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    In General 
  • The Western live-action TV business certainly wasn't left untouched by the "Weinstein effect", with numerous actors and producers seeing themselves booted from prominent shows as a result of sexual misconduct allegations.
    • Netflix announced the cancellation of House of Cards shortly after it was revealed that Kevin Spacey, who played the Villain Protagonist Frank Underwood, had made sexual advances on a then-14-year-old Anthony Rapp in 1986. The initial subsequent plan was to finish production on the sixth season to give the show a proper Grand Finale, but more accusations against Spacey began to spill out, including multiple incidents during the production of the show. This led Netflix to suspend production indefinitely and fire Spacey, with the producers eventually reaching the decision to move forward with wrapping up the series without him, leaving Robin Wright as the sole lead for the final season.
    • PBS programs Charlie Rose and Charlie Rose: The Week ended after the eponymous host of both shows got caught up in his own sexual assault scandal on November 20, 2017 (the first scheduled airing since Rose's fall was replaced with a rerun of Antiques Roadshow). He also lost his gig with CBS as the co-host of CBS This Morning in the fallout, being officially fired by both networks the day after. Rose was ultimately replaced by PBS with Christiane Amanpour and on CBS with John Dickerson, effectively confirming that his 45-year long media career was over. His only appearance on PBS since then has been in an archive interview with Raúl Juliá which was shown briefly in a documentary on Juliá in 2019.
    • NBC News fired Today co-anchor Matt Lauer in November 2017 for an undisclosed event of sexual misconduct at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. It would later be revealed in a book by The New Yorker's Ronan Farrow that the incident was actually an alleged rape of a colleague, Brooke Nevils. She had been working for one of the other Today co-anchors, Meredith Vieira, when it happened and finally felt comfortable enough telling Vieira after the Weinstein story broke. A distraught Vieira advised Nevils to go to HR and get a lawyer and Lauer was soon fired.
    • Andrew Kreisberg, creator of the television series Arrow, The Flash (2014), Supergirl (2015), Legends of Tomorrow was first suspended and then fired after several sexual harassment allegations were made against him. It was rumored that there were threats of a massive walkout from the cast and crew if he was allowed to return. The Supergirl crew went so far as to completely throw out his story outline for the second half of Season 3 and just made up a new ending on the fly, while years later, his idea for Eobard Thawne having a major role in Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019) was also scrapped because everyone was just that uncomfortable filming something that came out of his head.
    • Danny Masterson was fired from Netflix's The Ranch after accusations of rape against him began to surface. He also took Netflix exec Andy Yeatman with him in the fallout, when Yeatman bluntly said that neither he nor the company believed the accusations (to add insult to injury, he revealed this to one of the accusers, unaware of who she was).
    • Celebrity chef Mario Batali quit ABC's The Chew after several women accused him of "inappropriate touching". Whatever impact the show would have had without Batali was minimized when the show was canceled later that season.
    • Mere weeks after Charlie Rose lost his jobs, fellow PBS late-night stablemate Tavis Smiley was also fired by PBS following the investigation of multiple sexual misconduct allegations which were found to be credible enough to justify showing him and his program the door.
    • Mark Schwahn, creator of the CW's One Tree Hill and developer of E!'s The Royals, had allegations of sexual harassment made against him from cast and crew members of both shows - resulting in his being suspended from The Royals in November 2017 - and ultimately fired the following month.
    • Jeffrey Tambor faced accusations of sexual assault and was removed from Amazon Prime's Transparent. As a consequence, Tambor was unable to resume playing Maura Pfefferman (the titular trans parent) in what was intended to be the show's fifth and final season. To work around Tambor no longer being involved with the production, the series instead reached its conclusion in a Finale Movie titled Transparent: Musicale Finale, which involved Maura Pfefferman being killed off and the rest of the family reacting to her death.
    • Les Moonves, the man who helped make CBS a prominent network again after it spent the 1990s as a joke in the entertainment industry, resigned from his post as CBS chairman in September 2018 after multiple women accused him of sexual harassment. This led to Julie Chen, Moonves' wife, leaving The Talk due to this conflict of interest (she remains as host of Big Brother for the time being, and even began using her married surname towards the end of Big Brother's 20th season). Moonves was later denied a reported $120 million in severance pay following his exit.
    • Eliza Dushku was fired from Bull after reporting that her co-star Michael Weatherly had sexually harassed her on set. The firing was pre-Weinstein but the ensuing legal battle was after the scandal broke. She had a video of him doing it as well as emails and texts showing that her firing was retaliatory in nature which is illegal. She and CBS eventually came to a $9.5 million settlement in mediation. Part of the deal was that she got to have a meeting with Steven Spielberg whose production company Amblin made the show. Spielberg took her side and in May 2019, announced that he would be pulling funding from the show immediately. It, however, has been renewed for a fourth season without Amblin.
    • Not even supposed #MeToo advocates were safe from it. Actress Asia Argento became a leader in the #MeToo movement after becoming one of the many celebrities who outed Harvey Weinstein as a sexual predator. On August 19, 2018, The New York Times published allegations by actor Jimmy Bennett, claiming Argento of sexually assaulting him in 2013 when he was 17. Argento denied the allegations, but then things took a turn for the worse when bigger evidence of the assault surfaced, including text messages sent by Argento to model Rain Dove admitting to the encounter. The controversy led to her being fired from the Italian version of The X Factor and diminished her credibility as a #MeToo advocate.
  • Within the course of a year, Discovery Communications, the parent company of TLC and the Discovery Channel, was hit with three child abuse controversies, leading to the cancellation of all three shows:
    • TLC's reality show Here Comes Honey Boo Boo was promptly canceled after TMZ revealed that Alana "Honey Boo Boo" Thompson's mother June Shannon ("Mama June" in the series) was dating a man convicted of child molestation a decade before. What made things more shocking was the later revelation that the victim of the molestation was June's daughter, Anna, and that she was the one that blew the whistle.
    • Two months before, the Discovery Channel canceled Sons of Guns after star Will Hayden was arrested and charged with multiple child rape offenses. His firearms company promptly severed all ties with him in an attempt to clean their hands of the matter.
    • Josh Duggar took his whole family with him after he confessed to molesting several girls, including his sisters when he was a teenager. He resigned from his position at the Family Research Council and TLC pulled repeats of 19 Kids and Counting from their lineup, before finally canceling it after several weeks of uncertainty as to the show's future.
    • Duggar daughter Jill and her husband Derick got fired from the spin-off show Counting On because of Derick’s itchy Twitter finger. He'd publicly tweeted bigoted things about three fellow TLC personalities: Jazz Jennings, a trans woman (and a minor at the time) who he misgendered on purpose—among other horrible things he said about her and her family—and Nate Burkes and his husband Jeremiah Brent, who he not only insulted but also brought their two very young children into it as well, implying that the kids would never be normal because they had two dads. He capped it all by claiming the network had a “liberal bias” for allowing such a family to be on television—at which point the showrunners had finally had enough.
  • Food Network examples:
    • Paula Deen's long-running show was canceled after audio of her using the "N-word" and making off-color jokes concerning minorities and Jews was discovered. After her admittance to using racial slurs with no regrets whatsoever and the resulting backlash against her, the network chose not to renew Paula Deen's contract and ceased any and all involvement with her. Shortly after, Deen's endorsement deals began to rapidly fall from the sky. At least one article has been written that suggests that the N-word incident was just the final nail in the coffin, and Food Network had already been trying to get rid of her anyway because she didn't draw the 18-49 crowd advertisers love. She has since made a comeback on YouTube.
    • Robert Irvine was temporarily suspended from his first series, Dinner: Impossible, after it was discovered that he had padded his resume rather outrageously (including claiming to have worked on Prince Charles and Princess Diana's wedding cake and having been a White House chef), and he was replaced by Iron Chef Michael Symon for the fifth season. Irvine was ultimately allowed to return to the show the next season and remained host until the show ended its run two years later.
    • Have you ever wondered why Lenny McNab, winner of The Next Food Network Star's tenth season, never wound up with his show? Shortly afterward, allegations of him being racist, sexist, and otherwise rude toward various Food Network personalities behind everyone's backs cropped up. As a result, Lenny wound up being let go and so far is the only winner on the show to be denied his Food Network program.
  • RKO General was permanently banned from broadcasting in 1987 due to a wide variety of licensing misconducts dating back to 1965. The FCC vowed to reject any appeals on the decision; however, it gave RKO General the opportunity to wind down its operations peaceably, which it did by 1991, after which it went out of business. An epic case of a Company Ending Misdemeanor if there ever was one.
  • Three prominent media personalities were hit with this in the wake of the 2019 college admissions bribery scandal, a.k.a. "Operation Varsity Blues", in which dozens of wealthy parents were arrested and charged by the Feds for paying a total of $25 million in bribes to fake their children's' SAT scores and get them into Ivy League-level colleges through illicit means:
    • Actress Lori Loughlin (best known for portraying Rebecca Donaldson-Katsopolis in Full House and Fuller House) and her second husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, paid a bribe of $500,000, disguised as a charitable donation so that the University of Southern California's (USC) admissions committee would be led to believe that her two daughters would join the school's women's rowing program; in truth, Loughlin's daughters had never been involved in rowing and had no plans to join the program. The Hallmark Channel fired her from When Calls the Heart after the arrest and removed all of her character's scenes from the remaining episodes of the sixth season and, much like the Yancy Butler example elsewhere on this page, canceled The Garage Sale Mysteries with one installment still to be completed. Netflix also fired Loughlin from the the fifth and final season of Fuller House. Loughlin and Giannulli, who were both looking at 50 years in prison if found guilty if they had gone to court, didn't endear themselves with what was widely seen as a ridiculously arrogant reaction to the scandal, signing autographs outside the courtroom before the initial hearing and then refusing to plead guilty even though they were offered a very fair plea deal.note  They fought the charges for about a year before taking a plea deal, and in August 2020, Loughlin was sentenced to two months in prison, while Giannulli drew five, with proportionate fines and community service for the both of them. She reported for her sentence in October 2020 a few weeks ahead of the date given by judge so she could be out by Christmas.
