Follow TV Tropes

Following

Sandbox / MCU: S.H.I.E.L.D.

Go To

Main Character Index > Heroic Organizations > S.H.I.E.L.D.


Spoilers for all works set prior to the end of Avengers: Endgame are unmarked.

    open/close all folders 

S.H.I.E.L.D.

    In General 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shield_logo.jpg

Appearances: Iron Man | Iron Man 2 | Thor | Captain America: The First Avenger | The Avengers | Marvel One-Shots | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. | Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Ant-Man | Ant-Man and the Wasp | Captain Marvel | Avengers: Endgame | Spider-Man: Far From Home | WandaVision | Loki note  | Black Widow | What If...?

Nick Fury: The principle S.H.I.E.L.D. was founded upon was pure... Protection. One word. Sometimes to protect one man against himself, other times to protect the planet against an alien invasion from another universe... but the belief that drives us all is the same, whether it's one man, or all mankind.
Phil Coulson: That they're worth saving.

The Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division is an organization formed from the S.S.R. after the end of World War II. Inspired by the heroism presented by Captain America, S.H.I.E.L.D. was founded to protect the world from terrorist, alien, and supernatural threats, and to organize the best and brightest of the world to that end.

It would later be learned that S.H.I.E.L.D. had been infiltrated by HYDRA loyalists from the organization's conception, which would lead to the end of the group's position as the predominant defense organization of the world. As such, the organization was publicly disbanded (although operatives still worked toward cleaning up the mess HYDRA left in secret).


[[folder:In General]]
  • Animal Motifs: Eagles, appropriately enough. Their Helicarriers give them mastery over the sky and they're primarily presented as a noble yet arrogant organization that attacks from the shadows with quick cloak-and-dagger tactics.
  • Anti-Hero: As a whole, S.H.I.E.L.D. might be ultimately "on the side of the angels" (so to speak), but it's not that big of a surprise in retrospect that HYDRA was able to infiltrate them. In Endgame, when Tony and Steve travel to the 70s and visit their base in New Jersey which was the place where the Captain America experiment and the Arnim Zola AI was housed, Iron Man calls them "quasi-fascistic" which Captain America doesn't challenge or respond to.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Invoked with the numerical clearance level, where an agent's level is based on accomplishment rather than age or seniority. In the premier of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Maria Hill stated that the Avengers are Level Six clearance, even though only three members—Captain America, Black Widow, and Hawkeye—are proper agents. By the time of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Natasha and Clint are at Level Seven, while Steve is at Level Eight. There was a six month difference between these two points.
  • Back from the Brink: Phil Coulson and his team (along with the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. splinter cell) saved the entire organization from collapsing upon itself after HYDRA made its move.
  • Cool Airship: The Helicarriers are present. These versions look like oversized aircraft carriers, and are in fact fully capable of going on the ocean.
  • Cool Plane: The Quinjets, the Bus, and Zephyr One.
  • Cloak and Dagger: An extra-governmental organization established to deal with unconventional espionage. Justified in that the Marvel Cinematic Universe has enough weird stuff going on in it that S.H.I.E.L.D. would be a necessity.
  • Demoted to Extra: Was originally the linchpin that brought the Avengers and the entire Shared Universe together. However, they fall to pieces in The Winter Soldier thanks to the HYDRA reveal, play a minor role in Age of Ultron, and is mostly forgotten in the Phase 3 films, with the only references being the TV show (which has yet to crossover with the films) and some passing mentions in Ant-Man, Civil War, and Ant-Man and the Wasp, and it's not until Captain Marvel (which is set before their desintegration) that the organization is prominently featured.
  • Expy: For a variety of American government agencies. In Phase One they were meant to evoke the Department of Homeland Security (the War on Terror still being more relevant to contemporary audiences than WWII or the Cold War), even having "Homeland" in their name. In Agent Carter, the S.S.R. agents' attire and mode of operation more resembles the CIA (or OSS, rather) or Hoover's FBI.
  • Fun with Acronyms: Grant Ward jokes that whomever came up with the name of the organization probably wanted the letters to spell S.H.I.E.L.D. and used a combination of words that would make that happen.
  • Good Counterpart: To HYDRA.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: People were understandably terrified to learn that S.H.I.E.L.D. was housing a major terrorist cell, which is why they don't officially exist anymore. In season four of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. then Director Jeffery Mace tried to legitimize the agency and get it back into the world's good graces, which worked... Until an LMD of Daisy Johnson shot General Glenn Talbot in the head which led to the remainder of S.H.I.E.L.D. being hunted down by the American government.
  • The Men in Black: Back in Phase One, their agents would show up in black suits and try to keep a lid on things. However, it was obvious they didn't have a clear handle on exactly what was going on (they thought Tony had escaped the Ten Rings by turning collaborator, and that Thor was a foreign agent), and they stopped bothering with such secrecy when the cat got out of the bag.
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: Although S.H.I.E.L.D. itself survived the HYDRA infiltration, many operatives are dead, and the group is working on much more limited resources than before. They also have to cover their tracks because they're not officially supposed to exist. Ironically, this has forced them to Take A Level In Badass as a result to the point that (in a sense) they're even more formidable now than they were before.
  • Once Done, Never Forgotten: The deep HYDRA infiltration uncovered in Captain America: The Winter Soldier has proven to be nigh impossible to get past, to the point where even though S.H.I.E.L.D. is technically back in the government's good graces, they still don't officially exist anymore. In Season 4 of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., however, S.H.I.E.L.D. relegitimizes as an agency under the United Nations to help enforce the Sokovia Accords, though people frequently bring up the HYDRA infiltration as a reason to continue distrusting it.
  • Spy School: The S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy was split into three separate branches: Communications, Operations, and Science and Technology. Of the three, the Operations Academy was closest to the traditional Spy School trope.
  • Sigil Spam: Pretty much every S.H.I.E.L.D. vehicle in has the organisation's eagle logo on it. The most noticeable is the team's plane, which not only has the logo all over the inside, but has it emblazoned across the upper surface of the plane itself. The inside of every S.H.I.E.L.D. facility we see also has liberal applications of the logo, although there is some variation in the level of detail and the style with which the eagle is depicted. Remember, this is a semi-covert agency, and some of these vehicles really shouldn't be emblazoned so openly.
Advertisement:

    "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. 

"Real" S.H.I.E.L.D.

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shield_gonzales_faction_9.png
Gonzales: You have your orders, Agent Morse. This is not a democracy.
Bobbi: Maybe it should be.

A splinter cell of S.H.I.E.L.D., formed on the day S.H.I.E.L.D. fell. Nick Fury gave Bobbi Morse an order to sink the Iliad, a S.H.I.E.L.D. aircraft carrier, to prevent HYDRA from getting the cargo. She refused to follow through because she would have had to sacrifice the loyal S.H.I.E.L.D. agents still onboard. Against all odds, they took back the ship and then picked up survivors from the S.H.I.E.L.D. academy. Reasoning that Nick Fury's autocratic leadership style and secret-keeping is what led to S.H.I.E.L.D.'s downfall, they decided to rebuild it on the principles of democratic leadership and transparency. Distrusting Coulson for his loyalty to Fury and exposure to alien influence, they kept themselves hidden and sent moles to infiltrate his team, gathering intel to prepare to seize control from him.


  • Accomplice by Inaction: They haven't really done anything against HYDRA, focusing all of their resources on stopping Coulson. The members always deflect when anyone from Coulson's team brings up HYDRA.
  • Broken Pedestal:
    • None of them have any respect for Nick Fury after the HYDRA Coup. In fact their organization began with Bobbi disobeying Fury's orders.
    • Many of them—particularly Gonzales, Weaver, Bobbi, and Mack—were well-respected by members of Team Coulson, particularly FitzSimmons and Hunter, only for their plotting against Coulson to seriously damage their admiration.
  • Conflict Ball: They refuse to talk to Coulson about their misgivings over his leadership style, instead opting to plant moles on his team and then essentially hijack control of the organization when they believe he must be stopped.
  • Cosmopolitan Council: Gonzales and Calderon are Latino-Americans, Anne Weaver is African-British, Mack is African-American, Bobbi and Oliver are Caucasian-Americans, and Hartley might be a queer.
  • Easily Forgiven: They never get any punishment for all the trouble they caused by trying to wrest control away from Coulson, nor do they even admit they did anything wrong. Instead they're assimilated back into the organization - albeit with a lot of tension.
  • Fantastic Racism: They really don't like gifted people — in fact, they fear Coulson is forming an army of them. Bobbi is the only that doesn't have a natural distrust of gifted people, while the rest run the spectrum of calling enhanced people "it" and "something" to trying to kill an enhanced despite Bobbi ordering the use of ICERs to take her alive.
  • Hazy-Feel Turn: Although they stopped following Fury's orders they still have good intentions, but their heavy-handed methods and hypocrisy don't make them very trustworthy. They unite with Team Coulson in "Scars", serving as the successor to the council that had guided Fury.
  • Hero Antagonist: Misguided and hypocritical as they might have been, overall they were not evil. They were convinced Coulson's group was under alien influence to build an army of enhanced humans.
  • Hero of Another Story: Their version of what happened post HYDRA Coup is that while Coulson ran around hunting alien artifacts in order to raise a Gifted army for his alien handlers, they scrambled to save as many of their fellow agents as possible. In truth, Coulson was in the progress of checking bases for survivors before Talbot forced him on the run. With limited resources, he decided to refocus his efforts on stopping Garrett. It wasn't until Fury gave him the assignment to rebuild S.H.I.E.L.D. that he had the means to search for survivors.
  • Hypocrite:
    • They claim to value transparency but they're even more secretive than Coulson is. They also make claims of wanting to resolve the situation amicably but actively avoided any attempts to work things out with him rationally, jumping straight to force on flimsy pretenses.
    • They believe Fury's secret-keeping is why S.H.I.E.L.D. fell, ignoring or unaware that HYDRA's infiltration was a systemic problem from S.H.I.E.L.D.'s very inception at the beginning of the Cold War. Whatever Fury's role in HYDRA's endgame, Fury is at best one link in a very long chain, and they're ignoring HYDRA to focus on him.
  • I Reject Your Reality: When somebody brings up the fact that Coulson was hunting alien artifacts so HYDRA didn't get them first, they always twist the facts around so that the HYDRA factor is inconsequential.
  • Improperly Paranoid: They see Phil's favoritism over Skye (who is like a daughter to him and is a teammate) when she develops her inhuman abilities, his manhunt for criminals in the index (most of which were detained by S.H.I.E.L.D. in the first place to protect the public) and his secrets regarding Theta Protocol (reconstructing the Helicarrier for extreme emergencies, something that becomes vitally important in Avengers: Age of Ultron) as a nefarious plot where he is building an army of powered people for World Domination.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: For all their hypocrisy, Coulson admits they do have legitimate points over concerns about any negative effects of the GH serum might have on him, and that there are flaws in his leadership style.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: After "The Dirty Half Dozen", they quickly fold themselves into Coulson's command structure. Implicitly, knowing that he has both Nick Fury and the Avengers (through Hill) on his side made them reconsider any further hostilities.
  • No True Scotsman: Both in their name and actions. They are convinced that Coulson is illegitimate as Director because he does not answer to a board or council and thus his attempt to reconstruct S.H.I.E.L.D. is a farce hiding something nefarious. Unfortunately, rectifying this seems to take precedence over any more obvious or immediate threats like HYDRA or the super-criminals that have been running amok.
  • The Omniscient Council of Vagueness: They're led by a board of operatives with Gonzales as the chairman.
  • True Companions: Became this after the liberation of the Iliad, facing waves of Hydra mooks while completely outnumbered and on their own.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Apart from Bobbi and Mack, Calderon and Weaver are the only council members to have survived the events of season 2, yet neither has been seen since.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: They think Coulson is an alien sleeper agent building up a stockpile of Gifted soldiers who is bringing S.H.I.E.L.D. to ruin, and that they are the heroes who must come in and stop him before it's too late.

Members

    Founders of S.H.I.E.L.D. 

Advertisement:

Directors of S.H.I.E.L.D.

    Margaret Carter 

    Keller 

Director Keller

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/taloscaptainmarvel.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ben Mendelsohn

Voiced By: Ricardo Mendoza (Latin American Spanish dub), Toshihiko Seki (Japanese dub), Sérgio Rufino (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Captain Marvel

A high-ranking member of S.H.I.E.L.D., and by 1995, he was the agency's Director. Following an incident in Los Angeles, Keller was compromised when his identity was assumed by Skrull commander Talos.


    Nick Fury 
See the Nick Fury page

    Phil Coulson 
See the Phil Coulson page
Advertisement:

    Jeffrey Mace / Patriot 

Director Jeffrey Mace / Patriot

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/director_jeffrey_mace_4.jpg
"I try to live by a simple rule: A team that trusts is a team that triumphs."
Click here to see him as Patriot 

Species: Enhanced human / Inhuman

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jason O'Mara

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 68: "Meet the New Boss") | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Slingshot

The new Director of S.H.I.E.L.D. after Coulson stepped down due to personal reasons.


