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  • Ace Combat:
    • The agility and tenacity of the Game-Breaker QAAMs may be what happens when you put a real-world nigh-unbeatable heater, a la the Python 4/5, the AA-11/R-73, or the AIM-9X, against planes that usually encounter missiles sloppy enough to be outflown without needing countermeasures.
    • Likewise, when Captain Bartlett in Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War draws a missile away from Nagase, and then again when Nagase is targeted by a hidden AA position a few missions later, in both cases the missile stays right on them despite them pulling maneuvers that would have shaken off a standard missile in gameplay - must have been QAAMs.
    • Similarly in the Xbox 360 game Over G Fighters. Did you know that afterburner in the presence of heat-seeking missiles is a bad thing? On the other hand, unlike Ace Combat, the player (and also enemies) can sometimes break missile locks by turning enough to reduce their plane's radar cross-section.
    • One of the differences the competing Airforce Delta series has with Ace Combat is that the effect of air resistance on the control surfaces is more accurately depicted. Whereas Ace Combat tactics revolve around flying just above stall speeds to have maximum maneuverability and prevent overshooting and ending up in front of your target, planes in Airforce Delta all have specific speeds, much higher than in Ace Combat, where they're most maneuverable - slower than that means there's not enough airflow to properly change your heading, while faster than that means the systems to reduce airframe stress and your plane's inertia get in the way.
    • Air power being the number-one deciding factor in any sort of military engagement in the series means the armed forces of several nations and alliances are at risk of Crippling Overspecialization when weapons that are really good at taking out large chunks of an air force enter the picture. Ace Combat 04's "Stonehenge" is probably the most obvious case - a giant set of eight railguns that were designed to destroy an asteroid before it hit the planet turns out to be really good at anti-air operations when the enemy takes them over as their opening act of aggression. By the time the player character enters the picture, the enemy is already on the verge of winning simply because the sheer size of Stonehenge means they have guaranteed air superiority over roughly three-fourths of the continent.
  • AI War: Fleet Command: What happens when you make the AI with far more resources than you ever can have and no compunction against holding back sit up and decide you're a threat? You get flattened, that's what.
  • Alien: Isolation: As expected of a stealth game, even after Ripley does get a few weapons it just takes two or three bullets, even fired from across a room, to take her down. Attempting any kind of head-on fight will end up with her dead within seconds.
    • Also, using the proximity scanner or hacking tools will alert others of her presence. They do emit pretty conspicuous beeps after all.
    • Talking Is a Free Action is thoroughly averted. Except for scripted sequences which require the Xenomorph to be somewhere else, interaction with computers or conversations can be cut short by Ripley being tail-stabbed in the back.
    • The flamethrower is your best anti-Alien weapon, not because it hurts it, but because it's basically an animal and like most animals, it's scared of fire. Also, like an animal though, it's unpredictable, so sometimes instead of "flight" it might decide a better option is "fight", resulting in it charging you and knocking you down, or outright killing you if you are dangerously low on health.
    • Amanda isn't a soldier. When using the basic revolver, her aim is pretty bad because she lacks training with firearms, and so unless standing still and focusing long enough, most of her shots miss. Even other weapons she encounters that she can use both hands for in a more sturdy way have this issue. She's essentially a maintenance staff worker, not a fighter.
  • In Alice: Madness Returns, any time Alice falls out of Wonderland into reality tends to strike a nerve, as Alice is a helpless teenager wandering the streets of London and the game really drives that home; the second time you return, for example, Alice gets slapped unconscious by a pimp for trying to come to her friend's aid. Everyone is also aware Alice isn't entirely right in the head, a fact the Big Bad tries to use to pull a Karma Houdini; who would believe that a highly respected child psychologist raped and killed someone's sister with only the word of a known mental patient? Alice also admits he's right, then takes it into her own hands.
  • Alone in the Dark: If you light up a molotov cocktail (accidentally or otherwise) in the 2008 reboot, it simply cannot be stowed back in your inventory. Either you throw it away or it will explode right in Edward's hands after a few seconds.
  • Near the end of Ape Escape 2, Specter decides to fight the player in a gigantic robot suit. While trying to stomp the player, he has the suit balance on one foot, concentrating all its weight on one small area...and the robot promptly falls through the floor.
  • Apex Legends: In Titanfall 2, players have used Grenade Jumping to pull off record-breaking Gauntlet runs. When Octane tried it, he blew his legs off.
  • Assassin's Creed:
    • In all games, pickpocket victims who realize you're the culprit will try to punch you out. Problem is, the culprit is a battle-hardened warrior who goes through trained soldiers like a lawnmower. It doesn't end well for the civilian.
    • The first two assassinations from the second game are performed by someone who is A) completely untrained in the act of murder, and B) thirsty for revenge. Ezio doesn't kill his first victim with a single stab, he violently and repeatedly shanks him. And when killing Vieri, he angrily curses the dying victim before Mario angrily rebukes him.
      • Speaking of Vieri di'Pazzi, he's the only character who outright mocks the post-assassination conversations.
    • In every game from 2 onward when guns are introduced, the game treats them as an Infinity +1 Sword. Only the most durable of targets can survive even a single shot, and even as the arms race goes on and armor gets better to compensate for them it still remains one of the player character's most deadly and reliable weapons.
    • In Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood, Ezio gets shot at the start of the game and when he comes to he's seriously injured. At first, he can't even run or climb properly because of the injury combined with his age, and even after getting cured by a doctor he doesn't get his full climbing ability back until purchasing a climbing harness. Even being the Living Legend that Ezio is, even he can't resist the passage of time (by the time the game starts, Ezio is in his late 40s, in an age where it was common for people to be dead before even half of that) with the mediocre at best and outright harmful at worst Renaissance-era medical techniques.
    • In Assassin's Creed III while fighting the Big Bad, Connor ends up in a burning shipyard and has rubble fall on him. Upon waking up, he finds that he's been impaled through the side by a wooden beam. The following segment has him limping at an arduous crawl to chase after the equally wounded villain (who Connor shot when he tried to gloat, defying another trope), who he confronts in a bar half-dead, shares one last drink with, and kills. He goes back to normal in the post-game, but from a story standpoint, it's implied that even five years later in the epilogue, the injury crippled him for life and ended his career as an Assassin.
    • In Assassins Creed IV
      • Blackbeard, who is a One-Man Army deserving of his legend, dies when a British soldier stabs him in the back with a bayonet while he got surrounded. That his death was so depressingly... quiet, leaves Edward in a slump for some time after.
      • In general, while the game starts off in an idealistic "Golden Age" of piracy and high seas plunder, by the end of the game the grim reality of piracy sets in all at once; the British navy, in response to the rampant piracy, finally muscles in to protect their lucrative interests around the Caribbean. Since the "heroic" side's cast are all rival pirates with whatever ships and crews they could scrape together against the might of the most powerful Navy in that period of time with trained and equipped sailors, the British quickly start putting a brutal end to piracy in the Atlantic. They start recruiting the worthwhile pirates as privateers in return for full pardons for previous crimes, and wiping out any crews that resist or refuse the offer. By the final few missions, Edward is left a depressed wreck of a man seeking a purpose to give his life meaning, while his allies and friends die around him or turn heel and join the privateering initiative.
    • In Assassin's Creed: Syndicate, Jacob successfully assassinates the corrupt Templars who are the medical, transportation, and economic leaders of Britain in rapid succession. Since these assassination targets had a complete monopoly on their given industries and Jacob gives the Assassins no time to locate friendly replacements, this leads to medical supply shortages, transportation rackets, and an economic depression that Evie has to fix in order for London to not collapse on itself within a year.
    • In Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, Alexios or Kassandra's decisions can have some depressingly realistic consequences. Sure, you can feel quite good about sparing the last surviving family of a plague-ridden village from execution, and them thanking you for sparing their lives later, but be prepared to learn that they've accidentally spread the disease again and caused more suffering, and you've also directly caused the deaths of soldiers and priests trying to protect the common good. Other decisions that seem clear-cut "good" and "bad" also have similar consequences, like sparing mercenaries from death resulting in them ambushing you further down the road, them believing they owe you one.
  • Azure Striker Gunvolt, particularly its sequel, nicely deconstructs the ideas behind Revenge. Particularly where it concerns our two main characters, Gunvolt and Copen.
    • For Gunvolt, it turns out that killing someone out of vengeance, no matter how justified you may feel, won't make you feel better. Even after killing Asimov and avenging Joule, Gunvolt still can't find the will to forgive himself and is shown to be plagued by nightmares about it. However, he does learn from this and in his True Ending Boss Fight with Copen, attempts to teach this to him.
    Gunvolt: I've been in your position! Vengeance won't help! It's not noble! It's giving into the worst of yourself.
    • For Copen, dedicating your life solely for revenge is unhealthy, won't make you feel better, and can have detrimental and lasting negative effects on your life. During his fight with Desna, a known Fortune Teller, she warns him that if he continues on his path, he'll lose everything he holds dear. And during the final battle with Gunvolt in his True Ending, Gunvolt also attempts to dissuade him from his path, having been in his position himself. And sure enough, he learns this the hard way when he finds out that his beloved sister Mytyl, who he had been fighting so hard to save, is actually an Adept, the very thing he swore to destroy. This forces him to fake his death and cut ties with her and his family, so she won't be involved in his battles again and won't know the monster he's become.
    • The sequel also gives us one of the villains, Gibril, whose Septima gives her power over blood and metal. During her boss fight, when reduced to a 1/3 of her health, she unleashes her Iron Maiden Special Skill, where she uses her own blood to create spikes along the walls, floors, and ceiling. Naturally, after repetitive uses of the attack, she keels over from excessive blood loss.
    • This also applies to the game's backstory. Superpowered individuals begin springing up in mass quantities at an unprecedented speed all across the Earth. What follows is complete global destabilization of society and world order, causing Adepts to be feared and persecuted by the human race. The only safe haven is Japan, and only because the Adept threat is managed by a morally dubious Mega-Corp who captures and performs inhumane experimentation on the populace.
  • Baldur's Gate:
    • In the first game, you finally get the chance to confront the Big Bad, Rieltar, as he holds a meeting with his subordinates. Attacking and killing him results in being thrown in jail, because the only tangible evidence to his guilt are a few torn letters that may or may not even have been written by him.
    • Likewise, when you confront the real Big Bad Sarevok, a Villain with Good Publicity, if you don't have any evidence against him, he points this out, calls you criminals out to start a war and frame him, and successfully turns every noble in the city against you. Come on, you're a Hero with Bad Publicity with a heavy bounty on your head, he's a respected soldier and duke of the city, who did you think they'd believe?
    • Walking around during a storm wearing plate armor? Get struck by lightning. What did you think was going to happen?
    • In the second game, Ellesime decides to exile her former lover, who has become a crazed megalomaniac Mad Scientist with a god complex, instead of killing him, hoping this act of mercy will cause him to seek redemption. However, when she does so, she also strips him of his soul, but not his magical powers. Long story short, he gets even stronger and comes back seeking revenge. Love Makes You Stupid at its finest.
    • As is now common in RPGs, it's possible to enter romances with some of your companions. Contraception isn't particularly common in medieval fantasy, so it's entirely possible for a female partner to become pregnant. At which point she can decide to leave you, since traipsing around dungeons fighting dragons and the like isn't a great environment in which to raise a child.
  • The Bard's Tale:
    • The "good" ending ends with the Bard saving the world from an ancient and terrifying evil. However, as nobody aside from a small cult who don't really like him know this, he's soon back to hustling inns for free booze and sex.
    • The various "Chosen Ones" encountered during the game are victims of this. Bright, bold lads setting out to meet their destiny, they're quickly murdered by everything from wolves to trow to zombies. One sheriff took to locking them up for their own safety.
  • Batman: Arkham Series:
    • Even though the electronic fences are built by the company Batman owns, even he can't get through without codes. And even when he gets half the code, he still needs to hack through. They were made to keep unauthorized people in or out of certain areas, and that includes Batman.
    • Batman can take out dozens of prisoners with delicate uses of flips, jumps, punches, and Batarangs. But try to take on a group of gun-wielding goons head-on, and Batman will quickly be turned into Bat-paste. Especially when he fights mooks with high-powered sniper rifles.
    • It turns out that the formula that rapidly turns men into giant monsters developed in prison by a corrupt doctor with nothing even vaguely resembling proper medical testing, tested on a bunch of lunatics with improvised ingredients, has unforeseen short-term and long-term side effects. You don't even actually defeat the first boss so much as he keels over from a heart attack two minutes into the fight. The Joker taking the formula directly leads to the next game's central plot, where he's dying due to the damage that the untested formula did to his body.
    • The series' approach to super-villains. Yes, they are dangerous but the problem lies in finding them or dealing with their gimmicks threatening innocent life. Once that's all done, things go how you'd expect when Batman, an Olympic-level athlete/expert combatant in full body armor and specialized weapons, fights people who aren't all this.
    • Batman can Offhand Backhand individual mooks easily. But when faced with multiple mooks, he has to pull his punches so he can be sure he won't kill them. As his combos get longer, he starts leaping across entire rooms to strike foes, since they're hesitating - and giving him breathing room to think - after seeing him smash their pals into the pavement.
    • While for the most part the games have no true time limits, there is one point in Arkham Asylum where Zsasz takes a hostage, knowing full well that he has no hope in a fight against Batman. However, Zsasz is also a compulsive murderer with a penchant for killing women and his hostage is a woman who has made his life hell for a long time. Players who linger for a while or let themselves be seen by him results in him killing the hostage instantly, which is Lampshaded by Joker. It's particularly jarring for experienced players, who usually assume that there is no time limit and want to listen to all of Zsasz's dialogue.
      • When you call him in City, he says he has three hostages. Batman eventually needles the psychopathic murderer about his life choices during the course of tracking his location, which enrages Zsasz and makes him drop the call. When you get to him, he now only has two hostages and there's a corpse floating in his hideout. He said Batman would regret pissing him off.
      • Early on in Arkham City, Batman is held at gunpoint by four mooks inside the church. If the player decides to wait around, the mooks will eventually shoot Batman dead.
      • Same thing in Arkham Knight where Harley Quinn has Robin being held at gunpoint. If Batman takes too long to intervene, Harley will kill Robin.