      • As for their daughters, both dropped out of USC, but not before speculation that the school would expel them just to save face. One of them, Olivia Jade Giannulli, was a YouTube/Instagram influencer who also saw her career take a serious hit; see her entry in Web Original. Olivia has stated she became estranged from her mother as a result of the scandal.
    • Felicity Huffman, best known for her work on Desperate Housewives and Transamerica, paid a $15,000 bribe, also disguised as a charitable donation, to have someone take the SAT in her daughter's place. A humbled Huffman, however, did not suffer the body blow to her career that Loughlin later would: she quickly pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two weeks in prison,note  though the prosecutor had recommended four to ten months in her case. While her involvement in the scandal hasn't yet cost Huffman any roles, her Netflix series Otherhood did get pushed back several months to August 2019. She officially completed her entire sentence in October 2020- ironically the same month Loughlin's sentence began- and booked her first project since the scandal, a sitcom pilot at ABC, several weeks later.
  • The 2020 Black Lives Matter protests, which sprung up after George Floyd was murdered by a police officer for allegedly using a fake $20 bill, managed to get both the Paramount Network's COPS and A&E's Live PD cancelled and quietly swept under the rug. The former had long been accused of sensationalizing low level, victimless crimes (especially by black and Latino men) like drug use and prostitution, and glorifying excessive force by police; while the latter was less controversial to a degree but still would get caught up in controversy from time to time. A Live PD camera crew recorded an unarmed black man in Austin, TX being killed in police custody after being pulled over for broken headlight and wiped it at the officers' request. This has extended itself to syndicated reruns of Cops as well, with WGN America dropping the show and various local stations pulling the show off their schedules. As of July 2020, Paramount's sister streaming service PlutoTV still airs Cops reruns. In October 2020, Cops started producing new episodes but solely for international broadcast.
  • Jackson, Mississippi's NBC affiliate WLBT was taken off the air in 1969 due to them having a clear bias against the Civil Rights Movement, opting to air pro-segregationist content instead of NBC's live coverage of certain events tied to said movement. NBC themselves had been complaining about the station as far back as 1955 when the station manager sabotaged the local broadcast of a Today segment featuring Thurgood Marshall, who would later become the first African-American justice of the Supreme Court. Additionally, the station had also cut reporting on the Civil Rights movement from NBC's national news programming and pre-empted any network show that featured African-American actors or personalities, blaming the interference on technical issues. After the FCC considered these actions as a violation of their Fairness Doctrine, they stripped the station of their license and granted it to a trusted station group. This new version of WLBT became a pioneer in racial equity in Southern U.S. broadcasting, and their local newsmagazine program won a Peabody Award in 1976. As of 2019, the station retains its WLBT call letters and NBC affiliation but is otherwise a separate station to the one that existed prior to 1969.

    Creators 
  • Adrienne Bailon staged a fake nude photo controversy involving a stolen laptop with her agent and then-boyfriend Rob Kardashian in order to boost her fading career. The controversy caused a cancellation of The Cheetah Girls performance at the 2008 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and eventually led to the Cheetah Girls' dissolution. Previously, Bailon's recurring character was also dropped from That's So Raven because of backstage catfights with Raven-Symoné. Raven eventually left the Cheetah Girls as well (she was never an official member and only worked with the group for their first two films).
  • It is not an exaggeration to say that Michael Barrymore was the king of light entertainment in the UK during The '90s with a string of hit Game Shows and Chat Shows - he was essentially the UK equivalent of Regis Philbin in terms of his profile and popularity. It stopped abruptly after a man was found dead in his swimming pool after a party. The British tabloids pounced and stories of drug-fuelled gay orgies and other lurid and salacious behavior filled their pages. While Barrymore was never charged or convicted for any criminal offense, his contract with ITV (the UK's main commercial network) was terminated, his shows were all canceled and his career went into freefall. Since then Barrymore's only real high profile work since was as a housemate on Celebrity Big Brother in the mid-2000s.
  • Japanese singer and television star Becky lost several of her hosting gigs and most of her sponsors in 2016 after it was revealed that she had an affair with Enon Kawatani, the frontman for the Math Rock band Gesu no Kiwami Otome. On the other hand, Kawatani's career was largely unaffected because of what Western observers have described as a double standard in Japanese celebrity culture. In this culture, the fallout from such an affair would be more harmful to the career of a girl-next-door TV host than to the male lead singer of an indie rock band. She has since married Yomiuri Giants coach Yasuyuki Kataoka.
    • Gesu No Kiwami Otome themselves lost out on only a single job due to the controversy: The opportunity to record a theme song for the latest Crayon Shin-chan film. Despite the news breaking shortly before the release of their second album Ryōseibai, the album still debuted at number one in the Japanese charts. In 2018, the band would release a scathingly satirical music video attacking Japanese tabloid culture and the public's obsession with celebrity scandals that had many parallels with what happened to Becky and Kawatani.
  • Irish comedian and presenter Dara Ó Briain was briefly involved with a greyhound racing syndicate prior to December 2009, when one of their dogs—who'd been featured in an episode of Three Men in a Boat—was put down prior to its transmission. Ó Briain managed to invert the trope, however, as he was so devastated by the loss that he and his fellows immediately and permanently disbanded the syndicate. There were several demonstrations outside the venues where he performed in 2010 that called on him to publicly denounce the practice of greyhound racing, but aside from that, his career remained unaffected.
  • Jo Ann Castle, a pianist who performed on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1959 to 1969, was fired for her role in a Detroit bar brawl. While her offscreen behavior proved an embarrassment to Welk, the brawl appears to have been the last straw. Since then, Castle has wandered in and out of trouble with the law, culminating in a confession in 2013 to a child molestation coverup.
  • Mexican gossip show host Mauricio "Franco" Clark was essentially blacklisted by the major Mexican networks following his continuous statements promoting Cure Your Gays (he claims to be an "ex-gay") and accusing LGBT rights of being a front for a "communist dictatorship". In 2020, smaller network Multimedios gave him another chance, only to boot him two months later for using his host position to again promote his conspiracy theories and accuse co-workers and the network's owner of being in favor of communism and "persecution" of Christians for fact-checking him.
  • Stephen Collins' career was already flagging following the cancellation of 7th Heaven (where he played Eric Camden), along with his highly-publicized separation from fellow actress Faye Grant. The straw that finally broke the camel's back, however, came when TMZ leaked an audio recording of Collins admitting to Grant during a therapy session that he had molested several underage girls for years. The massive media and public fallout directly resulted in multiple stations, TV Guide Network and Up TV pulling reruns of 7th Heaven from circulation (CBS Drama in the UK also abruptly pulled the show from its schedule), Seth MacFarlane firing him from the production of Ted 2, being forced to resign from his post in the Screen Actors Guild Board, his Scandal character Reed Wallace getting McLeaned after announcing his intent to return in Season 4, and all of his agents dropping him. However, Up TV subsequently reinstated the reruns, presumably due to viewer demand.
  • Jeff Conaway's drug problems got him fired from Taxi after he was discovered in his trailer too strung out to work. His character Bobby Wheeler's lines were divided among other characters, causing the producers to realize they didn't need Conaway and the headaches he caused at all. His career had a slight bounce with his portrayal of Zack Allan, a recurring-then-permanent character in Babylon 5, but his habits kicked in harder after that series, with only bit parts in films and movies, including a Harsher in Hindsight stint on the first season of Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew, before his death in 2011.
  • Angus Deayton was the presenter of Have I Got News for You until lurid tales of drugs and disguised prostitutes came to light. He was mocked relentlessly on the show, then booted out. Panelist Paul Merton later claimed that it wasn't Deayton's behavior itself that led to his dismissal, but rather that it would make it near-impossible for him to fulfill his role on the show of skewering politicians and other public figures for the exact same behavior. The few episodes filmed immediately after the story broke suffer for that very reason: the format relied on Deayton playing the straight man, and he'd become the Butt-Monkey. He later hosted Would I Lie to You? for its first two series before being replaced there as well.
  • Perhaps the most famous example of a Career-Ending Misdemeanor in the British media came in 1970, on the part of former pirate radio DJ-turned-TV chat show host Simon Dee. It started when he was overheard making an off-colour guess as to how his line manager's daughter had secured a plum job at the BBC, involving the word "blow-job". Then, he attempted to spike a friend's pre-broadcast drink with LSD prior to going on air with the London Weekend Television programme he hosted; unfortunately, the drink was instead "snaffled" by his studio guest, James Bond actor George Lazenby, who consequently went before the cameras high as a kite, rambling incoherently about having a list of American Senators who were in on the conspiracy to kill John F. Kennedy, to the utter confusion of Dee and the recording's other guests, John Lennon and Yoko Ono. The episode was pre-recorded rather than broadcast live, but this incident led to LWT not renewing Dee's contract. Lazenby continued his acting career, but ultimately went to California, where he became a successful property developer; Dee, on the other hand, was last seen washing buses for London Transport and making very occasional appearances on "Whatever happened to...?" programmes before dying of bone cancer in 2009.
