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This is a page to show what singular Mario Party pages could look like, since some people are interested in a split. Under construction, will be deleted when pages are created.


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    Video Game/Mario Party 1 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty1cover.png

Mario Party is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 in 1999. It's the first installment in the Mario Party series.

This is the first game in the series, so it doesn't have a theme. Toad serves as the host.


This game provides examples of:


Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 1990s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 64
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    Video Game/Mario Party 2 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty2cover.png

Mario Party 2 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 in 2000. It's the second installment in the Mario Party series.

The theme is "costumes", as every level sees you dress up in a new outfit and take part in a sort of play. Toad once again serves as the host.


This game provides examples of:

  • Abandon Ship: This is played straight in a mini-game of the same name.
  • The All-Seeing A.I.: Torpedo Targets has you looking for targets and shooting them. The computer always knows where they are, even though there is no map or radar.
  • Amusement Park: Bowser Land.
  • Big Boo's Haunt: Horror Land.
  • Cutting Off the Branches: Zig-Zagged. In the intro, Wario claims the theme park should be named after him because he was the Superstar in the last game, but the argument over the superstar continues, making it ambiguous whether he was telling the truth or was being a Sore Loser revisionist.
  • Easy-Mode Mockery: Playing Mini-Game Coaster on Easy or Normal results in the player only being able to progress up to a certain point: World 3 on Easy, and World 6 on Normal. In order to face the Baby Bowsers at the end of World 8, you have to play on Hard.
  • Egopolis: The Mario characters create a new world that is initially named Mario Land, but each one wants to name the world after themselves, so they have a contest to determine who gets to name it.
  • Land of Tulips and Windmills: Windmillville. You have the flowers, the cheery bucolic atmosphere, the windmills, and even the Koopa shepherdess is wearing traditional Dutch clothing.
  • Mythology Gag: Bowser runs around causing trouble under various alter egos like Cap'n Bowser or the Bowser Sphinx, just like in The Super Mario Bros. Super Show.
  • Nintendo Hard: Minigame Coaster on Hard. It forces you to perform and win every minigame in a predetermined order on Hard mode. You have a very limited amount of lives, much like the earlier platformer games, lose one every time you failed a minigame, and you only earn 1UPs from invoking Law of 100 with the coins you win from cleared minigames. If you lose all your lives in any world, you must start all over from your last savepoint (which is at the start of each world), and the last couple of worlds both have 6 stages in them. The final few stages have mostly button-mashing minigames, and the computer is usually very good at these types of games. The absolute final stage only has one repeat of a Mini-game played higher up in the coaster, but the "Toad" in front of it asks you a trick question about whether or not you want to start the entire coaster over. The actual Mini-game is a second round of "Shell-Shocked", but it counts as a one-vs-three match because you're up against three Koopa Kid tanks who will try to gang up on you.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: The Minigame Coaster is much more difficult than its predecessor, Minigame Island in 1. Firstly, you no longer win extra lives by simply winning a minigame; instead, the amount of coins you earn is multiplied by your consecutive wins. You can't go backwards or replay beaten minigames anymore, meaning you can no longer grind up coins from a game you're good at, or even save your progress until you get to the next save space. There are also no branching paths, meaning you have to win every minigame in order whether you want to or not. Also, if you want to get the rewards from it, you have to beat it on Normal first (which stops after the sixth world) and then beat it on Hard. Also, the final minigame is brutal compared to the first game — in the original, you raced Toad in Slot Car Derby, who was simply a really good NPC. On Minigame Coaster, you have to face three Koopa Kids on Shell Shocked (normally a free-for-all) where they actively team up against you. Considering the second game axed control stick spinning, it's pretty telling that Minigame Island hardly compares.
  • Shifting Sand Land: Western Land.
  • Shout-Out: When you pass by the milk bar in Western Land, you have the option of inviting the other players to a hootenanny (with the potential of setting them back from getting a star before you can). If you refuse, the Wiggler running the bar will say "Y'all come back now, y'hear?"
  • Space Zone: Space Land.
  • Walk Into Camera Obstruction: The Pirate Land stage ending movie does this with Bowser and the winning character.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 64

    Video Game/Mario Party 3 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty3cover.png

Mario Party 3 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 in 2001. It's the third installment in the Mario Party series.