    • For most of City, there are an abundance of henchmen. After many of the inmates are killed in Protocol 10, there are a lot less heads to knock around.
    • Batman can pull metal grates off of walls. So can Joker, Nightwing, Robin, and Deathstroke since all of them are some degree of Badass Normal with strength training. Catwoman - who is more about stealth, agility, and speed - is not able to do this, to the point she asks Batman just how he does it at all.
    • The ending of Arkham City shows that Joker Immunity isn't always a sure thing. Attacking someone that is holding the only cure to the poison that is on the verge of finally killing you is not a good idea.
    • Also from Arkham City, Batman uses lethal force on both Solomon Grundy and Clayface. Considering they're both nearly impervious to physical damage (Grundy is literally an unkillable zombie, while Clayface is made of living mud) it's not surprising.
    • Harley Quinn's Revenge implies that, although not formally charged, the general consensus, at least among the remaining inmates of Arkham City, is that Batman killed the Joker. Murder by Inaction is still murder.
    • Origins has quite a bit:
      • Promotional materials for Origins mention "unconfirmed rumors" that Batman has personalized aircraft. When Batman discovers Bane's computer console and realizes Bane knows his Secret Identity, one of the monitors has a radar display. Bane figured it out by merely tracking the Batwing, and putting two and two together about where it takes off and where it goes to land.
      • Letting Joker ramble on too long while he has Batman at gunpoint will result in Joker killing Batman with a single bullet at point blank range. At this point, Batman is just another meaningless victim to the Joker, and without the clown's future obsession with turning the Bat insane like him, there's nothing stopping him from shooting Batman immediately.
      • During the credits, Jack Ryder is having a live conversation with Quincy Sharp and various political experts over the game's events, debating over how effective the cops are, the state of the country if such criminals can actually exist, and the failure of Gotham's prison system. The only one to escape criticism is Batman.
    • Knight has quite a few:
      • After the shit-storm in Arkham City involving Protocol 10, many of the surviving inmates sued Gotham City Hall for giving Hugo Strange the go-ahead for the protocol; many of them got a substantial payoff and were released from prison. Since the Gotham city government isn't obscenely rich (like most city governments aren't), the money for these payoffs came from budget cuts to Gotham city departments and services, like the GCPD and the Gotham Fire Department. This means big layoffs in both departments, which directly affects Gotham's ability to respond to emergencies during Halloween Night.
      • The police were unable to find all of the tainted blood the Joker sent to hospitals in the previous game. A statewide search and retrieval is not going to go off flawlessly, with any mistakes and errors caused by anyone in the chain of investigation preventing all the blood from being found.
      • Batman has three hideouts: Panessa, the clock tower, and his office. Each of these is occupied by just one of Batman's allies, two tops. All three are easily stormed by villains because there are no guards and the only security measures seem to be their innocuous locations and bio-metric recognition, which we see can be easily faked. Even the GCPD is attacked, but it takes a small army to make the attempt since the building is actually guarded by an entrenched force.
      • The supervillains pooled all of their money for a $3 billion army. As a result, they're so strapped for cash during Halloween that most of them have to do regular crimes just to get some income, with Penguin running guns and Two-Face robbing banks. This comes back to bite them as they lose whatever money they had left in the DLC chapters, thus losing their ability to pay for henchmen and means to fight the Bat Family.
      • Talia is mentioned a few times in the game, and despite Protagonist-Centered Morality, her impact on the world is mixed. Her family and Batman miss her, whereas Cash's entry in the evidence room calls her a terrorist, Alfred calls Nyssa the sanest of the Ghul family, and the Joker hallucination mentions seeing her in hell. The Joker one is especially poignant if you view him as a product of Batman's subconscious: even he couldn't totally deny Talia was evil.
      • Victor Zsasz was a recurring threat in the previous games, but it was clear that he only had Joker's support to make him a figure in the underworld, because the other villains were too disgusted or scared of him. With the Joker dead, Zsasz has been left to his own devices and is entirely irrelevant to the game's events, with his one appearance being incidentally on a security camera.
      • This is what the Knightfall Protocol is all about at the very end: when the Scarecrow unmasks Batman live on television, that's it, Bruce knows it's over. Batman relies on superstition and fear to be effective since he's just a normal human under the training and the high-tech gear, and having his identity revealed completely destroys that - not to mention as well that a successful vigilante like Batman, especially one prone to Arch Enemies due to his aversion to directly killing criminals, in a city as riddled with crime as Gotham, will have made a lot of enemies who absolutely will not hesitate to use any advantage they can get against him. He rounds up the last of the villains, races off back to Wayne Manor, and blows it all to kingdom come. It's uncertain if Bruce and Alfred died at the very end or not, but it's done to make sure no one goes after the other masked heroes connected to him.
      • After Batman's identity is exposed to the world, some mook chatter can be heard in the Playable Epilogue stating that even if Batman is Bruce Wayne, he is not any less dangerous.
      • Not all of the consequences of Batman's public unmasking involve villains coming after him with force. One of the mook conversations after the unmasking involves a couple street thugs planning to sue Wayne for everything he's got after all of the beatings he's given them in the past.
  • Batman: The Telltale Series: In Season Two, Episode 2, Bruce is forced to break into his own company, a guard is attacked and security footage captures him. However, while the guard is put on leave and Alfred replaces the footage with dummy footage, it does not stop the guard from telling the cops about it, while the dummy footage is easily seen through and results in Bruce almost getting arrested.
  • In Battle Brothers, Orc weapons are big, gnarly and deal tons of damage when they hit, but because they are ergonomically designed for beings much bigger and stronger than humans, your hired swords won't get a lot of practical use out of using them.
  • Battletech takes a lot of its cues for Overheating rules from its tabletop counterpart. Deserts and hot badlands make it harder to sink heat, snowfields make it easier. Standing in a river lets cold water wash over the heatsinks and improves cooling. Battling in space... makes heat management your worst nightmare. Space is NOT cold, in fact, there's very little for heat to conduct into at all, giving barren worlds and space platforms the most punishing heat modifiers of all.
  • Bendy and the Ink Machine: Even if the boss of an animation studio is respected and talented, he'll lose his employees' confidence if he undergoes Sanity Slippage, introduces an Awesome, but Impractical machine, and allows for unsanitary working conditions. On the tape recorder, the speaker threatens to quit if another pipe bursts.
  • BioShock:
    • With the sole exception of the final boss in the first game, all the antagonists are dispatched with one blow or in a cutscene. Sure, most of them are intelligent and charismatic people with a vast array of people and resources under their control, but they're still ordinary people that are no match for the One-Man Army main character.
    • BioShock has this trope as instrumental to the fall of Rapture. The city was built as a place with no laws or morals, and so Rapture attracted sociopaths and sadists only concerned with their own power. Without laws or ethics, these people inevitably rose to the top of Rapture society due to underhanded methods or because Andrew Ryan favored them. The city's location under the sea meant that Ryan couldn't convince the best members of various fields (science, engineering, the arts) to come live in his underwater utopia, because those people were both sane and well-established, so he only got the desperate ones or visionaries who weren't up to the tasks set to them. Despite the "everyone can make it" propaganda, the citizenry still needed people to scrub the toilets, so there was a huge underclass disillusioned with the Rapture dream, furious at founder Andrew Ryan and his ilk. All this came to a head with the discovery of ADAM, the miracle substance that powers plasmids, and the city promptly tore itself apart fighting over this highly powerful and valuable resource, with those same sociopaths taking their chance to get more powerful by splitting into their own factions.
    • Fontaine directly benefited from this trope: when nobody feels like doing menial work and yet some people are forced into it, who is the likeliest customer for goods that make menial tasks go away? Suddenly he went from a small-fry thief and conman to one of the most influential people in Rapture because he saw something nobody else did and grabbed it with both hands.
    • So what happens when you build a massive city at the bottom of the sea? A hell of a lot of engineering problems, that's what. It's frequently mentioned that large parts of Rapture are leaking before society fell apart, and it only got worse since nobody's sane enough to do the upkeep when Jack arrives. Some of the Big Daddies can be seen patching holes, but they're hardly trained engineers or a coordinated maintenance crew. By the sequel, parts of Rapture have just plain collapsed.
    • The prequel novel Bioshock Rapture shows an incident that serves as a perfect example of the consequences of a completely privatized society: the owner of the garbage collection service uses it to drive a rival grocery shop owner out of business by leaving his garbage piled up. Since this is not illegal and a public garbage collection service is anathema to Ryan's beliefs, the grocer resorts to Murder-Suicide.
    • The penultimate level of BioShock 2 reveals that Eleanor has been seeing through Delta's eyes the whole time, which has dire consequences for the ending if you've been harvesting the Little Sisters. After all, what else would happen when your little girl wants to be just like daddy?
    • Also from Bioshock 2, Persephone Correctional was meant to be the perfect dumping ground for Rapture's dissidents: almost unassailable, hidden on the edge of an oceanic trench, and kept secret from most of Rapture's populace, making it impossible to break out of. So, just about anyone Ryan didn't like was sent there for life... and given all the social problems mentioned above, that amounted to a lot more people than the guards could safely control. Plus, because nobody was ever released or paroled, the population just kept growing. Add to that the fact that many of the prisoners were being leased out to Fontaine Futuristics for plasmid testing, and the inmate population was dangerously unstable. When Sofia Lamb was sent to the prison, she was put to work in giving therapy to the inmates and rewarded with additional privileges for cooperation; as such, she was able to use inmate discontent, her privileges as a model inmate and her own charisma to stage an uprising and seize control of the prison - and because the facility was so well-defended, it was impossible for anyone to dislodge her. As such, Lamb was able to turn Persephone into her own personal Hotel Escobar where she could wait out the civil war in peace.
    • BioShock Infinite repeats the same scenario as Rapture in Columbia. The city is a miracle of technology, presenting itself as a divine haven far from the sins of the world below... with the same racism, imperialism, antisemitism and xenophobia as 1912 America. So not only does it get used as essentially a floating WMD (more than once in the Bad Future), but despite in theory being only open to WASPs they still need labourers, hence the oppressed underclass of "negroes" and "potato eaters", and the inevitable civil war that boils over because of their treatment.
      • Songbird is big, he's powerful, he lurks as a threat in the background of most of the game, he's intimately tied to the backstory of the deuteragonist, and everyone with even a passing knowledge of Video Game Tropes expects him to be fought in a big Climax Boss or even Final Boss battle. But Booker, for all his tricks, is still just a single human, and Songbird is still a giant flying Lightning Bruiser that's Immune to Bullets, so every time they cross paths Booker barely escapes with his life, incapable of doing the slightest shred of damage to Songbird. He's only defeated by a temporary Heel–Face Turn and then by dropping him at the bottom of the ocean since Songbird was not designed to withstand water pressure. Any timeline where Booker tried to fight Songbird directly quickly ended with Booker being torn to pieces.
      • The US government were not aware that Columbia had weapons capabilities. When the city got involved in the Boxer Rebellion, Congress was not happy with Comstock, and ordered him to return to the US. And when Comstock refused to return, the government declared that the entire city of Columbia had gone rogue, and cut all official ties with it. Even in the early 20th century, such a massive weapon would be a major liability to any sane government.
    • After Elizabeth killed Daisy Fitzroy, the Vox Populi don't simply pack up and surrender. Not only did the character's death fail to stop the Vox Populi's actions, but they are now even a bigger threat since Daisy is no longer controlling them.
  • The Blackwell Series: Throughout the course of her investigations, Rosa repeatedly breaks into homes and businesses, harasses multiple people well past the point where they want nothing to do with her, and is in close proximity to a lot of dead bodies. By the time of Epiphany she's banned from a hospital and two campuses, has multiple restraining orders put out against her, and being near to yet another freshly dead body gets her arrested, with the officer perplexed that she hasn't been arrested before, and the only reason she escapes being sent to prison is because of her Friend on the Force (a deleted scene shows that Police Commissioner Alex Silva has been protecting Rosa from police scrutiny for her own ends, but it isn't clear in the final product if that's still the case).
  • Blaster Master Zero completes its Golden Ending with Jason yanking Eve out of the Mutant Core's flesh before utterly vaporizing it. All's well that ends well? You're kidding, right?! Turns out hypermutagenic cells and viruses don't cease to exist just because the source body is obliterated, and Eve comes down with a case of corruption because of it. And because Jason and Eve are the only beings on Earth that know the mutants existed in the first place, there's no cure of any stripe anywhere on the planet. Time for another adventure, young Frudnick!
  • BlazBlue has several examples, as part of its overall Darker and Edgier tone.
    • Ragna destroying countless NOL divisions has made him a wanted criminal with a bounty worth trillions.
    • Following the Dark War, humanity had to relocate to high mountains due to the seithr concentration being too lethal for them at all lower altitudes. The main reasons that such mountains aren't covered in cities in real life is that they're both difficult to build on, and such locations are both too cold and the breathable air is too thin to support large cities. Humanity had a clear and present need to go up to the mountains after the aforementioned war, but the only way they're able to build those settlements and keep them habitable is through weather control devices that deal with these issues, and when one of them no longer functions, as shown with Akitsu-Kō, the place becomes bitterly cold.
    • Hibiki Kohaku being raised for nothing other than fighting has rendered him very psychologically unstable, to the point that he was willing to kill Kagura to become the ultimate killing machine.
    • If the main characters would have tried to reach out each other, realize the threat and work together instead of fighting constantly and minding their own business, much of the villains' goals would have been averted. This is underscored in one of Makoto's story modes, where she ends up in an alternate timeline where she tries to Set Right What Once Went Wrong; while she does some damage by tipping people off to things they otherwise couldn't have known, she deals the deathblow to the villain's plans for the cycle with one well-timed pep talk.
  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night
    • The backstory involves the Alchemist's Guild attempting to prove their relevance in an age where machines were beginning to overlap and erase the old ways, which they did by summoning The Legions of Hell - ostensibly so they commit an act of Engineered Heroism - but didn't plan beyond just opening the portal (which ended up being way larger than they intended). Unsurprisingly, faced with such numbers the Alchemists were promptly overpowered with any attempt to stop the demons and created a massive infestation that killed millions before it could be brought under control. And when the world found out that the Alchemists were the ones who summoned it, completely intentionally, their leadership was executed on the spot and it just hastened the decline of Alchemy and Magic even faster.
