to more closely associate himself with Soviet military victories.

    Governor 
While they may not be the most powerful rank in all the land, they are powerful enough to cause trouble for the protagonists, and if they are ambiguous enough, those above them might be threatened as well. If those above them are Reasonable Authority Figure, and the governor is not, expect a grab for power.

     Live-Action TV  

  • Star Trek: The Original Series: Kodos the Executioner, who was governor of a human colony that was facing starvation because of an exotic fungus. He executed 4,000 citizens in order to see to it that the other 2,000 wouldn't starve. He later disappeared, presumed dead, but in reality, had changed his name and was living life as an actor.
  • The Walking Dead: The Governor himself.

     Western Animation  

  • Pocahontas: Governor Ratcliffe, leader of the English expedition in Virginia. Racist, classist, and an all-around asshole. Manages to escape punishment after the events of the first movie because of his social status.
  • Star Wars Rebels has Governor Ahrinda Pryce, who is definitely a badass... and the company she keeps includes the likes of Grand Moff Tarkin and Grand Admiral Thrawn.

    Judge 

     Comic Books  

  • Judge Dredd. In fact, any Judge in Mega City One deserves a healthy dose of fear and respect, but Dredd is the toughest, meanest and most downright unstoppable of them all.
    • And of course Judge Fear, Judge Fire, Judge Mortis and Judge Death, the four Dark Judges. Immortal undead who destroyed all life in their home dimension, and are attempting to do the same to Dredd's.

     Film  

  • Judge Doom from Who Framed Roger Rabbit?. A Hanging Judge of the highest order, his stated goal is to create order in the toon anarchy, and the only way to make them respect the law is to execute all transgressors with his self-designed toon killing liquid, the Dip.

     Literature  

  • Judge Holden (more commonly referred to as "the judge") of Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. The man easily ranks as one of the most violent and fundamentally evil murderers in the history of fiction. A giant, albino and utterly hairless murderer, the judge incites a mob to hang an innocent preacher under false pretenses, is a pedophile and rapes and murders many children, leashes and subjugates a mentally disabled man as though he were a dog and scalps countless Native Americans. Not only is he utterly without morals, the judge is also an incredibly intelligent, Omnidisciplinary Scientist and strong enough to wield a mounted howitzer as most men would a shotgun. In the novel's final pages it is implied that the judge is less a man and more an immortal force of nature and warfare—a god of violence and depravity, if you will.

     Tabletop Games  

    Khan 
Khan was the title of the ruler among various nomadic peoples of the Central Asian Steppes. Since these peoples had occasional habit of launching wars of conquest against their agrarian neighbors, people with "khan" next to their name became objects of much fear. See, for example, Genghis Khan.

     Live Action Television  

  • While not an actual title, per se, Khan Noonien Singh from Star Trek has been a formidable villain in all three of his appearances. In fact, he is more often just called "Khan" than by his full name.

     Tabletop Games  

  • In BattleTech, the word Khan is generally used as a rank for the leader of a particular Clan. There are three variations of it. A kaKhan (though this term is rarely used in lore itself and is simply substituted for "Khan") is essentially the head-in-charge of the entire Clan and oversees their operations; a saKhan is the second-in-command of the Clan and answers to the ruling Khan; the ilKhan is essentially the commander-in-chief of all of the Clans, and is equivalent to the Real Life word "Khagan" (literally "Khan of Khans"). These ranks are very equivalent to Vice Admiral/Lieutenant General (for "saKhan"), Admiral/General (for "kaKhan"), and Admiral of the Navy/General of the Army/Air Force (for "ilKhan") in Real Life militaries.

     Video Games  

  • In Stellaris, one of the mid-game crises involves one of the Marauder empires (an anarchic collection of Space Pirates) uniting under a Great Khan, turning an already dangerous force into rampaging Demonic Spiders that often require a galaxy-wide effort to put down.

    Lord 
In particular, watch out for anyone who's so much of a Card-Carrying Villain that they style themselves as "Dark Lords" or even Evil Overlords.

     Anime  

  • In Slayers, the Lord of Nightmares. First mentioned when : Lina invokes an even more powerful Dark Lord against Shabranigdo.

     Film  

  • In Star Wars, the Dark Lords of the Sith. Sometimes, this title even makes its way into conversation. (Lord Vader, Lord Sidious, etc.)
  • From The Cabin in the Woods comes Fornicus, Lord of Bondage and Pain. He's a Cenobite, so he lives to satiate his victims' desires by bringing them new "pleasures", eternal torture.
  • The Lord Marshal of the Necromongers in The Chronicles of Riddick, who leads his Religion of Evil on their campaign of annihilating inhabited worlds and enslaving those who can withstand their conversion process.

