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    Our Gay Wedding: The Musical 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bg_to_use_355z0833ch4wedding_a2.jpg
"It's gayer than Glee!"
"Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to witness, well. To witness something so extraordinary and historic. A day I thought I'd never live to see. As of Saturday the 29th of March 2014, we gays can get married. Not a civil partnership, the works; full equality, at last. So, let me introduce two grooms: Benjamin and Nathan, who wanted to celebrate by sharing their wedding - their actual wedding - with all of us. Along with some fabulous guests they will tell us how they fell in love, and how we came so, so far. And because Benjamin's a composer, and Nathan's an actor and singer, they're doing it all in a rather special way."
Stephen Fry, the opening speech

Our Gay Wedding: The Musical was one of the first same-sex weddings in the United Kingdom, performed on the day that marriage equality was legalised there, 29th March 2014. It was recorded and then aired on Channel 4 two days later, marking the start of the channel's new trend of very gay programming (along with February 2014's controversial Gay Mountain).

Benjamin Till, a musical composer and musical documentary director, was engaged to actor Nathan Taylor after the announcement that marriage equality was to be recognised again in England and Wales from March 2014note . Following the repeal, England and Wales became the 17th and 18th countries to permit same-sex marriagesnote . Till then got in touch with Channel 4 and pitched his idea of having his ceremony as a Sung Through Musical.

After an opening speech from Stephen Fry regarding the momentous occasion, a pre-recorded clip of family and friends singing a song of messages that the couple received upon announcing their impending nuptials whilst making their way to the hallnote  is played. The wedding-musical is entirely sung through except for two lines announcing recognition that legally have to be spoken. It also features a short video recounting the history and progression of homosexuality in England and Wales, another about the state of the world regarding homosexuality, and a pseudo-newscast that "interrupts" regular broadcastingnote . Some of it was shot in Australia.

Nathan and Benjamin met on the set of Boy George's musical Taboo, Nathan performing and Ben the musical director. Amongst other notable members of the UK gay community, Boy George makes a special appearance. The whole musical is "written and composed by Benjamin & Nathan - the grooms, featuring Noëlle & Celia - their mothers, Samantha & Edward - the MCs, officiated by Franschene & John - the registrars, and some very special guests." Thank god everyone they know lives in a Musical and so can sing really well.

Songs

  1. "OMG!"
  2. "Brand New Future"
  3. "Ladies and Gentlemen"
  4. "God Only Knows (What I'd Be Without You)" feat. The Feeling
  5. "Franschene's Script/I Know No Reason"
  6. "Let the Sun Light Shine/Feel the Love" feat. Alison Jiear
  7. "A Little Respect" feat. Andy Bell
  8. "Let's Get To Know The Grooms (I Love Him)"
  9. "Franschene's Script/I Know No Reason (reprise)"
  10. "Changing Expectations (My Children Make Me Proud)"
  11. "Franschene's Script: Introducing the Vows"
  12. "Benjamin, I Love You (Nathan's Vows)"
  13. "'Gay': A Young Lad/Love Conquers All (Benjamin's Vows)"
  14. "Ladies and Gentlemen (reprise)"
  15. "Make Your Own Kind of Music" feat. Hannah Waddingham and The London Gay Men's Chorus
  16. "It Gets Better/Love Conquers All" feat. Sharon D Clarke
  17. "Franschene's Script: You May Now Kiss The Groom"
  18. "Love Is Everyone (Under the Sun)" (feat. Michael Ball, The Overtones, Katherine Kingsley, Rufus Hound, Lesley Garrett, Sharon Bushman, Christopher Sieber, Kevin Burrows, The Rebel Chorus)

Tropes

  • Aluminium Christmas Trees: The opening song says that the wedding-musical is "camper than a chiffon Christmas tree", a thing which does indeed exist.
  • Call-Back: Unintentionally, one of the lyrics is very similar to one from Gay Mountain: "woman and woman, man and man"
  • The Cameo: The "special guests" include Boy George, Will Young, Kylie Minogue, Gok Wan, Paul O Grady, Nick Clegg (Deputy Prime Minister at the time), Ed Miliband (Leader of the Opposition at the time), Lynne Featherstone (former Equalities Minister), Lisa Stansfield, Julie Hesmondhalgh, Leona Lewis, Olivia Newton-John, Jon Snow (C4 Newscaster), Peter Tatchell, Sir Nick Partridge, Lorna Fulton, Dr Christian Jessen, Toyah Wilcox, Robert Fripp, Ana Matronic, Kristian Nairn, Alan Cumming, Katherine Jenkins, Immodesty Blaize, Rosanna Flamer-Caldera, Walter Collins.
  • Camp Gay: It's a gay wedding that's a musical.
  • Cast Full of Gay
  • Distant Duet: The grooms' mothers' song pre-recorded in Essex and the Midlands.
  • Double Entendre: "What if I laugh when the registrar talks about the ring?/Why would you laugh when the registrar talks about the ring?" Benjamin smirks.
  • Exact Words: "marriage is no longer defined as a union of one man and one woman, but the union of two people"
  • Ho Yay: Invoked, and even sung about: "It's gayer than 'Glee'!" (Even with Glee's double gay wedding in 2015, it may still be stereotypically "gayer" than that.)
  • "London, England" Syndrome
    • Averted by the Establishing Shot showing the outskirts of London (indistinguishable from any other city) and only titled with "London, Saturday 29th March 2014".
    • But used for "Thaxted, Essex / Two weeks earlier" because who's heard of Thaxted?
  • The Musical
  • Musical Opening Sequence
  • Neon Sign: The logo for the musical is fashioned like one.
  • Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peace: The script is different in the UK, not only featuring 'until death us do part' and 'I will', but also "if anybody present knows of any reason why these two should not be joined in matrimony, they should declare it now."
  • Spoken Word in Music: Stephen Fry's reading of Siegfried Sassoon's "Everyone Sang"
  • Values Dissonance: A line from "OMG!" mocking anti-gay parents: "Twitter is crazy and the trolls are going wild/ Because the gays are on TV and I must protect my child". Later, there's the line that "I've brought the kids/I want their first experience of a wedding to be this".
  • The West End


    Odessa Steps 
Indexes: Scenes, Stock Parodies, Stock Shout-Outs, ImageSource.Live Action Films A To L
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screen_shot_2016_11_07_at_144109.png
What a long staircase.
"When ruthless White Russian cavalry arrives to crush the rebellion on the sandstone Odessa Steps, the most famous and most quoted film sequence in cinema history is born."

The "Odessa Steps" scene is a Stock Parody of the climactic scene from The Battleship Potemkin.

A shoot-out happens on a set of steps, with the actions either slowed down or taking far longer than they really should. Optional: Oncoming soldiers, a shot through the eyeglasses, and a Baby Carriage rolling downhill. Though many people remember the famous scene in the train station of The Untouchables, they may not be familiar with the fact that this itself was a complete reference to a grander version set on the steps at Odessa in Battleship Potemkin.