This game's theme is "storybooks", and the game has a kind of pop-up book aesthetic to it. Hosting duties are shared between two Original Generation characters: The Millennium Star, a star that only shines once a millennium, and Tumble, a magical die that was brought to life by the Millennium Star.


This game provides examples of:

  • Floating Limbs: Tumble appears to have these.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Waluigi's Island combines Palmtree Panic with Down in the Dumps.
  • Instant Home Delivery: There's an item called Cellular Shopper, which calls a store and lets you buy one item. There's no turn wait, you get it immediately.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Snifit in the duel maps has 2 in Attack and Defense.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: With decent players, an average game of "The Beat Goes On" consists of over three minutes of pressing the same buttons as the previous players and no one receiving anything for it.
  • Shifting Sand Land: Spiny Desert.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: Chilly Waters.
  • Snowy Sleigh Bells: The theme that plays on the Chilly Waters board has sleigh bells ringing throughout the entire song.
  • Static Role, Exchangeable Character: Each character has a predetermined stamp aligned with them, except for Luigi, who will fill in the hole in the cast if you choose one of the other characters. Mario's proper stamp is Courage, of course, but if you're playing as Mario, Luigi fills in his spot in the lineup instead. If you'd like, you can interpret this as Luigi qualifying for each stamp (Wit, Strength, Courage, Kindness, and Love) while the rest of the cast only qualifies for one each.
  • Stone Wall: Whomp from the Mario Party 3 duel maps. He has the highest amount of health but cannot attack. Koopa and Mr. Blizzard also count as this to a lesser extent.
  • Toy Time: This game takes place within a magical toy box, and the scenery looks like what you might find in a pop-up book.
  • Under the Sea: Deep Bloober Sea.
  • Underground Level: Creepy Cavern.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 64

    Video Game/Mario Party 4 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty4cover.jpg

Mario Party 4 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube in 2002. It's the fourth installment in the Mario Party series.

This game's theme is "parties and celebrations", and has unique "hosts" for each board, like a Toad or a Goomba. It also introduces the option to play party boards in a 2vs2 fashion.


This game provides examples of:

  • Amusement Park: Toad's Midway Madness.
  • Ash Face: Whenever the loser of a Bowser minigame is decided, they get a roasting from Bowser, which chars their entire body except for their eyes black. The unfortunate victim then turns toward the camera and blinks.
  • Big Boo's Haunt: Boo's Haunted Bash.
  • Casino Park: Goomba's Greedy Gala.
  • Doomy Dooms of Doom: Bowser's minigames are called Darts of Doom note , Fruits of Doom note , and Balloon of Doom note . There's also Panels of Doom (a special minigame available on Bowser's Gnarly Party) and Doors of Doom (a single-player game note ).
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: There's a swimming minigame where you're able to see the petticoats under Peach and Daisy's royal dresses.
  • Hypocritical Humor: Boo Spaces in early games let you pay coins to take other people's coins or Stars. In the Goomba's Greedy Gala board in 4, after a successful attack Goomba says "See you later! And remember, kids, stealing is wrong!"
  • Jungle Japes: Shy Guy's Jungle Jam.
  • Lethal Lava Land: Bowser's Gnarly Party.
  • Luck-Based Mission: Goomba's Greedy Gala has a roulette in the centre that determines which quadrant of the board you go to (although the scales can be tipped), and to progress around each quadrant, you have to win a dice-rolling game against Goomba or be sent back to Start.
  • Palmtree Panic: Koopa's Seaside Soiree.
  • Portable Hole: Losing the dice-rolling minigame against Goomba in the Goomba's Greedy Gala board in 4 causes a hole to appear out of nowhere below your character and spit you back to the Start.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo GameCube

    Video Game/Mario Party 5 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty5cover.png

Mario Party 5 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube in 2003. It's the fifth installment in the Mario Party series.