     Live Action TV  

     Literature  

  • Lord Voldemort from Harry Potter. Dark Lord, Master of the Dark Arts, and ruler of the Death Eaters, he wants to live forever and bring the wizarding world under his supremacy so he can enslave the Muggles and eradicate the half-bloods.
  • Chronicles of Thomas Covenant: Lord Foul the Despiser. He's every bit as pleasant as the name suggests.
  • Lord Vetinari, Patrician of Ankh-Morpork. He actually considers himself evil, and rules by the principle of One Man, One Vote. He is The Man.
  • Lord Dyrr, the de facto ruler of House Agrach Dyrr. Also working for an evil god who intends to turn Menzoberranzan into a male-dominated society.
  • Lord Vile from ''Skulduggery Pleasant'. The most powerful Necromancer in the world, who slaughters entire battlefields without a second thought. He was born from the tremendous anger and grief of Skulduggery himself. He doesn't care who his enemy is, as long as he has one.

     Religion and Mythology  

  • God is frequently referred to as "the Lord." While not evil by official canon, He's certainly unimaginably powerful and commanding respect.

     Video Games  

     Web Comics  

     Western Animation  

     Real Life  

  • The Swedish name of the Eurasian Bullfinch is "Domherre", literally meaning Judgment Lord.

    Major 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Hellsing's Big Bads are all referred only by title, and the sheer insanity of his voice makes him qualify.
  • The Major, from Ghost in the Shell. One of a handful in the world who can hack directly into your soul.

     Comic Book  

  • Major Disaster

     Film  

     Video Games  

  • Metal Gear Solid 3:
    • Major Zero seems like such a nice guy in Metal Gear Solid 3. Went on to found the Patriots and pursue total control of all information.
    • Major Ocelot, who would later be known as Revolver Ocelot.

    Master 
Especially "The Master", which is its own trope.

     Comic Books  

  • The Maestro, an evil alternate universe version of [[Incredible Hulk The Hulk].

     Film  

     Live Action TV  

     Video Games  

     Web Original  

  • Used a lot on The Erotic Mind Control Story Archive.

    Mister 
Even a humble honorific can intimidate if the character has no first name.

     Comic Books  

     Film  

  • Mister Book and Mister Hand in Dark City.
    • All of the Strangers address each this way.
  • Mr. Glass in Unbreakable. A realistic supervillain who killed hundreds of people in mass disasters so he could find his antithesis, a real superhero.

     Literature  

     Tabletop Games  

    Prince 
See also The Evil Prince, which is when they usurp the throne.

     Literature  

     Video Games  

  • The main antagonist of Diablo II is Prince Aidan, the Dark Wanderer.

     Webcomics  

  • In Homestuck, Dirk's SBURB title is the Prince of Heart, which he complains about - until Calliope explains that, with the actual powers of the class and aspect, it really means Destroyer of Souls.

    Professor 
When academics, or at least would-be academics, go bad.

     Comic Books  

  • Batman's recurring villain Professor Pyg. He uses brutal surgery to mutilate his victims.
  • The Flash has his archenemy, Professor Zoom (though nowadays, he goes by the Reverse-Flash or just simply Zoom). Seeing as he is a Speedster that has proven that he is faster than the Flash, he is a force to be cautious around.

     Literature  

  • Sherlock Holmes: Professor Moriarty. The head of a large and very active criminal ring.

     Live Action TV  

     Western Animation  

  • South Park: Professor Chaos, bringer of destruction and doom, is the latter.
  • Kim Possible villain Professor Dementor.

    Other 
Captain, Commander and high ranks are good too, either for villains but more so for antiheroes (or just straight up good-guy heroes). Anything lower tends to lack oomph. After all, nobody's scared of a Private. Sergeants, on the hand...

     Anime and Manga  

  • Just look at Millennium's Captain.
  • One Piece has the Admiralty, consisting of three Admirals and a Fleet Admiral, with the admirals given the titles of 'Greatest Military Powers'. Though individual Admirals have been replaced through the series and backstory, the presence associated with the rank retains it's mystique.

     Film  

     Literature  

     Live Action TV  

     Music  

  • Gloryhammer: "The Goblin King of the Darkstorm Galaxy" who has a magic crystal that can "unleash evil from the sky," AND a Space Batllefleet.

     Tabletop Games  

  • Typhus, Host of the Destroyer Plague: possibly the only name to include three of the major categories in a name of five words, and still be sinister.