And because of the only memorable thing to come out of that film, a lot of fiction now has action sequences on a staircase in slow motion. Unlike the "King Kong" Climb, though, the original and it's place in popular culture are not universally recognised; scenes that are smaller Shout Outs may be invoking the Genius Bonus. One such type of this scene is any case of a baby carriage rolling down stairs/downhill being put in slow motion and drawn out, often with a P.O.V. Shot from inside/looking into it (rather than a simple shot).

Note that, as the above paragraphs do describe, a full homage is not necessary to fulfil this: just enough to be recognisable. Truth be told, a lot of homages do just feature canny action sequences on large staircases — particularly the Alfred Hitchcock film Foreign Correspondent take on the scene; it combines the shooting-the-glasses and staircase brigade elements of the original. Most films with an action or attack sequence on a long frontal staircase is most likely an homage, though, given the scene's renown (and sheer impracticality to recreate for any other reason).

The actual staircase, the Richelieu steps, have now been renamed the Potemkin Stairs because of the film. The extended time that the action takes on the steps is an extension of their architecture, however, as they were designed as an optical illusion to appear much vaster than they are.

The original scene was one of the first uses of montage.

See also Baby Carriage and Homage Shot.


Examples

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Anime and Manga

  • Ergo Proxy: Viewers are treated to a baby carriage falling down a flight of stairs in slow motion during the mall chase early on in the series. Later, the carriage is shown lying on its side in a puddle of (presumably the baby's) blood.
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Film — Animated

  • Aachi and Ssipak: Beauty rolls down a staircase inadvertently strapped to a motorcycle as an homage to the baby carriage.
  • Beauty and the Beast: You have read that right; during the Angry Mob Song at the fight on the staircase, a baby carriage gets pushed down them.
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Film — Live Action

  • '71: Gary knocks over a woman pushing a pram while being chased by IRA gunmen.
  • Brazil has a short sequence that remakes the three most iconic shots, but with the baby replaced by a vacuum cleaner.
  • Evil Easter 3: Ozu shooting the Nazi Ape in the eye recreates the famous Eye Scream from the scene.
  • Fantozzi: There is a Film-within-a-film in this Italian work — in the second installment of the movie series, the titular White Collar Worker, Ugo Fantozzi, is forced, alongside his colleagues, to watch (a much longer parody-named version of) the movie as a "routine ritual" demanded by his boss. It is during the Odessa steps scene when the protagonist snaps and yells, "To me... Battleship Kotiomkin... is nothing but crazy bullshit!". Then the narrator — Fantozzi himself in first person — remarks in an "epic" tone: "Ninety-two minutes of applause ensued". (And hilarity ensued, too.)note 
  • Foreign Correspondent: Hitchcock's 1940 film includes a scene on a grand staircase in which a camera is rewired to physically shoot whoever it is pointed out. The resulting shot into the correspondent's glasses and the backwards fall down the centre of the staircase is an obvious homage to Battleship Potemkin.
  • The Godfather: The film starts its homage sequence referring to Battleship Potemkin, but then reproduces the fall from Hitchcock's film exactly.
  • The Three Stooges short Grips, Grunts and Groans: While running from some train depot guards, the Stooges knock over a baby carriage — containing a baby — and use the commotion of two women panicking over the injured infant to hide from their pursuers. It isn't exactly played for laughs, but it also isn't counted as a karmic strike against the Stooges, either.
  • The Hidden Fortress: A horde of prisoners runs down a staircase to meet the army.
  • Inglourious Basterds: The Film Within a Film "Pride of a Nation" (about Fredrick Zoller) shows a soldier get shot in the eye before covering it and screaming.
  • Metropolis: Fritz Lang's groundbreaking film from 1927 shows the workers in the bowels of the city panic at the rising floodwaters, and stampede up the stairwells seeking safety. Once they attain the city proper, the workers ascend the stately steps to the control building, seeking to confront the Master about their class disparity.
  • The Naked Gun Thirty Three And A Third: Frank has a flashback to the time he witnessed multiple baby carriages tumbling down a flight of stairs.
  • Revenge of the Sith: An homage during the Order 66 sequence as Anakin Skywalker, now known as Darth Vader, leads the clone army up the steps of the Jedi Temple to begin the purge.
  • The Trotsky: Leon has multiple dreams in which he is the baby on the Odessa steps. In the first dream, his stepmom is the woman pushing the carriage and his father is a nearby military guard. Later, he has the same dream again, with Alexandra as the woman, and his mentor as the guard.
  • The Untouchables: The most famous example, and where most people remember the scene from. It's a complete sequence homage, but in Union station.
  • When Nature Calls: Troma does a parody of it in When Nature Calls (1985)
  • Woody Allen:
    • bananas: When Fielding ends up in the war in San Marcos, during one of the shoot-outs there's a baby carriage rolling down the stairs.
    • Love And Death:
  • World War Z: Minus the steps, but the protagonist and his family stop at a supermarket that's being looted by panicked civilians. As he takes one daughter to get medicine, his wife puts their younger daughter in a shopping trolley and starts getting food and other supplies off the shelves. Suddenly he hears his daughter scream and sees her go flying down the aisle in the trolley, because her mother has just been attacked by a couple of opportunistic criminals.
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Live Action Television

  • Power Rangers in Space: In the episode "Silence is Golden", The Psycho Rangers have Applied Phlebotinum set up to hone in on the sound of the Rangers' voices within Angel Grove. So Cassie is hurrying back to base as silently as possible when she sees a baby carriage about to fall down a flight of concrete stairs. She struggles between protecting herself and warning the mother, but what other choice does she have...? (Besides morphing in public and rushing up to save the kid herself as the Pink Ranger, anyway.)
[folder]

Video Games

  • Chex Quest 2's "Cinema" level (its upgraded version, at least) has several "movies" playing, including one that is a loop of a baby carriage rolling down stairs. This is probably the most cerebral shout-out to be seen in a game about heroic anthropomorphic breakfast cereal.
  • The Licensed Game of The Untouchables uses the iconic film scene with the baby carriage rolling down the steps as the premise for an Escort Mission.
[folder]

Western Animation

  • Codename: Kids Next Door: In the episode "Operation DIAPER", a baby carriage rolls down a flight of stairs during a fight with a group of tooth-stealing babies. Number 3 chases it and catches it at the last moment, only to get punched in the face by the occupant.
  • The Critic: In the episode "Eyes on the Prize", Jay's student film, L'Artiste Est Morte, invokes this. It uses (cartoon) clips of parodies of famous film scenes — the Odessa steps one looks like it was filmed at his college, probably.
  • Dragons: Riders of Berk: A baby carriage goes careening down the steps in the episode "Gem of a Different Color" during the Changewing attack. It hits a cart and the baby is catapulted through the air, but fortunately Fishlegs and Meatlug are able to catch it safely.
  • The Simpsons: In one Halloween episode, Homer's ghost has twenty-four hours to do a good deed to get into Heaven. Just when he's almost out of time, he sees a carriage going down a flight of stairs and picks up the baby just because he's annoyed with its wails — the carriage continues its descent and once in a road is hit by a car and explodes in flames. The baby's mother believes it to be a miracle.
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    Badass Gay 
With the fading tradition of portraying gay people as effeminate, weak or perverted, and with some young people using the word "gay" as if it meant "incompetent" or "stupid", it still requires some skill to successfully make a character badass while at the same time have the character directly or indirectly engage in same-sex romance. If done well, the contrast between the negative stereotypes and the awesomeness of the character can enhance the character(s) and/or the plot.

