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  • The protagonist of A Dance with Rogues is the princess of Betancuria forced into hiding after a successful invasion by the kingdom of Dhorn. If she didn't fit this trope it would be a pretty boring game; despite being a princess she has rescued every one of her party members at least once and broken out on her own in all but one scenario in which she was captured, among other things.
  • Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura: Once it's made clear that you're trying to save the world, both the elven princess Raven and King Loghaire Thunder Stone of the dwarves (assuming you talked him out of his self-imposed exile) will take up bow and axe and aid you as party members, if you wish. Loghaire explicitly says he cannot sit idly by when Arcanum is threatened.
  • Cloche Leythal Pastalia and Luca Trulyworth from Ar Tonelico 2.
    • Prince Targana as well.
  • Atelier Meruru: The Apprentice of Arland is all about Princess Merurulince, who prefers just "Meruru." She decides to use the skills she's learned in alchemy to help her kingdom and a successful completion of the game involves seeing the kingdom's population grow to at least 100,000, at which point it merges with the Arland Republic and she and her father are no longer royalty.
  • In the Awakening series, Princess Sophia manages to defeat the evil Dreadmyre using just her brains and her wits. Her parents had sealed themselves in a time bubble with him in order to stave off further damage of his attack on the human kingdom until Sophia arrived.
  • King Ladekahn, Duke Calbren, Queen Corellia, and Xelha, from the first Baten Kaitos.
  • One of the unlockable playable characters in Cars 2: The Video Game is the Queen of England!
  • The king from Castle Crashers is a GIANT example of this trope - a bearded, midgety giant example. For one thing, though he starts out utterly terrified of the Big Bad, he gets his groove back real fast — and helps you by doing everything from dispensing useful advice to leading an attack boat filled with knights and cannons at a giant boss catfish. He even saves you from a giant frog by filling its stupid face with cannon fire!
    • Taken to a much further extreme with the King Pack DLC, which allows you to actually play as the King. Weirdly, he still appears on the boat with the knights and the cannon and whatnot to fight alongside himself. Oh, and he's also the only character with healing magic, which is insanely useful.
  • Chrono Trigger:
    • Marle, AKA, Princess Nadia of the kingdom of Guardia, the first person to join Crono's party, who actually proposed the idea of taking down Lavos. And that's only the start.
    • Ayla is Marle's ancestor, and it makes sense considering she's the leader of her tribe. Which sort of makes Ayla fall in this trope.
    • And then there's the Fiendlord Magus, a.k.a. Janus, the prince of Zeal...
  • Played with in Crusader Kings. There is nothing stopping you (or the CPU, who does it regularly) from appointing your ruler as head of your army (in fact, the game does it by default for troops raised from your demesne), but the effectiveness of this depends heavily on your ruler - not to mention that this is one of the better ways to get your character killed. The same goes for any other members of your family - excluding females (usually anyway), even they happen to be the ruler of the country.
    • Apart from that, most royals will likely get involved in the running of the kingdom in some other way, be it as stewards, diplomats or spymasters. Royals Who Actually Do Something tend to be much more common in the players' close family than normal, though.
  • Princess Monica Raybrandt in Dark Chronicle is skilled with her sword and magic and traveled back to the past to battle Emperor Griffon. Of course, since she holds the Blue Atamillia, she's pretty much the only one who can. Plus, she needs to avenge her father's death.
  • Royalty in Dark Souls tends to have earned their position, not inherited it.
    • Gwyn, Lord of Sunlight, from the first game was one of the most active and successful warriors in the war against the Dragons, and personally and knowingly sacrificed his life in an effort to save the world.
    • His son Gwydolin, the last remaining deity in Anor Londo, is also quite active in the attempt to continue the Age of Fire. While he never leaves the honorary tomb of his father, he appears to be working with Frampt and has set up the various guards around the divine city to test the skills and resolve of anyone who enters, seemingly in an attempt to find a worthy vessel for the First Flame. He is also an incredibly difficult boss fight if you choose to enter the tomb and fight him, showing he has the power and skill to deserve the title of Sovereign of the Darkmoon.
    • In Dark Souls 2, King Vendrick is remembered as a mighty ruler who lead his kingdom of Drangleic into a golden age, until the war with the Giants brought it all down. When the player learns more about Vendrick, they learn that he spent most of the last part of his life desperately researching a cure for the Undead Curse. He was ultimately unsuccessful, but is implied to have come closer than anyone ever has before. The Giant Lord in the same game is revealed to have personally lead his troops on the front lines of battle, and it was his death that turned the tables and finally lead to the defeat of the Giants.
    • The Three Kings of the Lost Crowns DLC were all powerful leaders who spent more time fighting and innovating that sitting on their thrones. The Old Iron King founded a kingdom made almost entirely of iron, building and building a huge sprawling fortress for himself before its own weight sunk it into the Earth. The Sunken King built a vast underground empire in fealty to the Slumbering Dragon, Sinh. And the Burnt Ivory King established a kingdom directly above the Old Chaos (implied to be where the Bed of Chaos once sat) so that he could fight the encroachment of its corrupting flames.
    • In Dark Souls 3, Yhorm the Giant was remembered as a beloved ruler who personally safeguarded his people with an iron will, as well as a really big sword and greatshield. He too willingly sacrificed himself for his people... though, in a cruel twist, his sacrifice ended up being the catalyst for the destruction of his kingdom.
  • The obscure SNES game Deae Tonosama Appare Ichiban has a bumbling Japanese feudal lord and a foppish French prince as protagonists. They're both stupid. But save Earth in the end.
  • Disgaea and other similar titles from Nippon Ichi have them in spades. In the Disgaea universe (and extended universe) Overlord's are essentially kings and queens, however they are expected to keep their thrones and titles by way of force. It doesn't mean they have to fight fair, but ones ability to hold their throne is dependant on their raw power and/or special abilities. Demon Lord's seem to be stronger-than-average demons who typically either go out with the goal of overtaking an Overlord, or establishing their own netherworld's, and Netherworlds[[spoilers:like Toto Bunny]] that are peaceful and avoid combat are not necessarily unheard of, but are incredibly rare.
    • Disgaea stars the overlord-to-be (and eventually Overlord proper) Laharl. Many of his opposers also are Overlords from other Netherworlds. Funny enough, since Laharl is a major character and is available from the beginning of the game, this trope is 100% true for Laharl, as he is front-row to all of the action during the entire game and actively participates in combat.
      • The direct sequel focuses on Laharl once more as he takes center stage to prove his power.
    • The second installment has Princess Rozalin as co-protagonist. She's badass enough to hide a minigun under her gown. Then it turns out that she's the real Overlord Zenon.
    • Princess Sapphire Rhodonite from Disgaea 3 serves as the army for her nation... No, we do not mean she serves in the army. She doesn't lead it either. She is the army.
    • All of the major characters of Disgaea 5 are overlord's of some kind. Killia, for example, is a former Overlord who was known for his ruthlessness. Seraphina is in line to take her netherworld when her father passes. Red Magnus is the current overlord of his netherworld. Usalia is a former princess in a way who ascended to title of Overlord when she reclaimed her Netherworld from the villains.