     Video Games  

  • Wild ARMS 2. Brad Evan's Character Class is "Prisoner 666".
  • Mass Effect: Commander Shepard. Full stop. Renegade or Paragon doesn't matter. If you're in his/her way or hurt his/her crew, you -will- regret it.
  • Tyrants in the Resident Evil series.
  • Shin Megami Tensei: Any time the player encounters a demon in the Fiend category, they can be sure that a particularly nasty battle is impending.
  • Warmaster Seerus from Spiral Knights.
  • Dragon Age: The Hero of Ferelden, after becoming Warden Commander of Ferelden. If you're becoming his/her target, just run. To the other side of the continent if you can.

     Web Comics  

     Western Animation  


A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Some people end up going by a pseudonym where they have a one-word description followed by an X. It's generally not a good idea to press them for real names.


Examples:

[[/folder]]

     Anime & Manga  

     Comic Books  

  • Marvel Comics, who publish X-Men, has Professor X, Weapon X, Agent X, and Mutant X.

     Film  

     Literature  

  • Devoted members of the Audubon Ballroom from Honor Harrington use "X" as their only last name; special mention goes to Jeremy X. Definitely run from the Ballroom if you're associated with the slave trade.

     Live-Action TV  

  • CSI: NY had a storyline about a female Professional Killer who they only referred to as "Suspect X." Her crimes included killing an Internet celebrity to take her identity, assassinating a federal judge, holding hostage, surgically altering and finally killing a random innocent woman to fake her own death, and hacking Second Life.

     Video Games  

  • While Mega Man X himself is a heavy aversion in the games proper, he does have an evil counterpart from the Megamission card game, "Mega Man iX". And then there's Copy-X to consider...
  • Longshoreman X (yes, really) is a boss in the original Dead to Rights. He fights with full fisherman gear and a spear gun.
  • Cave Story has a rather infamous boss called Monster X.
  • In Kingdom Hearts II, the only real "boss" in the Gummy Ship Missions is called Hunter X, found only in the very last mission on the hardest difficulty.

     Web Original  

     Western Animation  

  • Red X; not just the only antihero in the series but also the only character to never be defeated! (from the animated Teen Titans, with a color to boot!)
  • Beast Wars gives us Protoform X, complete with a big ugly X on his stasis pod. Prior to getting sealed in that stasis pod, he was on a massive spree of murder, destruction, and cannibalism, with a special focus on destroying everything Depth Charge ever cared about. Later receives the name Rampage once released from his stasis pod and forcibly recruited by Megatron.

     Real Life  

  • Malcolm X, why not. Real life Badass Preacher extraordinaire, not to mention (at least from his own perspective) an epic Heel–Face Turn when he left the black separatist Nation of Islam for mainstream Islam.
  • There is an as of yet unidentified pliosaur known as Predator X. Estimates put its length at about 50 feet and give it a bite force more powerful then a Tyrannosaurus rex.
  • Planet X
  • Angelspit's DestroyX.

Some people are so infamous that they need no introduction. Sometimes this is a title hiding their true identity... but if it isn't, then run.

A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast.

The Master and The Butcher have their own pages.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

  • In Excel Saga, it's That Man, who's the main villain for Pedro and Nabeshin. After That Man is defeated, they then face That Man There, This Man, That Man Over There, That Man Over Here, and This Man Over Here.
  • In Trinity Blood, if you hear the names The Knight of Destruction and/or The Lady of Death... run, fast...
    • Run even faster from the Contra-Mundi (the alias for Cain Nightroad).
  • In Rurouni Kenshin, our hero was formerly known as the Hitokiri Battousai, the "hitokiri" part meaning "The Manslayer" (in one of the dubs, "The Slasher" was used instead, while "The Manslayer" was used in the other). Yeah, might not want to make him mad.
  • With few exceptions, the most significant (and dangerous) characters in Trigun have the trope appended to their names. This includes the series main protagonist: Vash the Stampede. Also known as the Humanoid Typhoon. All the titles are justified in some way.
  • In Sword Art Online, our hero Kirito is known as "The Black Swordsman". He's actually (usually) a very nice guy, despite the name, if a bit clueless about girls.
  • Berserk also has a Black Swordsman in the form of Guts. He's so named because of his black armor and his ginormous sword, and has quite the infamous reputation for destruction, not the least because of his demon-attracting Brand of Sacrifice and his habit of going after any demon that he gets a fix on.