The theme this time is "dreams", and each level takes place in a themed dream, like a pirate cove or a toy-themed area. The game is hosted by the Star Spirits from Paper Mario, marking one of the few times a character from that series has appeared in a non-Paper Mario game.


This game provides examples of:

  • Dream Land: The Dream Depot, the main setting. All the boards are formed from peoples' dreams.
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows: Rainbow Dream.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: All boards end with "Dream" except for Bowser Nightmare.
  • Lethal Lava Land: Bowser Nightmare.
  • Level Ate: Sweet Dream.
  • Million-to-One Chance: This game introduces the Miracle Capsule, which gives all the Stars of the player in first place to the player in last place. However, the huge catch is that this action (which is the the most powerful single action in the series' history) requires one player to have THREE Miracle Capsules in their inventory to activate and the odds of getting even just one Miracle Capsule are very low. To give you an idea of how bad the odds are, most 50-Turn games will only see two Miracle Capsules appear at most.
  • Tactical Suicide Boss: Bowser in his giant form. He can breath fire out, and throw orbs that release shockwaves, yet keeps using orbs that leave behind rocks that can be thrown back at him after he uses his fire breath.
  • Toy Time: Toy Dream.
  • Trailers Always Lie: The promotional items made it seem that Mario and Bowser were running for Mushroom President. The game is actually about Bowser invading the Dream Depot.
  • Under the Sea: Undersea Dream.
  • Useless Useful Spell: The miracle capsules. If the requirements are fulfilled, it takes away all of the stars of whoever's in first place and gives them to whoever's in last place. Unfortunately, meeting these requirements are almost impossible. The miracle capsule itself is a very rare capsule to get, and to activate its effect, a player will need three of them, taking up their entire capsule space, so odds are, the game will be done before you collect enough of them. To make matters worse, since it gives the stars to the last place player regardless of who collects the capsules, there's no guarantee that collecting them will help you. More often than not, it's just wasting space.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo GameCube

    Video Game/Mario Party 6 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty6cover.jpg

Mario Party 6 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube in 2004. It's the sixth installment in the Mario Party series.

This game's theme is "day and night" and features boards that alternate between day and night, dynamically changing the way you move about them. The game is hosted by Brighton and Twila, the embodiment of the sun and moon, respectively.


This game provides examples of:

  • Disney Villain Death: This is the fate of the player character in the Thirsty Gulch single-player board if one manages to roll enough to walk past the Goal/Rare Mini-Game space that is the last space on the board. They'll step onto a rock platform that crumbles under their feet and drops them into a canyon river; the camera cuts off here.
  • Eternal Engine: E. Gadd's Garage.
  • Quip to Black: "Seer Terror", an unlockable minigame, consists almost entirely of Bowser making bad things happen to you and making witty remarks in the guise of fortunes. "You'll feel crushed by stress!" he'll say after you're crushed by a Thwomp.
  • Shifting Sand Land: The solo board Thirsty Gulch.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: Snowflake Lake.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Unrealistic Black Hole: Before Super Mario Galaxy existed, a black hole appeared in the minigame Black Hole Boogie. The objective of said minigame is to mash A in order to swim away from a black hole. The loser gets sucked in, but then the black hole disappears, and they can be seen floating across the screen in the background after the minigame has ended.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo GameCube
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    Video Game/Mario Party Advance 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mariopartyadvancecover.jpg

Mario Party Advance is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Game Boy Advance in 2005. It's the first handheld installment in the Mario Party series.