    • Zetta from Makai Kingdom.
  • King K. Rool from Donkey Kong Country, who serves as the Final Boss of the first four games (including Donkey Kong 64) and is a real pain in the ass to defeat.
  • The royalty and nobility of Dragon Age can't seem to keep their noses out of trouble:
    • King Cailan in Dragon Age: Origins is determined to be one of these, insisting that he fight on the front lines against the darkspawn army. It backfires spectacularly as he is killed in the ensuing battle.
    • Also the player if they are a Dwarf Noble, being the second child of the dwarven king and proving an epic-grade badass who, after defeating the Archdemon, is declared a Paragon — one of the quasi-gods of the dwarves.
    • The nobles of Ferelden in general qualify, since they have to be able to protect their vassals, who otherwise won't swear fealty to a lord who can't ride to their aid in time. Loghain, who spends the middle chunk of the game as regent of the kingdom, certainly qualifies. An Orlesian immigrant who had, along with her brother, fled Orlais after a Chevalier tried to take what he thought he had rights to, says in Ferelden, "the nobility is not so high, and the commoners not so low".
      • The family of the Human Noble, the Couslands of Highever, particularly qualify. When word arrived that the King was to do battle with the Darkspawn, without a moment's hesitation, Teyrn Cousland and his heir immediately prepared to ride out with their forces to join the King's Army. Unfortunately, Arl Howe took that moment to strike, murdering the Teyrn, leaving the Human Noble as the sole survivor. Almost. Their brother, Fergus Cousland, is revealed to also have survived, having ridden to Ostagar with some of the Highever forces before Howe's coup took place. The Human Noble is also the only player character who can possibly end the game having been named Queen or Prince-Consort of Ferelden, in which case they completely fit the trope.
    • Both candidates for the throne qualify. While Alistair doesn't have political savvy, he leads the army against the darkspawn in the end if you choose him and, hardened, he shows a willingness to learn how to rule. Anora, while lacking any martial training, took care of the politics in her late husband's place, making her a savvy and cunning ruler. One of the options for ending the Landsmeet is to arrange a marriage between the two, which provides a bright future for the country.
    • In Awakening, if you are a human noble and married Alistair or Anora in Origins, you qualify. The fact that you are the co-ruler of all of Ferelden is almost completely ignored, but still. Even if you didn't marry Alistair or Anora, your character is still the Arl/essa of Amaranthine as well as Commander of the Grey Wardens in Ferelden. Part of the gameplay is you dealing with the problems assaulting your realm, including how best to defend it.
    • Also played straight with King Maric and his mother, the Rebel Queen Moira, who were leaders of La Résistance during the Orlesian Occupation. Maric also marries Rowan, the daughter of the Arl of Redcliffe who led the cavalry during the war against Orlais, who becomes the Queen of Ferelden alongside him. Later, Maric accompanies a group of Grey Wardens into the Deep Roads to fight Darkspawn despite Loghain's objections. One of the reasons Cailan wants to fight on the front lines is because he has heard stories of his father doing the same.
    • In Dragon Age II, we have Prince Sebastian Vael of Starkhaven. After his entire family is massacred, he leaves the Chantry to become a Reluctant Ruler. He's also got the skills of a rogue and is deadly with a bow, and actively participates in the Templar-Mage conflict.
    • Given Hawke's noble background, they can also be considered this. It's mentioned in Mark of the Assassin that after Hawke was recognised as the legitimate heir of the Amell family, they turned down the title of "Lord/Lady Amell", because they wanted to earn the right to use a title and be recognised as "Lord/Lady Hawke".
      • Supporting the Templars during the end-game shows that they elect Hawke as the new Viscount/ess of Kirkwall. S/he doesn't hold the title long, but still.
    • In Dragon Age: Inquisition there are further examples - companion Cassandra Pentaghast is in line to the throne of Nevarra (78th in line, but still) yet is a Seeker and one of the founders of the Inquisition. As a human character, the player is also from a noble family, the Trevelyans. Regardless of origin, the Inquisitor is essentially the head of a N.G.O. Superpower, complete with honorifics such as "Lord/Lady Inquisitor" and "Your Worship".
    • Varric Tethras is from an exiled noble dwarven family, which essentially makes a noble dwarf on the surface, due to their hierarchy. In fact, he might be the single wealthiest member of the entire Inquisition, due to his powerful connections in the Merchants Guild, wealth that he made with Hawke in II, and being a highly successful novelist, and yet is still in the thick of things with everyone else. And as of the Trespasser DLC, he's been named Viscount of Kirkwall!
  • In Dragon Quest II, the entire party consists of royal cousins of a common ancestor, with two princes and a princess.
  • Dragon Quest V takes this a step farther in that almost every important human party member is in some way connected to a royal family. This includes two kings (Pankraz and the Hero), a prince (Harry), your wife turned queen (Bianca, Nera, and Deborah), and a prince and princess (your son and daughter).
    • V also points out the problems this can cause. While Harry is adventuring with the Hero, his country suffers greatly, and while Pankraz's brother proved himself a decent ruler in his absence, he was miserable in the role and eager to hand it over. Soon afterward, the Hero gets called out when he risks his life on another adventure — one that leads to him and his wife being Taken for Granite for several years.
  • The King, Queen, and Prince of Somnia in Dragon Quest VI all attempted to challenge Murdaw. All of them fail, and it's the Prince's dream self who has to take up the job.
  • In Dragonsphere, King Callah insists upon personally fulfilling the prophecy that he will overthrow the evil wizard Sanwe, despite the concerns of his queen. Only, in a subversion, it turns out that the "king" is a shapeshifter who only believes that he is the king due to fake memories.
  • Drakengard has Caim, a prince whose kingdom was taken away from him due to a black dragon killing his parents. He proceeds to make a pact with a red dragon, Angelus, and take down The Empire.
  • Dwarf Fortress usually averts it, but sometimes plays it straight. Nobles are best known for demanding elaborate lodgings and not doing anything while mandating the creation of items using materials the fortress doesn't have (and sometimes even Slade, which cannot be mined or worked and which the nobles shouldn't even know exists), and banning your most common exports, and then jailing your best craftsdwarves for not complying with their insane demands (sometimes even craftsmen who had nothing to do with the mandate going unfulfilled), which usually leads to them suffering Unfortunate Accidents, like pulling a lever that turns out to flood their room with magma. However, some nobles fight and mine along with their subjects and make only reasonable, easily-fulfilled mandates. These nobles tend to lead longer and happier lives.
    • And then there are the community characters, who were sometimes royalty and got their story remembered by being spectacularly awesome.
      • Queen Tholtig Cryptbrain the Waning Diamonds was a dwarf who crusaded against the elves to save her clan from extinction, personally killing thousands. When she finally died undefeated from old age, she became the Dwarven equivalent of King Arthur.
      • Cacame Awemedinade the Immortal Onslaught became Elf King of the dwarves after his wife was killed and eaten by another elf. Aside from having a very unusual position for his species, he has done things like kill a dragon with his hammer and break sieges on his own.
  • Prince Poo in EarthBound joins Ness' party to save the world. He is encouraged by his master to go on the journey.