    Comicbooks 

    Fan Fiction 
  • Child of the Storm has a few.
    • Thor is occasionally known as 'the Thunderer'.
    • Harry Dresden is sometimes referred to as 'the Detective'.
    • Doctor Strange is sometimes referred to as 'the Doctor', 'the Evergreen Man', and 'the Lord of Time'. These titles are all very Doctor Who themed, which is unsurprising, since the author is a definite fan and admits that he patterned Strange partly off the Doctor, and In-Universe, he's noted as an inspiration for the show. As it is, though, his actual name (well, not his actual name, Taliesin, which is known to only a very few people) terrifies people far more than any of these titles.
    • Dudley is alternatively known as 'the Blob' and 'the Beast.'
    • The Juggernaut appears.
    • And then, of course, there is the Phoenix.
      • And even more so, the Dark Phoenix.
  • The Wizard in the Shadows/The Black Wizard/The Darkness Slayer. Like the Doctor, basically... run.
  • From the Tamers Forever Series we have The Nightmare and The Son Of Destruction the former is actually an Invoked Trope, since Takato dubs the virus this due to his own sense of melodrama. The being's actual name is revealed in GOSPEL as Niflheim

    Film 

    Literature 
  • In Discworld, the Lady. Not evil, per se, but you do not want to annoy her. Especially not by saying her namenote . Rincewind is immune, but only because he doesn't believe he has gotten anything but a long series of lucky breaks.
  • In Louis Sachar's Holes, The Warden.
  • In Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, the protagonist eventually becomes known as "The Boss". He is not very scary, until you notice that he has substantial knowledge of 19th century science and engineering - in the 6th century. This includes gatling guns.
  • The Man in Black.
  • The Bard from The Sea of Trolls and the sequels. Also known as Dragon Tongue by the Vikings.
  • The Bane (his real name is Pearlpelt) from The Underland Chronicles.
  • The Judge in Blood Meridian. "What's he a judge of?", the Kid asks. He finds out soon enough.
  • The White Witch and the Lady of the Green Kirtle from The Chronicles of Narnia. The White Witch actually gets a name—Jadis.
  • The Sphinx (or the Ethiopian) from the Fablehaven series.
  • In the 1632 series, through a quirk of fate, regiments in the USE army have names as well as numbers. In 1635: The Eastern Front, an elite regiment is formed in the Third Division to deal with problems of discipline — The Hangman.
  • The Malazan Book of the Fallen has several. Primarily, you don't want to mess with the Son Of Darkness, The Rope, or any Knight of a House.
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four gives us—who else?—Big Brother.
  • In The Zombie Knight, Gohvis is known as "the Monster of the East" or "the Black Scourge." Hector had heard that last one, but thought it was a plague.
  • Space Marine Battles has slavemaster Algol, who goes by moniker "Skintaker" and is by far one of the cruelest characters in the novel.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Master, The First Evil, The Mayor (Ok, we get his name, but he's normally called The Mayor), to vampires and demons, The Slayer is an example of this.
  • Charmed When you hear about a demon, who's title is The Source of All Evil, run, fast, now.
  • When you are fighting something only known as The Beast, you have a problem.
    • Likewise when you're up against someone the residents of Hell call "The Destroyer".
  • The Pretender: Miss Parker.
  • Was it The Cancer Man or The Smoking Man? Or The Cigarette Smoking Man? Seemed to creep The X-Files fans out no end, and make them worry what would happen to Mulder. The Man needs no name, and no freakin' nicorette.
  • The Man a.k.a. Irina Derevko from Alias.
  • Leverage: The Butcher of Kiev.
    Hardison: "Have you ever been to Kiev? The Cakemaker of Kiev'd kick all our asses, this is the BUTCHER."
  • Doctor Who The Doctor, despite being the main good guy. It's even lampshaded at one point. His other famous titles include the Trickster, the Last of the Time Lords, the Phantom, The Oncoming Storm, the Mighty Warrior, the Destroyer of Worlds, the Lonely God and the Madman With a Box. As Eleventh puts it, "Hello. I'm the Doctor. Basically, run.
    • On the other hand, if someone introduces himself as "the Master", run.
    • Also, Omega and the Valeyard.
    • Let's not forget about the Monk and the Rani, not to mention series 5 and 6's The Silence.
    • Also the Last Centurion is becoming one of these.
    • We must not forget Stormaggedon, The Dark Lord of All. (Also answers to Alfie.)
    • In season 6, The Doctor learns that his antics are changing the meaning of his name throughout history from meaning "healer" to "great warrior."
    • The Bad Wolf.
    • And the most terrifying being to appear on the show. The Time Lord Victorious. Guess Who.
  • Some say that his tears are adhesive, and that if he caught fire, he'd burn for a thousand days... all we know is, he's called the Stig.
  • Lost Girl has a fae called the Mongolian Death Wurm. She also answers to Velma.
  • The Haitian from Heroes.
  • The Clairvoyant
  • House of Anubis has The Betrayer and The Collector, with turn out both to be Aliases. They're both Rufus Zeno.

    Music 

    Professional Wrestling 
  • The man who finally brought down "Gorgeous" George Wagner was simply known as The Destroyer.
    • Decades later, Samoa Joe would adopt the same moniker in his run with WWE.