This game focuses more on single-player, though there are multiplayer modes as well. Its story mode features one big main board that the player can explore to complete quests. The game also features small interactive toys called "Gaddgets", similar to the souvenirs from the WarioWare series. Tumble returns as the host for this game.


This game provides examples of:

  • Real Men Wear Pink: Bowser Pad. Hoo boy. It's decorated in pink and purple, and Bowser asks you to get him a ring, a necklace, or a bracelet.
  • Super Title 64 Advance: This game came out on the Game Boy Advance and contains "Advance" in the title.
  • Who Wants to Be "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?": Mini-Game Attack. 15 mini-games in order to win coins, 3 special items (Switch, Replay, and Practice). If the player wins five games, he can win 1,000 coins, ten games results in 10,000 coins, and 100,000 coins for all fifteen games. The player can stop and quit at any time, because if he fails, he loses everything.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Game Boy Advance

    Video Game/Mario Party 7 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty7cover.png

Mario Party 7 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube in 2005. It's the seventh installment in the Mario Party series.

This game has an "around-the-world" theme, and the boards are based on slightly stereotyped versions of real countries like USA, Egypt, and China. Toadsworth serves as the host. This game is also exclusively compatible with 8 players, both in Party mode and Minigame mode.


This game provides examples of:


Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo GameCube

    Video Game/Mario Party 8 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty8cover.png

Mario Party 8 is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Wii in 2007. It's the eighth installment in the Mario Party series.

This game has a "carnival" theme, and is the first to incorporate motion controls into its gameplay. The game is hosted by MC Ballyhoo, a big-mouthed circus ringleader with a talking hat.


This game provides examples of:


Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Wii

    Video Game/Mario Party DS 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mariopartydscover.jpg

Mario Party DS is a video game developed by Hudson Soft and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo DS in 2007. It's the second handheld installment in the Mario Party series.

This game focuses around "shrinking" as a theme, and incorporates boards and minigames being made out of normal objects. Like Mario Party 4, each board has its own host.


This game provides examples of:

  • Band Land: Toadette's Music Room.
  • Casino Park: Bowser's Pinball Machine. Also doubles as Pinball Zone, obviously.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: This is the first game in the series to have boss battles. Unlike the future games in the series, however, the bosses have a certain amount of hit points instead of a health gauge and don't turn red when their health drops to half or below, instead becoming harder with every hit. The boss minigames are also single-player games instead of four-player games.
  • Incredible Shrinking Man: The plot, where Bowser has made all the cast tiny. Minigames and boards play on this theme, with one board being set inside a (normal-sized) pinball machine.
  • No Ontological Inertia: DK destroying the Minimizer reverts the playable characters back to normal size.
  • Super Title 64 Advance: This game came out on the Nintendo DS and contains "DS" in the title.
  • Tactical Suicide Boss: Piranha Plant, where you catch the projectiles he spits at you and throw them back at him. Why is this tactical suicide? On the board itself, he simply breathes fire at you, which cannot be turned against him.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2000s, Hudson Soft, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo DS

    Video Game/Mario Party 9 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty9cover.jpg

Mario Party 9 is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Wii in 2012. It's the ninth installment in the Mario Party series.

This game introduces the "car" mechanic, having all players move together on the board rather than separately. The game is hosted by a Blue Toad and a Yellow Toad.


This game provides examples of:


Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Wii
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    Video Game/Mario Party Island Tour 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mariopartyislandtourcover.jpg

Mario Party: Island Tour is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS in 2013. It's the third handheld installment in the Mario Party series.

Exactly What It Says on the Tin, this game takes place on the floating islands known as the Party Islands, with various play modes. Blue Toad and Yellow Toad once again host.