  • The Elder Scrolls
    • The Backstory of the series is chock-full of royals personally leading armies to battle and being legendary warriors in their own right. In fact, in the history of the Nords, Authority Equals Asskicking is in full effect. Tiber Septim, aka Talos, founder of the 3rd Tamriellic Empire and Septim Dynasty, is perhaps the most shining example.
    • Morrowind:
      • Though not officially the government of Morrowind, the Tribunal have exhibited great influence over the affairs of the Dunmer for thousands of years and each has a royal title. They embodied this trope in past ages when they led the defense of Morrowind from multiple takeover attempts by the Reman and Septim empires over the course of several millenia, thwarted at least two takeover attempts by Akaviri races, and banished Mehrunes Dagon at least once. They also established and maintained the Ghostfence, which is the only thing keeping Dagoth Ur and the Blight at bay. By the time the game takes place, they've gone several centuries without being able to recharge their divinity, so they've been forced to withdraw from the day to day affairs of mortals in order to conserve energy.
      • King Helseth, as seen in the Tribunal expansion. He's actively working to turn his position as "King of Morrowind" from a Puppet King/figurehead position into one with some real power, first by having his predecessor killed and then by trying to weaken the power of the Tribunal Temple. He is also a Master Poisoner and isn't afraid to sic the Dark Brotherhood on anyone he sees as a threat to his power. The main quest of Tribunal centers around a power struggle between Helseth and the Tribunal Temple (among other things).
    • In Oblivion, Martin leads a bunch of people to the safety of Kvatch's chapel; helps you fight off the people attacking Weynon Priory; calls on all his knowledge of Daedra worship to get the Amulet of Kings back; leads the defense of Bruma; and even sacrifices himself in order to stop Mehrunes Dagon. Most of this he even does while trying not to believe that he's actually an important person of any sort, much less the son of the Emperor. Well, technically, he hadn't been crowned yet. But certainly he would have become the living embodiment of this trope had he not sacrificed himself to save Tamriel.
    • Skyrim's has Titus Mede II, the current Emperor, who is stated to have been a very skilled general who managed to successfully fight off the Thalmor during the Great War.
  • The Prince/Princess and Sovereign classes in the Etrian Odyssey series are nobility who actively join adventuring parties in dungeon diving, rallying them in the thick of combat. They learn Order skills that help them keep their teammates focused on the fight.
    • In Untold 2, Arianna is the Princess of Caledonia, having turned up in High Lagaard to participate in a ritual at the nearby ruins.
  • In Europa Universalis III, a nation's leader (often a king, although bishops, emperors, elected leaders, and popes are also possible) can be converted into a field commander and used to lead armies. Some kings can make quite effective generals, depending on their attributes and the social slider settings of the nation. However, one of the main reasons to do this is in the hopes of getting an incompetent ruler killed so that another (hopefully more capable) leader will replace him before 30+ years of rule by an weak/rude/unsavvy monarch bankrupts the nation.
  • In Fable III, the player eventually becomes the ruler of Albion after overthrowing their tyrannical brother Logan. This, of course, doesn't interrupt their ability to go around the world farting at villagers and doing sidequests.
  • Several servants from Fate/stay night, seeing how they used to be the above-mentioned mythical heroes when they were alive.
    • Saber deserves a special mention. Due to being King Arthur.
  • Extremely common in Final Fantasy games;
    • Final Fantasy II has Princess Hilda. While she isn't as hands-on as many of the examples here, she is still the leader and the brains of the Wild Rose Rebellion. Notably, she goes camping with her troops before the assault to retake Fynn, instead of staying in Altair where it was safe. Prince Scott also had an active role before his death, and Prince Gordon alternates between working with the party and working with Princess Hilda once he Takes a Level in Badass.
    • Final Fantasy III presents Princess Sara, who takes it upon herself to venture into the Sealed Cave to defeat the Djinn and save her people from a nasty curse. Although the party ends up helping her instead, she can cast support spells from the background.
    • Final Fantasy IV has this in spades. During the original game party members Edward and Edge are princes, and in the sequel The After Years they're joined by Cecil and Yang (kings), Rosa (queen), Ceodore (prince), and Luca and Ursula (princesses). The strongest summons in the game are royalty too — Leviathan and Asura are king and queen of the Feymarch, Odin is the spirit of the former King of Baron, and Bahamut is the king of monsters.
    • Final Fantasy V has Galuf, the reigning king of Bal; his granddaughter Krile; and Lenna and Faris, both princesses of Tycoon. Bartz too would be royalty, if his father had gone back to his home dimension where he was a king.
    • Final Fantasy VI gives us Edgar, the king of Figaro (and a skilled engineer), as well as his twin brother Sabin, as playable characters.
    • Final Fantasy VII tries its best to avert this trope by having most of the world under the thumb of a Mega Corp., but there is still Princess Yuffie, who comes from one of the few free nations left in the world.
    • Final Fantasy VIII comes close with Rinoa, whose father is Minister of Defense for the Galbadian Republic. (As the highest-ranking government official left by the end of the game, this might make him president; the game doesn't address the question, though.) In any event, her officers in the Forest Owls refer to her as "princess".
    • Final Fantasy IX has Princess Garnet/Dagger, who in a twist on the usual application turns out to not be royalty after all, but rather an adopted Last Of Her Kind.
      • There's also Prince Puck of Burmecia, who doesn't do a lot other than sneak about and cause trouble: there's Queen Brahne, Garnet's mother, who both accompanies her arial troops into battle and, having drained Garnet's Eidolons, is the one to use them in combat. She is not ineffective. There's also Regent Cid, who is the city's chief engineer, and, without participating in any actual battles, accompanies the party for a segment of their journey.
    • Considering that her dad took out an Eldritch Abomination, Yuna probably could have gone her entire life in comfort. You know, comparatively. But instead, she decided to go and save the world herself.
    • Final Fantasy XII has Princess Ashe, who fights to restore her kingdom and become queen.
      • Larsa is another example (deciding to personally investigate incidents and even guest-joining the party). In fact, what sets House Solidor apart from the other Archadian patrician families is that its members still abide by the meritocratic principles of the early Archadian Republic, which is why the Archadian military under their direct control has remained so formidable while the parts of the Empire controlled by the democratic-in-name-only Senate are showing evident signs of decadence. Larsa's brother is arguably a more villainous example: Vayne's main motive is topple the Occurias' hidden tyranny over the mortal races: getting rid of his family's corrupt enemies and establishing himself as a benevolent enlightened dictator is just a nice bonus
      • There's also Magnificent Bastard Al-Cid Margrace, who, despite not doing a lot onscreen, apparently works very hard in a political sense to postpone war.
    • The closest character that Final Fantasy XIII has to royalty is Hope, who is the son of a high-ranking Sanctum employee. Like many tropes in the game, this one is deconstructed in that Hope doesn't want to do anything, but is forced into action due to his overzealous mother and her "protector", Snow.
      • Final Fantasy XIII-2 plays this straight when Hope ends up becoming effective King of Earth, and he happily spends most of the game beating up monsters and creating war machines and tech for Serah and Noel to use. In an early treatment of the game's plot, Hope was supposed to be the third party member.