    Tabletop Games 
  • In Magic: The Gathering, most planeswalkers have dramatic titles on their cards like "the firebrand", "The Mind Sculptor" or "The Unseen". Nicol Bolas simply has "Planeswalker".
  • The Butcher of Khardov in the Iron Kingdoms universe.
  • Warhammer40000 Abaddon the Despoiler, and Kharn the betrayer.
  • Warhammer: Settra the Imperishable.

    Videogames 
  • In I Wanna Be the Guy your mission is to kill "The Guy", and the only thing standing between you and him is the hours of the most frustrating Platform Hell ever devised. Good Luck.
    • It should also be noted that the protagonist is known as "The Kid."
  • Team Fortress 2: All the characters are referred to this way, although due to his mediocre mastery of the English language, The Heavy refers to himself as "Heavy Weapons Guy," which also works.
  • Lu Bu in virtually any Dynasty Warriors game. Historically one of the most powerful generals in the time of the Three Kingdoms, pretty much everyone speaks of Lu Bu in hushed whispers, and when he shows up, he goes on a total rampage tearing through everything in his path. While there are some missions where you must actually kill Lu Bu — he's appropriately nerfed — in most missions attempting to do this is suicide, as he's many, many times stronger than anyone else in the game including your primary target for the mission (usually Dong Zhuo). If he's not kicking your ass, he's chasing you down, and it doesn't help that he always rides the fastest horse in the game. Yuan Shao's line, "Don't pursue Lu Bu", is probably the most useful advice you will ever recieve in Dynasty Warriors.
    • Ironically he was uncontrollable as the story had dictated. Although Lu Bu was powerful, what ultimately did him in was the fact that he was impulsive and prone to attacking or betray everything that was not nailed down. Had he been more stalwart and noble or at least more calculated, he would have been accepted by Liu Bei with open arms and may not have been himself betrayed and turned over to Cao Cao for execution.
  • Dawn of War: Araghast the Pillager, Eliphas the Inheritor, Gorgutz 'Ead Hunter.
  • Mass Effect 2: The Illusive Man.
  • That Man, from Guilty Gear, the enigmatic creator of the Gear biological weapons.
  • We don't mention Him.
  • From Prince of Persia (2008): the four bosses are The Corrupted, legendary figures who sold their souls to Ahriman for great powers and were twisted over the ages into monsters. They are known only by their titles: The Hunter, The Concubine, The Warrior, The Alchemist, and The King.
  • The Duelist in Red Dead Revolver.
  • Satan "The Accuser" from Shin Megami Tensei. The series features 2 versions of him, as he appears in Judaism (The Accuser) and Christianity (the fallen angel, Lucifer). The two are not fond of each other. His title is often used to avoid any confusion.
  • The Arcana Shadows from Persona 3 are all named after the first 12 trumps in the Italian tarot, and some of them would fall under this category; namely, The Magician, The Priestess, The Empress, The Emperor and The Hanged Man.
    • Not to mention Death (the 13th trump), who sometimes lurks in the floors of Tartarus. Unless you beat the game once and have a super powerful team, run as soon as you hear the chains.
  • Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater has The End, The Fear, The Pain, The Fury and The Sorrow, commanded by The Boss. Oh shit.
  • In BlazBlue, The Black Beast is not to be messed with. The last time he showed up he killed almost everyone on the planet, it took the most powerful beings on the planet years to stop his rampage.
  • The Ghost of Sparta. Running won't do you any good, though.
  • In Fallout: New Vegas, with the right perks, you can turn even your introduction into a Badass Boast.
    "They call me The Courier."
  • The Patriarch from Killing Floor. Just in case the hybrid machine-gun/rocket launcher he has for an arm didn't tip you off.
  • The Ruler of Evil in Dragon Quest IV. Which is actually a role any sufficiently powerful demon can claim for himself via the Secret of Evolution. Hence, the player has to kill two Rulers of Evil over the course of the game. Or, in the remake, three.
  • Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories: The God of All Overlords. Who's actually the girl you summoned at the start of the game.
  • .hack: Cubia is sometimes called by the title "The Anti-Existence". Small wonder this guy's essentially an unkillable force of pure destruction, eh?
  • Deadly Rooms of Death: The Pit Thing has a name like this. Subverted in that it's actually not malicious whatsoever, and even allies itself in Beethro's favor; it's just incredibly cryptic to the point of frustrating poor Beethro.
  • One of the bad guys you face among the Silver Hand, a group of very nasty werewolf hunters, during the Companions questline in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is a piece of work known as "The Skinner". As Aela tells you, "I don't think I need to tell you why."