This game provides examples of:

  • Big Boo's Haunt: Kamek's Carpet Ride.
  • Casino Park: Shy Guy's Shuffle City.
  • Corridor Cubbyhole Run: Banzai Bill's Mad Mountain.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: In Bowser's Tower Bowser will occasionally give out random "punishments" through a roulette wheel once you reach certain floors. One of these punishments is to send you back down to the first floor, which, if chosen, Bowser will outright say "That's just cruel, even by my standards!" and won't follow through with it. He also won't take any of your Mario Party Points if "Lose all your Mario Party Points" is chosen.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: When the character reaches the top of Bowser's Tower, Bowser will reveal that the destroyed Bowser was a decoy and then proceed to knock the character off the tower, saying that they can come back any time. Yes, this even includes Bowser Jr..
  • Space Zone: Rocket Road.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle!: When the character reaches the top of Bowser's Tower, Bowser will reveal that the destroyed Bowser was a decoy and then proceed to knock the character off the tower, saying that they can come back any time.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 3DS

    Video Game/Mario Party 10 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marioparty10cover.jpg

Mario Party 10 is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Wii U in 2015. It's the tenth installment in the Mario Party series.

The first game with Bowser as a playable character in his own mode, and the second to have more than 4 players playing at once. Once again, various Toads serve as the hosts (except for Bowser Party, where they share the role of host with Bowser Jr.)


This game provides examples of:

  • Asymmetric Multiplayer: "Bowser Party" mode is a 1 vs. 4 mode where one player controls Bowser as he chases down the other 4. Bowser gets to role 3-5 dice each turn and forces the normal players into a potentially lethal mini-game whenever he catches up.
  • Call-Back: amiibo Party operates in the same fashion as the earlier Mario Parties, with coins and Stars rather than Mini-stars.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: Playing as Bowser in Bowser Party is all about this: Bullying Team Mario and clobbering them in all sorts of ways.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Wii U

    Video Game/Mario Party Star Rush 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mariopartystarrushcover.jpg

Mario Party: Star Rush is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS in 2016. It's the fourth handheld installment in the Mario Party series.

This game places the spotlight on the Toads, with each player moving simultaneously and less emphasis on minigames and the other characters. Yet again, the hosts are Toads.


This game provides examples of:

  • The Place: The minigame Haunted Hallways takes place in the haunted hallways.
  • Promoted to Playable: Diddy Kong is playable after being a board host in DS and a "miniboss" in 9.
  • Pun-Based Title: One minigame is titled Tiles and Tribulations, which is a reference to the phrase "trials and tribulations".
  • Title Drop: Depending on how many coins they get, the players can earn a Star Rush or a Super Star Rush.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 3DS

    Video Game/Mario Party The Top 100 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mariopartytop100cover.png

Mario Party: The Top 100 is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS in 2017. It's the fifth handheld installment in the Mario Party series.

A collection of the 100 best minigames from the 10 home console Mario Party games. Toad and Toadette host, but non-Toad hosts from the previous console games make cameos.


This game provides examples of:

  • Composite Character: Since Koopa Kid has been gone from the series for years, Bowser Jr. takes on his role as an NPC in certain minigames.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: Any mini-game that has changed controls and/or objectives:
    • "Face Lift" uses the touch screen.
    • "Shy Guy Says" uses L and R instead of A and B.
    • In "Cake Factory", you have to press A twice to both grab and place your ingredient.
    • "Dizzy Dancing", "Hexagon Heat" and "Tidal Toss" are affected by the overall change of ground-pounding controls from A>Z to A>A[[note]]or 2>2[[/]]. "Bounce 'n' Trounce" has a similar change. Additionally, in "Dizzy Dancing", when one player catches the note, the game continues, with the player catching the most notes being the winner.
    • "Kareening Koopas" and "Crate and Peril" have you tilt the screen.
    • The controls for "Mario Speedwagons" are reversed - that is, A to accelerate and R to shift gears.
    • In "Three Throw", you press A twice instead of B to throw. This makes it impossible to throw from the ground.
    • "Cage-in Cookin'" and "Dizzy Rotisserie" are affected by the overall change in ranks in mini-games.
    • "Balloon Busters" and "Dart Attack" do away with speech-based commands in favour of blowing into the microphone (or pressing L). Additionally, in the former, one player is eliminated at a time.
    • The change in camera angle in "Track and Yield".
  • Megamix Game: As its name implies, this game features one hundred minigames taken from the ten numbered installments of the series, with redone graphics and sometimes different controls.
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop: Played With in the case of Mario Party 4's "The Final Battle". Upon being transferred to this game, several changes were made: the platforming sections no longer have a time limit, falling into the lava only costs one heart rather than killing the player instantly, and the camera actually follows the player during the final battle against Bowser and is no longer subject to Camera Screw. However, the player now starts off with seven hearts as opposed to the original's ten.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo 3DS