    • Prince Noctis, the hero of Final Fantasy XV, was forced to become this after being an Aversion for most of his life due to the rival kingdom of Niflheim invading Lucis while he was away with his True Companions in order to get married to the princess of their last allied kingdom. He's also the only person that can wield multiple magic weapons at once due to his royal blood as well as teleport innately.
      • His father, King Regis, was certainly no slouch before the invasion, as he had sacrificed a decent amount of his youth and vitality to maintain the shield over the capital city of Lucis, and Kingsglaive troops are explicitly stated to get their powers from the King himself through his magic ring and the Crystal that powers their kingdom.
  • The royal family from Find Mii (aka Streetpass Quest) prefers to manage their kingdom from the ground level rather than atop their thrones. Not that they get a chance to demonstrate this before they all get kidnapped, but it has clearly helped their popularity enough to get hundreds of passerby to take up swords and fight to free them.
  • Also a common character type in the Fire Emblem series, with "common" as in "the point of every game except the two involving Ike." Royalty tends to max out stats faster, are the most likely to have a pre-battle conversation with the villain of the chapter, and are obviously very important to the plot. Being a mercenary, Ike is a far cry from royalty, but even then he becomes leader of the best mercenary guild after his father gets offed.
    • Convolutedly played with in Micaiah and Pelleas' case. The latter discovers he's the prince as a young adult, proceeds to take his throne back from the invaders, and then realises he was just another commoner after all, prompting him to abdicate in Micaiah's favour. Then the epilogue reveals she's actually the thought-to-be-dead older sister of another country's Empress, Sanaki, who offers her the throne. Micaiah refuses, choosing to lead the country she's fought for.
      • The actual heir to the throne of Daein is Soren, who has also been "doing something" — he's been fighting alongside you the whole time. Subverted in that he doesn't know his lineage.
    • Even though Ike has no royal blood, he still becomes a noble during the course of his first game. Not to mention that his father was one of Daein's Four Riders. Not quite a royal, but close.
    • The Laguz Kings, who get to become kings because they are their tribes' most efficient warriors. The most obvious case is Tibarn, though Naesala, while he prefers not to fight himself, is also pretty damn powerful and all he does is more or less for the sake of Kilvas.
    • Even minor characters may turn out to be royalty, or at least, nobles. Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones really goes after this, featuring three princes and three princesses in its cast. Two of them didn't reveal until much later that they are royalty.
    • Tellius also brings us Elincia. She was for most of Path of Radiance inactive... however, near the end, she comes to Ike wearing armor next to her great-grandmother's pegasus saying she was tired of sitting around. This continues into Radiant Dawn, where she is shown ruling her kingdom and is an active unit. In fact, she's a popular end-game choice.
    • The villains count too; generally the Big Bad is royalty, as are many chapter bosses. Even in the rare cases where they aren't good at combat, they'll generally be at least be out on the battlefield with their troops.
    • Awakening is chock full of them: there's main character Chrom and his sister Lissa, both who patrol Ylisse and fight wars, Chrom's daughter Lucina and her cousin Owain, who've come back in time to change history, villains Gangrel and Walhart who lead their troops in battle, by technicality the Avatar during the middle chapters who serves as a tactician, minor nobles Maribelle and Ricken who are part of Chrom's army, exiled noble Virion trying to reclaim his duchy, Chon'sin princess Say'ri leading the resistance against Walhart, co-rulers Flavia and Basilio who also personally lead their troops in battle, and Emmeryn (Chrom's sister), Yen'fay (Say'ri's brother), Walhart, and Gangrel are all optional recruitable characters. And anyone who marries any of the above become this by marriage as well.
    • Fates has even more than Awakening. It's entirely possible to fill the dispatchable unit amount for a mission with entirely royalty - an absolute minimum of six royals will join up on any route, and a maximum of 22.
  • Freelancer has two noblemen (Lord Hakkera of Kusari and Diedrich Von Claussen of Rheinland) who are both Order agents and pretty good pilots. In fact, Von Claussen is known throughout Rheinland as an ace who has never lost a wingman.
  • The second set of player characters in Golden Sun: Dark Dawn are all royalty.
    • Anyone who played Lost Age knows that the people of Champa resort to piracy to feed their mouths, because they have only their smithy otherwise. Eoleo ascends to captainhood as a result of his father Briggs' death, but still swings a mean blade regardless of his rank. A captain who cannot fight alongside his crew doesn't remain captain for very long.
    • Amiti lived a relatively sheltered life off his mother's fame until Matthew and his friends came along. He may have volunteered to escort them through the Barai Ruins, but he takes on a more active role once the Insight Glass chooses him. Given the injuries sustained by King Paithos during the eclipse, Amiti ascended to the throne in its wake.
    • Himi, like Amiti, lived relative comfort as a Shrine Maiden alongside her parents, Susa and Kushinada. She falls into a coma after foretelling Isaac's descent into disaster, sending her older brother off to his aid, but winds up going with Matthew once the Third Eye awakens her from said coma.
    • The beastmen of Morgal take the brunt of Fantastic Racism on many sides, meaning even the Czamaral clan must remain primed for combat when it comes. While she runs your operations in Morgal, especially Belinsk, from behind the scenes, Sveta is no less capable as a fighter. Of course, the racism may not have ended soon enough, given the Grave Eclipse's activation, so when she ascends to queenhood in the wake of her brother's death, she's going to have to train a new army and capitalize on the light Adepts that emerged as a result of the eclipse's end.
  • Prince (later King) Roan in Grandia II.
  • The second player ship in the Gradius side story Salamander is piloted by the prince of the planet you're defending. Later incarnations name this ship after him: Lord British.
  • In Guild Wars: Nightfall, one of the first heroes to join your party and set your characters' plans in motion is Tahlkora, who is revealed to be a princess of Vabbi.
  • The Gryphonhearts in the Heroes of Might and Magic series, starting with Rion Gryphonheart, who led the Erathian army against Tarnum's barbarian hordes and defeated Tarnum in Combat by Champion. Rion's daughter (and Tarnum's niece) is also this, after Tarnum trains her.
    • Heroes of Might and Magic V has Isabel, Godric and Freyda, as well as Zehir.
    • The Ironfist brother that wins the Succession War (canonically Roland) goes on the field personally for the final battle of the war (the other brother is also on the field, but that is less impressive considering the battle is about besieging the last stronghold of the losing brother). Roland also went on a campaign against the Kreegan in the period between Heroes II and Might & Magic VI, though with less impressive results (it led to him being kidnapped by the Kreegan and held prisoner for some six to seven years). Archibald, while it was not readily apparent in-game about the Succession War, turned out to be a remarkably knowledgeable mage in contexts that made it clear that it must have applied before the War's end.
  • All the royals in Jade Empire have at some point been pretty active.
  • Pretty much every aristocrat in the Jak and Daxter series, be they good, bad, or neutral, does something: Baron Praxis actively fights against Jak and the Metal Heads; his daughter Ashelin is a member of the Krimzon Guard (later the Freedom League); Count Veger does things himself rather than relying on Mooks.