    Web Comics 

    Web Originals 

    Western Animation 


"Smilodon fatalis narrowly edged out Tyrannosaurus rex to win this year's Most Badass Latin Names competition, after edging out Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch spinifer (meaning 'horned dragon from the river of death') in the semifinals."

A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast.

If someone has a name that's Latin, or Sumerian, or Babylonian, this probably means they were around back then. A rule of thumb is usually the older something magical is, the more powerful. Expect Ominous Latin Chanting.

See also Names To Run Away From: Foreign Language Names, Names To Run Away From: Religious Names, and Names To Run Away From: Conquerors.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    General 
  • Anyone/thing with "Bal-" (Baal, "Lord") in their name. "El" (Hebrew for "god") is the non-threatening version (Jor-El, Kal-El etc.) Except when they're not (Azrael and any angel from Shin Megami Tensei for example)
  • Variants on "Cain" are a twofer, being both a really old name, and a notorious murderer; in fact, the person who invented murder.
  • Any villain/weapon/organisation etc. called Cerberus; that has the added kick of an animal name (the three-headed dog which is said to guard the gateway to Hell to prevent anyone escaping). Strangely enough, nothing villainous ever seems to be named for the Greek original of this name, "Kerberos" note .

    Comicbooks 
  • Apocalypse from the X-Men is also referred to as "En Sabah Nur". That's 30th century BC Egyptian for "Kick Your Ass." Or "Good morning" or "The First One", depending on who is translating. Or "Uncle Nur from Sabah", in 21st century CE Malaysian.

    Film 

    Literature 
  • Carcer is Latin for prison (the root of our incarcerate) and is also the name of the villainous murderer-cum-policeman in Terry Pratchett's Night Watch.
  • The Big Bad of Kitty Norville, being a vampire from the time of ancient Rome, has a Latin name by which he is known: Dux Bellorum, 'leader/general of wars'. 'Nuff said.
  • The name of Bellatrix Lestrange from Harry Potter means something akin to "Female Warrior Outsider".
    • Dolores Umbridge. Dolores=sorrows; umbrage=offence or annoyance.
    • Lucius, Narcissa, and Draco Malfoy. 'Lucius' is from the same root as 'Lucifer'; 'Narcissa' is the feminine of 'Narcissus', a beautiful, but poisonous flower, itself named for a vain mythological character, the root of 'narcissism'; 'Draco' means 'Dragon'; 'Malfoy' means 'Treachery', literally 'bad faith'. Considering that JK Rowling got her degree in Classical & Romance Languages, it is not surprising that many of her character's names follow this trope.
  • From The Dresden Files, we have Nicodemus Archleone. Two Biblical references with one name — and he's old enough to have met Jesus. He has the experience to show for it, too.
  • From the same author, there's the Codex Alera series, which has every name derived from Latin. The absolute crowner, however, has to be Gaius Tavarus Magnus, which translates into Lord Wolverine The Great. He's not a bad guy, but he certainly earns it.
    • Also Invidia (Envy) Aquitane.
  • Janos is an alternate spelling of Janus, the Roman god best known for being two-faced. It is also the name of the commander of the King's Landing city watch who betrays Ned Stark in Game of Thrones.
  • Borborygmus Gog in Galaxy of Fear. Borbogrygmus is the official term for stomach sounds; it comes from an ancient Greek word.
  • In Dragon Bones Stygian, after the river Styx in in the underworld of Classical Mythology. The horse of that name killed its first owner. The second owner renamed it "Pansy", and treated it much better, thus acquiring a Cool Horse.
  • Neferet in House Of Night. Averted with Zenobia, who is a genuinely good person. Since vampires get to chose their own names, this trope is invoked by a trio who name themselves for the Graeae of Greek Myth: Deino, Enyo and Porphredo.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Any vampire series; it's the ones with these names you really better watch out for. "Angelus" from Buffy the Vampire Slayer for example.
  • Shows up in Stargate SG-1 a whole lot. When your Big Bad Always Chaotic Evil race's shtick is stealing the names of the gods from primitive Earth religions what else would you expect? e.g. Ba'al, Chronus, Sokar, Anubis, ect.
  • In one episode of Doctor Who, The Master uses the alias Magister (Latin for "Master"). In another, Thascalos. (Greek for "Master").

    Video Games 

    Western Animation 
  • Semi-exception: Optimus Prime and Ultra Magnus are ancient by human standards, but a few million years is pretty standard for a giant alien robot, and they're nice folks. But extremely badass nonetheless.
  • The My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic episode "Do Princesses Dream of Magic Sheep" features the Tantabus, named after the Latin word for "nightmare", an amorphous Eldritch Abomination created by Princess Luna to punish herself for her deeds as Nightmare Moon, which increases in size and strength as it feeds on her guilt and spreads to other ponies' dreams, turning them into nightmares in the process.