  • Adaptation Species Change: His original comic counterpart was a normal human but this version is an Inhuman. Subverted: he's only pretending to be an Inhuman; his powers actually come from a serum. He's a genuine Inhuman in the Framework, though, thanks to his wish that he had "real superpowers I could use to kick your (the Superior's) ass."
  • Age Lift: The comics Mace was one of the replacement Captain Americas to replace Steve after he disappeared. This Mace is a present day character.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: He invokes this trope as part of his PR plan; in his view the public should occasionally see the Director of S.H.I.E.L.D. kicking ass alongside his agents.
  • Becoming the Mask: A Fake Ultimate Hero who is trying to become a real one.
  • Berserk Button: If he wants the truth, he wants the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God. And don't even think about pulling any of that Exact Words bullshit on him, lest he lose his patience with you (just ask Coulson). Racism and intolerance are also major do-not-push buttons for him. He gets seriously offended and pissed at Nadeer's casual racism towards Inhumans, despite only pretending to be one himself at that point, and completely derails his own PR stunt just to put her in her place.
  • Brutal Honesty: Although he values Coulson's advice and experience, he point blank tells the man that he has a blind spot when it comes to his teammates and friends.
  • Catchphrase: "A team that trusts is a team that triumphs." He says it so often than Coulson's team gets completely sick and tired of it by the second episode.
  • Character Death: In the Framework, he gives his life to help a kid escape from a collapsing building, which causes his death in the real world.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: In the comics, Jeffrey operated under the codename Patriot, and also spent some time as a Legacy Character for Captain America. He is not called by either of those names in the MCU, although it is mentioned that Coulson wanted the new director to be like Cap, and "Patriot" is the codename of the project that gave him his powers. Subverted once he's found in the Framework, as Coulson geeks out that he's meeting the Patriot as he is widely known, though Mace asks him to call him Jeffrey.
  • Composite Character: While he already had similarities to other characters besides the Mace of the comics, "The Patriot" reveals that he's one of both the Jeffrey Mace and Eli Bradley versions of the Patriot. Like Eli, Mace has superhuman strength and durability, derived from using a superpower-inducing drug he regularly injects. The serum being derived from Mr. Hyde's formula also calls to mind Jack Flag.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: In-Universe and Played for Laughs, but it's really more like Color Coded For Your Inconvenience. As part of his PR campaign to rebrand S.H.I.E.L.D. as a more legit and family friendly organization, he changes the old clearance level system to what he dubbed the "spectrum of security", where instead of rank and number, every agent is assigned a color that details their clearance level. And there are a lot of colors in the world, with his system not taking into account wavelength relationships, or even gradients for that matter. All it does is confuse and annoy every agent over who gets to do what.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Both the dispenser and recipient of one. When he takes on a crazed May, it doesn't even result in a fight - he simply suppresses her with zero effort. Not long after that, he ends up on the receiving end of a completely hopeless fight against the Ghost Rider.
  • Desecrating the Dead: After his death in the Framework causes him to die in the real world, his corpse is pulverized and thrown in the ocean by Ivanov to frame Daisy for his murder. Talbot later mentions being horrified by the sight after his body washes up on a beach.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Throughout the entire season, he tries to gain Team Coulson's approval, doing everything he can to do good (like reinstating Daisy as a legitimate agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.) and despite all that they never really accept him as one of their own. Framework!Mace lampshades this by asking Simmons what she knows about him as a person, with her not being able to give a proper answer. Sadly, it takes him performing a Heroic Sacrifice to finally prove himself as a true hero.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: Goes out like the hero he always wanted to be, holding up a collapsing building in the Framework long enough for Coulson, Simmons, Trip, and Ward to escape with the kids. Not only that, but witnessing it is the direct main cause for Framework May's Heel–Face Turn.
  • Endearingly Dorky: Averted. It's an image he constantly tries to project as part of his PR campaign and efforts to come off as likable and personable, and one of the main reasons Coulson's team doesn't trust him. Once the truth about his powers gets out, it's revealed that not all of it was a lie: He's genuinely a kind, decent man trying to do some good - he's just not the dork he initially appeared to be.
  • Expy: As a boy scout with super-strength and classical all-American goods looks, he's clearly patterned after Captain America, given that his comic book counterpart assumed the title for a while. The process is complete by "The Laws of Inferno Dynamics", when he starts sporting a Captain America-esque battle outfit and leads S.H.I.E.L.D. in the field. That said, his by-the-book nature and obsession with PR make him a bit of a Foil for the fierce individualist Steve Rogers, and his pro-government stance and darker costume imply U.S. Agent was an inspiration as well. It's later revealed that it was actually invoked in-universe; Talbot was literally told to "find the next Captain America" when searching for Coulson's replacement.
  • The Face: Of the new legitimate S.H.I.E.L.D.; in the words of Coulson himself "a powered person that people could trust". He himself thinks of this role as "team mascot".
  • Fake Ultimate Hero: The public believed he saved lives during the Vienna bombings, but it's a lie. He's so determined to keep it from being uncovered that he exempts Simmons from lie detector tests to avoid risking his own credibility. It turns out that an extremely heroic act for which he gained fame — using Inhuman Super Strength to save somebody from being crushed by falling debris — didn't actually happen. Someone just happened to snap a picture just as he tripped and fell into the shot, with his arms positioned in such a way that from the camera's perspective looked like he was holding up the debris, which was actually in no danger of crushing anyone. To his credit, he tried to explain what really happened at first, and only decided to go along with it because he thought that he could use his reputation to actually do some good.
  • Foreshadowing: The heroic act under Fake Ultimate Hero directly above is the way he dies for real in the Framework - using his Super Strength to hold up debris from crushing someone, at the cost of his own life.
  • A Father to His Men: Part of his deal with Senator Nadeer was that Simmons would help her Inhuman brother whose terrigenesis ended up botched for some reason; but when he needs Simmons back and Nadeer is reluctant to comply, he's furious and worried for her safety.
  • Fearless Fool: His over-reliance on his serum results in him doing some spectacularly reckless things, like say, trying to take on the Ghost Rider by himself, or rushing into deeply-fortified and guarded enemy territory to get the serum back. Both were extremely humbling experiences, to say the least.
  • First-Name Basis: No one seems to call him Director Mace but rather by his first name, Jeffrey. The same goes for him speaking to Coulson as Phillip or Phil, rather than Coulson.
  • Heel Realization: In "The Laws of Inferno Dynamics", he gets one after being confronted by Coulson and Daisy over that deal he made with Senator Nadeer regarding Simmons.
    Mace: In case you haven't noticed, Phil, we're not a team that trusts. We're not a team at all...
  • Heroic Sacrifice: In the Framework, he gives his life to help a kid escape from the reeducation center, which causes his death in the real world. This seems to be in vain when the Framework is deleted along with everybody inside, but Coulson, Simmons, and May were in the same building, and his sacrifice did keep them alive, allowing those three to escape the Framework later.
  • Hidden Depths: When he's first introduced, he appears to just be another incompetent Perpetual Smiler leader picked by people who don't know anything about what S.H.I.E.L.D. needs to do. By the end of the episode, he's revealed himself as an Inhuman, and while it's later revealed that he wasn't actually an Inhuman, but was given powers through a serum by a project to pretend to be one, it was out of him actually wanting to help, and subsequent episodes show him to be a very serious and effective leader.
  • It's Personal: Some racist remarks by Senator Nadeer right in the middle of a debate lead him to out himself publicly as Inhuman and appeal to the public to trust people like him. Only it turns out that he's not an Inhuman. However, he initially agreed to go with the lie because he does believe that Inhumans deserve equal rights.
  • Irony: He goes on and on about the importance of trust, but the reforms he's made to S.H.I.E.L.D. mean nobody really trusts anyone in the organization any more. Also, he is lying about being an Inhuman.
    Mace: Trust must be earned with random non-invasive testing.
  • Made of Iron: The serum he takes doesn't just give him abnormal strength, it makes him seriously tough to take down. The Ghost Rider gave him a beating that would've killed a normal human at least several hundred times over, yet Mace didn't even get a scratch. Downplayed though, as despite not taking much damage, the asskicking left him in no shape to continue fighting.
  • Mauve Shirt: The creators, in confirming his death and that he was indeed dead, implied that they added him to the series to sacrifice for a situation someone wouldn't leave alive at a time they're not willing to sacrifice an established member of Team Coulson.
  • The Men First: He doesn't hesitate to push his subordinates aside and risk his life for them when he encounters an enhanced threat, like Ghost Rider.
  • Mid-Season Upgrade: Fitz makes modifications to Mace's battle suit that enable it to serve as the delivery system for the Patriot Serum, so the really conspicuous briefcase is no longer necessary. It also has devices for monitoring his vital signs in case his health goes south while using it.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Spends the entirety of the episode in which he's being interrogated by the Superior shirtless.
  • My Greatest Failure: Being a Fake Ultimate Hero with no genuine superpowers. This is corrected in the Framework, and he gets to go out doing something genuinely heroic.
  • My Greatest Second Chance: As of "No Regrets", the only regret that the Framework has truly corrected belongs to Mace. It creates a similar situation to the incident in Vienna where he gained his fame, only with him actually saving someone, using real Inhuman powers. He reacts without hesitation and faces his death with dignity.
  • Mythology Gag: The project and serum that give him his powers are named after his comics alter ego, the Patriot.
  • Nice Guy: He is quite friendly and reasonable, even though he puts some restrictions on Team Coulson.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: By outing himself as Inhuman and winning over the public, he made himself a very easy target for Senator Nadeer, who beats the Rider to the punch in no selling his reveal and demonstrating that yes, the most powerful chief of security in the world CAN be intimidated.
  • Perpetual Smiler: He is almost never seen without a smile of some kind.
  • Properly Paranoid: The division of departments and lie-detector tests for his inner circle are all about detecting another HYDRA infiltration or some other group. In regards to his shock that Dr. Radcliffe had built an android, Aida, without his permission, he's proven right at the end of "The Laws of Inferno Dynamics" when Aida snaps a guy's neck and then cleans up an unconscious Agent May, of whom she had made an LMD.
  • Puppet King: Once the sham behind his powers and reputation is revealed, Coulson leaves him in place to handle the PR and politics of the S.H.I.E.L.D. front office, but makes clear that Coulson is the one calling the shots from now on. He's okay with this, as he feels guilty about lying in the first place, and makes a real effort to be useful.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Whatever else he might be up to, Jeffrey definitely appears reasonable. He wants Coulson to lead the tour group not as a demeaning punishment, but because Coulson knows more about the S.S.R. and S.H.I.E.L.D. than anyone else, which is needed to impress the visitors. He quickly adjusts when Simmons tells him not to visit the containment cells, comes up with a better idea and then credits someone else for having it. He only uses as much force as needed to knock May out (and then quickly checks her vitals). He doesn't flip out on Coulson for going after Daisy alone, and seems honestly apologetic that they have to treat her as a wanted fugitive.
  • Sheep in Sheep's Clothing: He lied about his superpower origins because he wanted the public to have a better image of Inhumans then what Nadeer was putting out and he joined S.H.I.E.L.D. under false pretenses because he wants to be a genuine hero.
  • Slave to PR: S.H.I.E.L.D. is under the UN's jurisdiction, so he has to be this by necessity. Which is why he's so hell bent on capturing Daisy, a rogue agent that is making the organization look bad. Unfortunately, it comes back to bite him in the ass when Senator Nadeer blackmails him after he messes with her during their live debate. Fortunately, it also comes in handy. When Daisy is cornered by the press in the aftermath of an operation, he not only defuses the situation for S.H.I.E.L.D. but also erases all of Daisy's bad PR.
  • Smug Super: Due to his overly-dominating physicality, he goes into his fight against Ghost Rider thinking it'll be over quickly. And it was - the Rider viciously kicked his ass all over the cargo bay.
  • Super Serum: At first he presented himself as an Inhuman, but as it turns out the real source of his powers is a serum derived from Calvin Zabo's Hyde formula. The serum's effects are temporary, necessitating his assistant carrying vials of it in a suspiciously inconspicuous briefcase, both of which are with him at all times.
  • Super Strength: He easily grabbed May by the neck and knocked her out with one blow.
  • Super Toughness: He was able to withstand Melinda May's attacks without being moved. Even when May resorted to hitting him with a lamp, it caused him no injury. Even an extensive beating from the Ghost Rider caused him no visible injuries.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In the Framework, he's an actual Inhuman with superstrength, and enough fighting skills to defeat May (who also had superstrength at this point) in a matter of minutes. He's also finally got the leadership training to be an effective leader of the resistance.
  • Underestimating Badassery: His super-strength makes him very confident in his ability to suppress situations. Effectively used against a crazed May, but when he tried to take on Ghost Rider, while he did get in a few good hits at first, he got his ass kicked utterly.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: He starts off this way, as Talbot only gave him a very basic course in combat training, forcing him to rely on his strength in most fights. He later starts training for real and shows progress. This changes in the Framework, where he has the actual fighting prowess to defeat high level HYDRA agents.

    Alphonso "Mack" Mackenzie 

Director Alphonso "Mack" Mackenzie

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mackenzie_alphonse.jpg
"Like I told my man here, when you want something in life, you gotta grab it and walk out like you own it."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Henry Simmons

Voiced By: Raúl Solo [Disney dub], Víctor Hugo Aguilar (Season 2) and Raúl Solo (Season 3 onwards) [Sony Dub] (Latin-American Spanish dub), Paulo Bernardo (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 23: "Shadows") | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Slingshot

"We can't afford to lose our best agents in one fell swoop... not here, not tonight!"

A mechanic and equipment specialist Coulson recruits for S.H.I.E.L.D. who would go on to succeed him as Director.


  • 10-Minute Retirement: His decision to quit after Coulson becomes the man in charge of the combined S.H.I.E.L.D.s becomes a temporary one when the Inhumans attack.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: His comics counterpart has gray hair. Here, he's bald.
  • Adaptation Name Change: He goes by "Al" rather than "Mack" in the comics. Ironically, rather than solving any naming issues, the new nickname violates the One-Steve Limit, since there was a minor character named Agent Mack in Season One.
  • Age Lift: His comics counterpart is a veteran S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. Here, he looks younger.
  • Ambiguously Evil: He and Bobbi are double agents for Gonzales's S.H.I.E.L.D., which is separate from Coulson's branch and trying to overthrow him. Mack shares their penchant for Fantastic Racism, though he still clearly care about Fitz and tries to protect him, and wanted to avoid conflict with Hunter.
  • Amicable Exes: He claims that all of his exes are "awesome", though he seems to retract that statement when reminded that he once had to pretend to like quinoa for a year.
    Mack: [utter seriousness] That was a dark time.
  • Badass Baritone: As befitting a big guy like him, Mack has a notably deep voice.
  • Badass Boast: "I'm the guy who kills Gordon."
  • Badass in Charge: He's been a prominent field agent since season 2, and in season 6 becomes the director of the agency.
  • Bald of Authority: Takes the role reluctantly halfway in Season 3. Proves to be a firm but fair leader who manages to take down a major HYDRA asset and bring his team home safely. And then in the Season 5 finale, Daisy officially assigns him this role after determining that she isn't fit to lead the team after Coulson becomes terminally ill.
  • Bayonet Ya: Mack can flip the axe-head on his Shotgun Axe around to turn it into a more traditional bayonet, which he uses to kill Kasius.
  • Berserk Button: Don't tell him he was a bad father or didn't cared about his daughter. Gunner, when Yo-Yo and Mack find out he was expecting a child, repeatedly insults Mack, asserting that it's a good thing he's not a father. Mack, who lost his daughter years ago, flips out and savagely beats him.
  • Big Brother Instinct: He slips into the role starting with Bobbi; it's implied he's been there to help with her relationship with Hunter for a long time. Then he helps Fitz manage his aphasia. Starting in season 3, he's become this for Daisy as well; telling people to back off when they get on her case and helping her with Inhuman team building, and alongside Coulson (her father figure) and Lincoln (her love interest), one of the three most determined to save her from Hive's infection. There's also a lot of Halo playing with both Fitz and Daisy. "Watchdogs" reveals he has a younger brother he's very close to who he's been unable to spend time with thanks to his work with S.H.I.E.L.D., and he's greatly troubled by it.
  • Black and Nerdy: When Hartley's team and Team Coulson come back after a violent encounter with Absorbing Man, Mack's primary concern is whether or not the agents managed to retrieve some technology he could play around with. He's visibly upset when Triplett tells him no. He also plays Gears of War and is itching for a chance to get to work on Lola.
  • Bound and Gagged: He's taped up by Elena Rodriguez in "Bouncing Back".
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Becomes this after touching an alien defensive mechanism that makes him attack Coulson and the rest along with giving him enhanced strength and durability. It wears off an episode later.
  • Brutal Honesty:
    • In a good way, as the imaginary Simmons notes that it's quite refreshing how unlike everyone else, he doesn't walk on eggshells around Fitz. It's enough that Fitz starts to use him as a sounding board rather than the imaginary Simmons.
    • With Simmons herself after she returns. He's the only one who's not afraid to confront her directly about the fact that she apparently abandoned Fitz right after he told her how he felt and nearly died saving her life. As with Fitz, he's still fairly kind in his delivery, even if what he has to say is undeniably brutal.
    • He has no problem telling Coulson to his face that he doesn't trust him after Skye's powers are revealed.
  • Cloudcuckoolander's Minder: He takes it upon himself to keep Fitz grounded.
  • Cool Car: He owns a classic Rolls Royce that he restored himself. Coulson still won't let him touch Lola, though.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: He ends up on the receiving end of a couple of these throughout the series.
    • In late season 3, when Daisy is under Hive’s sway, she uses her powers to deliver one of these to him and is only stopped by May.
    • In the midseason finale of season 5, after Kasius drinks the Odium and kills Future Yo-Yo, Mack squares off with him, and manages to hold his own for some time, but Kasius, being on the Odium, no-sells all of Mack’s attacks and eventually overpowers him, delivering a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown only stopped by the timely intervention of Simmons.
    • In the season 6 finale, Mack takes on Sarge by himself after Sarge had both delivered a fatal wound to May and unlocked his godlike potential, which was completely immune to point-blank quake blasts from Daisy and manages to fend for himself for some time strictly because Sarge makes absolutely no attempt to fight back, and once he does it’s with obvious minimal effort and he simply steamrolls over Mack until Izel’s death distracts Sarge enough that Daisy, May and Mack are able to Combination Attack him and kill him.
    Sarge: You put up a good fight, Director, but we’re no match now.
    Mack: I’ve been through...enough of these to know...we always come out on top.
  • Cutting the Knot: He has the presence of mind to simply lop off Coulson's hand to save him from the effects of the Terrigen crystal.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He's more than capable of dishing out sarcastic quips when he wants to.
  • Deep Cover Agent: Along with Bobbi, he's revealed to be working for a separate branch of S.H.I.E.L.D. that considers itself the "real" S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Demonic Possession: Halfway into Season 2, he gets possessed and augmented with Kree tech to serve as the temple's protector, allowing only Inhumans to pass and kill trespassers. It passes as soon as Daisy and Raina undergo Terrigenesis. Played straighter and more literally when he briefly serves as a host to the Spirit of Vengeance in "Deals With Our Devils", although it returns to Robbie Reyes by the end of the episode.
  • Embarrassing Nickname:
    • It's revealed in "Watchdogs" that his brother Ruben calls him Alfie; Ruben himself goes by Mack in his own circle of friends.
    • Mack was dubbed "Mackhammer" in his academy days, on account of a love of MC Hammer that he made the mistake of revealing. The whole team ribs him for it.
  • The Engineer:
    • Mack is a skilled mechanic and loves to play around with technology, allowing him to bond with Fitz. Unlike Fitz, however, Mack doesn't have a natural affinity for technology and requires things like schematics and instructions in order to know how to make and repair things. Mack also doesn't have a formal engineering education like Fitz's, meaning that he can't help Fitz find the exact terminology when the latter's aphasia gets in the way, and unlike Fitz, who tends to work rather fast, its noted that Mack is a rather slow methodical worker. Despite this, its revealed he was the Head Engineer on the Iliad, indicating his skills are pretty developed.
    • In Season 3, he makes himself a unique shotgun-axe that serves him well through the battle with Hive, the ghosts, and the Watchdogs.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Mack is without question one of the nicest and sweetest guys in the series, if not the entire MCU. But even he has his limits. And when those said limits involve, say, a virtual-reality simulation fantasy scenario where a digital duplicate of Daisy throws herself upon the player (read: Deke Shaw) for hugs and smooches, he's not going to react well to it. If anything, he'll give Tranquil Fury a whole new meaning.
  • Exact Words: When he was questioned by Coulson (pre-season) and asked if he was loyal to S.H.I.E.L.D., he said he was. He didn't specify which S.H.I.E.L.D., though, and more importantly he doesn't (or at least didn't, at the time) consider the ship that Coulson's running to be the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. in his eyes.
  • Fake Guest Star: He's appeared in every episode of Season Two to date and usually has as much screen time as the lead cast, but is still credited as a guest star, along with B. J. Britt (Triplett) and, later, Adrianne Palicki (Bobbi). It's averted in season 3, as he was Promoted to Opening Titles.
  • Fantastic Racism:
    • As Season 2 progresses, he develops a dislike of anything "alien" after Kree technology causes both his temporary brainwashing and Triplett's death. He eventually resolves to leave S.H.I.E.L.D. because he just doesn't trust Coulson. When he changes his mind, Coulson puts him in charge of securing and researching alien artifacts, on the grounds that a man who refuses to trust anything of alien origin will always be careful around them. By season 3, while he's aware of the danger of alien tech, he's pretty much over this. It helps that he's Daisy's partner and they're pretty damn close, with him dubbing her "Tremors".
    • He absolutely refuses to consider any kind of machine as a living being.
  • Fighting from the Inside: Despite being Brainwashed and Crazy, he's able to tell Coulson to run. Mack also temporarily halts his rampage when faced with Fitz begging him to snap out of it.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: With pretty much everyone but Fitz (even there, they bonded during battle, but it was from a supporting role rather than directly in the line of fire), Mack gained trust and friendship via fighting alongside. Though shown to be friends with them prior, his close loyalty to Real S.H.I.E.L.D.'s members came about following the battle of The Iliad, while his past grievances with Coulson and Lincoln dissolved after fighting Gordon and Lash alongside them respectfully. Lincoln outright states that fighting Lash beside him gave him some measure of trust (albeit, mostly because it meant Lash wasn't him).
  • Frontline General: As with many of the S.H.I.E.L.D. directors before him, he both leads the agency and goes out into the field himself, just as he did from before he became the director.
  • Genius Bruiser: He's a highly skilled engineer and mechanic and he's also built like a brick wall. Fought against HYDRA insurgents, held his own against Gordon with just an axe, and is still willing to kick some alien ass with little to no help.
  • Genre Savvy: He's seen enough films over the years to know that robots always rise up and turn on their makers, leaving him very distrustful of Aida and unsurprised when she seemingly turns on them. He even mentions to Yo-Yo that his life insurance policy has a special clause for "death by robot", with a very generous payout for his brother if that happens. In a world after Ultron, it makes sense.
    • In the season 5 premiere, he is adamant against splitting up the group to explore the space station infested with killer aliens the team has materialized in, directly citing the Alien franchise and knowing that The Black Dude Dies First. (Though as that trope's page notes, the Alien franchise actually has only had the black guy as the first to die only once.)
  • Gentle Giant: Tallest and most muscular member of the team but he prefers to leave the fighting to others and is content to stay behind with his engines and tools.
  • Good Is Not Soft: Despite being a very nice and morally upstanding member of the team, he will not hesitate to kill in order to fulfill the given objectives. And with an axe no less.
  • The Heart: He looks like the muscle, but his introduction makes it clear that his real gift is his compassion and desire to go above and beyond for people. His aspect as playing this role for the team is ultimately why Daisy cedes leadership to him.
  • Heel Realization: Starting with "The Frenemy of my Enemy", it finally starts getting through to him that maybe Real S.H.I.E.L.D. is actually part of the problem when he notices they're more obsessed with taking out Coulson (who is relatively small fry) than stopping HYDRA (who are meant to be their actual enemies). It doesn't stop him from quitting when Coulson comes out on top... only for him to come back almost immediately; Coulson jokes that he guilted Mack into it after he had to amputate Coulson's hand.
  • Hot Men at Work: Lampshaded when Fitz and the hallucination of Simmons discuss Mack's attractiveness, helpfully accompanied by a shot of Mack wearing a muscle-emphasizing undershirt while he works in the garage.
  • I Choose to Stay: Chooses to stay in the Framework even after realizing it's a Lotus-Eater Machine, refusing to abandon his daughter even though he knows that she isn't real either. Hearing that his real daughter is dead just reinforces his decision to stay.
  • In Name Only: Beyond sharing a full name with them, he doesn't resemble the Alfonso Mackenzie of the comics at all. Tropes Are Not Bad comes into play though, as Mack ends up being a very fleshed out character compared to the rather minor comic character he's based on.
  • Insult of Endearment: Elena nicknames him "Turtle Man" because of his slow working speed, which is rather unfair considering she has Super Speed. She continues calling him that after their Relationship Upgrade and it has clearly become affectionate by then.
  • Irony: After discovering that Coulson has alien blood in him in "The Writing on the Wall", he expresses some distrust in Coulson's leadership, especially after seeing how crazed he became from the compulsion to carve symbols. Two episodes later, he gets possessed by a Kree defense system that turns him into a superhuman that mindlessly protects the underground Kree city. This experience only hardens his opinion that Coulson shouldn't be trusted.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: While his jerkass moments mostly only occur on the topic of alien influence and technology, in "S.O.S.", Mack is immediately proven right on his insistence that "we are not opening that damn box in a thousand years."
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Originally he was a nice guy who was helping Fitz with his brain damage. Then he began distrusting Coulson due to the alien blood in him. Then came the incident at the Kree City and his Fantastic Racism became his most pronounced trait. He's still a good guy, but perhaps not as nice as we originally thought he was. Although this part of his character pretty much disappears after Season Two.
  • The Kirk: While still pretty empathic, he is also usually the one who rein's in the rest of the team when they get too emotional.
  • The Lancer:
    • Evolved into this, sharing the role with May. Even when May returns, he's shown to be the one Coulson relies on to both keep himself in line and acts as his personal backup when needed.
    • As of Season 3, he serves as this to Daisy. He has become her partner, best friend, and sounding board when it comes to the Secret Warriors.
  • Large and in Charge: One of the physically largest members of S.H.I.E.L.D., and as of season 6 onwards, its director.
  • Made of Iron: Mack has a history of being the receiving end of savage beatings and still getting up. Whether it's being beat on by a mad Kree exile in a possible future, taking on inter-dimensional invaders with superhuman strength or time travelling Chronicoms looking to end humanity. Mack has taken an astonishing amount of physical harm and keeps on going.
  • Minored In Ass Kicking: He's mostly an engineer, but can definitely kick some ass when called upon.
    Reuben: You're really good at this stuff, huh?
    Mack: [tiredly] I'm a mechanic. I hate "this stuff."
  • Mix-and-Match Weapon: The shotgun-axe that he made himself!
  • The Mole: He was actually loyal to a rival S.H.I.E.L.D. faction who was working to take down Team Coulson from within. After the rival factions reconcile their differences, this goes away, and Mack is fully loyal to Team Coulson from then on out.
  • Nice Guy: He's friendly and really makes an effort to talk to Fitz and tries to help him out. He even succeeds in recognizing that Fitz knows of a way to take down Creel, but is having trouble because of his brain damage.
  • New Job as the Plot Demands: Started out on the Iliad as the Chief engineer, he then joined Roberto Gonzales organization and went undercover as a technician to infiltrate Coulson’s organization. After dealing with the Inhumans attack on the Iliad, Coulson assigns him to watch over all the alien artifacts SHIELD acquired. He then serves as a field agent initially partnered with Daisy, and then Coulson, when the latter steps down as director. After Coulson falls ill and Daisy declines to be director, he takes over as director of SHIELD.
  • The Nicknamer: Fitz is "Turbo", Daisy is "Tremors", Alisha is "Ginger Ninja", Gordon is "No Eyes", and Lincoln is "Sparkplug" (in the Framework, he gives this nickname to his daughter Hope). He later calls the Secret Warriors "Power Rangers" and Elena in particular "Yo-Yo". Flint is dubbed "Pebbles". Deke is dubbed "Lemons." Elena gives him a taste of his own medicine by dubbing him "Turtle Man".
  • Non-Action Guy: Interesting variation. Mack is a very skilled and natural fighter, but he doesn't like violence at all and avoids it. As the series goes on he becomes more willing to do it and is eventually made a full field agent, but he notes twice that he hates violence, and when Daisy is brainwashed and listing the problems with S.H.I.E.L.D., she specifically notes how they turned him into a soldier even though he's only meant to be an engineer.
  • The Not-Love Interest: An interesting case of this; as Fitz and Simmons go through their Romance Arc, Mack fulfills the role of the Romantic False Lead for Fitz. He and Fitz bond while Simmons is undercover in HYDRA and the drama that plays out between the three seems very much like a Love Triangle with Simmons acting very jealous and Mack appearing as a tempting potential partner.
  • One-Steve Limit:
    • Not to be confused with the one-off character of Agent Mack from the first season.
    • To add even more confusion, his ex-girlfriend (and the mother of his dead daughter) is named Nicole. "Nicole Mackenzie" is also the name of an unrelated Caucasian woman and minor character from Season 1.note 
  • Only Sane Man: Mack is probably the most normal member of Team Coulson and is also the most resistant to accepting all the strange phenomena they constantly encounter.
  • Outliving One's Offspring: In 2006, Mack and his ex had a daughter named Hope, who died four days after being born. Mack has been able to grieve and move forward, but still feels the loss. Enough for the Spirit of Vengeance to possess and suppress him.
  • Promoted to Opening Titles: For Season 3.
  • Race Lift: He's white in the comics.
  • Real Men Love Jesus: When trying to form an understanding and reach common ground with Elena Rodriguez, Mack talks about how he had never seen it before, but that he was beginning to think that the Inhuman mutations all around the world are part of God's plan for helping humanity.
  • Religious Bruiser:
    • Reveals in Season 3 that he is actually quite religious and that it helps him get through the work he does and the things that he has to deal with, and is certainly capable in the 'bruiser' department.
    • Come season 4 and this marks him as the odd one out on the team, as he's rather open minded about Robbie's claim that he made a deal with the Devil to become the Ghost Rider. As Mack says, as he believes in God, he has to believe in "the other thing."
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here: When the S.H.I.E.L.D. civil war ends with Coulson still in charge and "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. in an advisory role, Mack quits because he still doesn't trust Coulson. He even admits that, in spite of all their assumptions about Coulson being wrong, he still thinks Coulson's pursuit of alien technology is foolish and won't be a part of it.
  • She Cleans Up Nicely: He's normally dressed in grease-stained clothing and can usually be found elbow deep in machinery. When he dresses up in a suit and brings out a classic Rolls to sell a cover, he looks like a completely different person.
  • Shipper on Deck: Averted in two cases.
    • Despite most of the team supporting FitzSimmons, Mack is strongly opposed to Simmons presence, believing that she abandoned Fitz when he needed her. He seems to soften up by Season 3.
    • He also opposes Bobbi and Hunter getting back together. Despite knowing that both love each other, he worries because he's seen what their past breakups have done to them.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: He certainly thinks so, especially when said shotgun is also an axe.
  • Super Strength: When he's Brainwashed and Crazy from one of the Kree city's defense mechanisms, he's granted superhuman strength. It goes away when the brainwashing does.
  • Take Up My Sword: Does this in a metaphorical way for Gonzales by primarily using an axe in "S.O.S."
  • There Are No Therapists: He's clearly suffering some serious PTSD after the events in the Inhuman city, but beyond Fitz and Bobbi, no one seems to do much to help him which contributes to his decision to vote to take down Coulson's leadership.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: The second half of season two shows him increasingly irritable and hostile, though given what happened to him its not hard to sympathise with him. He becomes considerably nicer in Season 3, being especially protective towards Daisy and sympathetic towards Joey.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: While still weirded out by alien stuff, Mack has become much more understanding and nice towards the new Inhumans. He and Daisy are even best friends and partners now, to boot.
  • Translator Buddy: He is the first person to confront Fitz's aphasia head on and make an effort to try and understand what Fitz is trying to express, be it through interpreting the true meaning behind Fitz's words (such as by realizing that Fitz saying "I didn't solve this today!" means "I solved this in the past but I can't remember which design.") or by running through lists of words or design schematics until Fitz hears or sees what he's thinking of. It takes a significant amount of effort on the parts of both men, but it does help Fitz to open up in the wake of his trauma.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds:
    • He and Hunter bicker a lot, but it's all in good fun.
    • He later pokes gentle fun at Fitz for not making sense, which is pretty bold when talking to someone who's suffered brain damage, but Fitz seems to appreciate it.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Gives a massive one to Fitz and Radcliffe after they create Aida, citing his paranoia of a robot uprising after watching so many movies about it. After Aida (predictably) goes rogue, he and Yo-Yo agree to force Radcliffe to watch all of the Terminator movies, including Salvation.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?: He's deathly afraid of robots staging an uprising, and even has a life insurance clause in case of a Robot Apocalypse. It's justified after Ultron and Sokovia, as well as Properly Paranoid given, well, Aida.
  • Willfully Weak: That Non-Action Guy thing is self-inflicted. He is fully capable of easily rendering someone unconscious with a chokehold and can fight alongside Bobbi just fine, but he doesn't like violence and so avoids it as much as possible.
  • The Worf Effect: Ever since he's started working in the field, he's fallen victim to this, being the physically largest member of the team and often the first one taken out of commission.
  • You Are in Command Now: The director of S.H.I.E.L.D., as of Agents Season 6.