The stereotype of gay people as effeminate and weak is almost exclusively used toward gay men. So to counter that stereotype, badass gay male characters are often Manly Gay or Gayngster. But that is not always case with all—enter Agent Peacock. Lesbians have the opposite problem since they often fall into the Lesbian Cop, Lesbian Jock, or Butch Lesbian stereotype in media. Being badass isn't the problem as much as making the character more well-rounded.


You may see some characters that are tough or awesome and also gay. That is not this. This is when there is a relation, at some point in the narrative, of a characters badassery and queerness. They are not badass and gay, they are badass gay.

This could be instances when the character forms a "badass" identity — a dominating personality, dangerous ability, or maybe an inflated ego with reason — without knowing that they are gay but, when they realize, they do not become wimpier (the usual storyline upon a "badass" or violent character coming to a gay awakening is to become softer).

On the other hand, it could be when the badass persona was adopted because the character is gay. It may be part of an Armored Closet Gay disguise, but also when the character is out and wants to defy stereotypes or protect themselves. One sub-set of this may be the suggestion that being gay has tempered the character to toughness. It can also be seen that in fiction, characters are more likely to be accepted as gay if they are not just Straight Gay or Manly Gay, but exceedingly manly to "make up for it".

When a character in a situation in which it would be unusual to be badass, but the gay characters are, this is also in play as the setting of the work invokes that either trait is a result of the other. There could also be situations where everyone is badass, but the gay character either does it better or is also the Badass Normal who manages to match or out-badass the others anyway.

Additionally, this covers characters that exploit their sexuality for a badass-related benefit (e.g. spies seducing same-sex marks... or distracting opposite-sex marks with homoerotic activity). It also covers the invocation that gay male characters may train harder than their straight counterparts because they are not focused on fighting being a masculinity contest, trans male characters training harder in order to prove their masculinity, and Lipstick Lesbian characters (who are also the height of stereotypically unlikely to be tough) either wanting to prove their strength or being confident in their badass abilities to beat everyone else out of nowhere.

The introduction of a character's badassery may be as a result of a sexuality-related incident: defending their honor, anger at different standards, gayngst or another. They will stick up for their sexuality (physically or no). They may be a badass in general, but go harder when it's personal, or a peaceful character who won't take homophobia and secretly has the ability to do something about it. A situation which shows both being gay and being a badass, if they're simply correlation not causation, does not count.

If there are multiple gay characters put into a situation and one acts more "badass" in the same conditions than the others, they may qualify.

One storyline that ties into this trope is the idea that a character is being a badass by (having the balls to) coming out or being gay (or dealing with being Forced Out of the Closet triumphantly).

A Badass Gay character may discuss or acknowledge in universe why or how they have embraced both traits.

The most common use, however, is being "badass" despite being Camp Gay. This does play on the stereotype that being camp is mutually exclusive to having physical ability or authority, but is a valid form of presenting characterization.

Given that the Butch Lesbian stereotype incorporates the "badass" ideas of toughness and violence, examples can go there unless the relationship of being lesbian and badass has causation or narrative importance beyond being a character archetype, or if the badassery of the character is more skilful and tactile than the outright bruiser ultraviolence that the other trope implied.

Characters that deliberately incorporate flamboyance into their fighting technique in order to gain an advantage through confusing (or repulsing) the enemy are the Agent Peacock.

This is one of the Unlikely Fighter tropes, from the gay archetype of explicitly not being badass.

Badass Gay TLP

     Queer Baiting 
Queer Baiting

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/queerbaiting_300x225.png
At least if they don't exist they can't be killed.

"No homo."

In the world of newspapers, there is one definition of "queer baiting": to invoke homophobia as a means to suggest unreliability (e.g. "... an openly-gay ex-Olympic fencer").

In popular media, there is another: to portray queerness to attract an LGBT Fanbase (and also the liberal and Millennial viewers also more interested in seeing representative stories), but never actually confirm it. Though the term seems pejorative, queerbaiting is not necessarily negative, but as a means to capitalise on both the queer and straight storytelling potential, and to retain as large an audience as possible. Basically, it's allowing the audience to see what they want to — and never outright denying nor confirming anything.

This is the queer preamble to a Ship Tease scenario, but it is not always surrounding a couple — in some cases, it may be the suspected belonging to the LGBT+ community of a single character. Queerbaiting may also be present in works where the suspicion has been resolved: confirmation either In-Universe or out, either for or against. One of these resolutions is the Bait-and-Switch Lesbians trope: teasing a lesbian couple, but they're really just very close, straight, friends.

It is frequently commonly associated with the television shows Supernatural and Sherlock, surrounding their male leads. In these cases, the characters are named as straight, but still given homoerotic interactions with each other — it is also most likely a conscious decision.

It is important for fans to remember that not all instances of perceived queerbaiting are a malicious effort on the part of the work's creators, that it may be unintentionally appearing that way, or just noticed by queer fans. Of course, there are many deliberate examples, some of which are covered by the trope Sweeps Week Lesbian Kiss: the use of promoting a homosexual relationship to improve viewings, often between girls, and then never returning to the storyline.

Sometimes, though, the queerbaiting is actually part of a long game reveal. This is seen in the show The Legend of Korra, where Korra and her female friend Asami grew increasingly close over two seasons, before getting together in the series finale as a way to evade censorship (It was on Nickelodeon). You may just have to wait for it.

Within the use of queerbaiting versus actual representation, you may have noticed a gender divide, and it is reasonably apparent: creators are much more open to showing actual queer women characters. This is probably because it will supposedly not alienate any part of the audience: it appeals to queer people and straight men, and both marketing and psychological research suggest that if the characters (no matter gender or orientation) are developed then female viewers will not care to not watch.

The other forms of this kind of queerbaiting are to include gay characters in one of two ways: the Token Gay Stereotype, in the form of a Butch Lesbian or Camp Gay satellite relative, friend, or neighbor, and the Gay In-Name-Only, where a character, who could be a main character, is confirmed as queer, but the ramifications of this (same-sex attraction, interest in queer causes, etc.) are never seen — they might as well be straight, asexual, or alien for all the effect it has on the character and story. These are attempts at representation gone wrong, the first being to show queer people while still preserving the stereotype and difference, the second being practically the reverse of standard queerbaiting by taking a queer character and giving them wholly straight attributes, perhaps in an attempt to hide this sexuality. Either case could be purely accidental on behalf of the cast and/or crew, but may also potentially be an attempt to attract queer, and liberal, viewers whilst also placating Heteronormative Crusaders.