    Video Game/Super Mario Party 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/supermariopartycover.png

Super Mario Party is a video game developed by Nd Cube and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Switch in 2018. It's the eleventh installment in the Mario Party series.

A complete reboot of the series. Returns to the board game mechanic prior to Mario Party 9 mixing with a few elements from later games (such as the "ally" recruiting mechanic from Mario Party: Star Rush). It also features a mode which takes emphasis on "dual screen" gameplay across two Nintendo Switch systems. Toad and Toadette return as hosts, while Kamek also serve as a host when characters land on a bad luck space.


This game provides examples of:

  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Where a player lands after their dice roll, what a space does, and how far they are from the star are immediately apparent at all times. Additionally, players can practice minigames on the minigame screen without having to go to a separate screen, and the minigame won't start until all players are ready.
    • Failing a minigame enough times in Minigame Island will result in a Toady giving you the option to skip it and move on to the next.
  • Developers' Foresight: Almost every NPC has unique dialogue when approached by Bowser or Bowser Jr. Among other things, path-blocking characters are polite and apologetic, "minion" characters in the plaza shower them with compliments instead of trash-talking them, and Kamek will be visibly quaking with fear if either of them land on a Bad Luck Space.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Each character has their own dice block. Boo's die is a Risk and Reward sort of thing. On one hand, you have a 2/3 chance of getting an extremely high roll. On the other hand, you have a 1/3 chance of not only moving nowhere, but losing two coins. Do you feel lucky, punk?
  • Easter Egg: This game has a minigame called Rhythm and Bruise, where the players bop plastic Monty Moles in time to the rhythm. If you play as Monty Mole in Rhythm and Bruise, Monty Mole will spend the entire minigame with a panicked expression and look away when he hits the plastic moles.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: This game has a 1v3 minigame in which the three-player team must crush the remaining lone player with a hammer-wielding crab mech.
  • Hailfire Peaks: Megafruit Paradise combines Palmtree Panic with Level Ate.
  • Invisible Anatomy: Zigzagged with Goomba. Sometimes it hold objects on its head, other times it grabs them using its mouth, but there are times when it can "hold" items as normal as if its has invisible hands.
  • Level Ate: Megafruit Paradise from Super Mario Party has islands shaped like a pineapple and a watermelon.
  • Mighty Glacier: With introduction of Character Dice, some of the dices can go really far but comes with high chance of not moving or losing coins. Minus coin also act as 0 spaces.
    • Bowser's dice had high number side, however the side effect is that the dice comes with 2 minus coins and 1 spaces.
    • Donkey Kong's dice also fall into this. The dice comes with two side of 10. Which helpful to boost him go for stars, but other 3 sides are 0 and another 1 side is +5 coins, at least you can get coins from one of it. Which means you had 2/3 chances for not moving at all.
    • Downplayed with Diddy Kong's dice. His dice comes with only three sides of 7, but only 2 sides are 0 and 1 sides for +2 coins.
  • Palmtree Panic: Megafruit Paradise.

Indexes: Everyone Rating, Minigame Game, Party Game, Video Games of the 2010s, Super Mario Bros., Nintendo Switch

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