    Deke Shaw 

Deke Shaw

In an alternate timeline, S.H.I.E.L.D. was decimated by an alien attack leaving Deke in command.

See the Team Coulson page.

Commanders and High-Ranking Agents

    Maria Hill 

Commander Maria Hill

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/maria_hills_avengers_4156.png
"We get into a situation like this again, what happens then?"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Cobie Smulders

Voiced By: Marisol Romero [main movies and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Disney dub], Gabriela Ornelas [Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Sony dub] (Latin-American Spanish dub); Cristina Mauri [main movies], Cecilia Santiago [Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.] (European Spanish dub), Laura Blanc (European French dub), Ariane-Li Simard-Côté (Canadian French dub), Márcia Coutinho (Brazilian Portuguese dub)

Appearances: The Avengers | Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. note  | Avengers: Age of Ultron | Avengers: Infinity War note  | Avengers: Endgame | Spider-Man: Far From Home note  | Secret Invasion

"Who would bring those people together and not expect what happened?"

Nick Fury's aide and S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Deputy Director and also held the title of "Commander."note  Clear-minded and pragmatic, she carries out his orders, though his seemingly reckless approach doesn't increase her trust of him.


  • Action Girl:
  • Adaptational Heroism: In this universe, S.H.I.E.L.D. is officially disbanded before the Civil War even happens, and her antagonistic role toward superheroes is transferred to General Ross, so she doesn't really get the opportunity to display the infamous bitchy attitude she had in the comic.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: Is much more approachable and nice than the occasional bitch her comics version is.
  • Affirmative Action Girl: It doesn't really balance it out, but it does help to decrease Black Widow's Smurfette rating in The Avengers.
  • Ambiguous Situation: Her fate after the events of Endgame is somewhat unclear. While Nick Fury is seen commanding a group of Skrulls in space after attending Tony Stark's funeral, Maria isn't seen alongside him, with it being unknown whether she's still on Earth after Soren impersonated her in Far From Home.
  • Aloof Dark-Haired Girl: She's usually serious and has dark brown hair.
  • Back from the Dead: She is a victim of Thanos's snap before she is revived by Bruce Banner.
  • Badass Normal: Would have to be in order for Nick Fury to trust her to use a truck and a small team to chase after Loki and the Brainwashed and Crazy Hawkeye.
  • By-the-Book Cop: This creates friction with her and Fury due to his more Military Maverick style, and several times she's filed reports to the WSC criticizing his actions. Even after she develops undying loyalty to Fury, she still retains this: notably she's not in any particular mood to join Fury or Coulson in their fight against HYDRA.
  • Call-Back: During Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. she says she's helping Stark "privatize global security" which connects to something Tony said back in Iron Man 2, only he said "world peace."
  • Commanding Coolness: In Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s episode "The Magical Place", it's revealed her title as Deputy Director is "Commander".
  • Communications Officer: The link between Fury and multiple S.H.I.E.L.D. operations.
  • The Cynic: In contrast to the more idealistic Coulson. When S.H.I.E.L.D. goes bust, she seems more resigned to give up the fight against HYDRA, be content to work for Tony Stark, and play ball with the government as much as she can. Coulson stills prefers to fight on, even if he has no official support or sanction.
  • Deadpan Snarker: At times.
    Tony Stark: [simulating an eyepatch while looking at two screens] How does Fury even see these?
    Maria Hill: He turns.
  • Despair Event Horizon: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s collapses seem to be this for her. She goes to work for Tony Stark; but she briefly joins Coulson in order to get Skye back, but that's it. She tells Coulson "there is no S.H.I.E.L.D. anymore" after he asks her for backup to go after the Centipede sector of HYDRA. She tells him he's on his own and goes back to her new civillian life. She either came back from it or was pretending because both Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. season 2 and Age of Ultron show her continuing to work with Coulson and for Fury.
  • Dressing as the Enemy: One of the mooks that guard the arrested Cap, Black Widow and Falcon turns out to be Hill in disguise, about to save them. She makes a snarky comment on the helmet being uncomfortable.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Not long after her introduction, after hearing Nick Fury get shot, she leaves with a small team and a truck, to chase after Loki, and the Brainwashed and Crazy crew of an unnamed S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, Hawkeye, and Erik Selvig to try to take back the Tesseract without even being ordered. She ends up with her truck facing the opposition head-on, with them firing at each other through windshields until she is forced to move away, surviving a crash not long after.
  • First-Name Basis: She's notably one of the only trusted allies of Fury who allows her to call him Nick. As Captain Marvel would retroactively reveal, Fury never allows anyone else to call him that, not even Carol Danvers herself.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: In her second Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. appearance, she assists Coulson's team as they attempt to recover their kidnapped communications specialist and their stolen plane.
  • Hauled Before A Senate Sub Committee: She had to undergo a Congressional hearing after S.H.I.E.L.D. was taken down in The Winter Soldier.
  • Important Haircut: Cuts her hair by the end of Age of Ultron when she rejoins S.H.I.E.L.D., so the throwback to the first film is complete.
  • It's Personal: In Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., learning that Ward is a traitor when she personally vetted him is enough for her to immediately turn on Talbot when she had previously been helping him.
  • Mission Control: For the helicarrier assault team in Captain America: The Winter Soldier and the Avengers in Age of Ultron.
  • The Mole: For the World Security Council in deleted scenes, though she sides with Fury in the end. In a blink and miss it moment, as she is trying to shut down the "rogue bird," you can see the WSC override has locked her out of the system.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: In "Nothing Personal", she tries to help Coulson following by brokering a deal with the US Military, leading them to Providence and Coulson's team as a show of good faith to ensure they all get fair trials. It's a sound plan in theory. However, when Coulson reveals that Garrett is still alive, Ward killed Victoria Hand, they both raided the Fridge, and by bringing in the military Maria has preventing him and his team from saving Skye from them she realizes she has made a miscalculation. To her credit, she then proceeds to immediately help Coulson fight off the soldiers and aid his team with their mission.
  • No Body Left Behind: Is disintegrated along with half the universe after Thanos completes the Infinity Gauntlet.
  • Not so Above It All: While she's very straight laced in her first appearance, subsequent ones played up her quirky side more often:
    • When she lets loose at the party early in Age of Ultron, cracking jokes on Tony and Thor, and this gem when she's a bit tipsy.
    Maria: Steve! He said a bad language word!
    • When she was doing personnel assessment's for Coulson's team, she left Grant Ward's personality and psych profile section blank and instead drew a porcupine. Coulson mistook it for a "poop with knives sticking out of it."
  • Not So Stoic: She usually behaves quite seriously and professionally, but "usually" is the operative word here.
    Agent Ward: I don't think Thor is technically a god.
    Maria Hill: Yeah, you haven't been near his arms.
  • Number Two: To Nick Fury and S.H.I.E.L.D. she is the officially second in command.
  • Once Done, Never Forgotten: Coulson loves to poke fun over her horrible porcupine drawing. He's also miffed she joined Stark Industries instead of joining his team, calling her a "sellout".
  • Put on a Bus: The Maria Hill in Spider-Man: Far From Home is the Skrull Soren impersonating her. Unlike with Fury, however, the real Hill is absent for the entire movie and her actual whereabouts are unknown.
  • Secret-Keeper: She was one of the few people who knew that Fury was alive from the beginning. If What If...? and the Captain Marvel comic-prequel is any indication, she's also one of the few people who knew about Captain Marvel's existence before Carol showed up in Infinity War.
  • Sell-Out: Coulson calls her one for joining the private sector instead of Coulson's team.
  • Spanner in the Works: Led the US military to Fury's secret base in Canada, interrupting Coulson's rescue attempt of Skye and denying his team any further use of it as a refuge.
  • The Stoic: She usually behaves quite seriously and professionally.
  • Terrible Artist: Her attempt to draw a porcupine in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. ended up looking to Coulson like "a poop, with knives sticking out of it".
  • Undying Loyalty:
    • By the time of The Winter Soldier, she's developed this towards Fury. She becomes The Lancer after Coulson's "death", firmly supporting Fury's actions. She's one of the few people he trusted with the truth of his survival.
    • As revealed in Age of Ultron, she only pretended to leave S.H.I.E.L.D. for Stark Industries. She was still working for Nick Fury the entire time, and is first to rejoin him aboard the re-commissioned Helicarrier. Tony Stark was less than enthused.
  • The Watson: In The Avengers, most of her quotes are questions about how to deal with what's going on.
  • What the Hell, Hero?:
    • She gets this from Coulson on multiple occasions: covering up his resurrection and then leading the US military to the secret Providence base.
    • Coulson is also upset that she joined the Private Sector instead of his team, calling her a "sellout".
    • Tony Stark, the man she sells out to, is not happy when he learns joining his company was a ruse until Fury was able to build a new S.H.I.E.L.D.

    Victoria Hand 

Agent Victoria Hand

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/victoria_hand_aos_7897.jpg
"No single agent is that important."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Saffron Burrows, Rachele Schank (in 1983)

Voicted By: Queta Calderón (Latin-American Spanish dub), María Jesús Nieto (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 7: "The Hub")

A famous S.H.I.E.L.D. operations agent in charge of The Hub. She has a cold and secretive demeanor.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Victoria Hand is a My Country, Right or Wrong type of character, which leads her to become Norman Osborn's right-hand woman, although she ends up working with the good guys after Osborn's downfall. The TV version still retains some of the comic version's less pleasant qualities, which makes it seem like she would be revealed to be a villain, but she turns out to be Good All Along.
  • Back for the Finale: She returns in the Grand Finale of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., stationed at the bar along with other agents after the Chronicoms attack their bases in 1983.
  • Batman Gambit: Does this in "The Hub". She sends Ward and Fitz in there without an extraction plan, which hinges on either Ward and Fitz escaping themselves or, failing that, Coulson and the others finding about the extraction plan (or lack thereof, in this case) and moving in to pick them up once their job is done.
  • By-the-Book Cop: In contrast to the more pragmatic, emotional Coulson. In fact, she suspects that Coulson is HYDRA because of all the rules he breaks.
  • Character Death: Killed by Ward while trying to deliver Garrett to The Fridge.
  • Commander Contrarian: Often against and obstructing most of Coulson's decisions.
  • Double Tap: After seeing someone walk away from a double gut shot, Ward puts a bullet in her chest and then two in her head to to make sure she's dead.
  • Embarrassing Nickname: She considers the nickname "Vic" (given to her by Garrett) condescending. Hartley later refers to her by the same nickname, but Hand isn't on-screen to complain.
  • Good All Along: As Simmons is relieved to learn, she's actually hunting for HYDRA agents; however, she honestly believes that Coulson is with HYDRA.
  • Good Is Not Nice: "HYDRA won't show mercy. Neither can we."
  • Hide Your Lesbians: She is a lesbian in the comics, and lover of Isabelle, but here she is killed by Agent Ward before there is any in-universe confirmation that she is a lesbian.
  • Inspector Javert: She has major suspicions about Coulson's allegiance because of all the rules he's broken in past episodes, not to mention his secretiveness and failure to be forthcoming with S.H.I.E.L.D. leadership.
  • Meaningful Name: Roughly translates as "winning hand."
  • Mentor Archetype: In the Framework, she was the one to recruit Grant Ward into S.H.I.E.L.D. instead of John Garrett. In both cases Ward was a Boxed Crook who developed Undying Loyalty to the person who spared him from prison, but while Real!Ward became a villain under Garrett, Framework!Ward became a hero under Hand.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: She's unhelpful at best, although outright lying about the extraction plan is pretty awful. It's a cover for even more ruthless behavior — for example, she orders the Bus to be taken down, so she can kill everyone onboard, because she believes they're all HYDRA agents. Mostly, it serves to set her up as a Red Herring as to being The Clairvoyant — she's not.
  • Red Herring Mole: She's not the Clairvoyant, although she's set up to look like it.
  • Sacrificial Lion: The first character of note to (indisputably) die in the show; the fact that Ward is the one to kill her hammers home just how deep HYDRA influence within S.H.I.E.L.D. truly is.
  • Secret Test of Character: Her HYDRA mole act was intended as a test of loyalty. Her subordinates passed.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: With Coulson and his team, due to her "by the book" way of doing things and their more maverick tendencies.
  • Unspoken Plan Guarantee: She didn't bother giving Fitz and Ward an extraction because she thought Coulson's team wouldn't need one. It's not clear if she expected them to escape on their own or for Coulson to figure it out and rescue them, but either way Coulson wasn't happy that he wasn't told.
  • We Have Reserves: Has no problem with sending Fitz and Ward on a dangerous mission without planning an extraction for them.