This "gay characters not really being gay" scenario is one that appears to be happening more often in The New '10s, possibly in line with progressive social change forcing more representation. But, as BuzzFeed argues again, not all representation is done well, and is even further teasing queer audiences without substance.

What is today referred to as queerbaiting was once the only legitimate way to incorporate homosexuality into a work, for example in the play Rope, but is now often seen by fans as an excuse to avoid having representation whilst reaping the benefits of playing both sides, getting the queer and straight audiences happy to watch, and "punishing" the queer viewers by leaving them without a satisfactory storyline and exploiting their desire for one to keep them watching with only little chance of genuine queer characters.

See also: Homoerotic Subtext, Hide Your Lesbians

Examples of commonly-discussed queerbaiting works, with descriptions and explanations, can be found in the Analysis tab.

    Quotes.Queer Baiting 
"Sometimes we'll do a take for that demo. I'll brush by [Maura's] blouse or maybe linger for a moment. As long as we're not being accused of being homophobic, which is not in any way true and completely infuriating, I'm OK with it."
Angie Harmon (Jane Rizzoli) on Rizzoli & Isles

"[Once Upon a Time], Rizzoli & Isles, Sherlock and Supernatural have all been called out by multiple news outlets and fanbases for creating strong gay subtext between characters, drawing in legions of loyal queer viewers, and then throwing in some “no homo” jokes to ensure they don’t alienate their straight audiences."

    Queerbaiting index/disambig 
Queerbaiting is a phenomenon whereby something "queer" is teased in a work and not followed through with. The overall concept is, therefore, meta as it deals with (at its most basic) audience expectations and (at its deepest) audience reaction and authorial intention. The different forms, though, are evidenced within works, and so there are a number of tropes describing different ways in which queerbaiting can happen — but they're not always necessarily used for queerbaiting. For more information, read the useful notes page on the subject.

Tropes that can be Queerbaiting:

  • Aborted Arc: When the arc was a slow realization of being queer or a Coming-Out Story, there will be a trail of queer hints that are unresolved.
  • Adaptational Sexuality: Taking a work with queer characters and remaking it, but without them/making them not-queer.
  • Ambiguously Gay: When a character appears to be queer but it is never ever discussed.
  • Bait-and-Switch Lesbians: Formerly had this page as a redirect, this is when a work explicitly shows a lesbian pairing that turn out to just be really close friends.
  • Bury Your Gays: Can be seen to be used in killing queer characters to remove them from the work, rather than Retcon their identity.
  • But Not Too Gay: A character that is confirmed as gay, or otherwise queer, shows no evidence of their claimed gender/sexuality/presentation etc.
    • But Not Too Bi: A bi- or pan-sexual character only shows attraction to one gender. Regardless of which it is, this is seen as bi-erasure and teasing the representation of a rarely seen demographic without showing it.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: The character's mental health is questionable. It's difficult to figure out his or her sexual orientation because they may not know themselves. They have a tendency to flip flop on the subject, perhaps without even knowing it. They have difficulty self-identifying as having any particular sexuality, and if they do, it could just be dismissed as a figment of their imagination.
  • Coming Straight Story: A character has been mistook for, or pretended to be queer and then retracts it.
    • Or, an author recognises one of their characters is being questioned by fans, and makes a statement to prevent themselves from being accused of baiting. However, by not changing the behaviour of the character they are still letting people hope for queerness that isn't going to happen.
  • Discount Lesbians: Having gay interaction only acceptable when it's "not really" gay, because one of the individuals is a different species.
  • Experimented in College: Two variants: 1. Character is canonically bi because they used to experiment, 2. A relationship is teased but is shot down as experimentation.
  • Faux Yay: Pretending to be queer when not.
    • Sorry, I'm Gay: Using the line to turn people down when untrue, the one line might be included in promos.
  • Girl-on-Girl Is Hot: When same-sex pseudo-romantic interaction occurs, but only when for the purposes of others' titillation.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: Giving vague hints about a character's possible sexuality by using the archaic sense of the word "queer" rather than "gay", "straight," "bisexual," or "questioning."
  • Hide Your Lesbians: The disparity in representation between straight and gay couples — the former will get intimacy and a resolution, the latter will be hidden in the background and only reminded that they're actually a couple for a Very Special Episode.
  • Ho Yay: Elements in the work which viewers can interpret as gay, whether intentional or not. If the work gets too many, fans may see this as deliberately teasing without substance.
  • Homoerotic Subtext: Often deliberate use of subtext that suggests eroticism between two characters of the same sex.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: When advertising plays up the queerness of a work that doesn't exist within it.
    • When advertising puts a work in a light that makes it seem gay when it isn't at all. Once it breaks willing suspension of disbelief, it may be taken to be deliberate.
  • No Bisexuals: The instances when a straight character shows some same-sex attraction but it is not treated seriously and as if it's not possible to be bi. note 
  • Office Romance: We can't get a clear read on homoerotic actions at work, because office rules forbid it.
  • Romantic Two-Girl Friendship: Showing what appears to be a loving lesbian relationship, but confirming that they are just good friends.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: A person's sexuality or a gay or bisexual couple's feelings for each other are unclear because circumstances keep them from acting on their romantic desires.
  • Sweeps Week Lesbian Kiss: Get attraction to an otherwise boring episode by having a same-sex kiss that will be quickly forgotten about.

Tropes associated with the idea of Queerbaiting:

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    Useful Notes/Queer Baiting 
"Sometimes we'll do a take for that demo. I'll brush by [Maura's] blouse or maybe linger for a moment. As long as we're not being accused of being homophobic, which is not in any way true and completely infuriating, I'm OK with it."
Angie Harmon (Jane Rizzoli) on Rizzoli & Isles

In the world of newspapers, there is one definition of "queer baiting": to invoke homophobia as a means to suggest unreliability (e.g. "... an openly-gay ex-Olympic fencer").

In popular media, there is another: to portray queerness in order to attract an LGBT Fanbase (and also the allies interested in seeing representative stories), but never actually confirm it. Though the term seems pejorative, queerbaiting is not necessarily negative, but as a means to capitalise on both the queer and straight storytelling potential, and to retain as large an audience as possible. Basically, it's allowing the audience to see what they want to — and never outright denying nor confirming anything.

This is the queer preamble to a Ship Tease scenario, but it is not always surrounding a couple — in some cases, it may be the suspected belonging to the LGBT+ community of a single character. This extends it to include cases of characters that may appear to be trans*, asexual, polyamorous, and other identities under the LGBT umbrella. Queerbaiting may also be present in works where the suspicion has in fact been resolved: confirmation either In-Universe or out, either for or against (i.e. explicitly stating a character's sexuality, even if their behaviour is contrary). One of these resolutions is the Bait-and-Switch Lesbians trope: teasing a lesbian couple, but they're really just very close, straight, friends.

It is frequently commonly associated with the television shows Supernatural and Sherlock, surrounding their male leads. In these cases, the characters are named as straight, but still given homoerotic interactions with each other — it is also most likely a conscious decision.