    • Guns have, point for point, the most potential damage in the game depending on what gun it is and which ammo is loaded in it, as firearms are relatively new, demons don't know how to counter them, and even weaker non-blessed bullets will beat out the damage from a sword that isn't outright magical (the only exception are the extremely weak infinite bullets, which are presumably made with magic), all while keeping one safe at a range..
  • Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel!:
    • Unlike on Pandora, enemies can't be set on fire everywhere you go, since Elpis is a moon with no atmosphere and little-to-no natural oxygen. The human population needs technology that creates an atmosphere and oxygen to survive, and most of the playable characters are equipped with portable oxygen kits for areas with no atmosphere... except for Claptrap, a robot who doesn't need to breathe.
    • After Jack discovers the Meriff to be a spy for Zarpedon, but decides to let him live, the Meriff tries to murder Jack by shooting him in the back. He misses point-blank, and quickly starts begging for his life, but Jack shoots and kills him. Jack is then much less willing to forgive his enemies - or even let his guard down around possible traitors - from that point onwards, seeing as it nearly got him killed the last time he did it.
  • In Breath of Fire III, Ryu, Teepo, and Rei attempt to pull a Robin Hood on the nearby McNeil family, who is oppressing the villagers with outrageous taxes. The heroes bravely break into the McNeil mansion, defeat the McNeilsnote , and rob the place, returning the ill-gotten gain to the villagers. Unfortunately, the villagers turn on the heroes, afraid of reprisals from the McNeil and the criminal syndicate he belongs to, forcing the heroes to flee.
  • Bully:
    • Attacking adults and teachers will be perilous, as they have far more health and can easily overpower and pin Jimmy. Prefects will also be a tough fight since they're physically prepared to wrestle combative students. If Jimmy tries to hide while in their line of sight, they will simply pull Jimmy out of his hiding spot.
    • Hitting younger kids will max out your trouble meter because Jimmy is both older and stronger, something he should automatically know better about doing. They also have smaller health bars due to their age and will look for the nearest authority figure to report you since very few younger students actually know how to defend themselves.
    • If Jimmy tries to be nice to the younger girls, then they might knee him in the groin for (seemingly) flirting with them. If he pinches their butt, then the trouble meter will max out because he's sexually harassing an underage girl.
    • Since violence against a female is considered a social taboo, hitting girls will max out your trouble meter. Even if the girl started the fight, everyone will assume that Jimmy attacked an innocent girl for no reason. They have lower health as well to reflect this.
    • If Jimmy starts a fight in a specific territory, your victim's friends aren't just going to stand idly by. They will dive into the fight to back up their friend. If you're careless, you will end up fighting the entire faction. In other cases, you may get an audience of students circling around you.
    • The Greaser chapter deconstructs the love triangle tropes. Johnny Vincent's girlfriend, Lola, has been dating a preppy boy behind Johnny's back and Jimmy has to help intimidate the boy. Does Johnny's paranoia end there? No, he gets insanely paranoid and tries to attack Algie the nerd for helping Lola, as he believes she's cheating on him again. In reality, she was just stringing him along so he can do her homework. She was also trying to flirt with another rich boy for $100, just as Algie and Jimmy confronted her. By the end of the chapter, Jimmy also starts dating Lola and ends up in a gang war between Greasers and Preppies. After fighting Johnny, he tells him that he doesn't want Lola as a girlfriend because she's a disloyal slut who loves being in the spotlight. You can only string someone along for so long before they realize you're not worth it and find someone better.
    • The game deconstructs the overall idea of having a school without fighting and where students are pacifists. All the boys in Bullworth are combative and will start a fight for any reason that comes to mind, whether it be to climb the social totem pole, to impress a girl, or just to entertain themselves. The only reason they stop fighting is that Jimmy established himself as their alpha and beat them all into submission. However, the truce only lasts a few hours before they start fighting again. Gary was able to manipulate everyone by making false promises and by taking advantage of their grudges.
    • In "Here's to you Ms. Philips", Jimmy is roped into helping the art teacher prepare for a date, under the assumption that Ms. Philips had feelings for him, only to find out that she was getting ready for her date with her coworker, Mr. Galloway. Ms. Philips is in her thirties and Jimmy is only fifteen, so if his fantasy came true, then it would be considered a sex offense.
    • As is Rockstar tradition, the Final Boss also falls under this. Jimmy Hopkins is a scrappy Combat Pragmatist who's been spending the entire game time fighting constantly, and as a result, getting stronger and learning more ways to beat people up. Gary Smith, his archenemy, is a Smug Snake who's been hiding behind the scenes making the other kids do his bidding. When you finally get to fight him, he's just as easy to beat up like anybody else. Even Elite Mooks Damon and Bif are tougher to beat in a one-on-one.
    • How Gary gets expelled at the end of the game. Gloating via screaming at the top of your lungs and yelling about your other activities will inevitably get someone's attention. Crabblesnitch hears Gary's rant and immediately expels him when he and Jimmy crash through the glass window.

    C-D 
  • Call of Duty:
    • Modern Warfare 3, during the tank gunner section in "Goalpost". Is the M1 Abrams a badass Cool Tank? Yes! Is it a good idea to drive it and all 57 tons of its weight into a parking garage only rated for 30 tons? Decidedly no. The crew realizes this about half a second before their tank falls through two stories into the basement. They survive, thankfully, but the fall - and several of the other cars falling on it through the massive hole it made - messed up the systems of the tank enough that they're forced to continue on foot.
    • Soap's death is another instance. Getting thrown out the top of a clock tower following a bomb explosion and smashing through various scaffolding on the way to the ground is bad enough, but then add on not being even two full months past a deep stab wound to your chest. Yuri is dazed for a while, but ultimately gets up on his own and is able to fight after a minute or so; Soap has to be carried through the whole level and leaves a near-entirely-solid trail of blood behind him until he bleeds out on a table.
    • The AC-130, in the various campaigns, is treated as a sort of undefeatable Infinity +1 Sword of air support that all but guarantees a successful mission - but its first appearance was where it shined because it was exactly the sort of situation the AC-130 is deployed for in reality, at night with no enemy anti-aircraft weaponry (due to the player and their squadron taking out the only cache of Stinger missiles the enemy had to take down their air support), and as the series went on it went to lengths to demonstrate the actual weaknesses of strapping that much firepower into a slow-moving and low-flying cargo plane. For starters is its appearance as a Kill Streak reward in the second game, where it lays down the hurt just as well as it did in the first game's campaign, but its only defenses are flying high enough that bullets can't touch it and having two sets of flares to draw away missiles - as soon as those are exhausted, it's a sitting duck that goes down in a single hit. MW3 goes even further, with AC-130s being deployed in noticeably more risky situations. In the campaign it's flying over a contested city, requiring a flight of fighter jets to protect it from the enemy, and even with that it still needs to retreat halfway through the mission as soon as enemy jets show up to harass it. In Special Ops mode there's also a level where one is flown over a mine directly in enemy territory - and the first objective the player on the ground is given is to haul ass to disable the air defenses within a minute before they simply shoot the AC-130 down.
  • In Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow's bad ending, Celia Fortner kills someone's Love Interest or appears to, at least. That someone just so happens to have the potential to become a Person of Mass Destruction if sufficiently angered. Needless to say, Celia does not leave with her life.
  • The "Farewell" DLC chapter of Celeste begins with Madeline's grief over Granny's death causing Badeline, the manifestation of her fears and insecurities, to re-emerge. In reality, mental issues aren't something you can have an epiphany on and then be done with forever. Something can always happen that triggers a relapse.
  • Chrono Trigger: In the first area, Millennial Fair, you can pick up someone's lunch to replenish your HP. Just a classic bit of video game kleptomania which will have no further consequences? Not so, as later you're put on trial and the person in question testifies against you, lamenting that you ate their lunch right off the table.
  • City of Heroes: The Freakshow are a gang of anarchists that replace parts of their bodies with cybernetic weapons to better smash the state. More dangerous members have replaced both arms with weapons, which makes them deadlier for heroes to face, but the game points out that this also means they have to rely on less-augmented Freakshow to feed them. Tellingly, the leaders of the Freakshow have only one cybernetic arm each.
  • In Command & Conquer: Generals, General Alexander is often considered the hardest General to fight by far, despite having assets not all that much greater than any other General. The reason for this is simple: Whereas every other General likes to take their time mocking your feeble attempts in the early game and gradually ramping up the level of force they use against you, Alexander comes at you full-force, immediately, when you are still at your weakest. This also works in reverse: Alexander may be incredibly dangerous on her own turf, but playing as her in any meaningful aggressive way is really hard because she specializes in defence based on existing infrastructure; take that away and she's easily crushed.
  • In Cultist Simulator, no matter how much mystical power you accumulate or how many followers you have, at the end of the day, you still have to pay your bills. Fail to have a regular source of income and your eldritch cult leader will go hungry and die. And all the mystical Lore in the world won't help if you get put in prison for the rest of your life.
  • The Final Boss of The Darkness, Uncle Paulie, is built up as the catalyst for all of the misery in Jackie's life, from the death of Jackie's girlfriend to getting blown out of a window by a bomb. Jackie finally makes it to Paulie, and Paulie goes down just as easy as the Mooks Jackie had been slaughtering to reach him. After all, Paulie's a normal human being, and a rather overweight one, at that. Jackie has the personification of all evil living inside of him. If anything, it's more of a Curbstomp Battle Cutscene Boss than a final boss fight.
  • Darkest Dungeon is a deconstruction of living in the darker counterpart of a D&D style Adventure-Friendly World; the explorers you hire to delve the suicidal dungeons for a pittance are dysfunctional mercenariesnote , each with their own personal quirks and flaws, and fighting against monstrous abominations from the unholy undead to the alien eldritch and beyond will both break them in new ways or drive their resolve to face greater challenges (mostly the former). Every damaging obstacle, every critical failure, every brush with death stresses your party, and if you don't help them recover before they reach a breaking point, you run the risk of driving them insane and letting the worst of their personality come out, which in a game about teamwork and strategy, can and almost certainly will be fatal for all involved.
  • Dark Souls: Part of the reason the franchise (and its fellows) are Nintendo Hard is that they just don't pull punches. Think you'll run into a group of low-level Mooks without a plan and win? HA HA HA— No you won't. Think that the various giant armor sets will make you invincible? You'll be a Mighty Glacier unless you have the right stats and you'll always have SOME weaknesses. Want to challenge that dragon guarding that bridge? You'll need real superhuman stats, clever placement and/or the proper equipment/spells active just to survive its Fire-Breathing Weapon. It's only thanks to (sucky) Complete Immortality do you have any chance, as your many and varied demises will prove; you're a living hunk of jerky in a Death World and only artificially powering yourself up with countless souls can you even hope to survive the myriad horrors that await you.
    • And that well at Firelink Shrine? You might believe there's some secret down there... but it is, in fact, just a well. Jumping down it gets you killed. Surprise.
  • Dawn of War:
    • There are several occasions when important characters get swiftly killed with little fanfare. Bale is easily killed by Angelos after the former's backup deserts him. In Winter Assault Sturnn is killed by Gorgutz in seconds by beating him into bloody pulp, because Gorgutz is a hulking green monstrosity and Sturnn is a normal human with fancy equipment. Retribution has Merrick go up against a Tyranid Hive Tyrant, and get killed even faster.
    • Dawn of War II and its first expansion Chaos Rising have the player achieving glorious victory over the enemies that threaten to engulf the subsector and destroy the Chapter, both ending in a triumphant speech by Gabriel Angelos about how heroic you are. The second expansion, Retribution, is set ten years later and shows that "defeated" is not the same as "gone"; remnants of all the different enemy factions are still making a mess of the subsector, all sides keep funneling in reinforcements to the point that all the planets are engulfed in constant fighting, and the situation has deteriorated so much the Imperial higher ups consider Exterminatus to be the best option.
    • During Dark Crusade, several of the strongholds play out this way. Gorgutz of the Orks is defeated by pitting his forces, notorious for in-fighting if they feel like it, against each other so he stands alone on the field. The Necrons are known to be unstoppable in combat, so instead their catacombs are nuked to cause a cave-in, completely disabling their abilities of repair and reinforcement. The Imperial Guard are regular humans and prone to cowardice and rebelling against bad officers, so the player can pit them against each other as well if it appears that the player in charge would be a better leadership than their own high command. The Tau venerate their Ethereals to the point of fanaticism, so killing the spiritual leader breaks their morale so hard they just pack up and flee.
    • Chaos Rising has Multiple Endings, and while the two Purity endings involve the Force Commander being made Captain of the Fourth Company or joining Angelos in purging corruption within the Blood Ravens chapter, the partial to total Corruption endings feature your strike force being sent on a hundred-year Penitent Crusade, the Commander getting a "The Reason You Suck" Speech from and executed by Angelos in person with the implication that your men are either dead or going to be or all your squads joining the Black Legion and fleeing into the Warp, with a vow from Angelos to pursue you wherever you go. In the case of the former two: you didn't think you could endanger civilians for personal gain, steal a dead Battle Brother's equipment, deliberately kill fellow Marines who didn't understand their reasons for fighting you were bogus and use suspiciously Warp-like abilities without Angelos finding out and without suffering the consequences, did you? And in the latter case, did you really think you could slowly but surely give your squads over to the influence of Chaos and you wouldn't lose yourselves to the Dark Gods?
  • Dead End Road: You can wish to be the grand ruler of the entire world. Too bad it doesn't mean you have the skills to maintain control over it.
  • Dead Rising Series:
    • As a Whole:
      • Some weapons are going to be more effective than others, and solely relying on hand-to-hand combat will be an unwise decision. Even though zombies lack strategy, they vastly outnumber you and you will need to retreat before they overwhelm you. While trying to find an effective weapon, items such as children's toys, novelty items, or cleaning products will be ineffective against the undead, as they are not designed to cause harm. Throwing your weapons at the zombies won't be the most effective strategy either, as some items are best used as melee weapons, while others can be hard to throw due to their weight.
      • While fire seems to a good strategy, it doesn't kill zombies as quickly as you want it to. As it takes a moment or two for a zombie to start burning, even then, they'll just flail around for a few moments until it dies. The same can be said for freezing zombies, as they won't immediately freeze solid.