    Rick Stoner 

General Richard "Rick" Stoner

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rick_stoner_mcu.jpg
"This S.H.I.E.L.D. technology will make you think that the 1980s got here a bit early."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Patrick Warburton

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 99: "All the Comforts of Home")

A S.H.I.E.L.D. leader who oversaw the construction and implementation of the Lighthouse.


  • Adaptational Job Change: He was SHIELD's first director in the comics, rather than an admittedly high-ranking agent. He also only made it as high as Colonel.
  • Adaptational Nice Guy: He was something of a Neidermeyer who antagonized Nick Fury in the comic, but is much friendlier in the show.
  • The Cameo: Stoner appears as a recording projection in the Lighthouse.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: While he is understandably dubious about Coulson and May's claims about sentient time-traveling aliens (S.T.T.A.s as he calls them), he immediately changes his mind after they save him from a Chronicom attempt on his life.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Only briefly appears and his current status isn't even known, but he's responsible for the construction of the Lighthouse, which becomes the much-needed headquarters for S.H.I.E.L.D. as of the second half of Season 5 after the destruction of the Playground.
  • Unwitting Pawn: A loyal SHIELD agent who's being manipulated by Malick and the Chronicoms into building HYDRA's Project Insight decades early.

    Robert Gonzales 

Commander Robert Gonzales

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/145287294014721.jpg
"Secrets is what brought S.H.I.E.L.D. down the first time, and we won't let that happen again."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Edward James Olmos

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 36: "Love in the Time of HYDRA")

"We're fighting a war with an enemy that is without honor. Sometimes, we make sacrifices for the greater good."

The commanding officer of the S.H.I.E.L.D. aircraft carrier Iliad. After S.H.I.E.L.D.'s fall during the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, he took it upon himself to reorganize whatever parts of the organization Coulson or Talbot hadn't touched into a new S.H.I.E.L.D. — the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D., as he calls it. Believing Coulson can't be trusted due to being brought back to life by alien tech, he seeks to remove Coulson from power and reform S.H.I.E.L.D. into what he thinks it should be. He has notable dislike of Gifted people and appears more focused on consolidating S.H.I.E.L.D. under one banner than fighting HYDRA.


  • Arc Villain: As the de-facto leader of the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D., he serves as this for the 2nd half of Season 2. Until he complies with a merging of his and Coulson's factions and is then killed by Jiaying.
  • Ancestral Weapon: Possesses a pistol which belonged to his grandfather and was used in combat in the Second World War.
  • Big Good: As opposed to his Arc Villain status, he is this for the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D., as he is a Reasonable Authority Figure who guides them through their darkest times.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: He tries to come across as a Reasonable Authority Figure, but he proves himself hypocritical and racist in short order. Any attempt to call him on this is ignored. Furthermore, despite being part of a more democratic S.H.I.E.L.D. and claiming that he doesn't want to be in charge, he shows visible annoyance when the majority opinion turns against how he wants to do things.
  • Canon Foreigner: He doesn't have a comic counterpart although he does share many similarities with Maria Hill as she was portrayed in Civil War.
  • The Chains of Commanding: Gonzales does not seem to be very happy with what he's forced to do due to his position as Director of "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. At the same time, however, he also doesn't like to be questioned on his methods.
  • Commanding Coolness: His title is Commander Gonzales, and he commands S.H.I.E.L.D.'s aircraft carrier, the Iliad.
  • Cool Old Guy: As antagonistic as he is towards Coulson, he gives off this vibe because he's a proven badass played by Edward James Olmos. He is also willing to join forces with Coulson in the end.
  • Decomposite Character: His way of running S.H.I.E.L.D., down to how they view superhumans and extraterrestrials, is eerily similar to Maria Hill's run as director of S.H.I.E.L.D. during the Civil War storyline.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: While Gonzales is a major antagonist in the second half of Season 2, he eventually allies with Coulson... and is soon after killed by Jiaying.
  • Enemy Mine: In "The Dirty Half Dozen", he teams up with Coulson to take down HYDRA's remnant forces.
  • Entitled Bastard: As part of his insistence that his S.H.I.E.L.D. is the real one, he expects Coulson and his team to extend him courtesies he pointedly refuses to show them, and is trying to paint the situation as them betraying S.H.I.E.L.D. by following Coulson.
  • Handicapped Badass: Faces off against hundreds of HYDRA thugs while having a shattered leg.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Joins forces with Coulson after the man willingly turns himself in and makes a deal.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Despite his Jerkass-ish behaviour, he does care about the people under his command and even his bias towards Coulson had some justification, and before Jiaying murdered him to provoke a war was ready to be at peace with the Inhumans.
  • Kill Me Now, or Forever Stay Your Hand: Pulls this tactic with Agent May prior to inviting her to take a seat on "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D.'s board. She declines to take the shot, claiming that he wouldn't be so stupid as to hand her a loaded gun; however, Gonzales reveals that it actually was loaded.
  • Misplaced Retribution:
    • He blames Fury for the fall of S.H.I.E.L.D., specifically bringing up that Fury was responsible for the inception of Project Insight, and tells Coulson as such to his face. Coulson counters that HYDRA was responsible. Gonzales consistently deflects whenever this is brought up. While he is right to an extent, in that Fury's suggestion was the opportunity HYDRA was waiting for, he's intent on blaming Fury and Coulson for his problems, even in the face of rational arguments to the contrary.
    • Blames Coulson for Hartley's death, despite the fact it was caused because people didn't follow his orders, and wouldn't have even been at risk if Gonzales hadn't withheld the Illiad's resources from him. He also blames Coulson for a number of things which were obviously outside his control or implying he intended for them to happen, such as Skye becoming enhanced.
  • Motive Decay: Originally he wanted to build a better S.H.I.E.L.D. that didn't suffer from the flaws of Fury's autocratic leadership, and thought (not unreasonably) that the GH Serum in Coulson had comprised him. Now he's obsessed with eliminating the potential threat of gifted people by putting them down, and he wants Coulson out of the picture because he's a threat to his leadership.
  • Never My Fault: Without question, he is the aggressor in this equation. Coulson didn't even know he was still alive until he had taken over the Playground. Yet whenever Coulson or his team act against him, he stubbornly insists that they're the ones responsible for the conflict.
  • Noble Bigot: Despite his mistrust against powered individuals he is still able to honestly negotiate peace and even sympathising with them on a personal level. Too bad Jiaying didn't appreciate it.
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: When he strong-arms Coulson into making him S.H.I.E.L.D.'s representative to the Inhumans, it looks like his Fantastic Racism and distrust of Skye is going to ruin the negotiations and lead to war. However when he gets to the table, he actually takes a surprisingly conciliatory stance, returning a precious keepsake to Jiaying, and doing his best to find common ground with her. Unfortunately it turns out that Jiaying has no interest in peace as she then murders him and frames him for attacking her, causing a slide into open war between S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Inhumans.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: "That man had an ax. Now I have it."
  • Pet the Dog: He gives Jiayang a sentimental heirloom relating to her daughter during their meeting.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Despite the flaws in his logic, he seems to be a fairly reasonable boss. He treats Hunter well despite kidnapping him, and insists Bobbi is still trustworthy despite Tomas raising concerns that she could have done more to stop Hunter's escape. Further shown when he makes an apparently genuine offer to May to act as Coulson's advocate on his board, accompanied by offering up his life if she really thinks it would be for the best. May assumes it's a trick and gives the gun back, but he then shows her it really was loaded.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Always wears a three-piece suit, even when he's commanding the Iliad.
  • Sore Loser: Major decisions are decided by a vote, and although he will still carry out the majority's will, he'll grumble about being outvoted.
  • The Spymaster: His function to the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. is the same as Coulson and Fury for the old one, though he resents the secrecy and double-dealing that comes with the position.
  • Still the Leader: On the day S.H.I.E.L.D. fell, he asserted that he remained the commander of the aircraft carrier, Iliad, which formed the nucleus of his own S.H.I.E.L.D..
  • We Used to Be Friends: Has this attitude with Coulson, even though by his own admission they never met before "One Door Closes". Coulson also thinks highly of him, but calls Gonzales out on claiming to know him pre- or post-resurrection.
  • You're Insane!: On his dying breath he calls Jiaying crazy because she will get everyone killed by starting a war.

    Anne Weaver 

Agent Anne Weaver

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/anne_weaver_aos_1574.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: British

Portrayed by: Christine Adams

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 12: "Seeds", Episode 17: "Turn, Turn, Turn", Episode 36: "Love in the Time of HYDRA")

A S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and director of the S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy of Science and Technology.


  • Badass Teacher: Inevitable for being both S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy director. See Mama Bear below for example.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Christine Adams has previously appeared in Doctor Who, which is particularly pleasing since Fitz-Simmons apparently love that show.
  • Mama Bear: On the day S.H.I.E.L.D. fell, she took on an enhanced HYDRA operative by herself to protect her students. According to Calderon, she was doing pretty well when he arrived with Quinjets to save them.
  • Never Found the Body: "Turn, Turn, Turn" implies that she dies during the uprising, but "Love in the Time of HYDRA" reveals her to be alive, well, and one of the founding board members of the new, "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: As the Academy director, she gives students a lot of freedom while at the same time keeping everyone safe.

    Others 

The World Security Council

    In General 

The World Security Council

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/world_secruity_council_avengers_5790.png

Appearances: The Avengers | Captain America: The Winter Soldier

"We're running the world's greatest covert security network and you're gonna leave the fate of the human race to a handful of freaks."

A secretive international group in charge of S.H.I.E.L.D. Nick Fury reports directly to them... but he doesn't always agree with them.


  • The Bus Came Back: Gideon Malick (Powers Boothe), who went unnamed in his appearance in The Avengers and then was conspicuously absent in The Winter Soldier, returns (now with a name!) in the third season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Character Death: Alexander Pierce executes Councilmen Rockwell, Yen and Singh when Nick Fury shows up to stop his plan. Gideon Malick returns in the third season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and two others don't appear in the film. Since she was replaced by Black Widow, however, Ms. Hawley (Jenny Agutter) may still be alive.
  • Cosmopolitan Council: International Group. Out-of-universe, this is why the Pentagon didn't provide assistance during production.
  • Face Framed in Shadow: You actually can see their faces, but it takes a bit of squinting. They are seen in full (four of them anyway) in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, though.
  • Fantastic Racism: They distrust the Avengers on the basis of them being an untested "handful of freaks". They also initially refer to Loki as merely "the Asgardian", until Nick Fury corrects them. They also refer to Captain America as a "costumed mercenary".
  • Horrible Judge of Character: They actually consider selecting Blonsky for the Avengers Initiative, citing that he is a war hero over the Hulk while blaming the latter for the destruction of Harlem, ignoring the fact that the Abomination is even harder to control than the Hulk.
  • Lawful Stupid: Hence why Fury often elects to ignore their orders.
  • Misaimed Fandom: invoked
    • The WSC wanted the Abomination on the Avengers instead of the Hulk, since they viewed Blonsky as a war hero and blamed Harlem's destruction on Banner. It takes a sneaky Batman Gambit from S.H.I.E.L.D. to have their request for Blonsky to be denied.
    • Later, Steve Rogers finds they've been collecting old HYDRA tech, as they've been studying them so they too can create Tesseract powered weaponry.
  • N.G.O. Superpower: They don't seem to be accountable to any government - as they order a nuclear mission to New York City without consulting anyone. After S.H.I.E.L.D.'s collapse they were permanently disbanded and when S.H.I.E.L.D. was relegitimized the UN took to directly overseeing S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Nuke 'em: They decide to solve the Chitauri problem with a nuke.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: Mostly to Nick Fury, hence why he elects to ignore their decisions.
  • The Omniscient Council of Vagueness: Whoever they are, not much is known about them. They even appear shadowed when communicating with Fury.
  • Override Command: The same override command that the pilot receives to launch the nuke locked Maria Hill out of the system before she could override the launch.
  • Shown Their Work: When they decide to nuke Manhattan, they launch two jets just in case somebody manages to stop one. Such redundancy is standard real-life procedure when "delivering a package".
  • Straw Character: In The Avengers, they are there to make Fury look right in spite of his Military Maverick attitude, most notably when they opt to immediately nuke New York rather than send in more military support, give the Avengers more time, or anything else. In Winter Soldier they are there for Robert Redford to be sarcastic at.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: In order to protect the whole world, they fired a nuclear missile at New York City to halt the Chitauri invasion.

    Jakuna Singh 

Councilman Jakuna Singh

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/councilman_singh.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: Indian

Portrayed By: Bernard White

Voiced By: Antonio Gálvez (Latin-American Spanish dub), Jordi Ribes (European Spanish dub), Mathieu Buscatto (European French dub), Benoit Éthier (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Councilman Singh served on the World Security Council after the Battle of New York.


  • Character Death: He's killed by Pierce with the rigged security badges alongside Rockwell and Yen.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Even they find Pierce's HYDRA scheme repellent. When Pierce gave one of them the hypothetical situation of their daughter being held at gunpoint by terrorists, about to be executed, and he could stop it with a flick of a switch, Pierce asks him if would. Sing retorts, "Not if it was your switch."
  • Fake Nationality: Singh is Indian whereas Bernard White is Sri Lankan-American.
  • Shut Up, Hannibal!: He gives a succinct and powerful refusal to Pierce.
    Pierce: Let me ask you a question: what if Pakistan marched into Mumbai tomorrow, and you knew that they were going to drag your daughters into a soccer stadium for execution. And you could just stop it, with the flick of a switch, wouldn't you? Wouldn't you all?
    Singh: Not if it was your switch.

    Douglas Rockwell 

Councilman Douglas Rockwell

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/councilman_rockwell_9.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Alan Dale

Voiced By: Mario Díaz Mercado (Latin-American Spanish dub), Joan Massotkleiner (European Spanish dub)

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

"You smug son of a bitch."

Councilman Rockwell served on the World Security Council after the Battle of New York.


  • Character Death: He's killed by Pierce with the rigged security badges alongside Singh and Yen.
  • Jerkass: A specialty of Alan Dale; he's the most blatantly disrespectful and angry member of the council.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: He's largely a replacement for (the then-unnamed) Gideon Malick; much like Malick's role in The Avengers, Rockwell is an argumentative and vocally critical American member of the council.

    Chao Yen 

Councilman Chao Yen

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/councilman_yen_1.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: Chinese

Portrayed By: Chin Han

Voiced By: Erick Salinas (Latin-American Spanish dub), Christophe Desmottes (European French dub), Yves Soutière (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

"A breach like this raises serious questions."

A member of the World Security Council and one of the prime overseers of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s operations.


  • Character Death: He's killed by Pierce with the rigged security badges alongside Singh and Rockwell
  • Fake Nationality: Yen is Chinese whereas Chin Han is Singaporean.

    Pamela Hawley 

Councilwoman Pamela Hawley

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/councilwoman_hawley_0.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: British

Portrayed By: Jenny Agutter

Voiced By: Claudia Contreras (Latin-American Spanish dub), Margarita Ponce (European Spanish dub), Pauline Larrieu (European French dub), Isabelle Leyrolles (Canadian French dub)

Appearances: The Avengers | Captain America: The Winter Soldier

"We don't need hearings, we need action!"

A member of the World Security Council and one of the prime overseers of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s operations.


  • Never Mess with Granny: Councilwoman Hawley, who is played by an actress in her sixties, delivers a Curb-Stomp Battle to the S.T.R.I.K.E. Mooks that accompany Pierce. Subverted when it turns out it's Black Widow, disguised as Hawley.
    Hawley: I'm sorry, did I ruin your moment?
  • The Smurfette Principle: Hawley is the only woman in the council.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Councilwoman Hawley is not killed at the meeting in Winter Soldier that proves fatal for the other three members of the council; she is replaced by Black Widow in disguise. The whereabouts of the real Councilwoman Hawley are not revealed.

    Gideon Malick 
See the HYDRA Leadership page

    Secretary Alexander Pierce 
See the HYDRA Leadership page

Other Agents

    Team Coulson 

    Agent Mack 

Agent Mack

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/mack.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Bodie Newcomb

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 3: "The Asset")

A seemingly ordinary truck driver tasked with transporting Dr. Franklin Hall.


    Agent Shaw 

Agent Shaw

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/agentshaw.jpg
"I'm just having a hard time killing the people we once called friends."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Charles Halford

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 7: "The Hub", Episode 17: "Turn, Turn, Turn")

A S.H.I.E.L.D. agent undercover in Siberia.


  • The Bus Came Back: He originally seemed to be a one off character, but comes back 10 episodes later during HYDRA's attack.
  • Foreshadowing: When the audience is led to believe that he, along with Hand and her faction, are HYDRA infiltrators, he is disgusted at the order to kill Coulson's team or any other of his fellow agents. This is one of the first indications that Hand's faction is Good All Along, as a HYDRA agent would not have been so sympathetic.
  • Nose Shove: He kept the intel he gathered hidden in a USB deep inside his nose.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted, as he shares a surname with Deke Shaw (who, while not technically an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D., spends a lot of time around Team Coulson regardless). Of course, given that the latter is FitzSimmons' grandson from a Bad Future, Agent Shaw may be an ancestor from Deke's father's side.
  • The Mole: When he first appears, it's implied that he is going to torture Coulson for information but it's soon revealed that he too is a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent.
  • Torture Technician: He's undercover as an interrogator.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: His fate since the S.H.I.E.L.D. Civil War hasn't been revealed.

    Agent Mike Peterson / Deathlok 

Agent Michael "Mike" Peterson / Deathlok

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/74992439e9709ab175f410884b1d8f73.png
"I could, you know? Be a hero."
Click here to see Mike as Deathlok 

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: J. August Richards

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 1: "Pilot")

"You said if we worked hard, if we did right, we'd have a place. You said it was enough to be a man, but there's better than man! There's gods... and the rest of us? What are we? They're giants... we're what they step on."