It is important for fans to remember that not all instances of perceived queerbaiting are a malicious effort on the part of the work's creators, that it may be unintentionally appearing that way, or just noticed by queer fans. Of course, there are many deliberate examples, both in works and in cleverly designed promotional materials. In works the queerbaiting is likely to be rather overt content, or the kind of subtext which has a long queer-related history; in promos it will likely be moments that only appear as queer as they do without the actual context they would appear in.

Within the use of queerbaiting versus actual representation, you may have noticed a gender divide, and it is reasonably apparent: creators are much more open to showing actual queer women characters. This is probably because it will supposedly not alienate any part of the audience: it appeals to queer people and straight men, and both marketing and psychological research suggest that if the characters (no matter gender or orientation) are developed then female viewers will not care to not watch.

There is another situation which fans may also designate as queerbaiting, this is the inclusion of characters that are gay in-name-only: examples where a character, who could be a main character, is confirmed as queer, but the ramifications of this (same-sex attraction, interest in queer causes, etc.) are never seen — they might as well be straight for all the effect it has on the character and story. This being practically the reverse of standard queerbaiting by taking a queer character and giving them wholly straight attributes, may perhaps be an attempt to hide this sexuality whilst still having "representation" and to attract queer, and liberal, viewers whilst also placating Heteronormative Crusaders. This scenario is one that appears to be happening more often in The New '10s, possibly in line with progressive social change forcing more representation. Of course, not all representation is done well, and may even further be teasing queer audiences without substance.

What is today referred to as queerbaiting was once the only legitimate way to incorporate homosexuality into a work, for example in the play Rope, but is now often seen by fans as an excuse to avoid having representation whilst reaping the benefits of playing both sides, getting the queer and straight audiences happy to watch, and "punishing" the queer viewers by leaving them without a satisfactory storyline and exploiting their desire for one to keep them watching with only little chance of genuine queer characters.

One specific, 2010s, form of queerbaiting is the Bury Your Gays version that caused public outcry and even sparked campaigns against the trope. The queer character's death would occur shortly after either confirmation of their sexuality/gender or something significant related to this (first happening in Buffy the Vampire Slayer when Tara got shot after having sex with Willow). Thus, it further supports that the character is being killed or Put on a Bus for their queerness, both in universe and out, and is more meaningful in the way that the representation had only just occurred but has been taken away before it can be cemented and have an effect on the work.

See also: Homoerotic Subtext, Hide Your Lesbians

Examples of commonly-discussed queerbaiting works, with descriptions and explanations, can be found in the Analysis tab.


    Conflicted Recruiter Cutscene 
A trope most prevalent in RPGs and for the Player Character in video games, the Capricious Recruiter is you.

Well, mostly. This character is the one that decides who can join your Men of Sherwood or Ragtag Bunch of Misfits. Welcome new NPC, who really shouldn't be part of The Team. He could be a saboteur, he's not trained, he... just gave a long spiel to convince you to let him in that gave some Info Dump to help you on your mission. Thanks, new guy, welcome to the team!

Everything is pointing to not accepting the new guy to the team, the recruiter really shouldn't let them in. But there seems to be no substantial argument to decline their request. Why do they, then? To force you into an informative cut-scene or forced dialogue, that's why! Valuable information or character development is hidden in manufactured conflict — the Capricious Recruiter trope is a situation in which this occurs often.


Examples

Video Games

  • Dragoneers Aria: Valen Kessler appears to do this with the admission of Euphe Kalm. When Valen won't let her in because he doesn't want to put her at risk, Euphe then reveals that she has a connection with the water dragon and that she is an empath, which convinces him and makes her useful.
  • Bravely Default:
    • In the Prologue Chapter this occurs with the admission of all the characters you will use during the game. There are many excuses used to why the potential member cannot join, but at the end of the conversation they join up. Needs context — currently says 'this happens'
    • We see this in the interaction with Tiz and Agnes. Tiz wants to join the party Agnes responds "...My task is not your concern". However soon after Agnes concedes and they become a party. ZCE
    • Agnes tells Ringabel "I cannot trust a man such as yourself. My answer is no, sir." as a denial of Ringabel's joining the party. However, shortly after he is accepted. ZCE
    • Agnes states that Edea's joining up is "unacceptable". Shortly after she joins up. ZCE
  • Lufia & The Fortress of Doom. This happens with the entry of the party member Lufia. The main character the Hero: descendant of Maxim first denies Lufia's entry then accepts her. Lufia tells the Hero "You're going somewhere dangerous again,aren't you". The Hero responds "Yes". Lufia then states "Even if I tell you not to go , I know you'll leave anyway". The Hero replies "You know everything, don't you? You're right. I'm going. I have to go". Lufia responds "I won't stop you. Take me with you". Hero states "I can't". Lufia says " I thought you'd say that , but I still want to go with you". Hero responds "No!". Lufia says "Please.....I". Hero says "No way!". Lufia says "Hero is so stubborn ! Fine. Even if he says no, I'm still going with him. I won't take no for an answer. I'm still mad at you about the pie!". The Hero replies "Still angry about that? I don't care. You want to come? Fine. Do as you like. Finally after some more banter The Hero states "Let's go Lufia. We must get to Sheran" Lufia says "Alright" and joins up. I... can't follow this. It's just dialogue?

     Change of Heart Recruitment Scenario that desperately needs a better name 
A trope most prevalent in RPGs and for the Player Character in video games.

There's a character (probably you) who is the one that decides who can join your Men of Sherwood or Ragtag Bunch of Misfits. Then appears a new NPC, who really shouldn't be part of The Team. He could be a saboteur, he's not trained, he... just gave a long spiel to convince you to let him in that gave some Info Dump to help you on your mission. Thanks, new guy, welcome to the team!

Everything is pointing to not accepting the new guy to the team, the recruiter really shouldn't let them in. But there seems to be no substantial argument to decline their request. Why do they, then? To force you into an informative cut-scene or forced dialogue, that's why! Valuable information or character development is hidden in manufactured conflict — this trope is a situation in which this occurs often.

One of the manufactured reasons why a male hero may not want to accept someone is because she was his Childhood Friend Romance and he doesn't want to lead her into danger. Only when she proves that she can fulfil a much-needed service will he (perhaps begrudgingly) let her join — in this instance, it is revealing more detail on the characters and their backgrounds that may be useful later on.