      • On the other hand, some weapons require strategy; shooting zombies in the chest with a handgun will just make them stumble until they eventually die, shooting them in the head will be more effective and less time-consuming.
      • While vehicles are useful against zombies, they eventually break down after taking too much damage.
    • Dead Rising:
      • Carlito, one of the most recurring bosses in the game and also the entire series, who is usually Made of Iron like all the other Psychopaths, dies from a single gunshot to the stomach and a hook through the leg from a character who had no importance to the plot.
      • Brad’s injury zigzags this; his shot in the leg averts Just a Flesh Wound and he’s in enough danger from the wound getting infected that Frank has to retrieve medication from the mall's pharmacy. He even falls unconscious, though it’s unclear if it’s from the pain of the wound (and having to walk back to the security room on his injured leg) or the incoming infection. However, once he gets the medication, he’s awake and moving again within a few hours.
      • The tie-in comics reveal that despite Frank’s best efforts, Isabela was arrested by federal agents the moment their helicopter landed. After she directly helped commit a terrorist atrocity that killed tens of thousands of people, the government is not going to care about that Heel–Face Turn she had midway through the event.
      • The DHS agents take a long time to consider Frank as an actual ally; Jessie refuses to hand over her gun until Frank manages to convince her that he’ll help Brad and already knows how to handle firearms, while he has to straight up blackmail Brad with the picture of Barnaby for him to consider informing Frank about what's happening. They’re both federal agents being asked to trust an independent journalist (whom they've never met before) with sensitive information, so of course they’re not going to tell him everything. It’s only after Frank saves Brad’s life that they realize they need all the help they can get and begin to let him into the fold. Frank directly exploits this trope to convince Jessie that this kind of situation isn’t the time to rely on protocol, especially not when the situation has already gotten wildly out of control.
      • Since shotguns and sniper rifles are designed to be stronger than the average handgun, shooting a survivor in the face with either of these weapons will either do massive damage or kill them instantly.
      • As this is the first zombie outbreak in the setting, survivors are also freshly traumatized by the shambling dead and regularly react to zombies by crying and screaming on the way to the safehouse. Survivors that are still willing to directly fight back against the zombies are rare, and the ones who are willing and able are even fewer in number.
    • Dead Rising 2:
      • People are strangely resistant to gunfire in the game. Chuck, while not an invincible steel wall, can take a .50 caliber rifle bullet to the face and negate the effects with a bottle of whiskey. Psychopaths are even more bullet resistant, with some taking it to ridiculous degrees (Antoine, a fat celebrity chef with presumably no combat experience can take 200 rounds of LMG fire by blocking it with a frying pan). So when Sullivan pulls out his handgun and puts a hole in Rebecca Chang's forehead and kills her mid-cutscene, it can be a bit stunning to a player to witness.
      • Chuck can recover health by consuming food or drink, but if he does this with alcohol several times in a row or with spoiled food, he'll get sick and throw up.
      • After the Sgt. Boykin boss battle, Chuck encounters two survivors: soldiers who survived the failed rescued attempt. Although they are both grateful for the escort to the Safe House, neither one is willing to give their gun to a civilian.
      • During the timeline between the first game and Dead Rising 2, survivors have become more acquainted with the undead and are now more prepared to handle zombies, making rescue missions a little less tedious. However, since Chuck has been recently framed for the outbreak, some survivors distrust him and will require Chuck to defend himself or do a favour for them. In the case of Carl Schliff and Brent Ernst, Chuck will have to fight vigilantes who want revenge on the man who is believed to have caused a zombie outbreak that killed thousands of people.
      • The zombies in Dead Rising 2 are physically weaker than the ones in the first game. As said before, some of this is because survivors are more acquainted with the concept of the undead and are now more confident in how to handle them and kill them efficiently. Medically speaking, the zombies that have been held in the "Terror is Reality" arena are weaker due to osteoporosis and the inevitable decay of their bodies. These zombies have likely been held in one, dark place for months or years, and their bodies have likely weakened during this time period.
      • The existence of C.U.R.E (Citizens for Undead Rights and Equality), is definitely divisive in-universe and yet have realistic reasons for existing. The public mistakes C.U.R.E for being a group of useless hippies who want zombies of all things to have equal rights, despite being mindless predators who aimlessly eat anything they encounter. However, C.U.R.E's actual motivations are more benevolent, as they want their zombified loved ones to be given a quick, merciful and dignified death. In their eyes, zombies were people once and should be treated as such as some trace of them remains, and should not be thrown into gameshows like Terror is Reality so they can be gruesomely mowed down and actively hunted for sport. But by Dead Rising 3, C.U.R.E disbanded after researchers discovered that zombies lose all traces of their humanity and personality once they become zombified. To put it plainly, the brain of a zombie is controlled by a parasite, and whoever that person was is completely gone, and that proved that the ideological core of C.U.R.E. was pointless.
      • Slappy's boss fight looks difficult until you learn Slappy's strengths (his speed and flamethrowers) are also his weaknesses, which are his roller skates and jury-rigged flamethrowers. Like real life, Slappy can be knocked over (by hitting him or making him charge into a wall) and stunned for a few seconds until he slowly regains his balance. His flamethrowers can also be temporarily disabled by spraying him with a watergun, since the water gets into his weapons and stops the fuel from being lit until he fixes it.
      • Evan's boss fight in Off The Record highlights the real consequences of fighting and killing a Psychopath. Insane or not, people like Adam the Clown had families outside of Willamette, and they will naturally hate you for killing their relatives. In Adam's case, Adam wasn't a soldier or outright evil, he was just a mall clown who lost his sanity due to witnessing the deaths of his young audience. Even if Evan discovered Frank's actions through Willamette survivors, other victims of the outbreaks won't appreciate how Frank might have portrayed their own relatives in his media appearances.
    • Dead Rising 3:
      • Marion Mallon is the true antagonist for all the games, a wealthy and corrupt pharmaceutical CEO whose employees have started at least 3 separate zombie outbreaks, and who has the cure, but refuses to release it to keep selling their treatment (the third game reveals that last one is a blatant lie). Despite this, she's still an old woman in a wheelchair, so Dead Rising 3 antagonist General Hemlock, a big, burly man easily kills her by just dumping her off a roof right into a crowd of zombies. If the fall didn't kill her, not being able to run with zombies around would (and did)
      • Protagonist Nick Ramos has no problem killing the undead because hey, they're not human and he's grown up knowing that they're not. When he kills an actual living human for the first time, he suffers a Heroic BSoD, due to having not killed someone before, even though it was rightfully done out of self-defense.
      • In any ending in which Hemlock succeeds in his plan, it’s revealed that soldiers aren’t willing to fight for a man who threatens their loved ones with zombification. If Hemlock becomes a dictator, he either is imprisoned for treason or throws the country into a civil war.
      • Diego is Nick’s best friend, so Nick is always vouching for him or trying to help him. He is also the only one of the group to have any faith in Diego at all. You can't really blame them for this, as Diego is a self described coward, even if it was justifiable under the circumstances, and is borderline unstable throughout the whole game. Of course, the people who didn’t know Diego before the outbreak aren’t gonna think very highly of him, when any other person who acts like this would cause them nothing but trouble.
      • Previous games treated the cars as an Infinity +1 Sword. They were limited, but the player could never be hurt in them and they lasted long enough to get wherever they were needed to go. In this game, however, every zombie the player hits damages the (now weaker) cars, and zombies can actually grab on to the side of them and hurt Nick and other survivors if he doesn’t shake them off in time.
      • Kenny's boss fight is a deconstruction of apocalypse enthusiasts. After Nick taught him how to survive the outbreak, Kenny starts emulating him and soon tries to kill him for interfering with his fantasy and for taking "his" identity. After the fight, Kenny (an overweight nerd) is out of breath and can barely stand, requiring Nick to save him again. Even his original combo weapon is just a trash bag full of sharp, random junk, since he's not a skilled mechanic like Nick and doesn't know how to make advanced combined weapons, nor tries to put some effort into learning how to do so firsthand from Nick's demonstration.
      • This game ends up deconstructing Isabela’s Heel–Face Turn and subsequent desire for public redemption; despite all the help she gave Frank and the DHS agents in the first game, she’s known to history as nothing more than an accomplice to Carlito’s act of terrorism and has to spend this game trying to “clear her name”. Even though it’s incredibly likely the government covered up her Heel–Face Turn, nothing about how she’s remembered is actually inaccurate, and her desire to restore her family legacy is not even remotely heroic. As a result, what would be a heroic story for another character becomes a Moral Event Horizon instead.
      • There are a few survivors in the game that start friendly and then turn hostile over the course of their side mission. Once they turn hostile, this trope kicks in, they lose any extra health they get from being a survivor, and they die in two or three gunshots.
      • This game treats the Knee Drop move realistically for the first time in the series. Not only does it not negate fall damage like it did before, Nick actually takes more damage from a fall with a knee drop than if he just falls. That’s what happens when you force yourself to fall through the air faster than normal so you can land on your fragile kneecaps.
    • Dead Rising 4:
      • In the fourth game, Frank questions the antagonist on her plan to create controllable zombies, guessing she intends to create an army of soldiers. She shoots back that no, the zombies are designed as menial workers, farmers, and other back-breaking labor, as an army of creatures the government has already been dealing with for 17 years would be worthless.
      • The beginning of the game is a nightmare sequence, showing that the events of Willamette still haunt him 16 years later. With how his life has gone since then, he’s had no way to recover from the trauma of his experiences there.
      • Exposing the truth to the populace is wonderful and the just thing to do until you make an enemy of the Government. Then you'll see those rights of yours go right out the damn door. The Government will happily ruin the life of a person who gets close to uncovering those secrets, and Frank's life goes right down as a result of it.
      • Frank is just a freelance journalist with limited idea of how to hide from the Government, so it doesn’t take long for Brad Park to find him when he becomes a fugitive under the alias Hank East.
  • Dead Space 3. Isaac Clarke, and the team investigating Tau Volantis, manage to find an old space shuttle in order to travel to the planet's surface and continue their mission. Too bad that the shuttle was around 200 years old, as were all the available replacement parts (what few there were), thus they didn't have the time nor resources to fully restore the vehicle. Upon using it to enter the planet's atmosphere, it works well... for awhile, but eventually the ship's age and lack of proper maintenance catch up with it. The ship breaks apart close to the planet's surface, killing 2 of its crew members and stranding the rest on the planet's frozen surface.
    • During the Action Prologue Isaac uses stasis to slow down an automated car on the freeway. Because it only stopped the one car and not the ones behind it however this ends up causing a pile up.
    • Later on Isaac must use stasis again to stop a fan as he is rappelling down a shaft. After passing it he quickly has to cut to line in order to avoid being pulled back into the blades once the fan resumes spinning.
    • In most of the games in the Dead Space series, the vast majority of weapons are actually futuristic industrial and mining tools. The majority of the games aren't set on military installations (Dead Space took place on a mining ship, Dead Space: Extraction on a mining colony, Dead Space 2 on a civilian space station and so on) and the protagonists use whatever they have on hand. The major exception to this is Dead Space 3, since several areas in the game were former military installations or the wreckage of military vessels, so actual firearms are plentiful. This isn't really a problem as the Necromorph's weaknesses mean that cutting tools are more effective than firearms anyway.
    • Unlike the Necromorphs, Unitologist soldiers are living beings and are not Made of Iron. When Isaac uses high powered engineering tools like his plasma cutter on them you get to see why safety regulations exist. Furthermore, it only takes a single shot to the head, from any weapon, to instantly kill them.
  • Deltarune: As the sequel to Undertale, it likes to have realistic consequences for things and a touch on the more fantasy-esque formula:
    • Unlike in Undertale, where even the worst villains could be befriended and redeemed (with the exception of the player on the bad ending path), the Big Bad of chapter 1, the Spades King, is an irredeemable despot who refuses attempts at reasoning, and tricks the party member who believes in Undertale's message of "nobody is truly evil" as part of an I Surrender, Suckers that almost gets the party killed. A realistic, surprisingly brutal, though perhaps needed bit of reality from Undertale.
    • Much like the Genocide route in Undertale, attempting the "Violent" route in Deltarune doesn't end favorably for the party. After defeating King, Lancer shows up and says he had to bar the door because the entire Dark World is trying to break in to capture and kill the party, forcing them to hurry to the Fountain of Darkness and leave. The Spades King may be a tyrannical despot who's taxed his citizens into poverty and locked up threats to his rule, but in that situation, he's still a better alternative to letting a band of outsiders - who have beaten up and attempted to kill everyone in their path on their quest to destroy the Fountain that King said will bring a new age to the Dark World - get their way. The player's aggression basically made King the one in the right to the Darkners' eyes and justified his extremism, which means he suffers no consequences as a result.
  • Destiny 2:
    • Guardians are ageless super powered warriors with decades if not centuries of combat experience each, a regenerative Healing Factor and Resurrective Immortality which makes death a minor inconvenience. Without the Light its a completly different story. While skilled they are entirely mortal and take heavy casualties from simple attrition, with many suffering from a Heroic BSoD.
    • Late in the story the adviser tries to make demands of Ghaul, reminding him how he gave him everything and made him the warrior that he is. Ghaul gets annoyed and chokes him to death.
    • Guardians' Resurrective Immortality only works because of their Ghosts rebuilding their bodies and reviving them once the Guardian's taken enough of a beating to kill them. If the Ghost is destroyed, that Guardian can't come back, even if they're not currently dead.
  • Deus Ex, a minor patron saint of deconstruction, lets reality happen quite a few times. At one point, The Dragon decides that it's much, much smarter to just order his troops to kill you, rather than actually having to go through the complicated business of waiting for the Explosive Leash to kick in. Notably, he also activates said leash - which for newer models like you is a relatively slow and seemingly natural death rather than instant death by explosion - just to be sure. At another point, you confront an enemy Obstructive Bureaucrat who realizes that trying to shoot the Super Soldier might not be such a good idea, so he waits until you turn around and leave, whereupon he shoots you in the back. At the "Realistic" difficulty level, there's a quite high chance that this will kill the player character in one shot. You can silently pick off the guards before he decides to sic them on you, resulting in a "You win this round, Denton."
  • Deus Ex: Human Revolution:
    • If you're cocky enough to act like Rambo or the Terminator, even basic mooks will make you regret it fast.