    • And after The Reveal, we now know that Jak himself is one of these.
  • The Prince of All Cosmos from Katamari Damacy has saved and/or rebuilt the cosmos numerous times. Sadly, his father gets all the credit, even though he's usually the one who endangers the cosmos to begin with.
  • Kingdom Hearts has Mickey Mouse. He's the king of Disney Castle, a badass and powerful Keyblade Master, and one of the main characters in the series, acting as a Big Good (though he defers to Bigger Good Yen Sid).
    • Minnie Mouse qualifies when needed. She's got Holy on her side.
    • Kairi is starting to become one of these as of Kingdom Hearts II, despite her status as a princess being only through the fact that she lacks darkness in her heart. Though it is mentioned at one point that her adoptive parent is a mayor...
  • King of Dragon Pass has all your tribes duties overseen by nobles. From trading and diplomacy to dangerous expeditions and warfare, they work their ass off until old age or death. They definitely earn their keep.
  • King's Quest sounds like it says it right there in the title, although the name probably refers to the King giving Sir Graham his quest in the first game. Following his promotion at the end of the first game, all but one of the other games involve royalty in a main role, either King Graham or his family members, personally saving their kingdom. While they are involved with exploits of purely the personal variety, you have an entire Badass Family whose exploits involve a lot more than afternoon tea.
  • King Dedede of the Kirby series goes back and forth on this. While he is a fearsome fighter, both when he opposes Kirby and when he occasionally helps him, he isn't much of a ruler, as it's explicitly stated that he performs absolutely no administrative duties whatsoever, to the point that the citizens of Dream Land more or less ignore his presence.
    • Prince Fluff from Kirby's Epic Yarn also counts, if playing in a 2-player game. The in-game cutscenes avert this.
  • Knights in the Nightmare has Willimgard who, despite being dead, comes back as the Wisp in order to prevent the villains from accomplishing their goal.
    • The same series brings us Yggdra and Gulcasa. Milanor, Luciana and Aegina probably count too. And in the same game, there's Arlier... and although Nordische doesn't get too far, he tries.
    • And three years ago, Soltier, Ordene, Aegina...
  • Knights of the Old Republic II has Queen Talia of Onderon. She's a staunch supporter of the Republic and sends them material assistance (despite its controversy among her people) while dealing with a Succession Crisis. She's also a Lady of War who duels her cousin Vaklu with swords, and he's no match for her.
  • Knights of the Old Republic The first game has one that is only recognizable in hindsight. Turns out Guest-Star Party Member Trask Ulgo, killed during the first level, was high ranking nobility from Alderaan, enough for his distant relative to seize the throne of Alderaan during the Succession Crisis 300 years later.
  • The Last Remnant has numerous examples of this (both good and evil). The most notable is David, the Marquis of Athium, who is a very competent and active leader both in the throne room and on the front lines.
  • League of Legends has Jarvan IV, son of the King of Demacia, taking a commanding role in the military and subsequently, the League of Legends. More than merely competent, he is one of the greatest troops at his city-state's disposal. So is his Arch-Enemy Jericho Swain, ruler of the Lawful Evil city state of Noxus. A cunning mastermind and a competent leader, he is also a formidable mage with a very hands-on approach to battle.
  • The Legendary Starfy has both the title character and his far more enthused sister Starly — while he's out helping his amnesiac space-bunny friend, she's at home in Pufftop beating the pants off of the invading army. Before boss fights, Moe even asks if you want to summon Starly for help.
  • The Legend of Dragoon has King Albert of Basil, who essentially picked up where a previous player character, Lavitz (a knight from Basil), had left off.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • Princess Zelda has fought alongside Link in several of the games in the series, including The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess. Even in games where she doesn't directly fight, she often plays a major role in vanquishing the Big Bad.
      • In Ocarina of Time, Link's mentor Sheik is actually Zelda in disguise.
      • In the beginning of Spirit Tracks, Zelda has her soul separated from her body by the Big Bad. She then joins Link as his Exposition Fairy, giving her the largest role she's ever had in canon. And within the tower she has the power to possess a suit of animate armor, becoming a sword-wielding badass made of metal and ghost that far outranks Link himself in strength.
      • In Breath of the Wild, Zelda is an Adventurer Archaeologist who's spent her entire life trying to unlock the divine power needed to help defeat Calamity Ganon; after awakening said power, she's been busy keeping Ganon sealed up in Hyrule Castle for the past 100 years.
    • Princess Zelda is even the protagonist of Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon, one of the non-canonical Philips CD-i games. The same game also has King Harkinian; once he hears that his brother, Duke Onkled, is in danger, he runs off to Gamelon (after dinner, of course). He even comes prepared with the Triforce of Courage. Granted, nothing comes of it, but he tried, after all.
    • King Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule from The Wind Waker. For the majority of the game he's Link's boat, serving as his only transport form island to island and giving him vital information for his quest, and just before the final battle, he cheats Ganondorf out of his wish on the Triforce by making his own wish: to have Hyrule, and Ganondorf with it, washed away forever.
    • Hell, franchise Big Bad Ganondorf himself may count. He did start out as King of the Gerudo, after all.
    • Minor character example in Majora's Mask: When you defeat the undead swordsmen in Ikana Castle, the king himself jumps up from his throne without a word, pulls out a sword and shield, and proceeds to continue where his generals left off. There's also the Deku Princess, who went with her monkey friend to get rid of the poisonous waters emanating from Woodfall Temple.
    • One word: Midna. True, she was dethroned in Twilight Princess, but she still helped Link more than any other character in the entire series. She was more like his partner than his sidekick, which is more than can be said of the various fairies. The dethroner, Zant, is not above accompanying his minions into battle, either.
    • In Oracle of Ages, there's Ralph, heir to the throne of Labrynna. Not the most endearing sidekick ever, but he does have his moment.
    • Queen Gohma, King Dodongo, Stallord, and tons of other bosses who are the direct rulers of the Mookss you fight also count.
    • Hyrule Warriors allows many other established royal characters to fight directly in battle, including Zora Princess Ruto, Goron Chieftain Darunia, and "Insect Princess" Agitha.
    • The Zora royal family is very much this in Breath of the Wild; Prince Sidon and King Dorephan are renowned warriors, while Princess Mipha was one of the four Champions selected to help Link and Zelda defeat Calamity Ganon.
  • Lost Odyssey's Ming Numara at first seems like a useless figurehead, but soon proves herself to be an extremely powerful sorceress and a strong, competent, and proactive leader who was only in the position of a figurehead because she had been forced to seal away her own memories in order to save the lives of her subjects.
  • Lufia: The Legend Returns has Princess Melphis of Alstadt Kingdom joining your party. Fellow party member Deckard turns out to be her brother, the missing Prince Alheim.
  • In Magna Carta 2, Princess Rzephillda should be sitting in a tower somewhere hiding from her country's Civil War. Instead, she leads a front-line elite unit in an effort to retake her power.
  • In Mechwarrior 4: Vengeance, the protagonist Ian Dresari is from a royal family, seeking to restore legal rule to his planet (and the final battle is with his cousin). After one of his missions, a lancemate actually says "I guess you're not one of those royals who let the rest of us do the heavy lifting."