Examples

Video Games

  • Dragoneers Aria:
    • Valen Kessler appears to do this with the admission of Euphe Kalm. When Valen won't let her in because he doesn't want to put her at risk, Euphe then reveals that she is an empath and has a connection with the water dragon, which convinces him and makes her useful.
      Valen:[...]it's too dangerous, I can't put you at risk like that.
      Euphe: I am an empath, I healed the water dragon!
      Valen: You don't know when to give up, do you? Fine, but don't call me 'sir'.
    • Mary Murphy is rejected because Valen says it's too dangerous — Mary says she is tough as a "raging ocean tempest" and that she wants to get revenge for the wind dragon. This is the key information for the player, and so she is let to join after it is revealed.
  • Bravely Default:
    • Although Tiz is the Player Character, in the Prologue he functions only as a vessel for the set-up of the plot, especially seeing as it isn't his party that people are joining Agnes is the one making decisions. Tiz wants to join, but Agnes is insistent that her "burden" is none of his concern. Tiz has to reveal to everyone (including the player, who is him) that he lost his city Norende and it will not come back and this is a cause worth fighting for. Tiz makes the case to Agnes that he is important by showing her that she is going to the graveyard and doesn't even know where she is going and finally she realizes she needs him and can't do this on her own. This initiates the group.
    • Agnes tells Ringabel "I cannot trust a man such as yourself. My answer is no, sir." as a denial of Ringabel's joining the party. Agnes who functions more as the leader when recruiting the final characters rejects both but at the end of the conversation they still join. ZCE
    • Agnes states that Edea's joining up is "unacceptable". Shortly after she joins up. This is in regards to Agnes believing Edea is an enemy to the party as she is a part of the Empire. But Edea still joining anyway. ZCE
  • Lufia & The Fortress of Doom: Lufia, though the title character, is initially denied to join the player on their journey. Her initial dialogue is asking if he's "going somewhere dangerous again", suggesting that they know each other well. When trying to convince the player, as he refuses to take anyone with him, she stops pleading and instead talks about Noodle Incident in jokes ("I'm still mad at you about the pie!"); the way that the hero character responds reveals that this has hit a nerve, and so shows that she was a childhood romance, and equally that he is a caring character.

    Superhero World Naming Conventions 

     Bury Your Gays 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/watchmen1.jpg

"[Television] has yet to recover from the [2015/16 and 16/17] seasons, which included the deaths of an overwhelming number of lesbian and bisexual women characters. These deaths were often in service of another straight, cisgender character's plotline, and sent a toxic message to audiences. This decades-long trend — referred to in popular culture as "Bury Your Gays" — has made countless headlines in the past year, educating both viewers and creators alike on just how ubiquitous this trope has been."
— Opening statement to the 2017/18 GLAAD Where We Are on TV Report

The Bury Your Gays trope in media, including all its variants, is a homophobic cliché. It is the presentation of deaths of LGBT characters where these characters are nominally able to be viewed as more expendable than their heteronormative counterparts. In this way, the death is treated as exceptional in its circumstances.

Often, especially in older works (to the extent that they are found in older works, of course), gay characters just aren't allowed happy endings. Even if they do end up having some kind of relationship, at least one half of the couple, often the one who was more aggressive in pursuing a relationship, thus "perverting" the other one, has to die at the end. Of course, it can also happen to gay characters who aren't in relationships, particularly if they're Psycho Lesbians or Depraved Homosexuals.

Nowadays, when opinions on sexuality have shifted somewhat, justification may be attempted via Too Good for This Sinful Earth. Sometimes it's because the Magical Queer has died in a Heroic Sacrifice so that the straights may live. Naturally, this is subject to Alternative Character Interpretation.

Also known as Dead Lesbian Syndrome, though that name has largely fallen out of use post-2015 and the media riots about overuse of the trope. And, as this public outcry restated, the problem isn't merely that gay characters are killed off: the problem is the tendency that gay characters are killed off in a story full of mostly straight characters, or when the characters are killed off because they are gay.

If the characters' relationship is obscured, or plain baiting, it drastically increases their chance of survival.

As stated above, sometimes gay characters die in fiction because, well, sometimes people die; this isn't correlation, and it's not always meant to "teach us something", nor is it necessarily indicative of some prejudice on the part of the creator. There are many Anyone Can Die stories: barring explicit differences in the treatments of the gay and straight deaths, it's not odd that the gay characters are dying. The occasional death of one in a Cast Full of Gay is unlikely to be notable, either.

Can be seen as Truth in Television in some cases, as gay and lesbian people are at a substantially higher risk for suicide and assault. The fact that AIDS hit the gay male community most prominently provided potent fresh fuel for this long running trope (which, like many things about the eighties, still has an effect on more recent works).

Period fiction also needs to take into account the lack of understanding of gay characters, whereby depicting the death or murder of gay people may not reflect the views of the author but the social dynamics of the setting. However, again, there were gay people throughout history who survived and lived full lives, and it is possible to tell those stories rather than working on the assumption that tragedy is the only narrative option. Defaulting to the reasoning of Truth in Television provides some justification, but does not necessarily negate this trope.

The revival of this trope in 2015/16 (especially with regards to things that happened in reality), particularly for female LGBT characters, sparked a lot of outrage and a pledge to encourage show-runners' reconsideration if planning to implement the trope. Read a thesis written about the trope and its consequences here. It's possibly also for this reason that a small British future dystopia series was brought into the spotlight, and won two Emmys in 2017: it deconstructs the hell out of the trope.

The exact opposite is found in Preserve Your Gays, often a reaction to this.

Specific variants:

index
  • Gayngst-Induced Suicide: When an LGBT+ characters commits, or attempts to commit, suicide because of reasons connected to or caused by being LGBT.
  • Homophobic Hate Crime: When a character is attacked and often murdered by homophobic characters.
  • Tragic AIDS Story: When the character is gay, usually a gay man, and their doom is presented as "destined to be" because they are gay.
/index

As a Death Trope, all Spoilers will be unmarked ahead. Beware.

Advertisement:

    Quinceañera Question 
Title will be wikiworded to Quincean~era, indexes: Birthday Tropes, Teenage Tropes, Aging Tropes, Maturity Tropes, Parental Issues, Always Female, Rituals and Ceremonies, Trope Names from Other Languages, Party at My Index, link on Growing Up Sucks, Dances and Balls, and Rite of Passage. Will include a comment note saying not to put on an Alliterative Name index because of quince being Spanish.
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/51qdo0yx7cl.jpg
What do you mean it's not a wedding?
Lydia: We have a problem, your daughter does not want a quinces[...] She has to have a quinces, how else will we know the day our little girl becomes a woman?!
Elena: You missed it. I was twelve, I was in gym, and ironically it happened in first period.

In Latin American culture it is traditional for 15-year-old girls to have a big party called a quinceanyera (lit. "fifteen years"). It's a very old tradition similar to the debutante in French and English culture, where eligible girls would reach maturity in their mid-teens and be paraded around eligible bachelors. However, whilst the French and English have stopped, the Latinos have continued their tradition — but not everyone agrees.

There is, from The '90s and certainly growing through the 21st century, much real life debate over whether the traditional celebrations should continue. It is generally accepted that in Latin American culture, 15 is the 16/18/21 of other cultures and so warrants a big coming of age celebration, but the question is whether it should follow the rituals of the quinceanyera, for reasons that include an inherent misogyny to it but also the fact that many teenage girls nowadays are not as in touch with their culture, especially with some who are a few generations departed from their country. It's also a very big, very expensive celebration on par with many traditional weddings, and some people are just not up for that.