An ordinary guy with a son who mysteriously receives superhuman abilities thanks to "Project Centipede", attracting the attention of both S.H.I.E.L.D. and Skye. Mike is eventually transformed into Deathlok by HYDRA, and forced to work for them or else they will kill him and his son. S.H.I.E.L.D. manages to free him and his son when they take down John Garrett. He is later recruited into the resurrected S.H.I.E.L.D. by Director Coulson, working as a secret operative hunting down the remnants of HYDRA.


  • Action Bomb: He very nearly explodes due to the Extremis in his system, like the previous user of Centipede. Unlike the former, Mike is spared from this fate.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the comics Deathlok is extremely unattractive- his cybernetics cover almost the entire left side of his head (including a large, bulging, yellow eye), and his human parts are scarred and (Depending on the Artist) withered almost to the point of being zombie-like. In the series, he has some scarring on the right side of his face and head.
  • Adaptational Badass: In the comics, Michael Peterson is a normal human and not a Deathlok.
  • Adaptational Villainy: In the comics, Deathlok was a hero in the vein of RoboCop. At least in Season 1, Mike is an unwilling villain through Centipede having him cowed by the Explosive Leash they have in his eye socket, and not allowing him to see his son, Ace. After being freed from HYDRA he strikes out on his own, presumably to become an Anti-Hero like the comics version, and Season 2 shows he's been working as a One-Man Army shadow operative for Coulson since he assumed Directorship of S.H.I.E.L.D., cementing him back into the "heroes'" side.
  • An Arm and a Leg: Lost his right leg in the explosion at the end of "The Bridge". It's replaced with a high tech counterpart.
  • And I Must Scream: He knows he's a good man deep down inside, and he's more concerned about his son's well-being than anything even after becoming Deathlok, but he has to do HYDRA's bidding or else, especially considering what he had learned about another victim of the eye implant.
  • Anti-Villain: In the pilot, Coulson calls him a "good man with a bad break". From "T.R.A.C.K.S." to "The Beginning Of The End", he's only working with Centipede because of the eye implant.
  • Appropriated Appellation: He's known as "the Hooded Hero" because he wore a hood when he performed his Heroic Fire Rescue at the opening of the pilot.
  • Arm Cannon: Gets one in "End of the Beginning", specifically a two-shot mini rocket launcher. It also comes with a few extra gadgets.
  • Ascended Extra: He's returned as of "The Bridge" to work with Coulson and later becomes a Centipede Eye-drone. Not only that, see Composite Character below.
  • The Atoner:
    • In "The Bridge," he's very ashamed of his past actions and eagerly works hard to be as much a force for good as possible to make up for them. Which only makes it worse when Centipede forces him to betray Coulson to save his son Ace.
    • Walking away in the Season 1 finale implies that he is going to make up for the evil deeds he was forced to commit.
  • Bald of Evil: Sort of. He's not evil, just extremely unstable and being coerced.
  • Becoming the Mask: Garrett thinks this is the case in "Ragtag", after he punches a drug lord's head clean off. It's clear he's wrong about it, though; Mike is just venting in the few ways he can.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Saves Coulson and Hunter from the 'Real' S.H.I.E.L.D. in "Afterlife".
  • Big Eater: He mentions in "The Bridge" that he eats about four times the amount of food he used to, and when using his strength maybe ten times.
  • The Brute: A hitman for Garrett, albeit a very reluctant one.
  • The Bus Came Back:
    • In "Afterlife", he returns as Coulson's reinforcements against the other S.H.I.E.L.D. It's revealed that he's been tracking high level HYDRA members for Coulson for months.
    • Deathlok returns in "The Real Deal" to help Team Coulson, though he's apparently "gone solo" outside of helping S.H.I.E.L.D..
  • The Cape:
    • At the start of his introduction, there's an explosion. While other people are running scared or taking pictures, he tells his son that someone needs his help and goes to work. Later on, he tells Coulson that his stalwart nature ("it depends on the kind of person you are") is why he can control the Extremis in his system. A combination of With Great Power Comes Great Insanity and bad circumstances make him an antagonist.
    • When he returns in "The Bridge", he does everything he can to make up for his earlier mistakes.
  • Composite Character: As of "T.R.A.C.K.S.", he's the newest Deathlok, but isn't named after any of the known versions of him from the comics. As a Mythology Gag, his leg is labeled 5.0, and there were only four Deathloks in the comics. He's still this. Though one of the Deathloks' secret identity in comics is Michael Collins, there's a Michael Peterson, a young African-American, that appeared in an issue of Slapstick in 1992.
  • Cybernetics Eat Your Soul: The more he's been upgraded with equipment, the less he resists orders, but his love for his son stays as strong as ever. As soon as he's freed, he becomes a hero once more. If anything, he's just developed (pardon the pun) Nerves of Steel and become more stoic while on assignment.
  • Cyborg: As of "T.R.A.C.K.S.", now that he has a robotic right leg to replace his missing one. As of "End of the Beginning", more than 95% of him has been transformed underneath the surface of his skin.
  • Decoy Protagonist: His first scenes in the show are a showcase of heroism and extraordinary ability when he saves someone from a burning building. Skye even lampshades it and expresses a desire to be his sidekick. If it wasn't for the title of the show, many viewers might be led to think that he's the main character.
  • Defeat Means Friendship: He's excited to work with The Team that shot him. Justified in this case as the shot stabilized his serum and he wants to be a hero.
  • The Dog Bites Back: "The Beginning of the End" sees him defeating Garrett with a rocket and a stomp to the face.
  • The Everyman: He was the most ordinary of Joes who was down on his luck and behind on his bills before he got his powers.
  • Expy: With the new backstory, he's basically Winter Soldier without the movie involvement.
  • Face–Monster Turn: Zigzagged Trope from the first to the last episode of season 1. Narrowly averted in the pilot thanks to the Sanity Slippage from the Extremis being stabilized. Played straight as of "T.R.A.C.K.S.", as he's been forced into becoming Deathlok. Then defied when he assists Team Coulson as soon as he's freed.
  • Give Him a Normal Life: More than anything else, Mike wants his son to be safe and happy, and he's all too aware that he can't provide that.
  • Guest-Star Party Member: When he re-appears in "The Bridge", he's temporarily drafted into the team to help them against Centipede's new super soldiers.
  • Healing Factor: Courtesy of Extremis he heals quickly.
  • Heel–Face Revolving Door: Though not entirely of his own volition - he would have stayed firmly on the Face side if not for being captured by Centipede.
  • Heel–Face Turn: He quickly turns on Garrett upon learning that S.H.I.E.L.D. had taken his son back from HYDRA.
  • Hero of Another Story: He spent the bulk of season 2 on a mission assigned to him from Coulson. He was tracking Dr.List, one of HYDRA's heads, and monitoring his activity. If Marvel Studios ever wants to make a Deathlok mini-series, that would provide plenty of material.
  • Hero's First Rescue: Mike's heroic debut was climbing up the side of a burning building to rescue a woman trapped in the top floor.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: Inverted in "The Bridge"; when he surrenders Coulson to Centipede against his will, Coulson's the one to reassure him that in doing so, he did the only thing he could do to ensure that nobody got hurt.
  • I Have Your Wife: This is used by Raina to force his cooperation in "The Bridge". In "Nothing Personal", he notes that S.H.I.E.L.D. being disbanded has left his son vulnerable, which is on top of the Explosive Leash currently in his eye socket. By the time of "Ragtag" it's revealed that HYDRA has now captured his son, leaving him even more under their control.
  • Imported Alien Phlebotinum: He's got a mixture of alien technology, gamma radiation, super soldier serum and Extremis running through his body.
  • Impossibly Cool Clothes: Fitz-Simmons give him a bodysuit that monitors his vitals, protects him from bullets, and is very comfortable.
  • Instant Expert: Here is a justified use of the trope. After his return, Mike is able to upload all of the data on a S.H.I.E.L.D. quinjet and expertly pilot in under a minute through his cybernetic eye.
  • In the Hood: Wore one during his original rescue, hence the "Hooded Hero" moniker.
  • Jumped at the Call: In "The Bridge" he is ecstatic to be recruited by Coulson and can't wait to get into the field and start helping people.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch:
    • Even if it was stemming from the Sanity Slippage due to his powers, it's not hard to side with Mike when he injured the foreman of his former job after he was harassed and insulted by said foreman.
    • In "Nothing Personal", he does this to Ward by triggering a heart attack via one of his shock devices.
    • Quite a literal example when he stomps Garret's head in in "The Beginning Of The End".
  • Knight Errant:
    • At the end of season one finale is currently hitting the road to do good to make up for his actions.
    • He lands back in the main story in Season 2, by rescuing Coulson and Hunter from "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D.'s forces and piloting the quinjet out of there. Turns out he's been working for Coulson for a little while to atone.
  • The Knights Who Say "Squee!": Based on his first scene in "The Bridge", he's taken 'Captain Rogers' as his role model in superheroing.
  • Made of Iron: Being hit with a shotgun blast to the chest doesn't do much to him apart from knock him over a rail owing to the sheer blast, and he gets back up afterwards.
  • Never Found the Body: Appears to be blown up in "The Bridge", after spending the entire episode trying to atone for his prior insanity, and even more specifically trying to "make up for things" and save Coulson after Centipede forced Mike to betray him in a Sadistic Choice. As it turns out, he was taken alive by Centipede, and his right leg was left behind so S.H.I.E.L.D. would have something to find.
  • Nice Guy: Before his Start of Darkness, he was a friendly and humble guy who wanted nothing more than to provide for his family. He returns to this in his second appearance.
  • Obliviously Evil: His Sanity Slippage leads him to believe that his Jumping Off the Slippery Slope is his Superhero Origin.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • After he discovers that Centipede had recaptured him. And he's missing a leg. And he has an eye implant.
    • After becoming Deathlok, other people suffer this the moment they learn he's in the area.
  • One-Man Army: When Hunter learns that the reinforcements Coulson calls in "Afterlife" is just one person, he replies "that's not reinforcements, that's a gravedigger!". After Mike takes out two quinjets full of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents with only minimal assistance, he learns that one man is indeed all the back up they need.
  • Papa Wolf: He deeply loves his son. Even being transformed into a mostly-cyborg killing machine doesn't change that.
  • Phlebotinum Rebel: Once HYDRA's control over him is broken, he quickly turns on them.
  • Psycho Serum: The Centipede has a side effect of Sanity Slippage, making him more violent. Really, what did they expect if they used the same stuff that created the Hulk?
  • Punch-Clock Villain: In "Nothing Personal", he admits to Skye that he's more concerned about Ace's safety and well-being than anything and only serves HYDRA so that nothing will happen to his son. After Ace is freed, he turns on HYDRA.
  • Put on a Bus: Nowhere to be seen in Season 3. The last time we saw him is after HYDRA removed most of his cybernetics. He returns in Season 5 to lead a bunch of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents to the Lighthouse and saves Coulson from the manifestations of the Fear Dimension.
  • Scars are Forever: Despite his Centipede powers, the burn scars on his face remain.
  • Scary Black Man: As he grows closer and closer to his Super-Power Meltdown. In his second appearance, the serum's side effects are completely gone, and he's friendly and affable again.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: The first Case of the Week, but also shown that the people behind his powers, the Centipede group, was still out there, continuing where they left off. Later averted when he returned in a bigger role.
  • Super-Power Meltdown: Narrowly averted, by way of Ward using the Night-Night gun. "The Bridge" reveals that being tranquilized at just the right moment fixed his meltdown problems permanently.
  • Super Prototype: Mike is one of the very first of Centipede experiments, but is the strongest.
  • Super Strength: Due to the Centipede group's serum, or rather the Extremis aspect of it, he is far above human in strength.
  • Super Toughness: Able to withstand serious blows without any injury, though it's implied that he can die from a headshot. His later upgrades make his durable enough to resist all but a few places being shot.
  • That Man Is Dead: He claims that Mike Peterson is dead in "End of the Beginning", having given up on the hope that he might be freed or ever see his son again.
  • Took a Level in Badass: In Season 2. His return is marked with a new costume which looks much better than the original, EMP rockets to complement his more lethal payload, and a tech overlay that lets him upload and learn new tech systems like the S.H.I.E.L.D. quinjets.
  • Trapped in Villainy: Like Akela and The Englishman before him, and by the same method. After Project Centipede is destroyed, he becomes free again.
  • Two-Faced: The result of being caught in the explosion at the end of The Bridge. Presumably the only reason he's even alive to begin with is because of the Super Serum in his blood.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: Unlike most S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, he has no formal combat training, and is a mere factory worker when the series begins. However, through his Super Serum and later cybernetic upgrades he becomes a force to be reckoned with, effectively the inverse of the Badass Normal agents seen throughout the series.
  • Villain of the Week: Though not the reason for the problems with Centipede, he's the primary face of it to the S.H.I.E.L.D. agents.
  • Walking the Earth: At the end of "Beginning of the End", instead of turning himself in or reuniting with his son, he decides that he has to make up for his bloody actions and hits the road, telling Skye that they can keep an eye on him through his eye implant.
  • We Can Rebuild Him: After being caught in a bomb planted by Centipede, he's turned into the cyborg Deathlok.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Given all the trouble that he's been through, it's hard not to feel sorry for him, even as he starts having a psychotic breakdown.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: He's obviously aware of the old tropes, claiming at one point during the pilot that the events unfolding around him are the elements of a typical Origin Story of a superhero. However, his Origin Story ends up being that of an Atoner Anti-Hero, played out over the entire season instead.

    The Koenigs 

The Koenigs

A Badass Family of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agents who report straight to the Director. Fury trusted them enough to let them know he faked his death after the HYDRA Coup and put them in charge of the secret bases he set up in case of emergencies. They rarely go out into the field, although they are more than capable should they be called to action.


  • Almighty Janitor: They mostly look after secret bases - which are used either to rebuild the organization or house weapons and tools that are only brought in as a last resort.
  • Ambiguously Human: While Eric was human, his identical brothers have the exact same mannerisms as he so there's been a lot of (In-universe!) speculation on what they actually are. It's eventually clarified that the brothers are just identical quadruplets, or at least that's what they told an inquisitive Red Shirt. The subsequent reveal that they also have an identical grandfather, who was interested in robots, heavily suggests that the previous reveal that they are perfectly normal humans was not true.
  • Back Up Twin: We don't know exactly how many brothers there are; but we do know there's a sister somewhere. According to Trip, Billy namedrops a new twin all the time.
  • Badass Family: Being a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent seems to be the family business.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: They may look more like desk jockeys than secret agents but don't let that fool you - they are S.H.I.E.L.D. agents after all who report directly to Coulson (and previously Fury).
  • The Gadfly: They love teasing people with different possible explanations for being multiple (13?) perfectly identical (robot?) brothers.
  • Geek: They really like their video games and geeking out about other badass agents.
  • Generation Xerox: They are (almost) all quirky S.H.I.E.L.D. agents who had a hand in the LMD program, just like their quirky grandfather, who developed an interest in robotics after meeting Enoch and is implied to be a future member of the SSR. And they're all played by Patton Oswalt.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partner: All of them are very close and often play Call of Duty online. They took Eric's death very hard.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: Implied Trope. Fury trusted them to look after his secret bases and let them know he was faking his death.
  • Inexplicably Identical Individuals: Eric, Sam, and Billy act more like clones than brothers.
  • Mythology Gag: It's revealed that there's a Koenig sister. In the comics, Eric does have a sister, Ilsa.
  • Rules Lawyer: All of them are a strickler for the rules - and one of those rules is that you have an ID lanyard with you at all times.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns:
    • Their quirkiness and overall weirdness provided some levity during their brief tenure on the show, but they were quietly phased out as Season 2's Inhuman plotline kicked into gear, with no further mention or appearances even though the two surviving brothers are still with S.H.I.E.L.D. until Season 4, missing entirely Season 3.
    • Billy Koenig is dead in the Framework's reality, to show how much Crapsack World it really is. There's no mention of the other Koenigs, assuming they exist at all in this reality.

Agent Eric Koenig

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/eric_keonig_aos_5417.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Patton Oswalt

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 18: "Providence", Episode 19: "The Only Light In the Darkness")

A Level Six agent in charge of "Providence", a secret base in the Canadian wilderness, set up by Nick Fury as a failsafe in case S.H.I.E.L.D. was compromised.


  • Adaptational Nationality: Changed from German in the comics to American in MCU.
  • Badass Family: With his brothers and fellow S.H.I.E.L.D.agents.
  • Basement-Dweller: In a manner of speaking. While he doesn't live at home, Koenig fits the type as he is likely the only person residing in "Providence". His isolated assignment has allowed him to rack up some major time on Call of Duty with his brother.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: He may look more like a desk jockey than a secret agent, but don't let that fool you. He was hand picked by Fury himself to watch over a secret base. When he notices the readings are off when Ward's in the lie detector, he immediately grabs a gun and keeps pushing Ward for more direct answers to his questions regarding HYDRA, and doesn't seem scared in the slightest. He also threatened Coulson in regards to revealing Fury's survival, without flinching.
  • Fanboy: His welcoming of Coulson can be compared to Coulson's own welcoming of Captain America.
  • Forgotten Fallen Friend: Averted. He's brought up in the Season 3 penultimate fall episode.
  • Geeky Turn-On: After Skye hacks the NSA's satellites, he says he understands why Ward likes her so much.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: Implied Trope. If Nick Fury, someone with major trust issues, trusts him to run his super secret, if-all-else-fails base, then he's gotta be pretty darn trustworthy. Hell, he's in that VERY exclusive club that knows Fury's still alive after the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier.
  • Killed Off for Real: Ward kills him after he starts to uncover too much about his allegiance with HYDRA. Skye finds his body, so he's definitely dead.
  • Mauve Shirt: He's the only person residing at Providence who hasn't been on the show up until now. Take a guess what happens.
  • No Social Skills: Smooth is not a word you'd use to describe him.
  • Properly Paranoid:
    • Given that HYDRA just launched a coup from within S.H.I.E.L.D. itself, he's understandably reluctant to trust the rest of Coulson's team until they've been properly vetted. When he sees Skye about to call Ward, he snaps at Coulson for allowing her to call a number at a secretive army base.
    • Not only does Koenig distrust the rest of the team, he also hides from them the fact that Nick Fury's still alive, only trusting Coulson with the information. Smart call, especially since it was revealed that Ward is with HYDRA.
  • Rules Lawyer: He's quite adamant about sticking to Fury's rules, including keeping the team besides Coulson Locked Out of the Loop about Fury's own survival. He also is willing to give Team Coulson some new clearance cards but in due time, as he is beginning to trust them. Turns out that this was a very good call on his part. Had he shared that with the entire team, HYDRA would have found out as well about Fury's survival once Skye called Ward.
  • Secret-Keeper: One of the few people in the world who knows Nick Fury is alive after Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Agent Billy Koenig

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/billy_koneig_aos_2603.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Patton Oswalt

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 22: "The Beginning of the End")

A Level Six agent in charge of "the Playground", a secret base set up by Nick Fury as a failsafe in case S.H.I.E.L.D. needed to rebuild from the ground up. His brother, Eric, is the agent who was put in charge of Providence.