    • In the original Mechwarrior, the protagonist Gideon Braver Vandenberg is the heir of a Duke who was overthrown by a political conspiracy with Gideon as the patsy. Instead of taking this lying down or getting others to fight on his behalf, Gideon goes on to form his own mercenary unit to prove his innocence and exact bloody revenge.
  • Might and Magic VII includes this; the starting island of the game centres around a contest in which the prize is for the winning group to jointly become 'Lords of Harmondale'. After winning and arriving at Welnin, the main settlement of Harmondale, the adventurers quickly find out that, amongst other things, the inhabitants all think they won't last long, no-one of the nobles and royals of the continent regard them as actual nobles, and the Castle that is supposed to be their home as Lords is partially in ruins, as well as goblin-infested. The middle portion of the game is about fixing all that. Also, it is possible for Harmondale to become an independent Kingdom, making the Lords more properly Royal.
  • MOTHER 3 has Princess Kumatora, who fights alongside Lucas.
    • Of course, there were never any real monarchs on the Nowhere Islands; she was just planted there and entitled as one when everyone's memories, save for Leder's, were wiped and rebuilt when they moved there.
  • Each of the five kingdoms in Mount & Blade is ruled by a king who leads his own combat party and has a high renown value (this being a game statistic usually increased by winning battles). Though they sometimes hang out in their respective castles, they are known to lead campaigns into enemy territory. Good thing the Never Say "Die" rule applies to all named characters in this game, because they're always part of the first group to deploy, and they often get knocked out and captured in the course of a battle. Still, unless you've got some serious skills/leveling/equipment, do not engage the king alone. He'll cut you down in seconds.
  • NieR has The Masked King of Facade, who leads his soldiers into every battle, including their last stand, which he knows he won't survive, but still manages to win.
  • When Nintendo Wars came to the GBA, under the Advance Wars title that it is known by in the West, the Yellow Comet faction embodied this trope, with the two commanders representing the faction in the first game being Emperor Kanbei, and his daughter, Sonja, who also is the head of intelligence operations for the faction. While Sonja did become a Distressed Damsel during the final mission, this was from her attempt to confront Sturm directly.
  • The cast of Odin Sphere is made up mostly of these. Four of the five main characters are princes, princesses, and queens. Even Oswald turns out to be a long-lost prince of Titania, and Cornelius' cousin. The supporting cast gets in on this as well. The only royal who doesn't really do anything is King Edmund, who's just too old and feeble at this point (but still has killing his father after he transformed into the Darkova and ran amok as part of his backstory.)
  • There's quite a few in Ōkami, but foremost is Queen Himiko. At first it looks like she's the one responsible for Sei-An city being covered in toxic fog, or at least apathetic to her citizens plight, being shut in the imperial palace; however, she died in a Heroic Sacrifice. Using her murder by Ninetails to fuse her soul with her clan's Crystal Ball to locate Oni Island and give Amaterasu the chance to slay Ninetails and destroy a major source of monsters. And thanks to her powers of prophecy, she knew she was going to die. Needless to say, the Player Punch reaction when Ninetails taunts you with not being able to protect her (and in fact giving her the tool she needed to kill her!) is a powerful one. Even in death (and a sidequest), her tears give Nuregami a power boost and will net you a new and powerful water attack.
  • Lian from Paladins is a young heir of a once powerful noble family who has taken it upon herself to lead her family's armies and restore her House's glory.
  • In Pokémon Black and White Team Plasma's King N aka Natural Harmonia Gropius is a fighter first and foremost, and a king second.
  • PoPoLoCrois for the PS1 and PSP has Pietro, who is the prince of the country of the same name. Another party member who joins you in the PS1 version is Jilva, who is the princess of another country as well. (And actually a pretty strong physical attacker.)
    • Narcia may also count, as it's revealed she may potentially be the daughter of Titania, queen of the faeries.
  • Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time. To date, the Prince has let loose an ancient curse, battled basically Fate itself, and WON, and then fought the Vizier who caused the first problem by manipulation, who by then absorbed a lot of the Sands of Time, turning him into pretty much a really shiny being who was supposedly immortal. If there's one man who embodies Royals Who Actually Do Something, it's the Prince of Persia.
    • To a lesser extent, Farah as well, being the daughter of the Maharaja.
  • Every princess in Princess Waltz is some form of badass. The Princess Waltz tournament of the titular Visual Novel allows the strongest princess in the land to marry the Emperor, giving them good reason to not just sit around. Most notable are Princesses Liliana and Angela, who both fight in their Kingdom's navy and army respectively. Princess Liesel, on the other hand, is a noted inventor and smith.
  • Princess Eruca or Granorg is very active, first doing her best to use her political sway to try and limit the damage her lazy, vain, and stupid, stupid stepmother is doing, and when that doesn't work, she spearheads a rebellion. She'd like to be even more active, but is constantly told to stay off the front lines. She is usually swayed to agree, since while a martyr would be good for the rebellion, the world as a whole is boned without her and the nature of Stocke's time travel means he's better off avoiding the circumstances of her possible death entirely, rather than altering the specific moment.
    • In the backstory, her older brother, Prince Ernst, who made himself beloved by the populace for basically trying to fix everything. It didn't turn out so well, since King Victor started getting a little nervous that his son's popularity might be a threat to his reign and had him executed on false charges of treason to get him out of the way.
  • The Quest for Glory series has a few: In the first game the baron's daughter is a skilled swordsman, and she returns in the fifth game, as an accomplished fighter and adventurer. The Hero's long-time friend and mentor Rakeesh the Paladin used to be the king of his homeland Fricana. When a demon horde threatened the kingdom, Rakeesh personally fought the most powerful of the demons and won. After the rest of the demons were driven out of the land Rakeesh wanted to make sure they would never threaten anyone again, but the ruling council refused to commit to fighting a threat that had moved on to become someone else's problem. Thus, Rakeesh abdicated the throne to pursue the demons alone. Then he met a paladin who mentored him and eventually became one himself. Finally, in the fifth game the King of Silmaria has died without a heir, and tasks have been set to choose the new king. The Hero can succeed in ascending to the throne, and if he chooses not to, Elsa will take it up instead. Given that pretty much every task requires Hercules-levels feats of heroism, anyone who manages to succeed would qualify under this trope.
  • Most nobles in Ravenmark: Scourge of Estellion have, at one point or another, served in the Imperial Mark. In fact, due to the meritocratic nature of The Empire of Estellion, any commoner who wishes to achieve Ravenhood (temporary nobility) has to serve in the military for 22 years (there is an alternative of 36 years of administrative service, but most choose the military path). Ravenhood is passed on to the soldier's children but not grandchildren. Any family that manages to retain Ravenhood for 10 unbroken generations (i.e. constant service) becomes a permanent noble House with the 11th generation firstborn becoming a Rook (a title equivalent to a Real Life Lord but also signifies a general-type rank). Specific examples include Rook Vidius Harper and Rook Delvinius Cato. However, the late Emperor Sergius Corvius ascended to the throne after leading a successful military campaign in the northeast region of the Empire. The four Queens (more like department heads), one of whom is Sergius's daughter, are also capable military commanders, even the manipulative Phoebe Corvius. Exceptions include Sergius's son Gratian, who is more of a schemer, and Gratian's son Ovidius. The Court of Shadows (formerly House Cordance) are a borderline example, being a secret order made up of Heroic Bastards of House Corvius, trained in espionage and Blood Magic, and sworn to protect their legitimate brothers and sisters from any threat within the Empire and without. The "borderline" part comes from the fact that it's not clear if bastards are considered to be nobility.