In fiction, if there is a Latin American family you can bet that they'll have a teenage daughter so that a storyline featuring her quinceanyera and peoples' views on it can happen. Any of the above reasons will come into play, with most commonly the girl herself not wanting the party, but sometimes other people try to explain why they don't think she should have one instead. The question itself is simply "will she have a quinceanyera?", and most commonly the answer is, in fact, yes — the story will deal with all the different views but usually resolve it by having a quinceanyera for whatever reason.

Sometimes it's a positive in-story message, especially if the girl is a main character, like maintaining culture in the face of modern society ruining traditions and how, like marriage, a quinceanyera has shifted away from its original ideals; or perhaps a very family-oriented reason, as a lot of the celebration is about familial ties, commonly for the girl to understand or build a better connection with her mother.

Alternatively, having the quinceanyera can be seen sometimes as a negative portrayal, as it may be done despite asking the question in order to maintain status quo or, especially if the girl is a side character or only brought in for the storyline, to show only a stereotype of Latin America or one of the most commonly known parts of the culture without fully engaging with/acknowledging the debate about it.

Other tropes that commonly appear include a Pimped-Out Dress, a discussion of Family Honor and a Big, Screwed-Up Family, and some serious Choreography Porn because Dancing Is Serious Business.

May overlap with Your Tradition Is Not Mine, but not always, and that trope is more about situations where the person seriously does not want to be even associated with their family and rejecting their way of doing things is a marker of this.


Examples:

Live-Action TV

  • The George Lopez Show: George actually asks if they can cancel Carmen's quinceanyera because he's not earning enough money to pay for it, going into a discussion over the elaborate nature and some excess of the parties, before Angie steps up and says that her business is doing well enough they can afford it, doing some reaffirming of female power in regards to the traditional quinceanyera.
  • One Day at a Time (2017): The first season has a long plot regarding Elena not wanting a quinces, arguing that they're misogynistic and she doesn't need one, and it also runs concurrently with her Coming-Out Story, suggesting that she is doing fine transitioning to adulthood without a big party to mark it. However, when her mom explains that she mostly wanted Elena to have a quinces so that she could prove single moms are capable of organizing one, Elena is all for that message and female empowerment and agrees to do it. However, she does it largely on her own terms, and the season finale ("Quinces") is dedicated to it.
  • Wizards of Waverly Place: The episode "Quinceanyera" has Alex rejecting her party, because she doesn't understand the significance of it and hates the big poofy dress, hurting her best friend who has actually studied the culture and is planning the party, until she is told by her grandma that her mom couldn't afford her own quinceanyera and had always wanted one. She performs a spell that swaps her and her mom's bodies so that her mom can have the party she's always wanted.

Music

  • Shakira's song "Pies Descalzos, Suenyos Blancos" seems to be satire about imposing specific gender roles on girls after they're fifteen and the problems of this and focusing so much on propriety and a perfect quinceanyera instead of real issues, and the stress it can cause the girls by putting so many expectations on them and requiring certain acceptable behavior.
    y en la fiesta de quince, es mejor no olvidar
    una fina champanya y bailar bien el vals
    y bailar bien el vals.translation 

Trope Pantheons

     The Unholy Trinity 
Quinn Fabray, Santana Lopez and Brittany S. Pierce, Goddesses of the Reformed, but Not Tamed (Cheerios!, spies, Teen Lesbians, Losers, The Unholy Trinity)
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screen_shot_2015_07_17_at_173150.png
  • Theme Song: "I Say a Little Prayer (For You)" (their cover).
  • Symbol: Red, black and white cheerleading uniform.
  • Alignment: Chaotic Neutral, formerly Chaotic Evil
  • Portfolio: Alpha Bitch, The Cheerleader, Heel–Face Revolving Door, Anti-Villain, Anti-Hero, Lady in Red, The Ditz (Brittany), Churchgoing Villain (Quinn), Girl Posse, Terrible Trio
  • Domains: Fanservice, Sexuality, Sexuality, Sexuality, Cheerleading, Singing Alto, Manipulation, Slushy-ordering, Reputation Redemption, Return From The Bottom, Doing Good Behind Closed Doors, Doing Bad Because It's Fun, Skewed Priorities, Telling It As It Is, Brutal Honesty, Revealing The Truth At The Worst Time, Intimidation, Being Cruel To Be Kind, Being Frenemies Then Actual Friends.
  • Followers: The Cheerios!, Rachel Berry
  • Allies: Kurt Hummel.
  • Rivals: Kurt Hummel (again).
  • Herald: Kitty Wilde, Sue Sylvester.
  • The Unholy Trinity have control over the Cheerios! and often hold influence over Sue Sylvester, as well as the WMHS football players and Principal Figgins. At times, they can control the whole of William McKinley High School, but at others have less power.
  • Upon joining the glee club, the Alpha Bitch cheerleaders retain their insults and snark towards their co-members. Occasionally they seem to mellow, but there is routine aloof insulting lasting beyond graduation and even becoming friends.
  • Though Quinn was quickly reformed into being True Companions with the glee club, she was still biting and dismissive towards them on occasion, and continued to use her powers of Bitch to exploit their kindness for a while.
    • Although she was against the glee club photo like everybody else but Rachel, she convinced Sue Sylvester to give a Cheerios! page to the group. This is also when she played her Ace in terms of blackmail, showing devotion to the group.
  • Though initially following Quinn into the glee club and then Sue's orders to spy, Santana reveals that being able to sing and have fun is the best part of her day. Brittany is so obliviously sweet that she forms real friendships with even the "losers" of the group. However, Santana is "straight up bitch" and Brittany is so ditzy as to not censor her thoughts, so they are still also cutting right to the faces of the glee kids.
  • In their sophomore year, all three do form actual friendships with the glee kids, including ignoring each other for other members, having group phone calls, and sharing secrets. This does not stop their bitchy qualities.
  • Even after singing the glee club's praises in her junior year, Quinn still played games in the background to sabotage the group. This seemed to be a combination of her mental illness, it being part of her nature, and wavering loyalties.
    • By the end of the year, Quinn seems uncertain as to whether there are benefits of being in glee club, especially when she believes they still see her as the Alpha Bitch and yet that they are stealing her popularity. She turns quite vicious.
  • Santana gets closer to the glee club in her junior year, though a lot of this is for control and other ulterior motives. By the end, however, she is trying to convince Quinn to remain sane and to support glee.
  • Brittany wants to take over the glee club at the start of her junior year, but begins dating Sam and Artie. Though she continues to meddle on the behalf of Sue. At the end of the year, she does join in with songwriting.
  • At the beginning of their senior year, Quinn no longer affiliates herself with any group at McKinley High. She is still reformed in personality from the beginning of sophomore year, but has become a carefree spirit. She lights a glee club piano on fire (with Santana's assistance) and is persuaded by Sue to make a video exposing the negatives of glee club. However, she quickly cleans up her act in order to woo Shelby into letting her see her daughter. She rejoins the glee club to further this ends.
    • When Puck tells Shelby about Quinn's plans, Shelby has a heart-to-heart with Quinn that reminds her to live for herself. Quinn follows this advice and becomes a supportive member of the glee club. Still, she is not ashamed to bitch out Rachel and speak her mind when Rachel announces her plans to marry Finn. She remains openly criticising members of the club, but still not as harshly as...
  • Santana, also at the beginning of senior year, tries to convince Quinn to come back to glee club because it's their thing. However, she quits and joins Shelby's all-girls' group. When in this group she is very mean to Finn and Rory, ultimately resulting in them outing her. This obviously turns her untamed nature directly onto them, but the boys manage to calm her and convince the girl group to reconvene with the glee club.
    • At the end of senior year, Santana and Quinn join forces to stuff the ballot and have Rachel crowned Prom Queen. However, Santana ruins this by informing Rachel of this charade at one of the worst moments — Rachel's faith in her peers propelled her self-esteem, and Santana knocks it right down at a moment when Rachel needed it most. Quinn flinches, so she may disagree with Santana's choice, but does not stop her (she is also a lover of payback, and may see this as fitting for when Rachel revealed her baby's real father to Finn).
  • Brittany, in senior year, once again follows Santana's lead for the most part. However, she decides to launch a class president campaign to run against Kurt. Santana and Quinn support her in this. Sue's control seems to have slipped, but there are still a few instances of Brittany (willingly) antagonising the glee kids.
  • The girls' true untamed nature is supported by events later in the series: at Finn's memorial, Santana's natural tendencies to rip into people cause her to turn on Sue; at the reunion, Quinn is revealed to have belittled Tina by claiming to their classmates that Brown (the college Tina attends) is barely an Ivy League school, compared to Quinn attending Yale; when Brittany believes the world is about to end she decides to tell everyone what she really thinks about them, and what follows can be said to be harsher than Santana.
    • Still, come the recreation of the glee club by Rachel when they're all in college, the girls return as alumni to recruit new kids for the group. This does not stop them from being rude and brash while they're there, though. You could say that by the very end, they are still bitchy but now only mean good.