  • Ambiguously Human: Is implied to be a robot. "Hot Potato Soup" reveals that no, he's not a robot, although he did work on the original LMD program.
  • Backup Twin: Although he was mentioned before appearing, there was no indication he was also a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent or Eric's twin. Which is really is just the tip of the iceberg for how surprisingly similar they are.
    • It turns out there's several Koenig brothers, with Sam Koenig appearing in a SDCC special teaser.
    • Triplett claims that Billy introduces a new brother into the mix every time they speak and that each brother is described in exactly the same way. Triplett spends a lot of time trying to rationalize it all in his head, and he practically has a Heroic BSoD when he sees Billy and Sam together.
  • Badass Family: With his brothers and fellow S.H.I.E.L.D. agents.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Eric mentioned that he spent most of his time playing Call of Duty with his brother, which always seemed odd since he was in a top-secret base. It's less odd when we find out said brother was also in a top-secret base.
  • Dead Alternate Counterpart: The Framework version of Billy died revealing the location of the Playground to S.H.I.E.L.D., allowing them to use it as their secret base.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partner: With his brothers. He's very upset over Eric's death.
  • Rules Lawyer: Like his brother Eric was at Providence, Billy is stringent about maintaining regulations in the Playground, especially when it comes to the ID lanyards.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: Both in-universe and out. He greets Coulson with the exact same speech as his identical twin brother.
    • Lampshaded by Fitz in the Season 2 opener "Shadows", claiming he was their new "golden boy". With Fitz not being what he was once was, Billy is the only person that has been shown that could do some of the stuff like Fitz has done.

Agent Sam Koenig

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sam_koenig_695.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Patton Oswalt

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 31: "...Ye Who Enter Here")

A Level Six Agent just like his brothers Billy and Eric. He first appered in a special SDCC 2014 video, before appearing in the show proper in "Ye Who Enter Here". He's in charge of the Theta Protocol. He has a crush on Bobbi.


  • Ambiguously Human: Billy jokes that he's a robot. Well, at least, Trip thinks he's joking... It's eventually clarified later in "Hot Potato Soup" that he's not actually a robot.
    Billy: All the excitement fried [Sam's] circuits. His cooling system kicked in and he's recharging his batteries.
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: Billy considers him this due to his fanboy reaction to getting to meet agents like May and Morse.
  • Back Up Twin: Looks just like his brothers, he is exactly like Eric.
  • Badass Family: With his brothers and fellow S.H.I.E.L.D. agents.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: First appears in a promotional video for season 2 at San Diego Comic-Con in July 2014, before finally appearing in the show proper on the December 2nd episode "Ye Who Enter Here".
  • Has a Type: Sam is explicitly attracted to women who can kick ass.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partner: With his brothers. He's very upset over Eric's death.
  • Insistent Terminology: He keeps referring to Daisy Johnson as "Agent Quake" in "Hot Potato Soup", even after she expresses her dislike of the name.
  • Secret-Keeper: It is revealed in "Scars" that he was in on Coulson's Theta Protocol.
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: When he mentions that there are Slash Fics involving Daisy and Black Widow, he says that he's never read any of them, but he's aware that the stories and associated drawings are quite "steamy". Daisy looks like she wishes she could unhear that.

Agent L.T. Koenig

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/koenig_lt.jpg
"Agent L.T. Koenig. Sorry about kicking your candy ass."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Artemis Pebdani

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 78: "Hot Potato Soup")

The older sister of the Koenig brothers, and the one who recruited them into S.H.I.E.L.D.


  • Action Girl: To be expected of the sister of the Koenigs, as she easily overpowered Agent Davis. In fact, she trained the brothers.
  • Adaptation Name Change: In the comics, Eric Koenig's sister was named Ilsa Koenig. Then again, Ilsa Koenig was also a member of the German Resistance and Nick Fury's lover during World War II, so maybe it's not accurate to say that LT is based on Ilsa.
  • Big Sister Mentor: She was the one who recruited and trained Eric, Sam, and Billy. She's actually surprised that she wasn't able to recruit Thurston.
  • Big Sister Bully: When Daisy asks what it was likely growing up with quadruplets, LT says that there was a lot of crying...because she picked on them. She also casually shot Thurston with ICEr to shut him up when he refused to go into S.H.I.E.L.D.'s protection.
  • I Have Brothers: Inverted. They learned all of their masculine skills from her.

    Agent Isabelle Hartley 

Agent Isabelle Hartley

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/isabelle_hartley_aos_5395.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Lucy Lawless

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 23: "Shadows", in Episode 37: "One Door Closes")

A longtime member of S.H.I.E.L.D. who is an experienced undercover operative. She has prior history with Coulson, and aides him in his efforts to rebuild the organization.


  • Action Girl: On the day S.H.I.E.L.D. fell, she took down legions of HYDRA goons with throwing knives and her bare hands.
  • Alternate Self: Has a lookalike on Earth-96283.
  • An Arm and a Leg: She grabs the original 084 with her bare hand in an attempt to use it against Creel, forcing it to be cut off to save her life. Not that it ultimately saves her.
  • Blood Knight: If you tell her that there are 14 decks of HYDRA goons between her and control of an aircraft carrier, her response will not be fear but excitement.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Lady Sif (who happens to have made a couple appearances on the show herself) was referred to as "Xena" in the first Thor film.
  • Dead Star Walking: More proof that celebrities on this show have a high death rate: She dies at the end of her first episode.
  • Devious Daggers: She's an accomplished undercover agent, who always has a knife on her and is very adept at using it.
  • Due to the Dead: In "Heavy is the Head", the military buries her with full honors.
  • Hide Your Lesbians: The writers considered revealing that Isabelle Hartley from Season 2 was Victoria Hand's former lover, but cut any mention of this from the script since they thought Hartley's death would cause people to accuse the show of exploiting the Bury Your Gays trope. However, a later episode featured a flashback to the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, in which Hartley mentions having checked in on Hand, referring to her as "Vic", indicating that not only they knew each other but that they were also close.
  • Mauve Shirt: Creel kills her and Idaho by flipping their car. Only Hunter makes it out alive.
  • Minor Major Character: She dies in her first episode, but it turns out much later that she's quite crucial to the circumstances of Season 2 - she played a big part in liberating the Iliad, and during her time as The Mole she recruited her old friend (and Bobbi's ex-husband) Lance Hunter into her team for a time; this would have major consequences later on, with Hunter developing Undying Loyalty to Coulson and hampering the plans of Real S.H.I.E.L.D. massively.
  • The Mole: Turns out she was part of the 'Real' S.H.I.E.L.D. faction led by Gonzales and a mole alongside Bobbi and Mack.
  • Take a Moment to Catch Your Death: Hartley's team seems to be in the clear, escaping from the military and Hunter having amputated her arm to save her from the 084's infection. Then they crash into Creel, killing both Hartley and Idaho.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Dies in her first episode.

    Idaho 

Idaho

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/idaho_aos_9781.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Wilmer Calderon

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 23: "Shadows")

Idaho is a mercenary Coulson recruits to combat HYDRA and is teammates with Hartley and Hunter.


    Agent Noelle Walters 

Agent Noelle Walters

Species: Human

Citizenship: Unknown

Portrayed by: Melanie Cruz

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 28: "A Fractured House")

An agent in charge of a S.H.I.E.L.D. team in the Netherlands.


    Agent Tomas Calderon 

Agent Tomas Calderon

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9cab09cf9a05a4fd13b58bfabfcc9ca4.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Kirk Acevedo

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 36: "Love in the Time of HYDRA", Episode 37: "One Door Closes")

A subordinate agent to Robert Gonzales and a senior member of his "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D..


  • Bald of Evil: He's bald and the nastiest member of Gonzales' council.
  • The Dragon: He appears to be Gonzales' right-hand man.
  • Hate Sink: Seems to serve the singular purpose of generating audience dislike for the 'real' S.H.I.E.L.D. compared to the more reasonable Gonzales and already likable Weaver.
  • Hot-Blooded: More passionate than the other leaders of his faction of S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: Got impaled by a fast moving branch after Skye used her powers to defend herself.
  • Jerkass: Takes great pleasure at Bobbi's visible discomfort when Lance learns the truth about her, and shortly after accuses her of being a traitor for not stopping Lance.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: In regards to his accusation of Bobbi allowing Lance to escape; she did deliberately allow him to fight his way out and made no effort to subdue him, if only because she wasn't convinced he would succeed.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Tried to shoot Skye dead and got skewered (non-fatally) for it.
  • Token Evil Teammate: Probably the one and only member of the group who could be considered morally completely rotten.

    Agent Oliver 

Agent Oliver

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/oliver_mcu.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Mark Allen Stewart

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 36: "Love in the Time of HYDRA", Episode 41: "The Dirty Half Dozen")

Another subordinate to Gonzales and member of the "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D. leadership.


  • Flat Character: Not as developed as his peers, he's mostly there to fill in the leading board of "Real" S.H.I.E.L.D.. What is known is that he's less harsh than Gonzales, Weaver and especially Calderon.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: He (implicitly) outvoted Gonzales on the matter of letting May onto the board.
  • Taken for Granite: He and several other agents are killed when Jiaying traps them in a room and shatters a diviner-laced crystal inside.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: He received very little characterization before Jiaying killed him.

    Agent Damon Keller 

Agent Damon Keller

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/keller_aos.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Lucas Bryant

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 111: "Missing Pieces")

A STRIKE agent recruited by May into S.H.I.E.L.D. after it was reformed under the leadership of Director Alphonse Mackenzie.


  • Body Horror: The alien bat parasite begins turning Keller into Human Architecture Horror, with long jagged spikes coming out of everywhere on his body and growing as they made contact with the walls.
  • The Cuckoolander Was Right: His and Fox's idea that the strange occurrences are happening on the Ley lines is initially blown off as a stupid idea, but they're proven right. Keller never lets the chance to mention this pass by.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Snarks fairly frequently. Even after getting infected by the parasite and is possibly dying, he keeps it up, joking to Yo-Yo that it's a little soon to bring a parasitic alien into their relationship and wanting to know if it's ok.
  • Love Interest: Begins a secret relationship with Yo-Yo after she and Mack broke up.
  • Mauve Shirt: He is a very prominent character at the start of Season 6, until his death in the fourth episode.
  • Mercy Kill: Yo-Yo is forced to stab him with Sarge's knife to halt the parasitic transformation his body was undergoing that could have destroyed the entire base.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted. He shares a surname with S.H.I.E.L.D.'s 1990s-era director from Captain Marvel. It's not inconceivable that he could be a descendant or relation.
  • Sacrificial Lion: He only outlives Fox by two episodes (three if you count the one he didn't appear in.)
  • Those Two Guys: With Agent Fox, who was from near Keller's hometown and who he helped recruit into S.H.I.E.L.D.

    Agent Trevor Khan 

Agent Trevor Khan

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Shainu Bala

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A STRIKE agent recruited by tasked by Director Mackenzie with infiltrating Deke Shaw's Company.


  • False Friend: He befriends Deke and hangs out with him in order to keep up his cover. Deke believes Trevor actually likes him, which is not the case.
  • Mauve Shirt: After playing a supporting role throughout season six, when the Chronicom Hunters take over the Lighthouse, he's among the agents lined up and executed by the invaders.
  • Professional Buttkisser: To keep up his cover, he constantly praises Deke and his endeavors.
  • The Mole: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s mole within Deke's company.

    Agent Dimitri Smerdyakov 

Agent Dimitri Smerdyakov

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/spiderman_farfromhome_movie_screencapscom_4372_1.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: Russian

Portrayed By: Numan Acar

Appearances: Spider-Man: Far From Home

A member of Nick Fury's crew operating in Europe.


  • Adaptational Heroism: In the comics, Dimitri Smerdyakov is Spider-Man's foe the Chameleon. Here, he's working for Nick Fury (or maybe Talos, it's not clear which or if he knows the difference).
  • Alternate Self: Will have a counterpart in Sony's Spider-Man Universe with the upcoming Kraven film.
  • Ambiguously Human: After the reveal in the stinger, there has been some arguing in the fandom as to whether he and the female agent who gives Peter the stealth suit are humans or Skrulls.
  • The Comically Serious: Dimitri has one hell of an impressive poker-face, even in the face of all the weirdness that comes with babysitting Peter Parker. The only time he seems to lose his cool is when he rolls his eyes and shakes his head in pure annoyance and disapproval of Flash's social-media nonsense.
  • In Name Only: Outside of sharing the same real name, he has zero resemblence to the Chameleon of the comics lacking his distinctive appearance, Master of Disguise abilities, and villainous role.
  • The Quiet One: He only has one line in the entire film, telling Mr. Harrington that they're making a short rest stop. This technically doubles as a Mythology Gag to some depictions of his comic book counterpart, which have him never speak while not under a disguise.
  • Race Lift: in the comics Dimitri Smerdyakov is a white man of Russian origin, while in the movie, he is played by Turkish actor Numan Acar.
  • The Spook: Aside from his name, E.D.I.T.H. has absolutely no data on this guy, or at least none that Peter can actually access due to it being encrypted. Justified in that he's a spy.

    The Deke Squad 

The Deke Squad

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dekesquadaos.jpg
Left to right: Roxy, Mack (in foreground), the Chang brothers, Olga, Deke. Not pictured: Cricket.

Species: Humans

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Tipper Newton (Roxy Glass), John Yuan (Tommy Chang), Matt Yuan (Ronnie Chang), Jolene Anderson (Olga Pachinko), Ryan Donowho (Cricket)

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A cover band formed by Deke Shaw while stranded in the early 1980s, as a disguise for his ad-hoc S.H.I.E.L.D. cell operating out of the Lighthouse.


  • Ambiguously Gay: Olga tells Roxy (in Russian), "My heart resides forever in your beautiful clutches."
  • Broken Pedestal: The Chang twins are upset to find that Deke actually didn't write any of the songs they're playing, not even "Walk Like An Egyptian".
  • The Bus Came Back: Three episodes after Mack and Deke leave them, Roxy reappears, having started training to become a legitimate S.H.I.E.L.D. agent (having found out that Deke actually didn't have the authority to recruit her into S.H.I.E.L.D.).
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Cricket doesn't seem to be on the same plane of reality as the rest of the squad. Notably, he's the only one to not double as a secret agent.
  • Demolitions Expert: Olga.
  • Dirty Coward: The Chang twins, despite putting up a decent fight against Sybil's Killer Robots at first, panic and abandon their team when the bots start shooting lasers. Deke still forgives them.
  • Egocentric Team Naming: Named for lead vocalist Deke Shaw.
  • Hidden in Plain Sight: As Deke explains to Mack, the band is actually a good disguise for a S.H.I.E.L.D. faction, as they can move heavy equipment unchallenged and any odd behavior will be chalked up to drugs.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: Roxy seems to think Alfie is Mack's son (when the former is the latter's younger self), implying that Deke either didn't mention Time Travel to them, or just kept the situation with Mack's younger self a secret.
  • Made of Iron: Olga is seriously injured twice in a manner that might look like a Red Shirt going down, only for her to recover soon enough.
  • Master of Disguise: The Changs, according to Deke. We never actually see them do it.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: We never learn Cricket's real name.
  • Plagiarism in Fiction: Unbeknownst to the rest of the band, Deke is ripping off 80's pop songs that were (will be?) written by completely different people.
  • Psycho Party Member: Olga uses live explosives during the team's training sessions.
  • Pun: Deke's cover band is a cover for his operations.
  • The Runt at the End: When Deke is telling Mack about the squad, he lists off their capabilities as agents... except Cricket, who's just a drummer and drug dealer.
  • Sacrificial Lamb: Cricket doesn't get any noticeable development before one of Sybil's robots kills him.
  • The Smart Girl: Deke seems to regard Roxy as this.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Roxy tears into Mack for cutting himself off from everyone and abandoning his "son" (read: younger self), even while Deke checks up on the boy.

S.H.I.E.L.D. Support Staff

    Benny Pollack 

Benjamin "Benny" Pollack

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/benjamin_pollack_3691.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jesse Bradford

Appearances: Item 47

"I hope you are right..."

One half of the Outlaw Couple that formed following the Battle of New York. After getting pitched the crazy idea to rob banks with his girlfriend, he went along with it reluctantly, but deep down is grateful for the chance to finally live out their dreams.


  • Anti-Villain: Just an ordinary guy reluctantly robbing banks to fix his life's problems.
  • Boxed Crook: At the end of Item 47, he's given a job at S.H.I.E.L.D. in their Research and Development department's "Think Tank" due to his skill with Chitauri weaponry.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: He manages to make the Chitauri gun work, while S.H.I.E.L.D. hasn't made any progress with it.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Bank robber to S.H.I.E.L.D. employee.
  • Henpecked Husband: Pre-husband, as Claire is his girlfriend, but she still definitely shows she's the boss.
  • Outlaw Couple: With Claire; they rob banks.
  • Pink Girl, Blue Boy: In Item 47, he wears a black ski-mask, while Claire's is pink.
  • Shout-Out: His name is a Shout-Out to Bonnie of Bonnie and Clyde.
  • Super Weapon, Average Joe: Ordinary human with no connection to anything super except for the Chitauri gun.
  • Villain Protagonist: A bank robber starring in Item 47
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Since S.H.I.E.L.D. is revealed to be infiltrated by HYDRA all along, his fate after S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Civil War has yet to be revealed.

    Claire Wise 

Claire Wise

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/claire_wise_icon.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Lizzy Caplan

Appearances: Item 47

"I'm always right. And I'm always right about you."

Claire's had a hard life of bills, rejected dreams, and alien invasions. But when a Chitauri gun literally falls out of the sky as if as a present, she sees the chance to finally take matters into their own hands and gain the means to live like they want to.


  • Anti-Villain: Just an average woman with bills to pay who thinks she could solve her problems with bank robbing.
  • Boxed Crook: At the end of Item 47, she's given a job at S.H.I.E.L.D. as Agent Blake's new assistant.
  • Deus ex Machina: She thinks of the Chitauri gun as this. After all, it literally fell out of the sky.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Bank robber to S.H.I.E.L.D. employee.
  • Outlaw Couple: With Benny. Bank robbing was her idea.
  • Pink Girl, Blue Boy: In Item 47, she wears a pink ski-mask, while Benny wears a black one.
  • Shout-Out: Her name is a Shout-Out to Clyde of Bonnie and Clyde.
  • Super Weapon, Average Joe: Ordinary human with no connection to anything super except for the Chitauri gun.
  • Villain Protagonist: A bank robber starring in Item 47
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Since S.H.I.E.L.D. is revealed to be infiltrated by HYDRA all along, her fate after S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Civil War has yet to be revealed.
  • Women Are Wiser: Thinks of herself because she's the one taking chances and opportunities to find a better life.

    Dr. Streiten 

Dr. Streiten

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/streiten.jpg
"You'd lost your will to live. We tried to give it back."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ron Glass

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 1: "Pilot", Episode 11: "The Magical Place")

A physician working for S.H.I.E.L.D. He knows how Coulson survived being stabbed by Loki during The Avengers.


  • My God, What Have I Done?: Is both obviously traumatized and horrified over what they had to do to bring Coulson Back from the Dead.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here: He goes off the grid after Coulson confronts him about his resurrection, with not even S.H.I.E.L.D. able to find him.
  • Secret-Keeper: Along with Maria Hill, he's one of two characters confirmed to know how Coulson was resurrected besides Nick Fury, who ordered it.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: No further mention of him is made after he disappears, with his fate after HYDRA's emergence being unknown; and with Ron Glass' death, it's unlikely we'll get any more about him.