    • If you Take Your Time getting to the Sarif factory, the terrorists occupying it will have killed off all the hostages, even though it's not explicitly a Timed Mission.
    • Similarly, a major named ally will die if you take too long to kill her attackers, even though there's no explicit timer here either.
    • In The Missing Link DLC, a Belltower commander makes mention that a number of their people that Jensen "peacefully" knocked unconscious by bashing them in the face with a metal fist are in comas. If you do a non-lethal and/or stealth run through the mission then the commander will point out that even though Jensen hasn't killed anyone, all that means is that the character is extremely resourceful and more dangerous than someone just shooting people, and that the soldiers under his command should be even more vigilant in the event Jensen decides to start taking lethal options.
    • When the head of a powerful mega corporation is approached by an intruder demanding information, she doesn't just cave in, she talks until she can trip the alarm and run for the panic room.
    • Being invisible or transparent in real life would allow light to travel through you. Because of this Jensen can pass through laser wires while invisible without setting them off.
    • When a random civilian tries Mugging the Monster by threatening to call security forces on Adam, you can get him to change his mind by pointing out how easy it would be to break his bones. There's nothing keeping you from exiting the conversation and just killing or knocking him out on the spot either.
    • A crooked bouncer demands money in exchange for the location of a missing prostitute. If you refuse to pay he'll point out that it's pointless to threaten him since "It's not like I have the info conveniently on me...". If you knock him out or kill him, you instantly fail the mission because he really didn't have it on him. In another case of ensuing reality, once he gives you the info you need, there's nothing stopping you from knocking him out or killing him to get your money back, which he WILL have on him.
    • An in-game example happens if you get jump enhancements (especially the ground-pound attack) before you get the Icarus Landing System will result in you being hurt for jumping too high; they only improve the force in which you lift off, not reducing it when you come back down. In extreme cases, this can actually kill a player who is unaware of this fact.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided
    • Hugh Darrow's psychosis-inducing signal, causing all augmented humans around the world to go temporarily homicidal lasted, at most, an hour. In that hour, the thousands of people with augmentations caused millions of deaths, billions of dollars in property damage and turned the order of the world on its head. The aftermath was profound. The augmented, who were once touted as superior to baseline humankind, are now persecuted with near impunity by both individuals and governments, feared and segregated from the rest of humanity. Augmentation technology is effectively brought to a complete halt, used only sparingly, and even then it still invites scorn. Some cities, like Dubai, who put a heavy emphasis on using augmented labor, are devastated both physically and economically, and by the time the game takes place, these places still haven't recovered. For the individual augs, in addition to having to deal with the new prejudices and societal pressures, many of them suffer mental disorders, both from the trauma of the signal itself, and from struggling to come to terms with what they did while under its influence.
    • Going off a point from the first game, Adam is still, despite having more time to be used to his augmentations, not invincible. Just after the mission in Dubai, a bomb goes off at the train station he is at and Adam is nearly right next to it. He's startled, moderately injured, and his augmentations are heavily damaged as a result of being so close to the blast. As a result, he is temporarily put on leave so he can recover from the attack, as nobody, not even an augmented badass like Adam can just walk off a bomb going off next to him and be perfectly fine after.
    • Although augmentations are obviously pretty advanced sci-fi technology, its explained that they still operate like most forms of technology do, so they have updates and other such factors. When Adam finds out he has several new augmentation power-ups installed somehow, he finds out he cannot simply use them because his original augmentations were designed around him, so trying to use new augmentations without care is like trying to use high end tech on an out of date machine; the new tech overloads the out of date operating systems unless Adam disables some of the older systems to clear up space for them.
  • Devil Survivor: The Yamanote line in Tokyo gets locked in by the SDF and food rations are only dropped in sparingly. It takes very little time for the people to turn to anarchy, and start fighting over any food available or otherwise falling into lawless ways. Even several police officers begin to abuse their status and kill, since the lockdown is considered a lawless zone and they can do whatever they want. If one ignores the supernatural aspect of a demon summoning app giving people the power to fight with demons on their side, this is what would happen to a metropolitan area being closed off for prolonged time.
  • Devil Survivor 2:
    • After the big route split, you can talk to your companions who didn't side with you or are alive and try to convince them to rejoin you. If you lack a high enough FATE bond with them, they refuse to join you, citing that while they may like you, the fact you were willing to fight them over differing views means they don't feel like they can truly trust you, before leaving for the rest of the game. Sure you might of fought alongside them before, but unless you have a strong bond with them before fighting them, your friends won't just automatically forgive you for being willing to hurt them over a differing perspective.
    • Your phone being the source of the Demon Summoning App means that your ability to do things in a given day is determined by how much battery is left on your phone. This is mostly used for gameplay purposes, but at one point roughly halfway into the game, Joe ends up in trouble when his phone dies and he is attacked by Demons while trying to help people escape. It's the only instance of this happening narratively in game but the point still remains that forgetfulness is a sure fire way to die when you have to rely on one means of survival.
    • The game applies this to the concept of Screw Destiny as well. The Death Videos show how someone will die and thus the person's fate can be altered so they survive, but there is a big difference in knowing someone will die versus actually preventing it. Just because you know someone might die doesn't mean it automatically is prevented, you need to actually work to save them and cannot just hope things work out. Take your time before running off to help them? They'll die because you took too long. Didn't help your friend who was obviously hiding their pain from you? They lose the will to live because they couldn't move forward. Also, some people simply cannot be saved, no matter how hard you try because while you might want to save someone, the person in trouble might not want to be saved or might not care; in every story route at least one character dies, and you can end the game with barely four allies left if you are not careful.
    • The Nicea app was released to pretty much everyone, meaning in theory everyone can summon powerful demons to fight for them. Naturally there are people who take to using their new powers to bully others, or begin attacking people to get what they want now that society has collapsed. Without laws to keep people in check, there will be people who take advantage of it to hurt others. Also, the widespread usage of the app means many people who summoned a demon died because they either failed to control it, or were killed by another, leaving plenty of phones around that can now summon demons freely.
    • Even in a world with demons and magic, being shot with a gun is likely going to be fatal no matter how skilled you are with using said demons or magic. If you fail to arrive quick enough, Ronaldo will shoot and kill Makoto once she is weakened from combat. Makoto is still a regular human after all.
    • Joe's FATE revolves around him struggling with how to handle his sickly girlfriend and how he is afraid that she might die. As a result, he tends to be late and avoids seeing her because he doesn't feel he can handle seeing her as she is. After going through Character Development and realizing he needs to be mature and see her, Joe goes to visit, and learns she died already before he could see her. Doesn't matter how much development he got, a person invoking Take Your Time will cause them to miss important moments, plus the fact that in a end of the world type situation, sickly people are likely not going to last very long.
  • Dishonored:
    • Corvo may have a vast array of powers, but when it comes down to it, he's still physically an ordinary human - getting in a scrap with guards and getting shot, or falling a long distance without breaking it via blink will do substantial if not fatal damage to you. The same applies to every normal human too. Any fight you get in tends to be dangerous because of the numbers, but a single target will die quickly regardless of if you cut him down with your sword or just shoot him dead. This includes all of the major targets; most are no better than mooks when you fight, and even the tougher ones you can simply kill at range before they even know you're there.
    • While Corvo also has a bunch of wonderful toys, his handheld crossbow doesn't pack much of a punch, one-hit-killing is only possible with a headshot or an incendiary bolt. Daud's own wrist-based crossbow has the same weakness, and he ultimately gets far more mileage out of it in a takedown animation where he fires the bolt into a guy's neck at point-blank range, then has the crossbow pull it back into position when it rearms itself.
    • The last assassination targets don't even try to fight Corvo; by this stage, whichever way you have played, they know all too well they can't win.
    • Killing every enemy you come across will not secure any kind of victory. The dead guards will just be replaced with less than savory new recruits, your enemies will increase security with more elaborate death machines sooner than they would in a pacifist run, and your own allies will get increasingly disillusioned and/or paranoid with you. And much like Eleanor Lamb above, Emily Kaldwin learns by watching you, so if you decide that violence is the way to go, so will she. She's also the rightful successor to the throne, so having a young Empress learn that violence solves all problems will not end well.
      • And what happens when there are corpses everywhere? Rats, that's what happens. Filthy rats, carrying the plague.
    • Corvo and Jessamine were secretly lovers, except it wasn't a secret to anyone, given everything from their obvious closeness to the daughter they had out of wedlock. The reason no one ever said anything about it (unless you let a dying Pendleton talk in High Chaos) is because of the sheer Refuge in Audacity of it all.
    • When trying to find information on Delilah, Daud has the option of getting it from Abigail Ames, either by helping her, or torturing it out of her. Should the player choose to help her, she'll sell a favor in a later level. Should the player torture her instead, she'll still sell the favor, except it will actually be an explosive trap. Abigail's not the forgiving type.
    • If you chose to ambush Campbell down in the basement when he is going to try and kill Curnow, but don't do it when he is clearly about to kill Curnow, Curnow will attack you. Even though you were trying to save his life, without knowledge that he was going to be killed, from his perspective Corvo, a wanted man and an assassin, just jumped down and attacked someone of high rank in front of him who, up to that point, was still technically an ally. If you want to save him and avoid fighting him, you need to wait till Campbell is about to kill Curnow, at which point he thanks you for saving him.
  • Dishonored 2:
    • The previous game's points regarding human vitality, taking on multiple enemies at once and the consequences of killing every enemy you come across all apply here, with the exception being that the rats are now replaced by parasitic flying insects.
    • It's mentioned several times that Emily and Corvo knew about Luca Abele's despotic regime, but were content to ignore it until it led to them getting deposed. As a result, a number of people consider them partly responsible for how bad the situation has become in Serkonos.
    • Near the end of a Low Chaos playthrough, Meagan Foster drops a huge bombshell about herself; she's actually Billie Lurk, one of the assassins who murdered Jessamine, aka Emily's mother/Corvo's lover. Despite Meagan being one of their staunchest allies, and whatever the player might want to do, neither Emily nor Corvo will take such a damning revelation well. At best they'll acknowledge that Meagan's changed since then, after making it very clear that they'll never forgive her. At worst they'll be openly disgusted with Meagan, and want nothing more to do with her from that point on. They can even murder her, and it'll be considered avenging Jessamine.
    • The Overseers' music boxes work like a charm on Outsider powers... but not on anything else. So when the Overseers march on Delilah, they get wiped out because the clockwork soldiers are machines, not sorcery.
  • Divekick features The Baz, a fighter who's special moves have him shock his opponent with electricity. Final Boss S-Kill flat out tells him that this is blatantly illegal, and his ending has him barred from any future Divekick tournaments because his electric powers ended up putting multiple divekickers in comas. This is implied to be a big reason why he's been kicked out of countless other fighting tournaments.
    The game is called "Divekick", not "Electrocute People".
  • In Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!'s "Lightning Look-Out", as in real life, it is a bad idea to be swimming during a thunderstorm, as you'll be shocked regardless of if the actual lightning bolt hits you while underwater.
  • Dragon Age II:
    • The Amell Family Shield is virtually worthless (at least, by the time you find it). Unlike the other examples, it doesn't appear in any quest, and seems to just be an excuse to let the player actually equip one of the numerous Amell family crests they will have seen hanging up all over the city.
    • An example that crosses over with Jerkass Genie and Be Careful What You Wish For: Xenon, the owner of the Black Emporium, once wished for eternal life. He got his wish, but it didn't do anything to stop his body aging because he never took that into account, and by the time you meet him, he's an ancient, immobile and unhinged corpse.
    • Playing Hawke as a mage gives you an opportunity to reveal as much to a group of Qunari Arvaarad-essentially the Qunari's "handlers" of mages and hunters of rogue mages. Being that the Qunari fear magic and only see mages as safe when they're restrained and under guard (and those who are separated from their handlers, even for a short time, are immediately killed on suspicion on being "corrupted") they react predictably to how one would think they'd react to a foreign, unbound mage standing right in front of them: They freak out and immediately attack.
  • Dragon Age: Origins:
    • The ending of the Dwarves Succession Crisis shows how not all situations are not as black and white as "appoint the Reasonable Authority Figure as king" like you might expect. Harrowmont is a good man who wants to do what is right, but he is also a firm traditionalist; he doesn't push to bring reforms to society because the status-quo is more important to him and the majority of the senate. So if he is appointed king, he ultimately fails as a king because he is a Slave to PR who wants to keep the senate on his side, causing the already Dying Race nature of the Dwarves to get worse. By contrast, while Belen is ruthless and honorless, especially if you are a Noble Dwarf background, his radical viewpoints and belief in the strength of common people are ultimately what Orzamar needed to get back on its feet, as the ending shows him making things better for the starving masses of casteless, as well as establishing much-needed relations with the surface.
    • Magic allows you to shoot lightning at people, raise the dead to work for you, or call down giant firestorms on your enemies... but is also feared and hated by most of the world, and performing magic without explicit permission from a major organization is outright illegal.
    • The Dwarf Noble origin notes that the old Aeducan family shield they find is crude by their current standards and only of symbolic value.
    • Alistair is beyond pissed if the player tries to forge a grand redemption arc for Teryn Loghain by inducting him into the Wardens. Alistair is unable to forgive or forget Loghain's atrocities and storms off, leaving the party permanently.
    • Helping the Dwarven priest build a church in Orzammar leads to its destruction and his death, since the atheistic dwarves are outraged by him spreading foreign beliefs. These events draw the attention of the Chantry which is said to be considering a holy war against the city following this.
    • In return for their aid during the blight the Dalish elves are given lands to settle. However tensions quickly arise with an independent elven state forming in the middle of Human lands. Things deteriorate faster if the Warden choose to ally with the werewolves, who are given those lands instead.
    • The most popular way to handle the Landsmeet is to name Alistair as king, due to him being the bastard son of the late King Maric, with or without having him marry Queen Anora. Another possible solution is for a male human noble player character to marry Anora himself and become a monarch. But if you make a comment about becoming "King," Anora will swiftly remind you that you'd be her prince consort and that she'd still be the one calling the shots.