     The Unholy Trinity (Mk.II) 
Quinn Fabray, Santana Lopez and Brittany S. Pierce, Goddesses of Sympathetic Lovable Alpha Bitches/Bitches Becoming Nice(r)/Taking A Level In Kindness/Bitches Who Gain Morality (Cheerios!, spies, Teen Lesbians, Losers, The Unholy Trinity)
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/screen_shot_2015_07_17_at_173150.png
  • The Unholy Trinity have control over the Cheerios! and often hold influence over Sue Sylvester, as well as the WMHS football players and Principal Figgins. At times, they can control the whole of William McKinley High School, but at others have less power.
  • Upon joining the glee club, the Alpha Bitch cheerleaders retain their insults and snark towards their co-members. Occasionally they seem to mellow, but there is routine aloof insulting lasting beyond graduation and even becoming friends.
  • Though Quinn was quickly reformed into being True Companions with the glee club, she was still biting and dismissive towards them on occasion, and continued to use her powers of Bitch to exploit their kindness for a while.
    • Although she was against the glee club photo like everybody else but Rachel, she convinced Sue Sylvester to give a Cheerios! page to the group. This is also when she played her Ace in terms of blackmail, showing devotion to the group.
  • Though initially following Quinn into the glee club and then Sue's orders to spy, Santana reveals that being able to sing and have fun is the best part of her day. Brittany is so obliviously sweet that she forms real friendships with even the "losers" of the group. However, Santana is "straight up bitch" and Brittany is so ditzy as to not censor her thoughts, so they are still also cutting right to the faces of the glee kids.
  • In their sophomore year, all three do form actual friendships with the glee kids, including ignoring each other for other members, having group phone calls, and sharing secrets. This does not stop their bitchy qualities.
  • Even after singing the glee club's praises in her junior year, Quinn still played games in the background to sabotage the group. This seemed to be a combination of her mental illness, it being part of her nature, and wavering loyalties.
    • By the end of the year, Quinn seems uncertain as to whether there are benefits of being in glee club, especially when she believes they still see her as the Alpha Bitch and yet that they are stealing her popularity. She turns quite vicious.
  • Santana gets closer to the glee club in her junior year, though a lot of this is for control and other ulterior motives. By the end, however, she is trying to convince Quinn to remain sane and to support glee.
  • Brittany wants to take over the glee club at the start of her junior year, but begins dating Sam and Artie. Though she continues to meddle on the behalf of Sue. At the end of the year, she does join in with songwriting.
  • At the beginning of their senior year, Quinn no longer affiliates herself with any group at McKinley High. She is still reformed in personality from the beginning of sophomore year, but has become a carefree spirit. She lights a glee club piano on fire (with Santana's assistance) and is persuaded by Sue to make a video exposing the negatives of glee club. However, she quickly cleans up her act in order to woo Shelby into letting her see her daughter. She rejoins the glee club to further this ends.
    • When Puck tells Shelby about Quinn's plans, Shelby has a heart-to-heart with Quinn that reminds her to live for herself. Quinn follows this advice and becomes a supportive member of the glee club. Still, she is not ashamed to bitch out Rachel and speak her mind when Rachel announces her plans to marry Finn. She remains openly criticising members of the club, but still not as harshly as...
  • Santana, also at the beginning of senior year, tries to convince Quinn to come back to glee club because it's their thing. However, she quits and joins Shelby's all-girls' group. When in this group she is very mean to Finn and Rory, ultimately resulting in them outing her. This obviously turns her untamed nature directly onto them, but the boys manage to calm her and convince the girl group to reconvene with the glee club.
    • At the end of senior year, Santana and Quinn join forces to stuff the ballot and have Rachel crowned Prom Queen. However, Santana ruins this by informing Rachel of this charade at one of the worst moments — Rachel's faith in her peers propelled her self-esteem, and Santana knocks it right down at a moment when Rachel needed it most. Quinn flinches, so she may disagree with Santana's choice, but does not stop her (she is also a lover of payback, and may see this as fitting for when Rachel revealed her baby's real father to Finn).
  • Brittany, in senior year, once again follows Santana's lead for the most part. However, she decides to launch a class president campaign to run against Kurt. Santana and Quinn support her in this. Sue's control seems to have slipped, but there are still a few instances of Brittany (willingly) antagonising the glee kids.
  • The girls' true untamed nature is supported by events later in the series: at Finn's memorial, Santana's natural tendencies to rip into people cause her to turn on Sue; at the reunion, Quinn is revealed to have belittled Tina by claiming to their classmates that Brown (the college Tina attends) is barely an Ivy League school, compared to Quinn attending Yale; when Brittany believes the world is about to end she decides to tell everyone what she really thinks about them, and what follows can be said to be harsher than Santana.
    • Still, come the recreation of the glee club by Rachel when they're all in college, the girls return as alumni to recruit new kids for the group. This does not stop them from being rude and brash while they're there, though. You could say that by the very end, they are still bitchy but now only mean good.

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