    Real Life 
  • Phytophthora, the genus of the pathogen responsible for the Irish Potato Famine, is Greek for "plant destroyer", which is pretty much what the organism does.
  • The genus name for belladonna AKA deadly nightshade, Atropa, means "inevitable", which is also the basis for Atropos, the last of The Fates.
  • "Cancer" and "carcinoma" are derived from the Latin and Greek words for crab, respectively, due to tumors sometimes resembling crabs under the skin.
  • Tyrannosaurus rex literally means "Tyrant Lizard King", which is a pretty apt description of a 9 ton, 40 foot long reptilian super predator with jaws that could warp steel.

A form of Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Languages besides English can be quite open when coming up with names you normally wouldn't give your child.

See also Ancient Dead Languages.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

Jaeger

The German word of Hunter. Often used for a badass character.

    Anime And Manga 

    Film 

    Literature 
  • The sickeningly racist novel Hunter features a Neo-Nazi Serial Killer named Yeager who targets interracial couples. He's a "hero" by the book's warped standards, but anyone with a brain would consider him a flat-out villain.

    Webcomics 

    Real Life 
  • Chuck Yeager, World War II Ace Pilot and Cold War test pilot. Appropriately enough, he established his ace credentials by scoring 11.5 kills against the Luftwaffe, including making "Ace in a Day" by downing five planes in a single day, including two planes without firing a shot - one German pilot he was pursuing accidentally collided with his own wingman. Possibly more famous for his calm steady voice than for riding the cutting edge of aerospace technology or for his combat prowess.

Yue

A word meaning a 'tragic accident' or 'lethal occurence'. Though, this name is given to children who died either before birth or shortly thereafter. Still some parents don't quite get it. It's more widely known to be the Chinese name for "moon."

    Anime and Manga 
  • Angel Sanctuary's Katou's seldom mentioned first name is Yue, given by his father, because he was not his child, but the result of his mother's betrayal. It didn't finish him off after birth, but in the course of the series he gets killed - or most often kills himself - four times total.
  • Yue from Cardcaptor Sakura counts as well, since as the Judge he had the power to strip away the memories and emotions of everyone Sakura knew and loved. Sakura certainly seemed intimidated by him, though that may also have been due to his appearance and emotionless facade.
    • Yue's name in CCS is actually meant to be Chinese and carries the meaning of 'moon', not the above mentioned meanings (it's a symbolism going back to his creator—Clow Reed's symbol was the Moon). Could still be sort of playing with this meaning, though.
  • Yue Ayase from Mahou Sensei Negima! averts the majority of this trope, despite all signs that she might.

    Literature 

    Western Animation 
  • Princess Yue from Avatar: The Last Airbender. Both meanings ("tragic accident" and "moon") apply: she nearly died at birth and was only saved by the power of the moon. During her Heroic Sacrifice, she gave up that bit of energy to save the moon's life, died, and was reincarnated as the Moon Spirit.

Jafar

From the Arabic Ja`far, meaning, of all things, "brook." Probably gained its notoriety from Ja'far ibn Yahya al-Barmaki, about whom read below.

    Film 

    Videogames 

    Western Animation 
  • Jafar, the evil vizier in Aladdin.

    Real Life 
  • The original Jafar, the one they were all named after, was Ja'far ibn Abi Talib, who was of all things a pious warrior and a cousin/companion of the Prophet Muhammad. Yep.
  • Ja'far ibn Abi Talib's great-umpty-great nephew, Ja'far ibn Muhammad al-Sadiq, was the Sixth Imam of Shi'a Islamnote  (being a descendant of Ali ibn Abi Talib and the Prophet's daughter Fatima) and one of the founders of Islamic jurisprudence. As indicated by his laqab (nickname), he was noted for being upright, honest, trustworthy, and not in the least bit interested in actually ruling (despite claiming to be the legitimate leader of the Muslims).
  • Ja'far ibn Yahya al-Barmaki, aka the Grand Vizier Jafar, was a Persian nobleman and the Grand Vizier (i.e. Prime Minister) of the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid. He was executed under suspicion of having an affair with the Caliph's sister Abbasa. He appears in the Arabian Nights as a sort of detective (in a tale often cited as the Ur-Example of the Detective Story), but his patronage of learning—specifically the revival of Greek and Persian science and the encouragement of the paper industry, recently arrived from China—may have led to a reputation as a sorcerer: hence the villainous connotations.
    • It wasn't exactly "having an affair with Abbasa." Harun al-Rashid basically told Ja'far and Abbasa to get married but not to sleep together. He then flipped out when they disobeyed him. (And whether this story is true is quite debatable; his family were likely just executed for having too much power and therefore being a threat to the caliph's power.)
    • The fact that the Barmakids had only recently converted to Islam from Buddhism and were hugely tolerant of different religions (Ja'far's father regularly held gatherings of wise men from all religions at the court debating philosophy) also made various jealous people cast rumours of irreligion against them. They were usually accused of heresy rather than sorcery.
  • Muslim Spain actually did have a vizier named Ja'far who usurped the throne in the Middle Ages.