  • Dragon Age: Inquisition:
    • The Ferelden Nobility were sympathetic towards the Mages with Arl Eamon even allowing the mages shelter in his estate of Redcliffe. But if you side with the mages, once you complete their recruitment quest, the monarch of Ferelden, which can be either Alastair or Anora, will personally arrive to tell the mages to leave the country because they abused the hospitality of the monarch and Arl Eamon, supported a Tevinter cult responsible for the murder of the Divine (Thedas' equivalent to the Pope) and expelled the Arl from his own estate.
      • There is no change based upon the above choice despite one crucial detail if Alastair is present in that scene - Fiona is his mother. She doesn't reveal the fact as he is unlikely to believe her, due to the lie she asked Maric to tell him.
    • Impersonating a Grey Warden is a very serious offense. You can lose Blackwall permanently as a result.
      • Two characters both show admiration for the Grey Wardens and believe them to be heroes who protect the weak and defenseless. It goes badly for both characters because their primary duty is to stop blights, not play heroes. Blackwall's is a major hint that he's lying right from the start as any Warden who invokes the right of conscription would use it not to train humble fishermen but to forcibly recruit new wardens from people who would be executed or killed otherwise. The other, while she is willing to seek out the Wardens to join, will end up dead unless the Inquisitor recruits her for themselves due to the Wardens being highly suspicious of them.
      • Related to the above, should the player use Blackwall's Grey Warden connections to obtain resources for the Inquisition, the people who provided the resources will demand reparations once Blackwall's duplicity is revealed, seeing as you pretty much committed fraud against them.
      • You can invoke this back on the people demanding reparations if you choose Cullen's option: Regardless of Blackwall's duplicity, those resources were needed against a threat by Darkspawn (albeit not a Blight/Archdemon-related Darkspawn) and since you are now allied with the remaining Grey Wardens (or exiled them and seized their holdings), the resources now rightfully belong to the Inquisition.
      Cullen: I'm sorry, did we embarrass a duchess at a soiree by stepping on her gown, or was the sky torn open and Haven beset by an ancient darkspawn magister? We needed the gold. We needed the men. You would have persuaded someone to part with them, with or without the treaties. We are not making reparations for doing what we had to do. What no one else could have done.
      • Another Grey Warden point; the Wardens are revealed to have effectively been tricked into summoning a demon army for the Big Bad. Is it any small wonder that some of your companions will call for you to exile them as a result of this?
    • Take a Third Option is not always the best decision. Out of the three possible candidates for Divine, Vivienne, being both pro-templar and a mage, is arguably the most controversial. Most characters with an opinion on her appointment are surprised at best and more than a little wary of her ambition and iron-fisted methods, and depending on what choices you make, she can kick off her rule by having the remaining rebelling mages mercilessly suppressed by the Templars.
    • Vivienne is initially presented as a possible romantic choice because of the option to flirt with her, but as revealed when you first meet her, she's already in a loving relationship with her lover Bastien. He dies from an illness, but you cannot attempt Comforting the Widow.
    • Being hailed as The Chosen One doesn't automatically mean you're The Hero - the first thing the Herald has to deal with is the Chantry declaring them and all those who support them as heretics.
      • People will be skeptical of your claim to being the Herald of Andraste if you're not a human. This is due to official teaching of the Chantry that humans, while still shunned by the Maker, were not nearly as shunned by other races, as well as being a mostly-human organization.
    • The Qunari Inquisitor, if they try to discuss what it means to be Qunari with The Iron Bull, will be coldly shot down - Bull states that the Inquisitor isn't a follower of the Qun so has no right to call themself a Qunari.
      • The Iron Bull, if declared Tal Vashoth, goes into a Heroic BSoD due to the teachings of the Qun saying that those who abandon the Qun are insane, which was the justification he used for killing deserters of the Qun. If he doesn't go insane then that means he killed a lot of innocent people.
      • Bull mentions that the Qunari are not fond of wearing shirts, given how much trouble it is to put one on when you have a large pair of horns growing out of your head.
    • One side quest has the Inquisitor collect pieces of an ancient sword and ask Dagna to reforge it, only for her to explain that you cannot remake a sword from its shards. She instead makes a new one using the collected pieces as inspiration.
    • The Revered Mothers of the Chantry are just old women - their most effective weapon is their unified voice and the Chant of Light. It's no wonder that Lord Seeker Lucius was able to completely shatter their illusion of power by assaulting one of them.
    • Trying to re-appropriate the culture of another civilization is highly offensive to those from the original culture, especially if you get it wrong. This is why Solas hates what the Dalish have become, especially when their Facial Markings, which they think is to honor the elvish gods, happen to be the equivalent of a Slave Brand.
    • According to Varric, Hawke had to go on the run after his game due to the events of the last chapter making him a scapegoat. Also the general corruption of the city alone was enough to have numerous calls for the city to be the target of an Exalted March even before the incident with the Qunari and an apostate committing a terrorist bombing of the local Chantry.note 
    • Related to the above, when Cassandra learns that Varric had lied to her about not knowing Hawke's whereabouts, she angrily confronts him over it. Varric asks her what she was expecting, given that she kidnapped him and interrogated him about the location of one of his closest friends.
    • As Dorian's backstory proves, even in a world where homophobia is nonexistent and being gay is seen as little more than a sexual quirk not unlike a fetish, it can still be problematic if you come from a culture that emphasizes strengthening and continuing your lineage. And of course, parents love to try to 'fix' their children - even if involves dangerous magical experiments. There's also the fact that living in a world without gay bars or Grindr means finding partners isn't easy.
      Cole: (reading Dorian's memories) Rilienus, skin tan like fine whiskey, cheekbones shaded, lips curl when he smiles. He would have said yes.
      Dorian: I'll...thank you not to do that again, please.
    • The most difficult way to end the Orlesian civil war is to gather enough blackmail fodder to force all three factions—sitting Empress Celene, her cousin Duke Gaspard, and elven spymaster Briala—to work together instead of playing out the Kingmaker Scenario. But despite seeming like it'd be the most rewarding option, it's actually the worst. According to the epilogue, once the main danger is past, they're on the verge of starting the civil war up all over again since none of the underlying issues are addressed. You can reunite former lovers Celene and Briala, which results in the best in-game rewards, long-term stability in Orlais, and more rights for the oppressed elves. However, you have to implicate Gaspard in plotting against Celene and let her sentence him to death, even though he's no more or less guilty than Briala, and backstory reveals that Celene isn't a stable relationship partner in the first place; you can't just give a bunch of sappy love letters and assume that all the serious relationship wounds have healed themselves. In all cases Briala can not take the throne herself because she is not royalty, so she has to rule through Gaspard or Celene, preventing her from fully reforming the system. In other words, to get the ending you want, you have to play The Grand Game.
    • A key plot point of the Trespasser DLC is that Ferelden and Orlais are unhappy about having an independent military organization like the Inquisition on their borders, with Ferelden calling the Inquisition out on some of their more controversial actions and wanting them disbanded, and Orlais wanting more control over the organization.
    • At the end of Trespasser, it's pointed out that an organization like the Inquisition will inevitably fall victim to internal corruption as it expands.
    • Relationships are a bit more realistic in that not every love interest is available to every player. In addition to gender preference, some characters have racial preferences as well, and party members' approval meters are invisible to the player and harder to manipulate. You can no longer shower them with gifts to make them like you, and you can't avoid disapproval by not bringing them on quests where you know they'll disagree with your actions, such as leaving Sera, who hates magic, at home when you do a quest supporting mages. It will get back to her. Bioware may have felt they were perpetuating "Nice Guy Syndrome" in previous games by implying that as long as you make all the right moves with your crush and tell them what they want to hear, they will mindlessly fall in love with you regardless of your personal traits. In reality, some people are just not into you.
    • There is no Blood Mage specialization for a mage Inquisitor, due to it being seen as inherently evil. In previous games, it was always the preferred spec for a purely-offensive playstyle, and storywise, no one was in a position to stop you. But in Inquisition, the player character is the leader of a religious organization tasked with keeping the peace across Thedas. The Inquisition depends on the goodwill of the public to function, and it's already controversial if the leader is a mage (especially one that isn't human). There is no way the Inquisitor can get away with openly practicing blood magic without losing crucial support. Necromancy is tolerated - just barely - by being a Nevarran cultural practice which is actually shamanism under a morbid name rather than raising the dead, but blood magic is right out.
  • Dragon Ball Heroes is mostly a card game type video game so there is little story aspect, but the first few animated openings for it show some of this with the point of view character. He's initially excited about being sucked into the world of Dragon Ball, but although he does come in as a Saiyan, he's still a child with no grasp of how to use the powers a normal character in that universe would. In the very first opening, he tries to attack Cell, and gets easily beaten back and does no damage since he has no idea how to use his powers. Slowly over the openings, he can be seen getting a bit stronger, but it takes him a while to unlock the Super Saiyan form, and he generally can't stand up to most villains because of his inexperience until way later.
  • Dungeons Of Dredmor plays several tropes to their natural conclusions for humor. For example:
    • Extremely powerful books on cloud magic will barely even assist you inside the dungeon, because there's no windows at all and you're underground.
    • Mana is restored through drinking booze. As a result, the Age of Wizardry came to an end due to the great wizards all succumbing to alcoholism and its complications like belligerent colleagues and dwindling funds for and quality of booze.
    • Several double-weapons like the Double-Quarterstaff and the Dire Halberd are actually rather terrible, because the sheer difficulty of handling them makes them rather useless in actual combat.
    • Heavier, more protective helmets tend to obstruct your vision, reducing your viewing distance as a result.
    • The "Water Supply Fluoridation" debuff is in there as a Doctor Strangelove reference, and your bodily fluids are sapped, but the tooltip helpfully remarks it also did what it actually does and strengthened your teeth, buffing your resistance just slightly.
  • Dwarf Fortress:
    • The huge material properties overhaul resulted in a few of these, as a simple damage multiplier for each metal was replaced with actual stats for tensile strength, shear and compressive yields and so forth. Adamantine turned out to be incredibly strong and lightweight, making for excellent edged weapons like swords, but when players forged blunt weapons like warhammers and maces from it, the results were disappointing.
    • You planning on subverting that river into your base for a fresh water supply? Water carries motion still, so without proper planning you might just flood your base. See that awesome battle on a mountaintop, with people fighting and dodging? Well, one combatant just dodged off a cliff, and is now plummeting to his death. Despite the odd, and often fun, physics of the game, sometimes it will start behaving realistically enough for you to realize that you've just screwed up.
    • The mechanics behind that most insidious of threats, the Catsplosionnote  seems pretty ridiculous. But think about it for a second; how would you feel if someone killed your pet, even for "the greater good"?
    • The Dwarven Economy was a dire case of Artistic License – Economics, but that's not what lands it here. Getting the economy to "work" required minting hundreds, possibly thousands of coins. All of which were treated as unique objects, tracked individually and each with their own crafting level and description. Modern (2019) computers would struggle with that, hardware at the time was inevitable brought to a crawl. That was the main reason it was Dummied Out and ultimately nixed completely.
    • The update that fixed the Bonsai Forest problem, instead giving out huge trees that yielded multiple logs, also showed one of the problems with the aversion of this trope; namely, that a giant tree's collapse can and will injure anyone it falls on, including the woodcutter if he's standing in the wrong spot. Don't give woodcutters pets if you don't want a tragedy, and remember: Accidents happen.
    The oak wood log strikes the woodcutter in the right foot and the injured part explodes into gore!
  • One of the many endings available in Duck Season revolves entirely around this trope. Upon discovering that he's being stalked by a menacing figure who knows where he lives - in a neighborhood recently struck by a spate of serial killings - the player character can respond by simply calling the police and telling them what they just saw. Police are Useless is completely averted in this case, and they deal with the situation decisively.
  • Many of the cutscenes in Dynasty Warriors 7 invoke this with Annoying Arrows. In one scene, Pang Tong succumbs to a wound that resulted from taking an arrow intended for Liu Bei, Zhou Yu dies in a similar fashion, and another cutscene has the famous Eye Scream scene with Xiahou Dun (at least as much as can be shown in a T-rated game). To say nothing of Wu.
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  • The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim:
    • Using Dragon Shouts in a city or town will result in a guard asking you to stop. Magic or not, those shouts are awfully loud, and some of them can cause a lot of collateral damage, so of course it would make the locals nervous. On the other hand, when pressed, the guard will admit that there's not actually a law against it since there's only a handful of Tongues in the world, who generally don't leave their monastery, and of course using Shouts outs you as the Dragonborn. But they'll still ask you to knock it off.
    • If the Dragonborn already has a bounty on them in Whiterun when they try to enter the city for the first time, the Guard will try to arrest them, since a known criminal just walked up to them.
    • The Vigilants of Stendarr are a sect of Church Militants that aggressively hunt the daedra and other supernatural beings. Walking up to them while carrying a daedric artifact, or while wearing full daedric armor, will cause trouble.
    • Realizing he's lost, Alduin decides The Battle Didn't Count and retreats. While he plays it off as inconsequential, his followers, staunch believers in Ass Kicking Equals Authority, are none to pleased that their leader ran from a fight his opponent rightfully won, making quite a few question his authority and right to lead.
    • The Big Bad of the Dawnguard DLC plans to block out the sun, in order to allow the vampires to dominate Tamriel. It's pointed out that, while such a plan would give the vampires a huge advantage over the mortal races at first, it would eventually lead to their doom, as practically everything else on the planet - including the vampires' prey and their sources of food - needs sunlight to survive. It's also mentioned that the danger from such a scheme would likely force an Enemy Mine between the Empire, the Stormcloaks, and perhaps even the Aldmeri Dominion.
    • Also from Dawnguard, the aforementioned Vigilants of Stendaar try to go after the Volkihar Vampires, a clan directly created by Molag Bal and thus much stronger than the feral vampires around Skyrim. They not only get massacred in the field, but the Volkihars lead a counterattack on their HQ that completely wipes the order out. For all their preachiness on cleansing daedric corruption, they were a group that only killed feral vampires, daedric cults which at best are six members strong, and the occasional Werewolf, so they were completely caught off-guard by an organized counterattack from a large force.
    • In the Dragonborn DLC, cultists approach the Dragonborn in a public (and possibly well-guarded) place, and proceed to taunt and attack them. I think you can figure out what happens next.
    • The Dwarven Crossbow has the highest base damage of any ranged weapon in the game. This is because it uses the same pulley system as modern-day compound crossbows, making it mechanically superior to even the highest-end standard bows.