    Cameron Klein 

Technician/Specialist Cameron Klein

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/9324882346419.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Aaron Himelstein

Appearances: Captain America: The Winter Soldier | Avengers: Age of Ultron

"I'm not gonna launch those ships... Captain's orders."

Cameron Klein was a S.H.I.E.L.D. Technician responsible for the launch of the Insight Helicarriers.

He's later recruited by Nick Fury and Maria Hill along with several other former S.H.I.E.L.D. agents in relaunching the 'mothballed' Helicarrier.


  • Ascended Extra: In Avengers: Age of Ultron, he's recruited by Nick Fury as a technician for the old Helicarrier in a bid to evacuate the citizens of Sokovia before Ultron could enact his Evil Plan. Upon arrival he launched the Helicarrier's lifeboats to the now levitating city so that the Avengers and local law enforcement could commence with the evacuation. This time, he's credited with the name "Cameron Klein".
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Averted, as he intended one by defying Rumlow's commands while having a gun put to his head, but Sharon managed to kick him away from the gun and thus save his life.
  • Mission Control: His job in S.H.I.E.L.D. is to offer assistance with information and technology to those in the field.
  • Mythology Gag: In the comics, he is grandson of Stanley Klein, a United States Armed Forces private rescued by Captain America and the Howling Commandos during World War II. By knowing this, his loyalty to S.H.I.E.L.D. and Captain America becomes more heartwarming and meaningful.
  • Non-Action Guy: He's a technician, not personal combatant. It's made explicit by him hiding under his desk when the S.H.I.E.L.D. loyalists and HYDRA infiltrators start shooting at each other and in Avengers: Age of Ultron hysterically screaming when an Ultron drone breaches the Helicarrier bridge.
  • No Name Given: He's unnamed until his appearance in Avengers: Age of Ultron.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted and made into Decomposite Character. The other man with the name "Cameron Klein" is a retired S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and T.A.H.I.T.I. patient from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. who now lives with new name, Hank Thompson.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Cap ends up stopping Project Insight with only a second left to go, which would not have been possible had Klein not delayed the launch of the helicarriers for as long as he could, even with Rumlow holding a gun to his head. His decision saved literally millions of lives.
  • Undying Loyalty: To S.H.I.E.L.D. and Captain America as seen in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Even with Brock Rumlow holding him at gunpoint, he doesn't sacrifice his loyalty even if it might cost his life.
  • The Unreveal: In The Stinger of Infinity War, Nick Fury tells Maria Hill to contact Klein to do unspecified task before getting cut off by a car crash. Klein makes no appearance nor mention in Fury and Hill's next appearances in Endgame and Far Frome Home, leaving it ambiguous what they were trying to contact him for.

    Dr. Marcus Benson 

Dr. Marcus Benson

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bd096169_83e6_4ba2_922d_08f80722a6af.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Barry Shabaka Henley

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 111: "Missing Pieces")

A natural sciences expert recruited to S.H.I.E.L.D. by Director Mackenzie and Agent May from his former position at Culver University.
  • The Alcoholic: Slipped into Drowning My Sorrows after the death of his husband, to the point that his superiors at Culver University are slowly pushing him out the door to retirement. Sure enough, May and Mack meet him in a bar.
    • "From the Ashes" implies that the problem goes back even further, as a manifestation of Benson's late husband accuses him of having been drunk on the night of the car crash that claimed his life.
  • Badass Bookworm: A middle-aged, alcoholic university professor...who flatly refuses to help Izel, a body-hopping alien destroyer goddess, with the information she needs to pull off her Evil Plan.
    Benson: I've already lost everything that matters. Death doesn't scare me.
  • Bluff the Impostor: He quickly catches on when Yo-yo refers to Agent Keller in the present tense in front of an Izel-possessed Mack, who doesn't catch the error until Benson has already deleted the schematics Izel needed.
  • Closest Thing We Got: Mackenzie and May seek him out as their organization lacks scientific "brains" with Fitz still lost out in space and Simmons still out of contact hunting for Fitz after a full year.
  • The Eeyore: Fairly uniformly serious and grim, at least so far.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink: Pours Mack a drink as he prepares to report that Sarge's DNA exactly matches Coulson's — then downs it himself after delivering the Wham Line.
  • Jumped at the Call: Being handed a folder full of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s current scientific challenges is enough to convince him to come aboard.
  • The Lost Lenore: His late husband is this to Benson, who has become The Alcoholic by the time he is introduced in Season 6.
  • The Mentor: Agent May explains that Dr. Benson had this relationship with her late ex-husband, Dr. Andrew Garner. Now, she and Mack intend for him to fulfill this role to a new generation of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents and scientists.
  • Not Afraid to Die: Flatly refuses to lead Izel to her "temple", saying that ever since the death of his husband, he's no longer afraid of dying.
  • Spear Counterpart: To Agent Weaver, who headed the S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy before the agency's fall in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and which Director Mackenzie intends for him to reestablish in the wake of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s relegitimization.
  • Straight Gay: It's mentioned that he was married to a late husband, but he has no overtly campy personality traits.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: To Dr. Streiten from Season 1. Dr. Benson focuses more on natural sciences rather than medicine, but still ends up dissecting a victim of the Shrike and attempting emergency surgery to try and save Agent Keller from the same creature.
  • Twofer Token Minority: Black and gay.

Former S.H.I.E.L.D. Operatives

    Felix Blake 

Felix Blake

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/blake_felix.png
"Hate's a good motivator."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Titus Welliver

Appearances: Item 47 | Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 6: "FZZT", Episode 16: "End of the Beginning", Episode 58: "Watchdogs")

"When I got out of the hospital it turned out there had never been a S.H.I.E.L.D., just HYDRA hiding behind one. I signed up to protect the world from these dangerous alien elements, [and now] you use them, unleash them, you've got those freaks working for you. Hell Phil, you are one. Makes me sick."

An agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. in charge of surveillance. After Outlaw Couple Benny and Claire get on the organization's radar due to their robberies, he tasks Sitwell with retrieving the alien Arm Cannon known as Item 47. After receiving traumatic injuries during the hunt for the Clairvoyant, Blake emerges from a coma after HYDRA revealed itself and new powered people began appearing more frequently around the world. Disgusted by what S.H.I.E.L.D. had become, Blake joined the Watchdogs and dedicated himself to protecting the world from powered individuals by any means necessary.


  • All There in the Manual: His first name is only shown for a split-second in "End of the Beginning".
  • Amazon Chaser: He tries (fruitlessly) to flirt with Melinda "The Cavalry" May while they're on a mission.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Psychics? Pfft, nonsense. Astrology? There's something to that. May calls him on this.
  • Badass Bureaucrat: Despite appearing a mere supervisor instead of a field agent, he fights Deathlok with admirable ability and even has the foresight to replace his weapon's ammunition with a tracker beacon so the other agents would be able to track him down.
  • By-the-Book Cop: He's a rather staunch rule-follower, which brings him into conflict with the likes of Coulson who sees the value of improvisation and unconventional tactics.
  • Despair Event Horizon: Blake's by-the-book dedication to S.H.I.E.L.D. dies a painful death; he's crippled by Deathlok and wakes up to discover that the organization he dedicated his life to was little more than an illusion maintained by HYDRA.
  • Evil Cripple: When he reappears as the head of the Watchdogs, it's revealed that Deathlok's attack left him paralyzed from the waist down.
  • Evil Former Friend: Coulson and Blake don't get along very well in "FZZT", but Blake was noticeably upset when he accidentally called Agent Sitwell "Coulson" in Item 47, and Coulson did consider Blake a friend. After he learned Coulson was resurrected with alien blood, however, Blake says that Coulson makes him "sick".
  • Face–Heel Turn: Blake was always a rather abrasive agent, but he was still a trustworthy S.H.I.E.L.D. agent. Then he gets crippled by Deathlok, and the HYDRA revelation pushes him into becoming the leader of an anti-Inhuman hate group called The Watchdogs.
  • Fantastic Racism: He develops a downright genocidal hatred of anyone who isn't a pure human. He considers all aliens and Inhumans to be the enemy simply by virtue of their species.
  • Irony: Unlike Agent Sitwell, Agent Blake was never a part of HYDRA when S.H.I.E.L.D. fell. Then, in season 3, he's becomes HYDRA's Unwitting Pawn by collaborating with the Watchdogs.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Despite coming off as gruff and unpleasant he honestly tries to reason with Deathlok, addressing him as "Mr. Peterson" and promising to help free him if he'll call off his attack. In addition, while Sitwell is a HYDRA traitor, he is not. However, his heart of gold is ripped out by his injury and the rise of HYDRA.
  • Jumping Off the Slippery Slope: While he wasn't all that pleasant to work with as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, and remained loyal unlike Agent Sitwell, who was part of HYDRA, he goes way off the deep end by actively supplying arms and intelligence to The Watchdogs.
  • Karma Houdini: He never gets any comeuppance for his role with the Watchdogs.
  • Locked Out of the Loop: His Not So Stoic entry shows he isn't Level 7, since he is unaware that Coulson survived his attempted murder by Loki. He got a promotion sometime between then and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D..
  • The Men in Black: He was in charge of the retrieval of Item 47, though Sitwell does the field work.
  • Must Have Caffeine:
    • The first thing he does when granted an assistant is tell her to make him coffee.
    • When given particularly difficult missions, his first reaction is to reach for more coffee.
  • Not So Stoic: He noticeably quiets up a bit when he accidentally calls Agent Sitwell "Coulson". It turns out even Blake misses him.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: In "FZZT" he insists that S.H.I.E.L.D. protocol be followed to the letter: if "infected cargo" is present on the Bus it has to be jettisoned into the ocean. Coulson's counter-argument that said "cargo" is a human being and fellow agent who still might survive her illness apparently has little impact on him.
  • Sinister Surveillance: He's technically on the side of good, but he comes across as rather sinister regardless. His first in-person appearance in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. cements this. He insinuates that Coulson's days with the agency are numbered. Then he touches Lola.
  • Smug Snake: He's not a villain per se, at least until he becomes one by joining The Watchdogs, but he's very confident in his own abilities.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: In the third season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., he reappears heading an anti-Inhuman organization called The Watchdogs, having developed (or at least acted on) a large amount of Fantastic Racism since his hospitalization in the first season.
  • Unwitting Pawn: To HYDRA in his new capacity with the Watchdogs.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Despite the Watchdogs taking a more central role in Season 4, Blake is nowhere to be seen and isn't mentioned by any character. The sole leader of the Watchdogs is Anton Ivanov aka 'The Superior'.
  • You, Get Me Coffee: Tries this at the end of Item 47, but is stymied by the fact that his new assistant can't make coffee.

    Richard Lumley 

Richard Lumley

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/richardlumley.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Boyd Kestner

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 12: "Seeds")

A S.H.I.E.L.D. agent who went off the grid after investigating an 0-8-4 in Hunan, China.


  • Combat Pragmatist: Uses the environment of the alley while fighting May, including a wooden pallet.
  • Cyanide Pill: Was willing to take one when he was confronted by Coulson and May.
  • Secret-Keeper: He's one of the only surviving people on the planet to know about the 0-8-4 from Hunan. It was Skye, and even he doesn't know the details, just that an entire village died to protect her when she was a baby.
  • Sole Survivor: Of the team that investigated the 0-8-4, with all the others being killed off one-by-one before Lumley went off the radar to avoid the same fate.

    Sebastian Derik 

Sebastian Derik

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/f9f4f73907b7b479f1f04f0eab01bae1.png
"I do some carving now and then."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed by: Brian Van Holt

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 28: "A Fractured House", Episode 29: "The Writing on the Wall")

A S.H.I.E.L.D. assassin and test subject of Project T.A.H.I.T.I.


  • Anti-Villain: What really drives him into villainy and becoming Serial Killer is because the effect of G.H. Serum from T.A.H.I.T.I. Project. Anyone exposed to it gains some of the alien's Genetic Memory, which comes in the form of a blueprint to an unknown city. However, his mind cannot properly process the image and he desperately needs an answer from this.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: Inverted. Rather than going mad, he calmed down and is saved from madness after knowing the answer to the symbols: blueprints to a city.
  • Professional Killer: He was a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent working as an assassin.
  • Serial Killer: Becomes one for test subjects of Project T.A.H.I.T.I. due to his GH.235-induced obsession to complete the Words of Creation - on their bodies - and understand their meanings.

    Janice Robbins 

Janice Robbins

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/janice_robbins.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Monique Gabriela Curnen

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 29: "The Writing on the Wall")

Phil Coulson: How do you feel today?
Rebecca Stevens: Terrific. I've never felt better.
Coulson: Do you remember how you got here?
Stevens: I volunteered. I was dying, and when I woke up, everything was okay.

An art teacher who was once Rebecca Stevens, a Level Six S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and test subject of Project T.A.H.I.T.I.


  • Adaptational Badass: Her comic book counterpart is a historian whereas the TV show Janice/Rebecca is a trained S.H.I.E.L.D. agent.
  • Back from the Dead: She was listed as having died from cancer, which she actually had.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: Just like everyone else in the T.A.H.I.T.I. program. However, this is averted once their memories are wiped and they're given new identities.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: She was subjected to the Memory Overwriting Machine to cure her of the GH.235-induced psychosis.
  • Race Lift: The comic book version of Rebecca Stevens is a caucasian, whereas the TV version is a Latin of mestizo descent.

    Hank Thompson 

Hank Thompson

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/909dfac4756637b23956b42a8a50d2b7.png
"So I was some kind of super spy?"

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Joel Gretsch

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 29: "The Writing on the Wall")

"I know who I am. I'm Hank Thompson. I've got a wife I love, a kid I adore, and every day, I wake up happy."

A welder who was once Cameron Klein, an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. and test subject of Project T.A.H.I.T.I.


  • Achievements in Ignorance: Despite having his mind wiped after Project T.A.H.I.T.I. he built a model train set that completed the 3D map of the hidden city. He did this completely subconsciously which is quite an achievement given that dozens of people were trying to figure out the puzzle for years.
  • Back from the Dead: He's a patient of Project T.A.H.I.T.I. formerly named Cameron Klein.
  • Barehanded Blade Block: Hank Thompson catches a thrown knife in between his bare hands, before throwing it back, slicing clean through the rope holding Coulson.
  • Decomposite Character: In the comics, Cameron Klein is a S.H.I.E.L.D. technician. In the MCU, there's this former agent as well as a technician that appears in Winter Soldier and Age of Ultron both named Cameron Klein.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: Just like everyone else in the T.A.H.I.T.I. program. However, this is averted once their memories are wiped and they're given new identities. He's the only one that doesn't begin obsessively painting or sketching or carving the alien symbols. Because his way of expressing them is to build an elaborate model train set, making him the only one to display them correctly, in three dimensions.
  • Happily Married: He's perfectly content with living a quiet life with his family.
  • I Choose to Stay: When given the option of returning to his old life as Cameron Klein, decides that he'd much rather remain as Hank Thompson, family man.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: After catching the knife that Sebastian threw at him, Thompson manages to accurately throw it so that Coulson was cut from his bindings.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: Subjected to the Memory Overwriting Machine to cure him of the GH.235-induced psychosis.
  • Never-Forgotten Skill: Hank stops a knife that Sebastian throws at him by catching the blade in both hands. He looks surprised for a moment before throwing it at the rope holding up Coulson, freeing him. Apparently, that was a skill he learned back as Agent Klein of S.H.I.E.L.D.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted. There's an unrelated man with the name "Cameron Klein" in other Marvel Cinematic Universe media. He's the S.H.I.E.L.D. technician who disobey Brock Rumlow's order once HYDRA is exposed by Captain America in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. He reappears in Avengers: Age of Ultron, now works under Nick Fury, and the film credits him as "Cameron Klein".
  • Papa Wolf: He's protective of his family, especially where crazed GH-325 patients like Sebastian Derek are involved.
  • Retired Badass: He's a former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent and according to his file, one of the elite. He was forced into retirement via memory wipe and now he prefers his new life.

    Tony Caine 

Tony Caine

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Jake Busey

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A former student of the S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy and classmate of Alphonso Mackenzie. Eventually he was recruited by a government operation to provide new identities to HYDRA scientists which had been forcibly recruited.


  • Brilliant, but Lazy: Bright enough to obtain exam answers and forge fake IDs but rarely attending classes.
  • High-School Hustler: During his time in the Academy, he was a dealer of exam answers and fake IDs. This was the cause for his expulsion.
  • The Slacker: Unlike Mack, Caine was a lazy student that constantly missed classes.

    Rick Mason 

Rick Mason

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/be13d9c5_1d52_4db0_94cc_1ff3f65c0df9.jpeg

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: O-T Fagbenle

Voiced By: Tomokazu Seki (Japanese dub)

Appearances: Black Widow

A former agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. and ally of Natasha Romanoff.


  • Advertised Extra: Despite getting his own character poster, Mason only shows up in a few short scenes.
  • The Fixer: Is introduced having brought Natasha supplies and a set of fake IDs.
  • Race Lift: In the comic books, Rick Mason is Caucasian, whereas the MCU version is African-American.
  • Red Herring: Before Black Widow's release, some fans theorized that he was the true identity of Taskmaster, which was backed up by a number of the few scenes Rick appeared in. Turns out, they were wrong, for Taskmaster turns out to actually be a woman.
  • Unrelated in the Adaptation: In the comics, Rick Mason is the son of Phineas Mason aka the Tinkerer. No evidence of that is present here, and indeed, given Rick's Race Lift and the fact that their actors are of similar ages, it's probably not the case.

Former S.H.I.E.L.D. scientists

    Dr. Franklin Hall 

Dr. Franklin Hall

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hall_franklin.jpg
"I've seen the future, Mr. Coulson, and it's a catastrophe."

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Ian Hart

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (appears in Episode 3: "The Asset")

"S.H.I.E.L.D.? S.H.I.E.L.D. is just as guilty of the same thing, experimentation without thought of consequence! Your search for an unlimited power source brought an alien invasion."

A brilliant S.H.I.E.L.D. scientist who theorized on the existence of gravity manipulating element called Gravitonium, and who further invented a means of controlling it. When said element is discovered, he is kidnapped by an old colleague of his named Ian Quinn, who wants him to finish his research.