  • On Beverly Hills, 90210, Shannen Doherty had developed a reputation for being rude and confrontational on set - at one point coming to physical blows with Jennie Garth. She was frequently late as well. Apparently, the last straw for the producers came midway through filming the season finale when Doherty decided to get a major haircut that wreaked havoc with the continuity. She was fired and replaced with Tiffani Thiessen.
    • Then, by the third season of Charmed (1998) (ironically enough also produced by Aaron Spelling), the tension between Doherty and Alyssa Milano was so high that the actresses would only speak to each other to say their lines. There were also rumors that TW King, who played her character's love interest, was written out after Season 1 simply because she didn't like him. Conflicting reports say that Doherty was either fired after offering producers an ultimatum or asked to leave. Either way, she also denied them the right to use her image on the show again.
  • In February 2018, Warner Bros. did not renew Full House and Fuller House creator Jeff Franklin's contract following accusations of abusive behavior both on the set as well as in the writer's room.
  • Craig Gore is a TV screenwriter for Chicago P.D. and SWAT and was slated to participate in the upcoming Law & Order: Organized Crime. In June 2020, in the midst of nationwide unrest following the murder of George Floyd by police officers (including rioting near Gore's neighborhood in Los Angeles) Gore posted a picture on Twitter posing with an assault rifle, and promised to "light motherfuckers up who are trying to fuck with my property." Christopher Meloni distanced himself from Gore while L&O creator Dick Wolf immediately fired him, stating that he would "not tolerate this conduct, especially during our hour of national grief."
  • Kathy Griffin lost a large amount of her support and show appearances in 2017 after the election of Donald Trump due to posting a picture of her holding (depending on the source) either a pineapple dressed to look like or a mask that resembled Trump’s severed head, complete with a knife and fake blood. Being outspoken about her dislike of Trump, it was clear Kathy was making a "shocking" image, but this backfired as many people called her out on what came across as a call to violence against the President, or in general, seeing it as too extreme of a joke. Barron Trump (Trump's youngest son, who was only 11 years old at the time) saw this graphic image on TV and had a panic attack, assuming it was real, prompting the president to lash out at Kathy. She was dropped by her marketing team, followed by CNN, several of her comedy shows were outright cancelled, and several state senators cancelled their support or events with her in response. By the end of it all, she was also put on the No Fly List and investigated by the Department of Justice for two months. She attempted to continue her comedy career in spite of this, but the events around it made it very difficult for her to do so, causing her to largely back off from comedy as a result. In early 2019, she attempted to garner sympathy by making an interview movie about the experience, but very little buzz occurred for it despite her best efforts to spread the word, and by 2020, her career had grinded to a halt. For her part, Kathy apologized not long after the image went viral, but by then the damage was done, and in an act of defiance following Trump's ban from Twitter in January 2021, she reposted the picture, which this time got deleted by Twitter for "promoting violence". Only time will tell if Griffin reclaims her fame now that Trump is no longer in office.
  • British television presenter Bill Grundy was suspended and then eventually let go by Thames Television after his infamous interview with the Sex Pistols on the Today programme in December 1976. The then-new and already controversial punk band were booked to appear when Queen dropped out of the show, and guitarist Steve Jones swearing live on television helped increase their notoriety and popularity in the UK. Grundy, however, managed to be much less well behaved than his punk guests, announcing at the top of the show that he was drunk - again, on live television - and he spent much of the interview trying to provoke the band members into saying something controversial. When Jones swore, it was because he had lost his temper with Grundy after the host made a sexually explicit pass at the band's friend Siouxsie Sioux, who was sitting in the audience. After the broadcast, Thames suspended Grundy for two weeks and Today was canceled two months later. While Grundy continued to work in TV, his career was never the same. In 1980, his alcohol problem cost him a hosting gig for the BBC's Great Railway Journeys of the World. After that, he mostly only appeared on regional television until his death in 1993.
  • Artie Lange was fired from the original cast of MADtv after season two due to his cocaine addiction (ironically FOX did allow Artie to do a cameo on a later episode, where they make fun of the reason he was kicked off). After his dismissal, he caught on as a regular on Howard Stern's radio show but lost that job in 2009 because of his continued drug and alcohol problems. Lange was clean for several years following his 2010 suicide attempt, but his bad behavior and poor work ethic have continued; in 2014, he was banned from appearing on ESPN programming after a string of racist, sexual tweets that he made about First Take host Cari Champion. He was arrested for drug possession in 2017, but the incident did not result in him losing his role on the HBO sitcom Crashing.
  • Showrunner Peter M. Lenkov helmed three of CBS's rebooted dramas during the 2010s — Hawaii Five-0, MacGyver (2016), and Magnum, P.I. (2018) — until he was fired from the network in July 2020. Soon afterward came a troubling Vanity Fair article which reported that Lenkov was fired for being an emotionally abusive tyrant who created a hostile work environment for his writers and actors. Among Lenkov's many accusers was Lucas Till, who claimed that Lenkov's body-shaming caused him to be suicidal during his first year as the lead star of MacGyver. Till also accused Lenkov of pressuring dwarf actor Meredith Eaton to return to work when she was in recovery for an on-set injury, reducing her to tears. The article also revived allegations of racism against Lenkov from 2017, when Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park (both Asian-Americans) left Hawaii Five-0 over pay disparities (given the fact that both Kim and Park were more established actors yet were still being paid less than the white actors), after which Lenkov reportedly castigated Kim for "bringing 'equality' into it" instead of taking the "classy" route into resolving the dispute. (For his part, Lenkov denied all of the allegations in the Vanity Fair article.)
  • Gugu Liberato was a famous TV host in Brazil known for his variety show Domingo Legal (Cool Sunday) on SBT in the 1990s and early 2000s. He was the biggest competitor to Fausto Silva and his similar show Domingão do Faustão (Big Fausto's Big Sunday) on Rede Globo, but his career derailed in 2003 when he aired an interview with the Brazilian criminal organization PCC. Not only was this interview completely staged, but the fake criminals also issued threats to Brazilian politicians and celebrities, resulting in massive legal trouble; Domingo Legal was taken off air for some time, and ratings plummeted. His claim that he had nothing to do with it went nowhere, and years later Liberato was replaced and left for another network to do a similar show, which didn't work out for him either. He died in November 2019 after suffering a fall at his home in Orlando, Florida.
  • Chicago sportswriter Jay Mariotti was a regular panelist on the ESPN show Around the Horn until he was fired in 2010 for his arrest in a domestic assault case. He would return to ESPN in a reduced capacity in 2013, which didn't include his return to the show.
  • After Mitchel Musso’s DUI bust, his Pair of Kings character King Brady moved to Chicago and was replaced by King Boz, a Suspiciously Similar Substitute played by Adam Hicks, as Disney has a rather hardline stance toward reckless behavior (see the Adrienne Bailon example above). His hidden camera show PrankStars was similarly killed four episodes into its run, with the remainder of the episodes that had not aired burned off in the United Kingdom solely to get copyright protection. On a side note, he did not lose his other Disney job, voicing Jeremy on Phineas and Ferb; it helped his case that it's one of their most popular shows and that the creators spoke on his behalf to let him stay.
  • After coming out in 2020 as a Conspiracy Theorist who, among other things, believes the COVID-19 pandemic is an invention to implement a communist world government, that vaccines are "the mark of the beast", and supported Donald Trump's unsuccessful re-election despite his many controversies and derogatory comments about Mexico, Mexican actress/singer Patricia Navidad was all but vetoed by the major Spanish-language networks. She would also later be booted from Twitter for the same reasons.
  • Brett Ratner resigned from producing the 2012 Oscars under public pressure after he made a gay slur and bragged about his alleged sexual encounters with Olivia Munn and Lindsay Lohan. This led to the scheduled host, Eddie Murphy, resigning as well because he didn't want to perform without Ratner. Longtime host Billy Crystal replaced Murphy.
  • Producer, writer and actor Dan Schneider was involved in over 20 years of live-action comedies on Nickelodeon including All That, The Amanda Show, Drake & Josh, Zoey 101, iCarly, Sam & Cat, Game Shakers, and Henry Danger. By 2018, however, Schneider and Nickelodeon decided not to extend their production deal after the network received many complaints from cast and staff members about his aggressive and inappropriate behavior.
  • Kurt Sutter was fired as showrunner of Mayans M.C. after multiple complaints about his behavior behind the scenes. For his part, Sutter had been planning on stepping aside from the series for some time, handing the reins over to co-creator Elgin James, and admitted to being an "abrasive dick" in a statement he made after his termination.
  • Japanese television personality and singer Masashi Tashiro's career was virtually destroyed after his sexual harassment and drug use scandals in the early 2000s. Even his former associate Takeshi Kitano, no stranger to controversy himself, thought Tashiro went too far.
  • Rip Torn's character on 30 Rock, Don Geiss, died of a heart attack between seasons after Torn's increasingly bizarre behaviour culminated in him breaking into a bank in 2010. His character in the Men in Black franchise was similarly McLeaned in Men in Black 3 for the same reasons.
  • Anthea Turner's prominent UK television presenting career never recovered after she began an affair with a married man with three daughters in the late 1990s, who subsequently left his wife for her. Having always been marketed as a wholesome and family-friendly presenter, the British tabloids branded her a "homewrecker" and her popularity nose-dived. When the two of them later divorced after the man had another affair many were quick to label this "karma" and "poetic justice".