  • In Robopon, Princess Darcy and Prince Tail commentate on Robopon matches, and Tail is an expert battler. In the second game, the Kings of Wonder and Delica battle, too.
  • In Rune Factory 4, the player is named acting prince/princess of the town of Selphia and is responsible for pretty much the entire plot. The actual prince, Arthur, is perfectly willing to let them take over for him, but he earns his keep by maintaining a busy trading practice.
  • The Heroine and her family in Shall We Date?: Magic Sword are this. The princess has always been a tomboy and had taken an interest in sports. The prologue focuses on the princess trying to defend her kingdom from invading forces.
  • Prince Enrique from Skies of Arcadia.
  • Sonic
  • Hildegard "Hilde" Von Krone of the Soul Series. She's the princess (and acting ruler, due to her father's insanity) of a small kingdom, who is very much a Lady of War and leads her country's army into battle.
  • Prince Valerian Mengsk of Starcraft is shown to be a Badass Bookworm trained in Martial Arts and swordsmanship as well as classical knowledge in the books. He's an Adventurer Archaeologist, to boot. He's also definitely taken notes from his father in Magnificent Bastardry and by the end of Starcraft II manages to disinfect Sarah Kerrigan with the help of Jim Raynor.
  • Star Ocean The Second Story: Celine Jules if one unlocks her secret ending in Rena's story. In fact, Blue Sphere confirms that the secret ending is canon.
  • Princess Leia and Emperor Palpatine are playable Heroes in Star Wars Battlefront (2015), engaging with troops in massive infantry assaults.
  • Games belonging to the Suikoden series are obviously filled with these. Special mention goes to King Lino en Kuldes, one of the fourth game's best fighters and his daughter Flare, two popular characters in, arguably, the series' most unpopular game.
  • Super Mario Bros.
  • In Super Robot Wars Original Generation, when Princess Shine's kingdom is overrun by the Divine Crusaders, she has to be rescued by your team. When the Neo DC attack again in Original Generation 2, she instead joins your team with a pair of custom-made Elegant Gothic Lolita-styled Humongous Mecha for herself and her friend to help protect her kingdom.
    • The spinoff Endless Frontier has more princesses than it has worlds, and each one that you meet joins the party to protect/redeem/avenge their kingdom. There's Kaguya Nanbu, master of the Nanbu Reijutsu sword arts; Suzuka, who controls a multiple gatling-wielding robot by dancing; and Neige Hausen/Howzen, who fights with a bayonet-equipped laser rifle (as well as a miniature Expy of the aforementioned Shine Hausen's Humongous Mecha). Then there's King Rubor Cullen, who would be better for his kingdom if he didn't pick fights with everyone he thought was a threat, Shuten, who regularly fights the party for his people's honor, and Stahl Dieb, who personally led an expedition into the Einst dimension.
  • Quite a few of the fighters in Super Smash Bros. can be counted as Royalty or have some kind of royal title in their home games: Bowser (King of Koopas), Ganondorf (King of Evil), King Dedede (Self-proclaimed king of Dream Land), Marth (The Hero King), Peach (Princess of the Mushroom Kingdom), Zelda (Princess of Hyrule), Lucina (Princess of Ylisse) and Bowser Jr. (Prince of Koopas). Other characters are also rulers of their domains, but don't have a royal title, like Rosalina, Palutena and Donkey Kong.
  • Tales Series:
    • Tales of Destiny: While Prince Garr/Woodrow initially trained in the woods with a legendary archer, when his uncle usurps the throne he very quickly comes back to end his tyranny, and when the party needs help saving the world he immediately joins them.
    • Natalia from Tales of the Abyss. On top of being the main party's archer, she's also politically active, using her position to help the economy and foreign relations and the like. As a result, when it's revealed that she's actually a maid's child that was swapped for the real princess Natalia when the real one was stillborn, and the king goes to exile her, the people rise up to help her out.
      • Luke becomes one, after his Important Haircut, and he's around fourth in line for the Kimlascan throne, as well as the heir to the most powerful non-royal aristocrat in the kingdom.
      • Emperor Peony may not be a playable character, but he does a great job running his country and is often highly involved with helping Luke and the party save the world.
    • Tales of the Tempest: Prince Tilkis of Senshibia. When his country was attacked by Spots, he crossed the ocean in a rowboat with only one bodyguard (who insisted on coming) to figure out what the hell was going on in Aurella. When he meets Caius and Rubia, the two (especially Rubia) see him as a cool older brother.
    • Tales of Vesperia: Princess Estellise suffers from such an acute case of Chronic Hero Syndrome that she feels compelled to personally try to solve every injustice Brave Vesperia hears about. It finally reaches the point where Judith snaps at her for it, causing Yuri to intercede by telling Estelle deal with one situation at a time. And, as a white mage, she has a compulsive habit of using her healing artes to treat any wounded she sees. While normally an admirable trait, it has dire consequences later.
    • Prince (and later King) Richard from Tales of Graces. When his father is murdered, he leads the uprising and insists upon fighting alongside his men. Also, as revealed in the epilogue, he dedicates his time to killing the monsters Lambda created.
    • Tales of Xillia: King Gaius is a firm believer that it is the duty of the strong to protect and lead the weak. True to this, he often sees to the threats to the people of Reize Maxia personally. His conviction reaches Well-Intentioned Extremist levels when he takes it upon himself to serve as Maxwell and destroy Elympios in order to protect his world. In Tales of Xillia 2, he decides to travel about Elympios incognito to better understand the people there and therefor better act for everyone as king. He also sees to eliminating the threat posed by the fractured dimensions along with the party.
    • Tales of Zestiria: Due to her low claim, Princess Alisha trained as a knight to better serve her people. After Sorey becomes the Shepard, she is more than willing to travel with him as a squire to help cleanse the kingdom of Hyland of malevolence. Unfortunately for her she also deconstructs this as her efforts to help tend to not be useful in the long run. Not until she starts getting politically active, that is acting as a princess instead of a knight, and after the reveal of her Evil Mentor and the crushing of her last illusions about knighthood makes her realize what she really needs to do if she wants to help.
    • Tales of Berseria: Subverted with Prince Percival. While his subjects believe him to be this, he's actually very restricted by his family in what he can do. Played straight after the Suppression.
  • Toki from Time and Eternity repeatedly travels back in time to prevent the murder of her fiancee at her own wedding. She ends up saving the entire timeline while she's at it.
  • The royal families in the Total War series. They can act as generals, accompanied onto the battlefield by generals, and can also act as a provincial governors, their personal attributes influencing the efficiency with which the province is managed (for better or worse).