  • And I Must Scream: He's trapped inside the Gravitonium with Ian Quinn.
  • The Atoner: In his youth, he was quite enthusiastic about his research until he realized how if misused or worse, turned into a weapon, it could result in the deaths of millions. As an adult, he's very unwilling to continue work on it.
  • Bald of Evil: Or rather, Bald of Extremism.
  • The Bus Came Back: He's absent for four seasons after his appearance, doubly impactful because he appeared in the third episode, the ending of which established a cliffhanger.He finally comes back in Season 5, but doesn't become Graviton as many expected, instead, he becomes a Greater-Scope Villain for the person who does — namely, Glenn Talbot.
  • Composite Character: In-Universe. He was absorbed by the gravitonium, then in an act of vengeance, he compelled the gravitonium to absorb Ian Quinn as well, as a result anyone who subsequently absorbs the gravitonium ends up absorbing their minds, including General Talbot, who became Graviton, Hall's identity in the comics.
  • Decomposite Character: Unlike in the comics, he does not become Graviton; rather, it is General Talbot who takes the role. Although Hall is still a part of it (see Composite Character above).
  • Fake Defector: Pretends to go along with Quinn's scheme in order to sabotage the project and keep the device out of the wrong hands for good.
  • Kidnapped Scientist: Exploited. He pulled the strings of his own kidnapping in order to ruin his kidnapper's plans, but said kidnapper isn't aware of this.
  • Mentor Archetype: He was FitzSimmons's favourite professor at the S.H.I.E.L.D. Academy.
  • "Not So Different" Remark: Hall claims S.H.I.E.L.D. is this to people like Quinn - and that their desire to control things led to the events of The Avengers. Coulson ultimately realizes that he and Hall are similar as well, and that they both make tough calls to protect people just before he seemingly kills Hall to save innocent lives.
  • Start of Darkness: In the comics, he becomes a gravity-manipulating supervillain named Graviton after a lab accident. And indeed, during the course of the episode, he falls into his device and is absorbed by a bubble of gravity manipulating matter... and is then seen at the end trying to claw his way out from the inside, complete with Scare Chord.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Was willing to cause the deaths of quite a lot of people in order to destroy the device and prevent it from ever being used to hurt anyone. Coulson agrees that he has a point and that he made a tough call, but doesn't let him go through with it.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Ian Quinn escaped with the Gravitonium, presumably with Hall still trapped inside, in the first season finale, and neither have been seen since. It was probably the biggest open plot thread on the show, until the Gravitonium resurfaced in the fifth season to be used as Applied Phlebotinum in an effort to seal the "fear dimension" rift opened by the destruction of the three Monoliths. Still, there has been no sign of Dr. Hall, at least so far. It turns out that his consciousness is trapped inside the Gravitonium, and he seems to be able to direct it somehow, at least against Ian Quinn.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Is well aware that his research could and is going to be used to harm people, and is forced to accept the fact that if he doesn't do something about it, the world may very well be worse off for his contribution. And so he decides to destroy the device by causing it to go haywire, obliterating a wide area, sacrificing himself and causing the deaths of many innocent people in order to make sure this doesn't happen.

    Elihas Starr 

Elihas Starr

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/elihas_starr.jpg

Species: Human

Citizenship: British

Portrayed By: Michael Cerveris

Appearances: Ant-Man and the Wasp

A S.H.I.E.L.D. scientist who worked under Hank Pym before being fired, and father of Ava Starr/Ghost.


  • Adaptational Heroism: While not quite a "hero" and still morally-questionable as a scientist, he still very much cared for his daughter and wasn't an outright villain.
  • Adaptational Origin Connection: Egghead had absolutely no connection to Ghost in the comics. Here, he's the MCU version's father and the accidental source of her powers and condition.
  • Ambiguously Evil: Hank says that he's a traitor that deserved to be fired. A deleted alternate opening shows that Starr had actually stolen some of Hank's research to try to build his own Quantum Tunnel in the 80s, only to be foiled by Ant-Man and the Wasp.
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Never called "Egghead", though that has a justification: Elihas never went full-on villain in this continuity to begin with.
  • Composite Character: The Egghead of the comics was never married and never had a child, instead he had a sibling (unknown if brother or sister) who got married and had a child, Egghead's niece, Trixie Starr.
  • Death by Adaptation: Dead by the events of Ant-Man and the Wasp, but alive in the comics.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Not quite a saint, but he was still very much a family man.
  • Foil: Deleted scenes make him one to Bill Foster. Both worked with Hank Pym and make it clear how much they loath the man, to the point that they brush off his valid concerns just to prove him wrong, and both throw their lot in with criminal elements to achieve their own goals. The difference is in their motivations. Elihas is implied to have done it for the sake of proving his own scientific capabilities, dismisses Hank's warnings and winds up killing himself and his wife while doing some horrific damage to his daughter as a result. Bill is far more altruistic, wanting only to help Ava, and learns to look past his own baggage with Hank to heed the man's warnings, resulting in a much better ending for everyone involved.
  • Posthumous Character: Died in a Freak Lab Accident that also mutated his daughter when she was a child.
  • Related in the Adaptation: The father of Ghost in the MCU, unlike the original.
  • Together in Death: His corpse is seen lying next to his wife's.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Appears only over the span of a flashback and then dies.

    Dr. Bill Foster / Goliath 

Dr. Bill Foster / Goliath

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/billfoster_antmanandthewasp.png

Species: Human

Citizenship: American

Portrayed By: Laurence Fishburne, Langston Fishburne (young)

Appearances: Ant-Man and the Wasp

A former friend of Hank Pym's during Pym's time at S.H.I.E.L.D. and fellow expert in growing/shrinking technologies.


  • Ambiguously Evil: He supports Ava's criminal behavior as Ghost because he wants to save his adopted daughter, but he himself doesn't come across as particularly evil. When Ava goes too far in her suggestion to kidnap Cassie Lang, that's where he draws the line. Later, despite his longstanding hatred towards Pym, he eventually agrees to surrender and allow him to rescue Janet after Pym promises he can also cure Ava.
  • Anti-Villain: He isn't actually evil, but he is a willing accessory to most of Ava's crimes, and is willing to endanger Janet's life to save Ava's. He does however draw the line at extremes like child kidnapping or outright murder and he turns on Ava once he realises she is going too far, yet continues to be protective of her even after this.
  • Black and Nerdy: A brilliant scientist in his own right and a lecturer at a university by the time of Ant-Man and the Wasp.
  • Cast from Calories: Compares notes about how tiring sizeshifting to huge size can be.
  • Everyone Has Standards: Immediately becomes petty and abrasive once he's in a room with Hank, but is disturbed when Ava suggests going after Scott's daughter Cassie to force them into compliance, threatening that he'll sever ties with Ava if she goes that far.
  • Kick the Dog: A cold blooded one when Bill says that Janet was the only who could tolerate Hank without being pushed way and that she paid the price for it. Hope and Scott has to physically restrain Hank. It was out of line and foreshadows the antagonism between them.
  • Meaningful Name: Bordering on Punny Name: His surname is Foster he is Ava's foster father.
  • Morality Chain: Despite helping as best he can, there are lines he won't cross. He's determined to help Ava save herself, but he still threatens to stop helping her if she actually goes ahead with kidnapping Cassie Lang as a bargaining chip.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Was part of a S.H.I.E.L.D. program with Pym called "G.O.L.I.A.T.H.", which was an alias that both of them went by in the comics.
    • He wears a blue sweater with the collar up, a visual nod to his classic comic book costume.
  • Never Hurt an Innocent: How he approaches his efforts to cure Ava. He tolerates Ava's collateral damage, illegal activities and any harm that befalls criminals but he draws the line at hurting innocents, most notably when he adamantly refuses to allow her to kidnap Cassie Lang. He even urges Ava to trust that Janet can help her to stop Ava from killing her by draining her quantum energy, something he turns out to be right about.
  • Nice Guy: He's generally polite and cordial outside of his mutual bitterness with Hank. He's pleasant to Hope, Scott thinks he's cool before he's revealed to be working with Ghost, and presumably they get over that by the end of the movie, and he genuinely cares for Ava/Ghost, basically his foster daughter. Despite technically being an antagonist he's an Anti-Villain at most, and even this is downplayed. He tolerates Ava's ruthlessness when it's directed toward criminals, but not innocents, and his own part in her operations is strictly selfless, presumably having had a hand in building the suit and isolation chamber which she uses to mitigate her condition.
  • Old Superhero: He is implied to be a retired hero, similar to Hank Pym. It is Played With, as his actor Laurence Fishburne was around 55-56 during the filming of his first appearance, so it is not as extreme as other examples of this trope.
  • Parental Substitute: Toward Ava. It becomes clear that his help isn't just about one-upping Pym but out of genuine concern for his adopted daughter.
  • Passing the Torch: It's an indirect version. He was partners with Hank on the technology that created Giant-Man and is implied to be the original Goliath superhero. Far from being upset that Scott is now using the technology he takes genuine interest and looks very impressed when Scott tells him how large he was able to grow. It's a subtle moment that suggests Foster has given Scott his approval.
  • Pet the Dog: When it seems like Hank is having a heart attack he's aggravated, but semi-quickly agrees to grab Hank's medicine. Which Hank was counting on; he was faking it, and the container was a trap.
  • Related in the Adaptation: The adoptive father of Ava Starr, this version of Ghost. In the comics, Goliath and Ghost are not connected in any way.
  • Sitcom Arch-Nemesis: He hates Hank. It's like a laboratory argument between colleagues that has lasted three decades. That being said, he doesn't turn Hank into the FBI when they come knocking, and he seems like a genuinely good guy who wants to do the right thing which includes helping Ghost, since no one else will. Hank Pym just seems to have that effect on people — at least Bill didn't steal his company and try to kill him.
  • Sizeshifter: As the original Giant-Man/Goliath, he reached a height of 21 feet.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: In the comics, Bill was killed during Civil War. In the films, he's introduced alive and well in a story set after the MCU's version of the event.
  • Unreliable Expositor: He's heavily biased against Hank, so Bill's accounts of how their partnership ended should be taken with a grain of salt. Neither of them were there for Elihas Starr's death, and this also affects their judgment when it comes to Ghost.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: He immediately puts his foot down when Ava suggests kidnapping Cassie as a way of forcing Scott and the others into compliance, threatening to end their relationship if Ava hurts Scott's daughter.

    Dr. Holden Radcliffe 

Dr. Holden Radcliffe

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/radcliffe_holden.jpg
"It's not a hunch, it's science. It's a science hunch."

Species: Enhanced human

Citizenship: Scottish

Portrayed By: John Hannah

Appearances: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (first appears in Episode 62: "The Singularity")

"I believe that art and science are entwined. The Devil, and God, is in the details. I don't want people to see my work and know it's work. If they gave a second glance, I want it to be out of awe, not disgust."

A former GT Agrochemical researcher whose theories and experiments on transhumanism got him fired from the company. He was kidnapped and recruited by Hive in order to recreate the Kree experiment which had created the Inhumans, after which he was rescued by Team Coulson and began working with S.H.I.E.L.D.


  • Adaptational Heroism: While he frequently finds himself doing bad things, he's generally trying to do them for the right reasons, or because he hasn't been given any choice. His comics counterpart was an utterly ruthless Corrupt Corporate Executive who Would Hurt a Child.
  • Adaptational Nationality: Radcliffe in Machine Teen was American, this version is Scottish.
  • Affably Evil: He is entirely friendly to pretty much everyone (unless he thinks that they're working for HYDRA) and gets on very well with fellow scientists Fitz and Simmons, especially Fitz — as of season 4, the two are frequently sharing beers and discussing science. Really, he's mostly harmless. His only problem is his occasional lack of a moral compass, which doesn't really help matters when he takes one brief glimpse of the text of the evil Darkhold.
  • Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Routinely begs for his life whenever he upsets Hive.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: Considering he's killed while he's still under Darkhold's corruption, it's hard not to feel a little sorry for him. Doubles for his ultimate death in the Framework, where he is Dying Alone, lamenting how he is glad that he will die now, as he doesn't have his beloved Agnes with him anymore.
  • Anti-Villain: During Season 3, all he really wanted was to improve humanity, realizing too late what Hive was really up to. And in Season 4 he gets corrupted by the Darkhold, which warps his view on how to help humanity.
  • Arc Villain: Of the LMD pod in Season 4, all in an attempt to gain the Darkhold, and with it, the secret of immortality. By the end of the arc, though, he is supplanted by Aida as the true villain of the season.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: Forms an alliance with the Watchdogs, giving them information and LMDs in exchange for protection.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Turns out he's under the Darkhold's morality-corrupting control and is using Aida to try to retrieve it.
  • Catchphrase: "This was never my intention."
  • Character Death: Murdered by Aida in "Self Control" when she thinks his regrets could possibly go too far but she plugs him into the Framework immediately afterward. The death only applies to his physical body. However, his mind dies too when the Framework is shut down in "World's End".
  • Composite Character: He's essentially the Mister Sinister to Hive's Apocalypse, being an Evilutionary Biologist who serves an ancient super powered being. However, personality wise Radcliffe is very different from Sinister. His role as the creator of AIDA is from Tom Thumb.
  • Comically Missing the Point: Sometimes the worst thing about Radcliffe is his lack of proper morals. Other times, it's his lack of common sense, usually at Fitz's expense:
    • In "Failed Experiments", Hive goes on a speech on how concentrating powers in the hands of a few will result in a war, while his plan to spread the Inhuman gene will avert this. Radcliffe asks if this means they can start the experiment. Hive takes a moment to compose himself before saying yes, implying that this has happened before.
    • In "The Ghost", when a dumbstruck Fitz asks "What the hell?" regarding Aida's robot body, Radcliffe assumes that it's over Aida being caught in a loop trying to say hello. Fitz was actually asking where the hell Aida comes from.
    • In "Let Me Stand Next To Your Fire", after Fitz mentions how his eyes would bulge when he was frightened, he sees Aida talking with May, and nearly panics. Radcliffe is more interested in seeing that Fitz's eyes actually are bulging.
    • In "Broken Promises", Mack describes a missing Aida as a Sex Bot, which Radcliffe takes offense at—he's never had sex with Aida, they're just good friends. Fitz winces over how Radcliffe is making things actually worse.
  • Deadpan Snarker: He likes to snark from time to time.
    Radcliffe: [to Talbot] I can tell by your mustache that you're a man of much importance and not to be trifled with...
  • Death Equals Redemption: Literally! After being bumped off by Aida/Madame Hydra, he comes to realize that the Framework has gone too far out of control and, albeit with some coaxing, tells Simmons and Coulson where their friends are being held.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Radcliffe is the main villain of the LMD arc, as he is the one who programmed Aida to become more ruthless and steal the Darkhold. However by the end of the arc Aida kills him once she believes that his various regrets could lead towards him deactivating the Framework, becoming the season's true Big Bad in the process.
  • Everyone Has Standards: To Radcliffe, science is meant to improve humanity, not hinder or harm it. He was appalled to learn that HYDRA placed explosives in the Deathlok's ocular enhancements, believing it a horrible misuse of science. When he thinks that Fitz and Simmons are from HYDRA, he orders his security forces to take them away. While working for Hive, Radcliffe makes it pretty clear that he is uncomfortable working on non-volunteers and that his only interest is in advancing the human race. His accidental creation of the Alpha Primitives horrifies him. He also makes it absolutely clear to Aida that he does not approve of her killing Agent Nathanson and attempting to kill Agent May.
  • Evil Former Friend: To Fitz after his treachery is revealed. Interestingly, the Radcliffe LMD still indicates that Radcliffe still considers Fitz a friend, though it's fairly one-sided at that point.
  • Foil: To Fitz and Simmons, who work selflessly to protect humanity and have lines they will not cross and people they won't work with; Radcliffe is fairly amoral and will work with almost anyone so long as he can advance his transhuman agenda — though he draws the line at HYDRA, and Hive's plan to turn everyone who isn't Inhuman into a swayed Primitive horrifies him.
  • For Science!: He willingly works for Hive after being kidnapped due to the opportunity to advance the human race by making everyone an Inhuman. However, he is less than pleased when he realizes Hive is happy with creating the Alpha Primitives instead so that he can have an easy-to-control slave race. Eventually, he's absolutely horrified at everything he's done, but is too afraid of dying to do anything about it.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: He briefly glimpses the Darkhold but refuses to read anymore as he felt his brain was being overloaded. Unfortunately, that brief glimpse corrupted his mind as he wants to uses it to make people immortal, and by "Hot Potato Soup" even he seems to be starting to regret even that brief glimpse. By "BOOM", it gets to the point where he's actively discouraging other people from trying to read it.
  • Gone Horribly Right: He is dismayed at the ghoul-like abominations he's created with his experiment, but otherwise it worked exactly as intended. Those exposed to the virus are instantly transformed and enslaved to Hive.
  • Hannibal Lecture: After being captured by HYDRA, he's fond of giving personality-probing lines to his captors, particularly the Doctor and his father.
  • Heel–Face Turn: He develops a friendship with Fitz and Simmons at the end of season 3 and begins working with them regularly. When Simmons has only 24 hours to save May's life in season 4, she makes a bee-line to his house.
    • The episodes "No Regrets" and "The Return" cement his second one, where he provides everyone on Team Coulson the location to a backdoor out of the Framework.
  • Karma Houdini: Somewhat. He helps out S.H.I.E.L.D. in the end, but doesn't seem to face charges for his (at first) willing cooperation with Hive, despite numerous hearings. It's later clarified he was given a pardon, but he's forbidden to conduct experiments without supervision — creating Aida is something that could get him jailed. It goes back and forth over season 4, ending with the corruption of his work, the death of his true love, and his own death, and all of it can be linked back to him.
  • Killed Mid-Sentence: As everything in the Framework is being deleted, Radcliffe decides to spend his last moments before he meets the same fate watching the sunset on a beach with a bottle of liquor. He pours himself a glass and raises it for a toast, quoting T. S. Eliot, but is deleted before he can finish his sentence, and the glass he was holding just drops to the ground.
  • Like a Son to Me: Radcliffe admits that Fitz had been like the son he never had, and it's implied that Fitz felt the same way. Which makes Radcliffe's betrayal hurt Fitz all the more.
  • Mad Scientist: Advancing the transhuman agenda means replacing parts of his own body with what he considers to be superior components from birds or machines and doing the same for others. Personality-wise he's pretty mild.
  • The Man Behind the Man: At the end of "Broken Promises", he's revealed to be pulling Aida's strings after duping the others into thinking she rebelled against him.
  • May–December Romance: He's over twenty years older than Agnes, his lover, going by the ages for their actors.
  • The Medic: From time to time, and he tends to be quite good at healing humans, if only because he's willing to come up with solutions that are Crazy Enough to Work.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: His reaction upon seeing the Watchdogs transformed into mindless slave creatures. He all but utters the trope by name.
    • His breakdown in the Framework!Triskelion's prison "No Regrets" also screams this, after he loses Agnes. This inspires a shred of sympathy from Skye.
  • Not in This for Your Revolution: He's largely uninterested in Hive's aims to control the world, save where they intersect with his of improving humanity — when this results in the Primitives, which are as close to an antithesis of his ideas as you can get (they're not evolved humans, really, they're devolved) and Hive is entirely happy with, he's horrified.
  • Omni Disciplinary Scientist: Played With. He's a brilliant genetic biologist and cyberneticist, but the practical engineering of a nuclear warhead is beyond him.
  • Pet the Dog: He's rather fond of Fitz and Simmons, and in the stinger of Season 3 he expresses sadness at the number of friends they've lost. This inspires his latest project: improving LMDs... which ends up going rather wrong when he's exposed to the corrupting influence of the Darkhold in the next season.
  • Plucky Comic Relief: His nonchalance about mad science is played for laughs to various degrees and he makes a great wise guy when paired with Fitz as the straight man.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here: After witnessing Hive's horrors, he is all too happy when S.H.I.E.L.D. shows up.
  • Transhuman: Not only is he a a member of the transhumanist movement, he is a transhuman, having a hybrid avian eye.
    Radcliffe: Bird's visual acuity is superior to mammals, I got envious.
  • Virtual Ghost: After Aida kills him and uploads his consciousness into the Framework, Radcliffe can only exist in the Framework itself. He's naturally not pleased to be spending the rest of his life in a HYDRA world order, and after Agnes is killed he becomes near-suicidal.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: His intention with the Framework is to end suffering.

Others

    Others 

Top