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    Shows 
  • Jessica Biel did a racy photoshoot specifically to get out of wholesome family drama 7th Heaven because she felt her squeaky-clean image was making her miss out on serious dramatic roles. It didn't quite get her fired, but it did drastically reduce her screen time.
  • In The Adventures of Superboy, Superboy's first actor John Haymes Newton was fired and replaced by Gerard Christopher after a DUI arrest and because Newton demanded a 20% pay raise.
  • All My Children:
    • Actor Jim Fitzpatrick, who played Pierce Riley, was fired abruptly in early 1996 after an incident in a New York City bar which involved him assaulting a woman—groping her and trying to drag her off into an empty hallway where he would no doubt have likely raped her had other bar patrons not intervened.
    • Actor Michael Nader was fired from his role as Dimitri Marick in early 2001 after a second arrest for drug use. Producers had bought his excuses for a previous arrest for drunk driving and had attempted to make allowances for him to attend rehab, but his second arrest was the last straw for them.
    • In 2003, five years before his first role on film, Chadwick Boseman played a disaffected teen called Reggie. His stint lasted only a week before he started complaining about how Reggie had been written as little more than a thug, and the producers quickly fired him. In an amusing twist, the actor who replaced Boseman as Reggie went on to star alongside him fifteen years later.
  • After boosting viewer figures for Ally McBeal, Robert Downey Jr. was fired from the show (and his character Larry Paul written out) after being arrested for violating his parole. It soon became apparent that this was actually worse than just a Role Ending Misdemeanor as ratings went back down again and the show was cancelled at the end of the fifth season, making the parole violation a Show-Ending Misdemeanor in the process. Series regular Lisa Nicole Carson, who played Renee Raddick, was also fired at the same time for her substance abuse problems.
  • American Idol:
    • When racy (though not nude) pictures of Frenchie Davis emerged, she was dismissed from the show.
    • Both Corey Clark and Jermaine Jones were also removed for having criminal records that they lied about.
  • Stoney Westmoreland was fired from his role as Ham Mack late in the production of season 3 of Andi Mack after being arrested for attempting to solicit a minor for sex over the Internet. This was the reason why a majority of the first two seasons never showed up on Disney+ everywhere excluding Japan, but how Japan has the complete series on their Disney+, despite what Westmoreland did, is a mystery for the time being.
  • Angel:
    • Lots of rumors swirl around regarding Doyle's death and Glenn Quinn's drug problems, which resulted in his death a few years later. Joss Whedon says his death in the first season was intended from the start, but some say the timeline was sped up out of fear it would rub off on his castmates, as both David Boreanaz and Charisma Carpenter were good friends with him.
    • Carpenter's pregnancy in season four led to Cordelia being written out and then brought back for the next season, only to be killed off.
  • After the Two and a Half Men fiasco went down, Charlie Sheen went on to star in FX's Anger Management. While he's pulled some prima donna behavior there as well, he was able to get Selma Blair fired for complaining about it, so he seems to be invulnerable for now. Although...
  • Bob Todd was fired from The Benny Hill Show by Hill himself after Todd failed to show up for a concert at the London Palladium due to a "drinking episode" so bad that Todd woke up in a Dublin hospital a few days later with no memory of how he had gotten there. The producer of the show persuaded Hill to rehire Todd, in part because of Todd's importance to the show and because his drunkenness rarely affected his work.
  • Big Brother:
    • The US version of the show has seen four contestants expelled from the house for misbehavior.
      • Perhaps the most notorious incident to ever happen on any version of the show came in season 2, when Justin Sebik drunkenly held a knife to the throat of his fellow contestant Krista Stegall while casually talking about killing her, after repeatedly threatening violence against various other contestants, such that the other houseguests were legitimately afraid of him. When he was called to the diary room (where he was promptly booted from the show) shortly after, he even said to Krista "I think it might've been that knife to your neck." This incident is the reason why the Big Brother house no longer has any proper silverware or other sharp objects that can be used as weapons.
      • In season 4, Scott Weintraub was expelled from the house after the "X-Factor" twist saw his ex-girlfriend Amanda Craig brought in as a contestant, which led him to throw a tantrum and refuse to go to the diary room when asked, telling the producers to come and get him themselves.
      • Chima Simone was expelled from season 11 after accusing the producers of rigging the show against her and openly violating the rules just to spite them, including refusing to put on her microphone and later just throwing it in the hot tub.
      • Willie Hantz was expelled from season 14 after starting a physical fight with Joe Arvin.
    • From the UK version:
      • Duane "Dog" Chapman's 1976 murder conviction (which was basically for being in the wrong place at the wrong time) scuttled his plans to appear on Celebrity Big Brother. The UK routinely denies travel visas to those with a murder conviction on their record, and did so in Chapman's case, making it impossible for him to take part.
      • Jim Davidson was to be a contestant on the 2013 series but got arrested following the Jimmy Savile scandal over allegations of historic sex offenses. He was cleared of any wrong-doing and went on to win the 2014 series. His book and live show No Further Action goes into more detail.
    • Season 8 of the Canadian version saw a rare double expulsion. First, Jamar Lee was expelled after Kyle Rozendal and Vanessa Clements accused him of making a threatening Finger Gun hand gesture to Kyle. Fans were outraged over Jamar's removal, with many feeling that it was racially motivated (Jamar being Black), that Kyle himself had been acting in a threatening manner beforehand, and that Kyle and Vanessa got Jamar removed in order to advance their game. In response to the controversy, Kyle wound up expelled right alongside Jamar two days later.
  • Kevin Lloyd played the very popular Tosh Lines in The Bill from 1988 to 1998. He was known as a drinker, but sadly, throughout this period, his drinking gave way to full-blown alcoholism. It affected his professionalism, and the series dropped him after it caused him to arrive late for work one time too many. If the decision to fire him was intended to help him, it backfired tragically: Kevin Lloyd's drinking problem cost him his life a mere week after he was sacked.
  • In 1998, Richard Bacon became the first host of the long-running British children's show Blue Peter to be fired from the show after he confessed to taking cocaine after a tabloid expose. He had been on for only 18 months and had to give his Blue Peter badge in. Luckily, he would prove himself to be no Pete Best as he would clean up and has since been a successful presenter for other grown-up based shows.
  • Anonymous reports from crew members claim both Michael Pitt and Paz de la Huerta were written off of Boardwalk Empire for prima donna behavior on the set, with de la Huerta's character Put on a Bus and Pitt's being Killed Off for Real.
  • After a participant on Buckwild died during production of season 2, MTV executed the show by canceling it and clamping down hard on the rights, to the point that they outright refused to allow its producers to shop the series elsewhere.
  • Julie Benz was removed early on from Buffy the Vampire Slayer in part due to tensions on set during Season 1. Alyson Hannigan has hinted in interviews that Benz was very mean towards her in particular. The incident prompted Benz to clean up her act, and she reappeared on the spinoff Angel and was brought back for a few more Buffy episodes. Years later, she was regarded by the cast and crew of Dexter as one of the nicest and most agreeable cast members.
  • Jay Thomas was fired from Cheers after someone called him on his radio show asking what it was like working there and he replied "Ugh, it's horrible. For one thing, I have to kiss Rhea Perlman." While Perlman happened to be listening, no less.
  • Coronation Street: Two key characters were in limbo after being caught up in the fall-out from the Jimmy Savile business. Actors Michael LeVell (Kevin Webster) and Bill Roache (Ken Barlow) were temporarily written out of the show pending resolution of alleged under-age sex offences. Michael LeVell's character came back, after spending a very long time visiting family. William Roache's character is now back as well. Les Battersby was also Put on a Bus after his actor was overheard drunkenly complaining about the show in a pub. More recently, Todd Grimshaw went on the run in 2017 after his actor Bruno Langley was alleged to have sexually assaulted a woman in a nightclub. The character returned to the show in 2020, but played by someone else.
  • Carl Anthony Payne was allegedly fired from The Cosby Show for refusing to cut his hair.
    • Some sources say that Lisa Bonet was exiled from the show to its Spin-Off A Different World after participating in an explicit sex scene in the movie Angel Heart. Others say Bonet (who apparently is an even bigger Cloudcuckoolander than her character, Denise) constantly butted heads with Bill Cosby, who used Angel Heart as a "last straw" excuse.
    • Cosby himself would suffer this fate decades later; in 2014, he'd planned to return to NBC with a new sitcom. But once the project seemed to be heading to the greenlight stage, over a dozen women accused Cosby of having raped them years ago, and later a deposition from 2005 was unearthed where Cosby admitted under oath to procuring drugs so he could have sex with women who had taken them. The number of women who came forward kept going up, with about 60 cases documented in the media. To say the entire fiasco destroyed Cosby's career would be an understatement: NBC, overwhelmed by public pressure, canceled his sitcom project before it could even reach the development stage; local stations and TV Land began pulling reruns of The Cosby Show from the airwaves in response to the allegations, with the latter going as far as removing any mention of the show from their website, and Cosby was stripped of many of his honors, including his AMPAS membership, his Kennedy Center Honor, and his Mark Twain Prize for Humor. Nearly every college that gave him an honorary degree — at one point, he was the most popular commencement speaker in the US — took those away from him too, and a Netflix comedy special was shelved despite it already being filmed. The fall from grace concluded on April 26, 2018, when the man once fondly known as "America's Dad" was finally convicted of his crimes; he was sentenced to prison in September of that year and declared a sexually violent predator.