    • Less son in the games set later, such as Empire and Napoleon. However, historically, many of the generals in Napoleon were aristocrats. Examples include Napoleon himself and Mikhail Kutuzov, although neither had actually been born into nobility. Napoleon made himself Emperor, and Kutuzov was granted the title of Knyaz (Prince or Duke) after his victory over the Turks.
  • Arcueid Brunestud is one. Actually, by this point 'doing stuff' is pretty much all she does anymore when not sleeping. She used to be treated like a princess by a castle full of vampires, but then she killed them all. But she's still doing the job that went with being a princess, and other characters still refer to her as one.
  • The Ultima series: The only reason Lord British isn't joining your party (without cheating) is to maintain some pretense at game balance. Nonetheless he aids you constantly, offering equipment, aid, room and board, and free heals and resurrections for both you, your party and the occasional collateral-damage NPC. Shamino, who can and usually does join you in practically every game, is also a king, although he's been stranded in Britannia since the breaking of Sosaria during the time of Exodus. And they're both Richard Garriott.
    • Lord British gets off his throne twice of note- in the backstory to Ultima V he leads the expedition into the underworld; and in Ultima IX he realizes he has been relying on you too much, and personally goes off to kick Blackthorn's ass and stop the moons in their courses.
  • Prince Maximillian from Valkyria Chronicles who takes an active hand in The Empire's invasion of Gallia.
  • Princess Alicia in Valkyrie Profile 2 Silmeria, along with a good chunk of the Einherjar she can call up who happen to be royals of one sort or another.
  • Warcraft, especially Warcraft III, has several royal heroes fighting on the frontlines, including Arthas, Muradin Bronzebeard (and his brothers in World of Warcraft, to an extent), Kael'thas and Anub'arak (ancient king-turned-traitor of Azjol-Nerub).
    • Brann Bronzebeard is so active as an Adventurer Archaeologist in the more recent expansions that his status as royalty seems mostly superfluous to his character.
    • Warcraft II rather inverts the trope, with legendary and/or royal heroes who when they appear on the field need to be kept away from the front lines at all cost, being weaker than regular units.
    • Then there is Varian Wrynn, King of Stormwind, in the comics. When he was introduced in World of Warcraft, he was quite a bit too eager to fight to actually make wise decisions, but he seems to have mellowed down in Icecrown Citadel.
      • Varian's father Llane Wrynn was one of the most beloved kings of Stormwind. It was his courage and determination that kept the orcs from razing the city for the 4 years of the First War. Then he turns his back on a former ally and gets his heart cut out for his trouble. Without Llane, Stormwind falls quickly. Lord Anduin Lothar (descended from the Arathi royal line) is a skilled commander and fighter. Unfortunately, his duel with Orgrim Doomhammer ends with his skull crushed by Doomhammer's warhammer of the same name.
    • Sylvanas Windrunner, the Banshee Queen, also fits.
      • She's technically not royalty as much as just calls herself that.
      • Arguably justified title, being that she is a recognized ruler of a distinct sovereign nation.
    • You also have Genn Greymane, king of Gilneas, even before becoming a worgen. During the Second War, he personally leads the Gilneas forces to cut off orc reinforcements after the ruler of the neighboring kingdom of Alterac makes a deal with Orgrim Doomhammer. He's the first to leap into battle. In the novel Wolfheart, Genn and Varian go on a hunt and bond over a fight with an angry bear. This is despite the fact that Genn is by this point over 70 years old. Genn's son was also this until taking a poisoned arrow for his father.
      • His daughter Tess turns out to be a Shadow, one of the leaders of the Rogue's guild The Uncrowned.
  • The Antiqua family of Xenoblade rule the High Entia. Sorean travels to Prison Island alone in an attempt to release what was trapped there to try to fend off a Mechon attack, Melia goes to try and kill an escaped Telethia even if that was an attempt to get her killed and travels with Shulk and co. and Kallian takes the leading role in forming the Allied Force of Bionis later leading them from the front lines of the Second Battle of Sword Valley.
    Kallian: Divisions 1 to 3, continue supporting the Homs and encircle the Faces.
    Guard: Your Highness, think of yourself!
    Kallian: Once the vanguard has been eliminated we must join the fight. Better that than die as cowards. Move!
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X has Ga Jiarg, former prince of the Wrothians. He would much rather battle his foes himself than send in his soldiers to do it for him.
  • In Ys Seven we have Aisha, she originally joins up with Adol and Dogi as a Princess Incognito to investigate the Bizarre phenomenons happening all over Altago. After a bit she ends up getting found out when she returns back and the King Introduces Adol and Dogi to her(Unaware that she was with them the entire time). However after the The Last Seal is gathered by the group and Adol and Company become fugitives after being framed for the murder of the king, she is temporarily removed from the party and is forced to stay in the castle.
  • Victoria from Agarest Senki 2. She's of the opinion that one should lead from the front-lines rather than behind and is a general via Asskicking Equals Authority. Mostly gets it from her father Wolfgang, who himself is a Reasonable Authority Figure who admits the only reason he isn't fighting is because of old age.
  • The Taiidan Emperor from Homeworld provides a Deconstruction: being a paranoid tyrant and having no idea of what he's doing, he made an enemy of most of the galaxy, brought the Taiidan population on the verge of rebellion, and then triggered it by ordering the destruction of Kharak in his paranoia. He also personally commands the Imperial Guard in the final battle, but proves an inept commander and, once the initial ambush is survived, the player can take him down with relative ease.
  • Eternal Sonata has Prince Crescendo and Princess Serenade. Prince Crescendo is the prince of Baroque, who is taking care of the kingdom in place of his ailing father. When the kingdom is threatened by Forte, he decides to turn himself over to the game's Big Bad, Count Waltz. The Updated Re-release PlayStation 3 version gives him more to do by having him join your party and making him part of a Bonus Dungeon. Serenade is his fiancee and a spy for Forte, but she realizes that what Forte is doing is wrong and flips sides. She also joins the party in the updated rerelease.
  • One Way Heroics allows you to recruit King Victor and Queen Frieda to fight alongside you, if you are lucky enough to find them and have enough charisma.
  • Chronus Arc has Princess Sharna of Kiribay who regularly interacts with the townsfolk and is more determined to set out on the initial journey than the game's hero.
  • There are lots of folks with Royal Blood all throughout the Dark Parables and, for good or for ill, most of them fit this trope. The ones who don't are usually incapacitated in some fashion - often by magic - and once released, they immediately return to being this.
  • Elodie, the crown princess of the kingdom of Nova in Long Live the Queen, is required at times to carry out various regal duties as she prepares for the day of her coronation, such as presiding over court cases and managing successions over her kingdom's provinces. As well as this, she can also elect to command her navy to repel an invading fleet in the lategame, and, with the right skillsets, even figure out that there's a potential threat coming ahead of time and direct resources to prepare for it.
  • Undertale: Asgore may be a recluse, but he's clearly quite competent. He's a formidable warrior, and before he isolated himself, he was a very active, involved king who sought to foster close ties with his subjects. All this applies to Toriel as well.


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