    • Being locked in prison for an extended amount of time will lower the Dragonborn's skill scores, or at least their progress towards their next skill increase. This shows how out of practice they have become from prolonged incarceration.
    • Committing a crime will have immediate consequences. No matter how unpopular your victim is, you will still be attacked by guards or civilians for being a threat to their community.
      • The Dawnguard DLC takes this one step further, the player can receive side quests to assassinate a specific vampire, who is hidden in one of the major cities. Normally, you'd just kill the vampire without question, but the non-hostile vampire is in a public place with no visible or proven evidence of vampirism on your part. If you just attack the target, all city guards will immediately turn hostile and attack the player. To them, you've just murdered someone in cold blood and have become a threat to their city. The only reason the player can tell which person is the target of the quest is that the player character's nature as the Dragonborn lets them see a vampire's Glowing Eyes of Doom... but nobody else can see this, so it's not admissible evidence by any standard.
    • Arguably the entire point of the Frostfall Game Mod. It adds immersive wilderness and cold weather survival mechanics to the hostile wilds of Skyrim. If you go out in a blizzard, you will probably get frostbite and die unless you are well covered up. You can light a fire to warm up, but you also need a tent to trap the heat; a fire in the middle of a snowfield will do little to help. If you drink alcohol your vision will turn hazy and you'll start to stumble, and if you keep chugging you are liable to pass out. Fresh meat, fruit and vegetables will spoil if you leave them in your inventory for too long, and salted meat will never spoil but eating it will make you thirsty.
  • In Fable II:
    • You can shoot the villain as he is doing his Motive Rant. If you hesitate, one of your companions (Token Evil Teammate Reaver) will pull the trigger.
    • In one of the weapons' descriptions, a marksman named Wicker challenged Reaver to a duel. Reaver simply shot him in the head.
  • Fallout:
    • Hitting a woman in the groin hurts them every bit as much as it does with a guy.
    • You can actually try to talk the Big Bad down from his evil plan at the end without fighting him, but it won't work if you go about it by trying to convince him his plan is evil. As far as he's concerned he's already doing the right thing by turning people into mutants because it's the only way to unify the wasteland, so he'll just brush you off as yet another obstacle to progress. To succeed in talking him down, you have to find out that his Super Mutants are all sterile so his planned "unified humanity" will die out within a generation. He'll accuse you of lying to him, so you need to counter by asking him if any of his mutants have had kids, at which point the penny finally drops.
    • If you convince the water merchants to sell water to the Vault, then congratulations, you've made it easier for the Super Mutants to find it, giving you less time to deal with them. Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!
    • If your Intelligence is 3 or less, you play as a bona-fide Idiot Hero with altered "dumbspeak" dialogue options. You'll be locked out of a lot of side-quests because most people won't even give you the time of day, nevermind ask you for your help. Why on earth would anyone trust their dangerous/important tasks to someone who is obviously brain-damaged in such a dangerous world? Plus, you'll probably end up screwing over a lot of people in your poorly thought out attempts to "help" them.
  • Fallout 3:
    • The first villain you encounter is the Overseer of the Vault you start in. You might think you could just kill him, but doing him in will cause his daughter and your friend Amata to angrily confront you about murdering her father- a completely justifiable reaction if your friend killed your parents.
    • Colonel Autumn learns just what happens when you stand, pretty much unarmored, less than ten feet in front of someone in a fire fight. It'd be hard to find a player who didn't just turn on VATS and shoot him in the head repeatedly.
    • The core game also ends with the player activating Project Purity and fulfilling their father's dream of supplying clean water to the entire Capital Wasteland. Then Broken Steel came along, acting as a Playable Epilogue, and if the player visits Project Purity they'll find that said dream isn't quite as glamorous as James made it out to be, as somebody has to deal with all the bureaucracy and paperwork that comes with running a massive water distribution network, and they're not happy about it.
    • It gets even worse if you proceed to activating Project Impurity. Anyone with even the slightest hint of radiation exposure is targeted by the modified FEV - i.e. anyone who's ever set foot outside of a Vault. You can even kill yourself in Broken Steel after activating Project Impurity by simply drinking three Aqua Puras.
    • Double-pointer with the ghoul Roy Phillips. He is one of the biggest assholes in the series, plotting to slaughter the inhabitants of Tenpenny Tower so he and his band of ghouls can move in (which he justifies by them being racist assholes, even though just being around him for 5 minutes makes it clear that he's no better than they are), and even working out a peaceful solution in which the ghouls can live in the tower without bloodshed will still lead to Roy killing the humans at the first provocation. Sometimes, there are just some people that absolutely cannot be swayed from their mindset or personal beliefs.
    • But unfortunately, unlike every other evil character in the game, killing Roy will award you negative karma, because the popular radio DJ Three Dog is absolutely convinced that Roy is the real victim in this scenario, making him a Villain with Good Publicity. Even if journalists are ethical and committed to reporting the truth, sometimes they get the facts wrong. You kill Roy and get caught, Three Dog will treat it like a cold-blooded racist murder and broadcast your "crime" across the Capital Wasteland. The only way to avoid bloodshed is to negotiate an agreement between the two sides, and then assassinate Roy without being caught - with his influence removed, the other ghouls will settle down in peace.
    • The Superhuman Gambit deconstructs the superhero genre, Canterbury Commons is the battleground between 2 characters, The Ant Agonizer and The Mechanist, who have been fighting each other for months with mutant ants and robots and every adult in town has gotten sick of this. They found it funny the first time (since they were just fighting ants) but are now annoyed by the constant attacks and want you to do something about it.
  • Fallout: New Vegas
    • One side-quest given to the player by Alice McLafferty involves stopping the production of more caps being made at the Sunset Sarsaparilla headquarters located outside of New Vegas. If asked why, she explains that because caps are the primary currency used in the Wasteland, having a machine that just simply creates more caps without any regulation is essentially the same as counterfeiting money; left unaddressed, it will cause a devaluing of caps as a currency and threatens to hurt business for anyone who uses caps.
    • The human wave tactics utilized by Caesar's Legion had proven effective in the past against tribals with similar close-combat weapons as themselves. Then the First Battle of Hoover Dam showed the Legion exactly what happens when you use human wave tactics against a more modern-styled entrenched army with automatic weapons and explosives.
    • The NCR might be the strongest faction of the Mojave, but they still have to move men and resources to the area from their home territory. Naturally this means the military force in the Mojave is so spread out that the Legion can send small strike teams deep into NCR territory without much resistance, and Raider groups can form quickly because the NCR can't police the areas enough to get rid of them for good. This also means towns under the NCR's banner have grown disgruntled about being tax-paying citizens that don't get anything in return for doing so, especially when their towns get attacked.
    • The conflict between the NCR and the Great Khans was a curbstomp in the NCR's favor because of this trope, nearly wiping out the Great Khans in the process. The Great Khans, an openly hostile raider group, was deliberately harassing the NCR for petty reasons. Naturally this incurred the wrath of the NCR to fight back, which nearly spelled total doom for the raider group. The NCR is a cohesive military force with well trained soldiers and supply lines, while the Great Khans are just a group of raiders sticking together with whatever they can find in the Mojave.
    • In relation, the Bitter Springs Massacre. The Great Khans attempted to hold-up in a canyon area to hold off the NCR. When it was clear the NCR would be victorious, the Khans tried to move their non-combatants safely away, which ended with them being gunned down by the NCR. Not only did the Great Khans not attempt to warn the NCR that they were going to do so, the NCR had no way of knowing the non-combatants were even not a threat during the middle of an intense fight between the two. As for the NCR, when they did realize what was going on, it was too late. Without lines of communication set up like phones or some manner of telecommunication, the soldiers and leaders had no way of communicating information quickly enough.
    • Having a technological advantage, even a large one, won't matter much if you're facing a numerically superior force, as the Mojave chapter of the Brotherhood of Steel trying to hold the HELIOS One Solar Power Plant found out when they ended up nearly getting completely wiped out by the NCR. The only reason the NCR avert this is because they actually provide both numbers and good equipment, meaning that they can trade blows with the Brotherhood, while the Brotherhood cannot with their limited numbers. Also, it's a really, REALLY bad idea to appoint a scientist with absolutely no knowledge of military tactics whatsoever and who cares for nothing other than obtaining his prize no matter how many of his soldiers he has to sacrifice to do it as the leader of your faction.
    • Having a nation run by a single person isn't new, but making yourself the sole defining trait that unifies your people together will result in things falling apart when you eventually die. As smart as Caesar is, because he formed a Cult of Personality around himself and is setup to be seen as a god among men, it meant that should he somehow die, the Legion will fall apart because he was the only thing holding it together to begin with. If you kill him, pretty much everyone agrees that the Legion will break even with Lanius as their leader because Lanius simply lacks that power to keep them united. You can actually point this out to Lanius if you sided with the NCR, letting him know the Legion is doomed to fail after they lose Hoover Dam and that winning doesn't mean anything.
    • On the flipside however, the game defies Decapitated Army with the Legion. You killed Caesar? You made sure that in the long term the Legion will fall apart, but at the present the Legion is still too big of a force to simply keel over without him. Just killing the leader doesn't mean the army will automatically give up and surrender, if anything it drives them to war more because now they have a personal reason to fight.
    • The origin of Cannibal Johnson's nickname. One day he was attacked and surrounded by a group of raiders, out of desperation, he decided to take a bite out of a raider's heart. This shock tactic actually horrified and disgusted the raiders into retreating, he was able to kill the rest and the nickname stuck. Videogame mechanics aside, nobody can win a fight against a group of psychopaths on their own. You have to think smart and fast to survive. Dignity and honour is myth when your survival is on the line.
    • If you win too many times at the casino, they will ban you from playing there. Not only because they can't afford to keep paying you; the other reason is because nobody is that lucky, and they will ban you under the assumption that you're cheating.
    • The death of Doc Mitchell's wife, who died from a new disease in Goodsprings. If a population hides itself away in an enclosed environment like a Vault for hundreds of years, without having to adapt to the new ecosystem, their bodies won't develop a natural immunity to new diseases and would leave you naturally vulnerable to new, enhanced, and possibly incurable diseases.
  • Fallout 4:
    • Using Stealth Boys or legendary armor with the Chameleon effect turns the player character invisible, along with anything they're holding. Good luck trying to aim with transparent gun sights.
    • To get people to join your settlements, you have to set up radio beacons broadcasting invitations and signals that they can follow to reach their new home. You know who else can listen to those signals? Raiders, Gunners and Super Mutants looking for a new target.
    • The Commonwealth Minutemen are a militia group pledged to each others' mutual defense, not a formal army or government, and their weak command structure almost led to the group's extinction. Losing their headquarters of the Castle, its radio tower, and their best leader all at once meant that members stopped supporting each other, so when a band of hostile mercenaries attacked one settlement, not enough people came to its defense to fend them off. After being massacred by Gunners, mirelurks and ghouls, by the start of the story there is only one remaining active Minuteman in the entire Commonwealth. Most wastelanders admire their intentions but thought their end was stupid, and are reluctant to entrust the safety of their settlements to them again.
    • The Brotherhood of Steel are operating in the Commonwealth from their huge, slow-moving zeppelin, the Prydwen. The Minutemen can build artillery batteries in their allied settlements, all over the Commonwealth. If the latter go to war with the former, one sudden barrage will wipe out most of the Brotherhood in a cataclysmic fireball.
    • The Railroad is actively battling the Institute, but has little support from the rest of the Commonwealth. That's because the Railroad is focused on liberating Synths, which most people view with fear and suspicion due to the Institute's use of them as infiltrators. Deacon, a Railroad agent, will express his frustration that his group doesn't do more work helping ordinary humans, since it would build goodwill, give them access to more resources, and help them sell their message of synth/human coexistence. As the Railroad doesn't have the same power of authority as the Brotherhood or Institute does, the Commonwealth is essentially back to square one unless you ponied up in the Minutemen and developed your settlements.
      • The Railroad ending also shows what happens when you deviate from an established plan and lock someone out of the loop, even for their own safety: Liam Binet, who had been assisting synths escape from the Institute but was intentionally not informed of his own involvement with the Railroad or any of their plans, is devastated and severely pissed when the Railroad puts their final plans in motion that results in the Institute getting destroyed, and ends up giving a massive "The Reason You Suck" Speech to the Railroad before killing himself. Fairly understandable, considering they kept him completely in the dark and just killed everyone he ever knew and loved in the name of freeing synths. Desdemona is deeply ashamed by this, because she knew that Bidet was right; the Railroad just wiped out not just a family, but arguably an entire community in the name of freeing synths, something that seriously does bring to light that the Railroad cares more about synths than actual humans.
    • The Railroad's secret password to access their hidden underground base is Railroad. The player character can point out to the Railroad's leaders how bad that password is, for them to counter that most wastelanders don't know how to spell. This is a post-apocalyptic setting with no public education, remember? That said, the Brotherhood of Steel has Scribes who are extremely erudite and therefore do figure it out and storm the lair.
    • If the player sides with the Institute, they can become its new Director... and still have only minimal control over its operations. After all, Father gave you the position without consulting the other department heads, and you're some unknown actor who walked out of the wasteland, not a fellow scientist who worked their way through the ranks normally.
    • Siding with the Brotherhood of Steel gives a rather unhealthy dose of reality, especially for those who played Fallout 3. Without Owyn and Sarah Lyons' influences, the Brotherhood's interests in helping the Wasteland community has pretty much dwindled to almost zero and they're returned to their quasi-feudalistic and religious ways reminiscent of the West Coast Brotherhood. Because of this, should you destroy the Institute with their help and establish them as the dominant power, they pretty much subjugate the Commonwealth and declare martial law, sending heavily-armed patrols out to exterminate synths and "negotiate" for needed resources. Needless to say, many of the Commonwealth's citizens, while relieved to be rid of the Institute's threat, are unsure if the Brotherhood's authoritarian ways are a better or worse solution.
    • The Wreck of the FMS Northern Star shows the sad reality of the Language Barrier. The raiders here are Norwegian so nobody speaks English and the game doesn't provide any translation for what they're saying. So they are actually defending themselves from you because you didn't understand their warnings. All these raiders are also ghouls, they've been around before the bombs and their paranoia is more than warranted.