  • English television chef Fanny Cradock saw her TV career ruined in 1976 when Gwen Troake, a housewife living in Devon, won the Cook of the Realm competition, leading to The BBC selecting her to organise a banquet to be attended by Edward Heath, Earl Mountbatten of Burma and other notables. The BBC filmed the result as a part of a series called The Big Time, and asked Cradock, by then a tax exile in Ireland, as one of a number of experts who would advise Troake as to the menu.
    • Troake went through her menu of seafood cocktail, duckling with bramble sauce and coffee cream dessert. Cradock, grimacing and acting as if on the verge of retching, claimed not to know what a bramble was, told Troake that her menu was too rich, and, though accepting that the dessert was delicious, insisted that it was not suitable. "You're among professionals now, dear," she declared. She scorned Troake's use of an ingredient for being too "English", and insisted that the English have never had their own cuisine, and erroneously claimed that "even the good old Yorkshire pudding comes from Burgundy".
    • Fanny suggested that Troake use a small pastry boat filled with fruit sorbet and covered with spun sugar, decorated with an orange slice and a cocktail stick through a cherry to give the dish the look of a small boat, suitable, Fanny thought, for the naval guests. In the event, the dessert was a disaster and could not be served properly. Robert Morley had also been consulted on the menu and said he felt that Troake's original coffee pudding was perfect.
    • When the dessert failed to impress, the public was annoyed that Fanny Cradock had seemingly ruined Troake's special day. Fanny wrote a letter of apology to Troake, but the BBC terminated her contract two weeks after the broadcast of the program. She would never again present a cookery program for the BBC, although she did make frequent appearances on the chat show circuit. (Troake, by contrast, published A Country Cookbook the following year.)
  • Thomas Gibson (Agent Aaron "Hotch" Hotchner) saw his contract terminated in Criminal Minds after allegedly attacking a writer over creative differences in an episode he was directing.
  • Portuguese television host Carlos Cruz had a very successful career, hosting shows as serving as program director in all four terrestrial channels including the Portuguese version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? on RTP1 before it was derailed in late 2003 after being charged with multiple counts of child sexual abuse that occurred a year ago at Casa Pia, a Portuguese state-run institution for the education and support of poor children and under-age orphans and SIC terminated his contract in light of the allegations. After being convicted in 2010 that led to him serving six years in a seven-year sentence before being paroled in 2016, his title of the Order of Infante D. Henrique was revoked in 2015 as a result.
    • Comedian Herman José almost had his career derailed after being accused of the same crimes from the same year before he was acquitted after it was discovered that he was in Brazil, covering the Rio de Janeiro Carnival for SIC at the time of the crimes happening.
  • CSI:
    • Gary Dourdan, who had been hinting that he might leave the series, was finally written out of the show due to his personal problems; rumors that his drug charges were a direct cause are untrue.
    • Another time, Jorja Fox was fired for skipping an episode due to a pay dispute. This proved unfortunate for George Eads who overslept that day and was also fired because they thought he was doing the same thing. Fox was later rehired when she worked out her dispute with the production company as was Eads when they realized it was a misunderstanding.
  • Rebecca Gayheart's involvement in a 2001 vehicular manslaughter may have contributed to her departure from Dead Like Me after 5 episodes. In that series, she played the role of a "Grim Reaper", helping the dead pass on to the afterlife. According to this, Gayheart's character Betty was written out by the fifth episode intentionally, though the series creator, Bryan Fuller, had to fight with studio execs to prevent Gayheart from being replaced by another actress. If Fuller hadn't left the series early in the first season, Betty would have returned by the beginning of the second season, which is what he had intended. Once he left, the studio execs changed the plotline for the second season so that Betty would never return.
  • Deutschland sucht den Superstar:
    • Xavier Naidoo was fired from the jury of the show's seventeenth season in March 2020 after filming for the call backs wrapped production, following videos of him singing one of his songs in the aftermath of the anti-migrant 2018 Chemnitz protests with altered lyrics containing racially insensitive content circulated online and thus was replaced by Florian Silbereisen for the remaining episodes. In fact, this wasn't the first time he fell into this due to his bigoted views as in November 2015, his participation as the German representative at the Eurovision Song Contest in Stockholm was revoked for the same reason.
    • Michael Wendler was dropped from the jury in January 2021 after filming for the auditions wrapped, following his conspiracy theories on the COVID-19 pandemic as well as comparing the German state to a concentration camp.
  • Doctor Who:
    • Phillip Hinchcliffe produced the show from 1974-7, a period that saw the series enter Darker and Edgier territory that was often criticised for being too scary and violent for children (and often considered the Golden Age of the series). The final straw came the notorious cliffhanger to episode three of "The Deadly Assassin", which saw the Doctor's head being held underwater. This was seen as going too far by Moral Guardians (most notably Mary Whitehouse) and, while The BBC publicly defended the programme, after three seasons Hinchcliffe was moved onto the adult police thriller series Target in 1977, and his replacement Graham Williams, who had created Target, was specifically instructed to lighten the tone of the storylines and reduce violence.
    • Writer Gareth Roberts was fired from the series due to numerous social media posts in 2017 in which he was openly transphobic. The last straw came when he was assigned to a book anthology of Who stories in 2019, and several of the other writers involved said they wanted nothing to do with him and would quit unless he was removed. Gareth's attempts to critique this, making a post in which he denied transgender people existed, was regarded as Digging Yourself Deeper. Prior to this, he got into a confrontation with Peter Capaldi while filming season eight's "The Caretaker" in 2014, thus ensuring that he wasn't invited back for the rest of his tenure.
  • EastEnders:
    • Melissa Suffield (Lucy Beale) got sacked after being caught going into London nightclubs while underage and getting unruly drunk. Her rather colorful social network sites might also have had something to do with it. The character was eventually reinstated with a new actress.
    • Rob Kazinsky (Sean Slater) got a temporary ban from EE for sending photos of his nude self around.
    • Leslie Grantham ("Dirty" Den Watts) narrowly evaded this at the start when it was revealed that the actor had served a "life" sentence (paroled after ten years) for murder. The BBC stood by him, arguing that he'd learnt his lesson and every former criminal deserves rehabilitation, and he lasted several years on the show before leaving of his own volition. (The fact that he was playing a villainous, semi-criminal character rather than any kind of role model also may have helped.) It is popularly claimed that his second stint as a regular character on the show ended when he was forced to quit after Internet footage was released of him performing indecent acts in front of a webcam for what he thought was a single-person audience, but this is a myth; it was the intention from the beginning that his return would only be for 18 months.
    • Zigzagged by Danniella Westbrook. In 1996 her character Sam Mitchell was axed from the show due to the controversy surrounding Westbrook's cocaine addiction. However, she returned to the role in 1999... only to be axed again the following year after a photo of her at a party showed that her continued addiction completely eroded her nasal septum. Sam was brought back again in 2002, with Kim Medcalf in the role, then written out in 2005. When the character returned briefly in 2009 and 2010, Westbrook, who had by now cleaned up her act and had reconstructive surgery on her nose, was handed the role back.
  • In the summer of 2020, executive producer Ed Glavin stepped down from his position on Ellen DeGeneres's eponymous daytime talk show after allegations exploded in the press of Glavin and others perpetuating a toxic work environment behind the scenes, including instances of sexual misconduct and racism.
  • Jussie Smollett was suspended from his role on Empire after allegations came out that he faked a hate crime against himself in February 2019 due to apparently being unhappy with his salary. The controversy hit the show badly enough that his character wound up being Put on a Bus and he was later reported to be fired from his role in a Broadway musical. In June Smollett was officially fired from the series and was later indicted on 6 counts of disorderly conduct by a grand jury convened by a special prosecutor the following February. Since then his career has been more or less on hold as thanks to the COVID-19 Pandemic, his trial had to be delayed.
  • Cas Anvar was fired from The Expanse in 2020 after dozens of allegations of harassment and sexual assault were raised by women in the fan community and on Anvar's other projects. His character, Alex Kamal, was abruptly killed off in the season 5 finale.
  • Before production began on the seventh and final season of Fantasy Island, co-star Hervé Villechaize was involved in a salary dispute. One big reason for this was that Villechaize not only felt under-appreciated by his co-stars, but his wife Camille Hagen had divorced him; he, therefore, requested a salary on par with lead Ricardo Montalbán. Unfortunately for Villechaize, he was dropped from the series, which permanently stunted his career; offers besides Fantasy Island dried up for him. This, combined with the chronic pain and health problems stemming from his congenital dwarfism, led him to commit suicide in 1993. Twenty-five years later, the last few days of Villechaize's life would be turned into the film My Dinner with Hervé, starring Peter Dinklage.
  • In the French sitcom Les Filles d'à côté, the role-ending misdemeanor for one actress wasn't asking for more money or being excessively difficult to work with on set (opinions vary). Cécile Auclert (Fanny) was exhausted by the workload, and after pleading for a let-up in the insane production schedule, she was straight-up dropped from the show. She was followed very quickly by Hélène le Moignic (Magalie) who had simply enough and walked out. While the door was held open for Auclert to return - she did so, briefly, before the end of the show's run - le Moignic was never offered the chance to return; her account is that the show completely severed its association with her after the last paycheck and even those of her former co-stars who were sympathetic to her were ordered not to make contact. note 
  • Actor Hartley Sawyer, who played Ralph Dibney/The Elongated Man in The Flash (2014), was quickly fired from the show in June 2020, after fans dug up allegedly misogynist and racist tweets that he made years before his role on the show were discovered during the Black Lives Matter protests of that year.