Geist

A common badass name. It translates as "ghost" or "spirit" (it can also mean "mind" but that's less common) but people/things named Ghost tend to be far less threatening... unless of course you've built up your tech tree.

    Anime and Manga 
  • MD Geist
  • Signum from Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha A's can summon the Panzergeist (Armored Ghost).
    • This is more commonly translated as "Tank Spirit", which is more accurate given the effect that it has.
  • In the new .hack manga and video game series, ''.hack//Link'', one of the Big Bad's minions is thus named. It's interesting to note that within Schicksal all members other members are named after musical instruments in German, making Geist the Odd Name Out. This later proves to be a quite Meaningful Name when it's revealed that Geist is actually Saika's brother in the real world, as well as the person who sent a virus replica of Aura named Death Queen Aura into The World R:X.

    Film 

    Literature 

    Tabletop Games 

    Videogames 

    Webcomics 

    Real Life 
  • The Geisterbahnhöfe in the days of the Berlin Wall were quite creepy.
    • Duh. German uses Geist- in the same way as English. Geisterstadt is 'ghost town'.

Mal-

The syllable mal- means "bad", "evil" in many Romance languages, being derived from Latin malus (with the same meaning). It also appears in many English words, as in malicious, malign, malevolent, malignant and (yes, these words exist) maleficent and malfeasant. Malefica particularly is Latin for "witch".

    Anime and Manga 

    Comicbooks 
  • Minor Marvel Comics Mad Scientist Doctor Malus, who grants super-powers to deserving C-list mooks.
  • Malice is the name of two supervillainesses, one in effect the Dark Invisible Girl.
  • Rogue of the X-Men is called Malicia in French, an obvious reflection of her status as a former supervillain.

    Film 

    Literature 
  • The Malfoy family from Harry Potter. This one is actually only indirectly derived from Latin; thanks to Rowling's obsession with French/Old French wordplay (cf. the names Voldemort and Lestrange), the name is rough Old French for "bad faith" (modern French would have something else).
    • With first names like 'Draco', 'Lucius', 'Narcissa', you know that these are not nice people.
  • Ivanhoe has a lot of these. The Templar Preceptor Albert de Malvoisin ("bad neighbor"), for one.
  • Maladicta, coffee-addicted vampire and Sweet Polly Oliver from Monstrous Regiment.
  • Matron Malice from the Dark Elf Trilogy.
  • The Demonata - Malice.
  • Maleagant, a villain from Arthurian legend, introduced by Chrétien de Troyes.
  • Gualterio Malatesta, an assassin and villain from the Captain Alatriste series.
  • The eponymous character in Les Chants de Maldoror.
  • Wizard-Emperor Maldor from Beyonders.
  • They don't get much more malevolent than General Augustus Malevolyn from the Diablo novel Legacy of Blood, who commits a lot of demonic atrocities throughout the novel.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Firefly: Malcolm "Mal" Reynolds, who if not an Anti-Hero is certainly flawed. River even Lampshades that interpretation of his name. Of course, the actual etymology of the name "Malcolm" is, ironically, strongly Christian.note 
  • The Malus from the Doctor Who story "The Awakening", which is an alien sentient WMD that causes and derives power from Hate Plagues.

    MMORPGs 
  • The villain of the MMO Wizard 101 is named Malistaire.

    Tabletop Games 

    Theatre 

    Toys 
  • Malum, desert-wandering antihero from BIONICLE.

    Videogames 

    Webcomics 

    Western Animation 
  • El Tigre: The Adventures of Manny Rivera features a gigantic monster named El Mal Verde (The Green Evil).
  • The DCAU Superman series had Superman free a trapped Phantom Zone Kryptonian named Mala. Any Spanish speaking viewer knew immediately where the episode was going.
  • In Total Drama, Mike's evil split personality is named Mal.
  • The witch Maleficent, the villain of Sleeping Beauty from 1959. As one of the most (maybe the most) distinguished Disney villains, she also appeared in the Kingdom Hearts video game series.
  • The Season 1 finale of Steven Universe gives us Malachite, a fusion of Lapis Lazuli and Jasper, bound together by The Power of Hate.

    Real Life 
  • Malaclypse the Younger note , one of the writer of Pr