  • Twins David and Jason Benham were set to host Flip It Forward on HGTV in 2014, but during production, their virulently anti-gay beliefs were uncovered and reported. HGTV pulled the series shortly thereafter.
  • One of Maine's Fox affiliates used to have a pair of spokespeople for their kids' lineup: a human and a guy in a fox costume. The first human was fired on charges of pedophilia... then, eventually, so was his replacement.
  • The Frugal Gourmet's slot on PBS's Saturday afternoon schedulenote  was given to other shows (most recently, reruns of This Old House) after the former's host, Jeff Smith, got caught up in sexual abuse allegations; though he was able to settle out of court, the damage had been done, and his television career was in ruins.
  • Actor Jean-François Harrisson was fired from the French-Canadian sitcom Une grenade avec ça?, his character was written out and all episodes featuring him taken out of circulation following his arrest on child pornography ownership charges in 2011.
  • Kirk Cameron's conversion to born-again Christianity became this for Growing Pains—from roles on the show, to production staff, and finally the show itself:
    • The influence Cameron had on the set caused both Julie McCullough and Matthew Perry to be sacked from the show: McCullough for posing in a Playboy shoot, and Perry for being, in Cameron's mind, a so-called "agent of Satan".In fairness, he did later apologise to McCullough.
    • But this same influence proved a Show-Ending Misdemeanor; Cameron's objections to the least bit of suggestive humour and themes that went against his evangelist views made him near-impossible to work with, turning the show into a Troubled Production. The final straw came when Cameron called ABC Entertainment president Bob Iger (who would eventually become the CEO of ABC's owner, Disney, in 2005) to chew out the show's then-executive producers Dan Guntzelman, Steve Marshall and Michael Sullivan as "pornographers" for simply wanting to go against his decisions, which led to them quitting and the show being quietly cancelled a year later. Cameron's own career was never the same, either; since the show folded, he has mostly been relegated to starring in evangelical Christian works.
  • Isaiah Washington's contract to the show Grey's Anatomy was not renewed for the show's fourth season as a result of some offensive homophobic remarks he made to T. R. Knight, along with the cast's embarrassment over his remarks, including denying it (while using the exact word, which really didn't help) in a post-awards show press conference. He returned in an episode near the end of the tenth season as part of Sandra Oh's departure from the series.
  • Devon Anderson, who played the original Sonny Valentine on Hollyoaks, was dismissed for "time-keeping issues". Sonny was hastily written out and not seen again until the character was re-cast seven years later.
  • Vine star Curtis Lepore was dropped from Rainn Wilson's TV show, Hollywood and Vine after Lepore was accused of raping his girlfriend in early 2014. He remained active on Vine, however.
  • Allegedly happened twice in Homicide: Life on the Street. First Brody was allegedly written out because Max Perlich had drug and arrest issues. Then, more controversially, it's been rumored that Howard was dropped because of press stories about unpleasant events involving Melissa Leo and her then ex-partner, despite the fact that she was most likely the victimized party in the situation. Notably, Max Perlich played Whistler from the above Buffy example, and was not carried over to Angel because of his issues.
  • In the Heat of the Night series co-star Howard Rollins was eventually dropped from the show after repeated legal problems, including cocaine possession and a DUI.
  • Robert Kilroy-Silk's daytime talk show on BBC One was axed in January 2004 after he made insensitive comments about Arabs in his article for the Sunday Express.
  • Jeremy Kyle's eponymous talk show ended midway through May 2019, after a man who'd appeared on the show the week before was found dead in his flat. The initial decision had just been to halt filming, but eventually, ITV chose to take all planned episodes off the air, and make sure any footage of the unfortunate guest's episode would never be screened.
  • Michael Moriarty claims that he was written off of Law & Order because of his open criticism of then-Attorney General Janet Reno, who had cited Law & Order as offensively violent, which Moriarty considered meant that she would attempt to censor the show. Dick Wolf for his part claims that his reaction to Reno was just the latest and most public example of Moriarty's "erratic behavior", which included Moriarty basically bungling a meeting he, Wolf, and other television executives had with Reno to dissuade her from supporting any law that would censor the show when Moriarty overreacted to any effect the law was likely to have on the show, as well as his on-set behavior (which included the filming of an episode during which Moriarty was unable to deliver any of his lines with a straight face). He later fled to Canada and publicly declared himself a "political exile" (over an acting gig?).
    • In addition, Moriarty wasn't fired from the show; he left on his own terms. NBC asked Moriarty back, but he wouldn't budge unless Wolf was fired. The network decided not to compromise the show's quality over the demands of a pompous actor, so NBC rejected Moriarty's decision. Ultimately, his character was McLeaned offscreen on an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit in 2018.
  • Clayne Crawford, who played Riggs on the Lethal Weapon TV series, was dropped from the show shortly after the second season finale in 2018. FOX and the producers of the show had gotten tired of his bad behavior on set, and incidents involving him led to the rest of the cast threatening to quit if Crawford continued with the show. He was replaced as Riggs by Seann William Scott for the third and final season, with the show being cancelled a year later, the last straw being Crawford's behavior was a decisive factor in FOX's decision to not renew the series for a fourth season (it didn't help the ratings were still good for the third season's final episode).
  • Timothy Hutton was excluded from the Freedive reboot of Leverage after being accused of sexual assault. He is notably the only member of the original cast not to reprise his role.
  • Julie McCoy was written out of The Love Boat after Lauren Tewes's cocaine addiction made it impossible to perform her job. It didn't help that she started making very bizarre claims to reporters, such as the claim that she could tie knots with her toes.
  • A series-ending one: HBO had agreed to give Luck a second season very early in its run, but then quickly cancelled it after the public relations nightmare of three horses being killed on set. However, all three deaths were purely accidental, and something HBO was trying much harder to prevent than other producers of horse-riding TV shows.
  • Disney dismissed Gina Carano from Star Wars series, The Mandalorian, on February 10, 2021 after she shared a series of social media remarks and "likes" on incendiary posts, with the final straw being a comment comparing being a conservative in the United States to being Jewish in Europe during The Holocaust. Lucasfilm execs had reportedly been displeased with her alt-right leaning social media posts for months,note  and jumped at her finally saying something bad enough to fire for cause. She was also dropped by her agent United Talent Agency shortly after.
  • Actor and comedian Fred Willard lost his job as the narrator of PBS show Market Warriors in 2012 after being arrested for lewd acts in a pornography theatre. His ABC game show Trust Us with Your Life was also yanked off the air prematurely, resulting in a pair of Missing Episodes. Willard later apologized, and apart from losing those two jobs, his career was otherwise unaffected and he continued to work until death in 2020.
  • Actor Kene Holliday was fired from Matlock due to his substance abuse, and he was replaced by Clarence Gilyard as the titular character's private investigator.
  • VH1's short-lived reality show Megan Wants a Millionaire was short-lived for a very grisly reason: one of the contestants, Ryan Jenkins, was wanted for questioning—and later charged outright—in the murder of his recent wife, Jasmine Fiore. Only three episodes were aired in August 2009, before VH1 cancelled the show and scrubbed all mention of it from the airwaves and the Internet in light of the events. Jenkins would hang himself three days later.
    • Jenkins had also been a contestant on another VH1 reality show, I Love Money. The accusations against him and his subsequent suicide led to the show's third season being cancelled the next day—with its fourth and final season only escaping a similar fate due to viewer demand.
  • CBS was forced to drop the initial 1980s run of ''Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer'' when series star Stacy Keach was arrested in London on charges of cocaine possession; to which Keach eventually decided to plead guilty to and serve a six-month prison sentence.
  • E4 have tried to deny it, but it's widely believed that Kelly being Put on a Bus between two seasons of Misfits with no proper farewell scene was due to Lauren Socha's conviction for racially aggravated assault on a cab driver in 2012.
  • Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans already had made some controversy during his time as cohost and judge of My Kitchen Rules for his views on vaccinations, his promotion for alternative medicines and telling parents to have their infants drink bone broth instead of baby formula. However, his career took a nosedive in April 2020 when he tried to sell a lamp known as a "subtle energy revitalisation platform" to his fans as a cure for COVID-19 and began to promote conspiracy theories about the pandemic and the disease, which resulted in his departure from the show (although it was unrelated to the incident itself) ginaand him being fined by the TGA for $25,000 AUD. His already falling career plunged even further into the abyss seven months later when he posted a cartoon on his Instagram account containing the black sun, a symbol long associated with the neo-Nazi movement and it led to his removal from the lineup of the Australian version of I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!. Shortly after that, his cookbooks and merchandise with his name on it were pulled from shelves in many stores, and his Facebook account was removed.
  • Diane Neal began appearing on NCIS as CGIS Special Agent Abigail starting in season 7, and rapidly became a very popular character. As such, Neal made once-a-year appearances until Season 12—and those guest stints stopped abruptly after she made allegations on Twitter ranting about how unsafe the working conditions were on the set of its Spin-Off NCIS: New Orleans, where she also made several appearances.
  • The original announcer of The Newlywed Game was Scott Beach. During commercial breaks, he would entertain the audience by singing war protest songs which supposedly didn't fly with the producers. Beach was fired and replaced by Johnny Jacobs, who would go on to have a lasting career for Chuck Barris.
  • While it had already ended production, Pee-wee's Playhouse had its reruns cut short by CBS, thanks to Paul Reubens' indecent exposure. Kinda hard to reconcile that fact with Pee-Wee Herman, no matter the protests to the contrary. The rumors that circulated at the time that Reubens had done it deliberately to invoke this trope and finally get rid of his career-starting but then career-limiting character didn't help matters.
  • Alastair Stewart, British newsreader and host of documentary series Police, Camera, Action! had his contract terminated in 2003 for a drink-driving offense (his second one, he'd referred to the first one previously in a November 1994 episode, the show's second episode) and was relegated to intro and outros in the rebooted version of it, which was now presented by Alastair Stewart and Adrian Simpson, as of September 2007. Surprisingly, he was allowed to present the special edition episode Ultimate Pursuits in September 2007.
  • Before he began hosting Real Time on HBO, Bill Maher had Politically Incorrect, a politically centered late-night talk show exploring controversial topics and subjects that were unusual for a typical talk show. It was so successful on Comedy Central that after five years at that network it moved to ABC, where it gained even higher ratings. However, it all came to an end in an episode airing just six days after 9/11, in which Maher agreed with conservative activist Dinesh D'Souza over disputing then-U.S. President George W. Bush's claim that the 9/11 hijackers were "cowards", stating "We have been the cowards, lobbing cruise missiles from 2,000 miles away." The massive public outcry ignited by the offending comments led to the show bleeding sponsors and viewers, enough that ABC canceled the series in July 2002 due to continued loss of advertiser supportnote . However, HBO, who co-produced and co-owned Politically Incorrect, stood by Maher's side and offered him another go on their own channel with Real Time, a similar talkshow that years later would prove to be more successful than Politically Incorrect ever was.
  • It's not entirely clear why Rich Fields, The Announcer on The Price Is Right, left the show in September 2010 after six years on the job. The producers claimed that they wanted to find an announcer with skill in improv comedy to play off Drew Carey (who took over hosting from Bob Barker in 2007), and got such an announcer in George Gray a few months later. Other sources claim that Rich had personal problems, including identity theft, that made him unable to continue on the show (though he did follow Drew over to Drew Carey's Improv-A-Ganza a year later, and filled in for a short time on Wheel of Fortune following the death of their longtime announcer, Charlie O'Donnell). Around the same time, The Price Is Right lost many of its behind-the-scenes staff, including a producer and director, under equally mysterious circumstances.
  • Despite playing one-third of the show's Power Trio, Orlando Brown did not return for Raven's Home, the Sequel Series to That's So Raven due to a recent series of run-in's with the law, which has led Disney to cut ties with him. This article for Louder & Prouder, a Revival of The Proud Family for Disney+ notes that the original cast would be returning, Brown's character Sticky is conspicuous by his absence.
  • Romeo and Juliet: The first episode of The Shakespeare Plays garnered some controversy when Rebecca Saire, who played Juliet in this production, criticized director Alvin Rakoff for the way he made her portray the character onscreen, resulting in Cedric Messina and the BBC cancelling several interviews she was scheduled for.
  • Roseanne Barr, already infamous for her behavior on Twitter, single-handedly torpedoed the 2018 revival of her eponymous sitcom after making a racist tweet towards a former presidential aide to Barack Obama. Although Barr apologized, it was the final straw for ABC, who canceled the show just a few hours later despite it being initially renewed for an 11th season. It only took a few more hours for the three networks airing reruns of the original series (including CMT, who'd earlier saved the above-mentioned Nashville) to drop them, plus Hulu eliminating the show from its library, despite that show still being extremely popular. Barr even made matters worse for herself by going on another Twitter tirade against members of the show's cast and crew and continuing to tweet out conspiracy theories about other entertainers, which led to many believing that Barr isn't truly sorry about her racist comment (Barr's ex-husband Tom Arnold even suggested she wanted the series to get cancelled), and evaporated any chance of ABC reconsidering their decision. In 2018, ABC began airing The Conners, a continuation of the series starring the rest of the Conner family without Roseanne; Her character was McLeaned in the new show's first episode.
  • Season 12 of RuPaul's Drag Race saw the very first instance of a queen being disqualified due to outside factors when after the first episode aired, several people came forward to accuse contestant Sherry Pie of catfishing them and having them do sexual favors in exchange for alleged parts in theatre productions. This led to her being UnPersoned through editing (in American broadcasts at least) and the show banning her from attending the reunion with no chance of winning regardless of overall placement. She reached the top four but as promised, was not present at the Reunion with Jaida, Crystal, and Gigi effectively being the only finalists.
  • Actor and stand-up comedian Mike Reid had a brief stint as Roger Moore's underwater stunt double on The Saint until he was sacked for making fun of the star's thinning hair.
  • Saturday Night Live has had this happen:
    • Subverted with Nora Dunn's departure. She was seemingly fired after boycotting the show following Andrew "Dice" Clay's appearance. However, Jon Lovitz later discussed her boycott of the show in detail during an episode of the podcast The ABC's of SNL with director Kevin Smith and revealed it wasn't that simple:
      Anyway, it's the second to last episode of the season, and Nora, uh, you know, she caused a lot of trouble and she was very hard to get along with, so [SNL] wasn't going to ask her back, anyway. And it's the [second to] last show, and she goes to the press and says, 'I'm not doing this show. He's against women, and I'm not doing it.' And this is how the press works, and I'm telling you, I'm on the inside of this. They don't know this story. They don't know she's just doing it to get press. It's her last hurrah. They're not asking her back on the show.
    • Comedy writer Katie Rich was fired from the show after Tweeting a joke that President Donald Trump's son Barron would become "the world's first homeschool shooter." Rich later deleted the tweet and apologized, but the backlash from Trump supporters and opposers alike forced NBC to fire her. However, Rich would later return to the show for the Weekend Update: Summer Edition spin-off.
    • Damon Wayans, tired of the minor roles he was getting, was fired for playing a cop as gay in one sketch without prior approval.
    • Probably the most infamous example - Charles Rocket saying "fuck" in a sketch parodying Dallas led to not only him being fired, but the entire cast and most of the writing staff, save for a select few, including Eddie Murphy.
    • Shane Gillis was fired just one week after being chosen as a new cast member for Season 45 when a clip of him making horribly racist and sexist statements on a podcast a few years earlier was unearthed, and he didn't help at all by defending it as being edgy.
    • Jay Mohr's time on the show was cut short in 1995 after he plagiarized an Irish bartender sketch he had written and appeared in from comedian Rick Shapiro. Mohr initially denied he had stolen the bit, but admitted to doing so after Shapiro sued SNL and Lorne Michaels confronted Mohr with a tape of Shapiro's original sketch. The sketch was pulled from the reruns of the episode, and Shapiro was given a cash settlement from NBC. Mohr, who was a featured player, claimed he had quit at the end of the season because he had been denied repertory status for the next season, likely because of the incident. His claim that he voluntarily left has been disputed.
  • On Scandal, Columbus Short's Harrison Wright ended up Killed Off for Real after his last appearance in the third season finale after continual domestic violence allegations made it untenable for Shonda Rhimes to keep him on the series further.
  • A stagehand was fired from The Shirley Temple Show in 1958 after Temple caught him swearing during a rehearsal of their "Mother Goose" episode. Temple told the cast she fired the crewmember because it was improper language for a children's show, even though no children were present at the time of the incident.
  • Rumor has it that Orlando Jones' character on Sleepy Hollow was written out in season 2 because the actor openly criticized the new showrunners.
  • Despite seeking treatment due to bulimia issues and depression, Demi Lovato daring to seek psychiatric help and going on leave was apparently enough for Disney to pull the plug on Sonny with a Chance and rebrand the series to So Random!, focusing on the skits of the aforementioned Sonny. It only lasted one season and reception was very poor, especially considering Demi wasn't involved in the show, becoming a Show-Ending Misdemeanor.
  • Yeoman Rand from Star Trek: The Original Series, if William Shatner is to be believed. While Grace Lee Whitney did have alcohol/drug issues, others say Rand was transferred to another starship due to the writers not wanting a love interest for Kirk on the ship, while others claim that she was fired after threatening to expose her sexual assault by a studio executive. However, Grace Lee Whitney did get to reprise her role as Rand in two of the Star Trek movies (Star Trek: The Motion Picture as the transporter operator and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country as a member of the Excelsior's crew) and returned for the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Flashback", taking place during VI.
  • Sasha Mitchell's character Cody from Step by Step was Put on a Bus because of real-life domestic abuse allegations from Mitchell's wife. The worst part is that it turns out SHE was actually the violent one and he was trying to protect the kids.
  • Dan Spilo became the first Survivor contestant ever to be kicked off the show when he was removed from the Island of the Idols season in 2019 after he was reported to have inappropriately touched a female crew member while he was getting on a boat. Spilo's behavior around female contestants had been an issue for most of the season, especially after Kellee Kim had accused him of touching her inappropriately. Spilo was given a formal warning by the producers after Kim aired her concerns about him to the rest of the tribe, but he was allowed to remain on the show, a decision that proved to be controversial for the rest of the season. The incident with the crew member was ultimately the final straw, and Dan was removed from the game on Day 36. The remaining five castaways were informed of the decision by host Jeff Probst that morning—no goodbyes, no placement on the jury, no final words, and no invite to the aftershow.
  • Chris Langham was written out of The Thick of It, despite playing the main character. Being arrested for downloading child pornography will do that to you. Malcolm Tucker (Peter Capaldi) became the de facto main character from the 2007 specials onward.
  • Bob Vila, the host of the PBS series This Old House, was a real pain in the neck for the show's construction crew to deal with. Among other things, he ended up hogging the spotlight. However, the last straw was when, before the 1989 season, he appeared in ads for Rickel Home Centers, a competitor to Home Depot, a local sponsor for the series on numerous stations. He was shortly fired for endangering the series as Home Depot and national sponsor Weyerhauser had dropped their sponsorships as a direct result of the ads.
  • In what ended up as a show-ending event, Christopher Titus admitted that he was the one responsible for Titus getting canceled, outlined in one of his comedy specials. He had spent three seasons fighting the Executive Meddling at every turn, not helped that the FOX network had a short turnover for its president during this period. In a meeting for season three, the new network president offered a direction the show could go, which he opposed on a fundamental level. But instead of playing nice, he tried calling out her out for the stupid suggestion and he expected Braveheart-esque support behind him. Instead, the season contract finished out, and he was told at the last possible legal moment that they were not renewed. He admits now that if you call your boss an idiot enough times, they will fire you.
  • The BBC did not renew Top Gear host Jeremy Clarkson's contract after he got into an offstage argument over catering arrangements with assistant producer Oisin Tymon that eventually resulted in Clarkson punching Tymon in the face. He was initially suspended after the highly-publicized incident, but when a BBC investigation concluded that he indeed did punch Tymonnote , the hammer was ultimately dropped; his contract, which was up for renewal, would not be picked up.note  Co-presenters James May and Richard Hammond, also looking at contract renewals, decided not to go on without Clarkson and left the series as well, although they have continued to present BBC programmes here and there. The BBC decided to continue Top Gear without them, hiring several new presenters to replace them. Meanwhile, Clarkson, Hammond, and May (along with long-time friend and producer Andy Wilman), negotiated with Amazon to create The Grand Tour, a Spiritual Successor to their version of Top Gear.
  • The Tribe: The teenage actors playing Ved and Chloe in season 4 reportedly held up production by going AWOL for a whole day during scheduled filming hours. This annoyed the producers enough that both characters ended up getting McLeaned.
  • Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, where do we begin with Charlie Sheen? Allegations of domestic abuse didn't cut it. An arrest and jail time in Aspen for violating a restraining order didn't cut it. No, this is what it took for Sheen to get kicked off Two and a Half Men: first, he got sent to the hospital for a hernia suffered in the middle of what was, by all accounts, a cocaine-fueled orgy; then he took a leave of absence to go into rehab, putting the show on hiatus in the process; then he called up Alex Jones and complained about everyone from the show's co-creator and executive producer, Chuck Lorre, to his co-stars and the higher-ups at CBS; and finally promptly demanding $3 million per episodenote  upon his return, at which point the show dropped him, killing his character (and making sure Sheen himself could never, ever come back to the show), and replaced him with Ashton Kutcher. It should be noted that Lorre had repeatedly tried to fire Sheen long before the grand event happened, and only didn't succeed because CBS always thwarted his attempts out of fear that his absence would severely damage the show's ratings base. Sheen was eventually invited back for the Grand Finale, but he instead insisted on a hook for a Sequel Series, which was rejected.
  • By some accounts, Lindsay Lohan's stint on Ugly Betty was cut short due to outrageous diva behavior on her part. Other sources claim it was due to Creative Differences (if this is true, we might presume Lohan was upset that her character was set up as a Fallen Princess only to be turned into a jerk for no reason).
  • In a sort of amusing irony, Watchdog and Rogue Traders co-host Dan Penteado was apparently fired after being arrested for benefit fraud and jailed. Considering the shows are meant to be about rip-offs and con artists, this ended up being mentioned by one of the rogues confronted on the show afterwards.
  • After four great seasons writing and producing The West Wing, Aaron Sorkin was asked to leave his position as Executive Producer after his drug scandal leaked out.
  • A case of one person's role costing another person their job occurred early in June 2019 with Netflix's Mini Series When They See Us. Actress Felicity Huffman's portrayal of controversial Central Park Fivenote  prosecutor, Linda Fairstein, proved a headache for the real Fairstein, who found herself facing a large enough wave of backlash that she resigned her membership in a number of organizations she was involved with, including her position on Vassar College's board of trustees—while a second prosecutor, Elizabeth Lederer, portrayed by Vera Farmiga, left her teaching post at Columbia Law School later that month for much the same reasons.
  • ViacomCBS fired Nick Cannon as host of VH1's Wild 'N Out over a podcast interview with rapper Professor Griff in which Cannon perpetuated anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and insinuated that black Africans were the only "true" Semitic people. The company's statement mentioned that they initially reached out to him but that he failed to apologize or acknowledge that he was spreading hate speech. The incident, however, did not cost Cannon his hosting job on Fox's The Masked Singer, but the network did condemn his comments. Lionsgate also shelved their upcoming talk show with him for a year, possibly with more to come, since as one article put it, "it might be a good idea to not immediately launch a TV series predicated entirely on the universal likability of Nick Cannon."
  • Yancy Butler had to leave Witchblade because of her alcoholism. Since she played the title character Det. Sara Pezzini, the show left with her.
  • The X Factor has had numerous controversies which have led to contestants being forced to withdraw from the competition, leaving the show as a result:
    • During Season 3, Avenue, one of the groups, was booted from the show by their mentor Louie Walsh after it was discovered they were already in a contract with a record label whose boss tried to exploit the show for publicity. Luckily they weren't far enough that another band couldn't be brought in to replace them.
    • Emily Nakanda, one of Season 4's contestants, was kicked out on the second episode of the live shows after a video of her Happy Slappingnote  a teenage girl was discovered on YouTube.
    • Frankie Cocozza was booted from the show during Season 8 after boasting about doing cocaine in the house where contestants stayed for the competition.
    • Brooks Way, a group participating in Season 13, was put on suspension mere hours before the first live show and kicked out before the results shownote  after it emerged that one of them had violently assaulted his ex-girlfriend as well as evidence that he regularly beat up his own brother, the other half of the band.
    • Not even the judges are safe. Tulisa Contostavlos was removed from the competition after an exposé was published about her dealing cocaine but the legal case against her collapsed after the reporter was caught lying in court.
    • For the New Zealand version of this show, Willy Moon and his wife Natalia Killsnote , who are the judges, got fired after making some disrespectful comments and their Jerkass behavior towards one of the contestants in 2015. Because of this incident, Willy and Natalia receive a lot of flak from viewers (even Simon Cowell, the creator of The X Factor franchise, the crew members, and even the co-judges aren't too happy about Willy and Natalia's Jerkass attitude to the contestant) especially on their social media accounts, so much that it resulted in them leaving social media, Natalia changing her name to Teddy Sinclairnote  and leaving from the public spotlight for good. To this day, people still haven't forgiven them because of this incident.
  • Alexa Nikolas was removed from Zoey 101 because she didn't get along with Jamie Lynn Spears.

    Puppet Shows 
  • The Christian Television Network pulled their 1990's series Joy Junction from re-runs on their channel in 2013 after series puppeteer and cast member Ronald William Brown was given a 20-year prison sentence for possessing child pornography along with plotting to murder and eat a child he knew from his local church.
  • There are multiple conflicting accounts explaining why Steve Whitmire, the successor to the late Jim Henson as the performer of Kermit the Frog, was fired from The Muppets after almost 40 years with the troupe. In a statement given to The Hollywood Reporter, Whitmire claimed he was terminated over Creative Differences: Disney (the current owner of The Muppets) wanted to radically alter the behavior of Kermit for the short-lived ABC series, but Whitmire felt the changes were short-sighted and an insult to Henson's legacynote . However, in their own statement for the Reporter, Disney claimed that Whitmire was fired over many years of backstage egotism, claiming that his behavior on-set caused production delays and was becoming increasingly difficult to work with. Brian Henson, Jim's son, supports this theory, adding that Whitmire was making "outrageous demands" while also admitting that creative differences did play a role.note  Regardless, this applies to both scenarios since the termination wasn't voluntary.
  • Sesame Street:
    • Kevin Clash, the performer of Elmo, went on a leave of absence after allegations arose that he had sex with a 16-year-old. The allegations were soon disproven, though just as it looked like he'd recover from that incident, a new allegation of the same kind from another party led him to quit the show and have Ryan Dillon take over the role of Elmo. Fortunately, he would eventually be cleared of all sex abuse charges in 2014, and while he has never returned to Sesame Street, or even Elmo, the rest of his puppeteering career at the Jim Henson Company remains unaffected.
    • Actor Northern Calloway, who played David, began to suffer a decline in both physical and mental health in the 1980s. He had a nervous breakdown leading to him getting jailed for a rampage in Nashville in 1980. However, he still returned to playing David and promised to take his prescribed lithium. However, the producers were skeptical of how long he would last and gradually ended David's relationship with Maria and eventually had him take over Hooper's Store when Mr. Hooper died. His behavior would remain erratic and after biting music coordinator Danny Epstein in a scuffle and intruding into the high school of Allison Bartlett, who plays Gina, and proposing to her, Calloway was fired/forced to resign and hospitalized and David was written out of the show. Calloway died in a facility in Ossining in 1990 of a heart attack caused by exhaustive psychosis/excited delirium syndrome, literally a fatal nervous breakdown. Unlike Mr. Hooper, they did not make David die offscreen or pay tribute to Calloway in any way (though it is briefly mentioned that David moved away from Sesame Street to live with his grandmother on her farm).


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