    • Sometimes the enemies will react with horror when they see the Sole Survivor kill one of their own, enemies or not, they were still part of a clan who regularly fought together to survive the unforgiving wasteland. On the other hand, they are still callous psychopaths who will react to death with indifference. As shown by Hardware Town when one raider kills another one for talking too much.
  • Fallout 76:
    • There are a variety of ways in which you can contract deadly diseases. A few examples include getting bitten by infected animals, eating uncooked or spoiled food, drinking water that hasn't been filtered or boiled first, and sleeping in beds that are low on the ground or exposed to the elements.
    • An additional danger to water is the fact that, with the game taking place very soon after the war, the water is much more irradiated, so you run increased risks of radiation sickness from both drinking and swimming in water.
    • Food spoils if left uneaten in your inventory for too long. If you keep it in a refrigerator, it will stay edible.
    • Unlike in Fallout 4, cooking food will not eliminate radiation. It does make it safer to eat by eliminating disease, but radiation isn't something that you can cook out of food. Same deal with boiling water.
    • Because there are no NPCs outside of a small handful of peaceful robots, there are very few ways to earn caps, and just as few ways to spend them on items. To succeed in this game, you will need to not only complete quests for rewards, but learn survival skills, such as repairing your equipment and living off the land.
    • The survivors in Appalachia had more than enough resources between them to fight off the Scorched, with the Responders' vaccines, the Brotherhood of Steel's technology, the Free States' early detection systems, and so forth. Unfortunately, the various factions of the region would not learn to trust one another. The Brotherhood found this out the hard way when they tried to request the Responders' aid against the Scorched, only to be snubbed as a result of the Brotherhood's bullying the Responders for tech. As a result, the Scorched spread through the region until nearly all human life was wiped out.
    • The Order of Mysteries was run by Shannon Rivers who is a washed up former actress who never ran any organization her entire life. Sure, she develops a “rank” system predicated on skills learned, missions completed and mentorship of younger girls by older girls, but her lack of organizational leadership leaves her blind to a deep-seated morale problem in her daughter Olivia, and is caught off guard when mission failures and casualties rack up. She never ever suspects betrayal and compromise and is flummoxed when Olivia betrays her. And then Olivia gets her own dose of hard reality when the raider gang she betrayed her mother to, turns around and kills her.
  • Far Cry 3: The protagonist, Jason Brody, is just a regular, directionless guy who will inevitably panic when he kills a man for the first time, in self-defense or not.
  • Far Cry 4: At the start of the game, Pagan Min asks you to wait for a bit as he takes care of some business. The game expects you to leave the table and start the plot. If you do wait for a bit (around fifteen minutes)... he comes back and resolves the business he invited you for, which actually leads to an alternate ending of the game.
  • Racing game Fatal Inertia has the Time Dilator power-up, that slows time around you while leaving your craft immune, adding up to a few seconds of enemies stuck the wrong side of Bullet Time while you surge ahead at normal speed. However, the way the powerup works in-universe means outside observers see everything still moving at normal speed, and the device's user suddenly going at several times their previous velocity. One of these outside observers is physics. So much as glance off a solid obstacle and one suddenly finds out where the title comes from.
  • Final Fantasy Tactics ends on a Bittersweet Ending where Ramza defeats Ultima, meaning the Church is more or less depowered, and the world is free from the Lucaiv's threat, but Ramza goes down in history as a Heretic and a traitor to his house. Ramza's actions occurred during a massive world war like conflict, meaning the crowning of Delita as king overshadows much of the events that occurred. With nobody able to vouch for Ramza in a influential way, he goes down as a Historical Villain Upgrade instead of The Hero.
  • Final Fantasy IV opens with Cecil attacking the city of Mysidia to take the crystal under orders from the King of Baron, an act Cecil feels immense guilt for doing. A few hours into the game later, Cecil washes onto the shores of Mysidia and approaches the city to ask for help. The people of Mysidia all promptly call him out for attacking them at the start of the game and make it clear he is not welcome in the city, and the only reason he is allowed in is because the city's Elder is willing to listen and give Cecil a chance for redemption. Shortly after, Cecil braves Mt Ordeals and goes from a Dark Knight to a Paladin to complete his redemption. His traveling companions Palom and Porom then reveal the real reason they joined for this trip; the village Elder wanted them to spy on Cecil to make sure he did actually try to redeem himself. Just because you feel immense guilt and want to redeem yourself doesn't mean your victims will agree or listen, and those who do have every right to be doubtful of you for doing so.
  • Infamously, when Aerith is murdered by Sephiroth in Final Fantasy VII there are no theatrics to it at all. No Hopeless Boss Fight, no Heads I Win, Tails You Lose, and no chance for Aerith or Cloud to react; Sephiroth just ambushes her while she's alone with Cloud in the middle of the night and impales her through the heart with his Masamune, killing her almost instantly.
  • Final Fantasy VIII
    • During the SeeD exam early on, Seifer ignores orders and runs off to do what he wants, namely going into a radio tower held by the enemy. After the mission ends, Seifer is thoroughly punished and reprimanded by the people overseeing their exam for not only disobeying orders, but for putting the lives of his fellow students (who he was supposed to be acting as the leader of during the mission) in danger to satisfy his own pride. He promptly is passed over for graduation because of this, while the others who did follow their orders graduate. They are a school for mercenaries after all. This also causes Quistis to be demoted from her teaching position back down to a regular SeeD agent, because from the school's perspective, Seifer's failure was her fault as his instructor. Doesn't matter that Seifer did it on his own, Quistis is responsible for her students' successes and failures.
    • While the player can't mess up the exam as badly as Seifer did, Squall, Zell and Selphie are still being monitored and ranked based on their performance. They're supposed to be professional mercenaries, so running from fights, ignoring the squad leader's orders, talking to non-mission critical people, and taking risky shortcuts all deducts points, and ducking into a hotel to escape the spider mech chasing you at the end in particular causes a massive point drop since you just put a ton of civilians in danger. Notably, though, while Seifer fails the exam because he ran off to the radio tower against orders, Squall and Zell still make the cut even though they went with him, because they were following his orders, so the burden of responsibility isn't on them.
    • Violently dealing with a political figure is not an easy task. In spite of Rinoa's admittedly rather smart plan to take President Deling hostage on the train, the simple presence of a body double made all that effort go to waste and made the Timber Owls look like chumps, while also putting Timber on high security. Seifer dragging Deling off at blade-tip on a live broadcast causes an international incident and (alleged) execution offscreen when Balamb Garden throws him under the bus to escape immediate reprisal. The assassination attempt on Edea a few hours later fails spectacularly for the sole reason that Irving chokes his shot at exactly the wrong moment when he tried to snipe her and allows her time to put up a barrier. As a result of the failed attempt and the fact the assassination party was made of SeeDs from all three Gardens results in Edea declaring war on the Gardens, Galbadia Garden throws the other two under the bus (Irving wasn't caught, so they could claim deniability) and sides with Edea while Balamb and Trabia Garden are bombarded with missiles (Balamb escapes due to circumstances, Trabia suffers a direct hit with massive loss of life).
  • Final Fantasy X.
    • What, you thought you'd just waltz into the most sacred place in the city after being declared a traitor, and walk back out of there without getting captured?
    • Tidus' reaction to most of Spira's quirks are fairly realistic of a response. When told why the Summoner cannot receive help from anyone while praying to the Fayth, he pretty bluntly asks why and refuses to sit back, deciding to help because it doesn't make sense why. Later when he learns the Awful Truth about Summoners - that they die defeating Sin - he is horrified by the revelation, realizing he was talking to Yuna about all the things they could do once Sin is defeated, unaware she wouldn't be there if they did defeat Sin. He also reacts fairly realistically when he learns that Jecht is Sin; he gets angry at Auron for dragging him to Spira and then dropping such a reveal on him, and, for a short time, is heavily upset at it, going so far as to even somewhat deny it for a bit before accepting it.
    • Wakka, who was a devout believer in Yevon, goes through a Crisis of Faith after learning that Seymour killed his father and the group fights him. Unlike in most works of fiction where a character going through a Crisis of Faith typically resolves themselves to turning against their beliefs quickly, Wakka remains conflicted for pretty much the rest of the game. Having grown up his whole life being taught Yevon's teachings, he struggles with what to do because it was all he knew and believed in. Also, Wakka's hatred for the Al Bhed doesn't automatically go away either; Wakka has to re-evaluate his beliefs over the course of the game to fully let go of it.
  • Final Fantasy X-2
    • After a millennia of forced Medieval Stasis, Spira's freedom from Yevon's oppressive Machina ban causes the world to change drastically in just the small time skip between the two games. Formerly untamed wildernesses like the Calm Lands, and religious sites like Zanarkand have turned into flat out tourist attractions, augmenting technology into combat has forced off most wild beasts, leaving formerly endgame zones safe at best, and the fiends that do show up are very low-level. The thunder plains in particular, for what a pain to navigate they used to be, has turned the lightning storms into a non-issue with machina-augmented lightning rods laid out across the entire road.
    • Since Summoners relied on Aeons and the teachings of Yevon, when the truth came out and Yevon was overthrown, Summoners became obsolete and thus anyone who was training to be one, or was one, were forced to suddenly change their entire lives quickly. Several Summons in-game admit to having no idea what to do and thus are conflicted on their life choices. This also means that Fiends have become more dangerous as without Summoners, as they were the only ones capable of preventing pyreflies from becoming Fiends.
    • Politics have also shifted, after it was revealed that Yevonism was both hypocritical and led by ghosts upholding an Ancient Conspiracy, Yuna told the entire story to the world. As a result, not even the most staunch followers of Yevon stayed loyal, instead creating a "New Yevon" religion who keeps to the positive morals of the old religion, while preaching for conservatively giving machines to the world, and the Youth League who thinks that since most of Yevon was lies, they don't deserve the time of day for redemption and want to tear down as many walls as possible to augment the world with machines, and the Al Bhed, who have centuries of persecution from Yevon behind them for their use of Machina, naturally sides with the League. When the two factions go to war, the story angles towards the Youth League being the "right" faction, as while neither is technically in the right and both are at fault for tensions getting so high, siding with a church that has risk slipping back into their old corrupt ways is considered the worse option of the two. Showing New Yevon any favoritism at all locks you out of the game's Golden Ending.
    • The Guado and the Ronso are both feeling extreme tension towards one another at the start of the game due to Seymour's actions. Seymour massacred a ton of their race as well as their Maester when the party went to climb mount Gagazet to reach Zanarkand in the first game, and as the official leader of the Guado as a whole, his psychopathy made everyone else look at the Guado with suspicion at best and hatred at worst, not helped that some Guado continue to revere Seymour, even if they admit that he was misguided and what he did was awful. If the party doesn't talk the Ronso down, this leads to tensions boiling over to a race war that it's implied leads to the extinction of the Guado.
    • As the one who defeated Sin for good, Yuna is beloved by the people and many see her as a rallying figure, which results in all the major factions wanting her to ally with them because it will make their side look more legitimate to the rest of the world. As a result, when Yuna finds a potentially important sphere and has to choose who gets it, it results in one side getting what they want, but the other factions become openly hostile because someone like Yuna can't just make choices freely when she carries so much weight in the world.
  • The Final Battle in Final Fantasy XII. Once it's done, everyone gazes thoughtfully at the sky to contemplate the villain's death and the implications of victory (and, in Fran and Balthier's case, to do a fist-pound) Then a destroyed fighter crashes in front of them because the two airship fleets have naturally been focused on the enemy ships, not tiny people running around on a stationary object, and don't magically know that they can stop shooting. Cue the heroes' frantic scramble to announce a ceasefire before any more lives are lost.
  • As a world that enjoys a bit of realism, Final Fantasy XIV has no small shortage of examples.
    • The guildmaster of the Leatherworker's Guild, Geva, is a Caustic Critic who believes in constantly belittling even the best leatherworker's accomplishments as a way of rallying them, except she doesn't make nearly the attempt to rally them alongside her insults. As a result, at the midway point of their original storyline over half the guild quits to get away from her abusive mentorship, leaving her to run herself to exhaustion trying to fill in an impossible amount of backlogged orders. Thankfully she learns her lesson from this... sort of. Being hostile is just who she is, so while she doesn't get kinder, she does get some more sense about giving proper praise where it's due.
    • A Realm Reborn shows that while ultimately Bahamut was stopped, it doesn't mean the world is simply back to how it was. All the major city-states are damaged and the people are not living in the best of situations because of the apocalyptic events that occurred only a few years beforehand. Several areas have had their entire weather regions changed, such as Ishgard and the Coerthas going from grassy landscapes to snow and ice covered rocky landscapes, and the Mor Dhona area, being the spot where the two largest events in Legacy occurred, is now barren with crystals everywhere. The main story of ARR deals with how the world is trying to recover from the damage of the events, but ultimately struggling to do so because of how much damage was down by Bahamut's awakening. Also, the Eorzean Alliance that allied to stop it? They somewhat fall apart because they have too much on their hands to work out and don't have the resources or manpower to help each other out, it isn't until the Scions step in and help that they reforge the alliance.
    • In the Stormblood Astrologian quests, it's shown that there's a strong demand for geomancers in Kugane, as the local businesses consider their divinations to be essential to success. Unfortunately, this also means that there's no shortage of fraudsters willing to play on the general population's ignorance, aided by a general attitude of "buyer beware" and lack of regulatory authority. And, as Kyokuho discovers the hard way, it's all too easy for a genuine and honest geomancer to be branded a fraud.
    • The Ishgardians have spent almost their entire history as a nation fighting dragons, so when they have to face threats that aren't dragons, they do poorly because they aren't equipped to fight against it properly, which is why the Heretics begin to become a massive issue in the lead up to the Heavensward expansion, especially when Iceheart gives them a unified leader. Furthermore, in Heavensward itself, after Aymeric pushes to end the war between Ishgard and the benevolent groups of dragons, the people are heavily resistant to peace, and some even try to sabotage the proceedings because fighting dragons is all they have. Aymeric has to set up a war game between Ishgard and the other three city-states to try to prove that fighting dragons isn't the only thing that can bring them national pride.
    • Magic being in play doesn't make wounds any less serious. Resurrective magics are more like magical defibrilators instead of putting a dead soul back into a body and even healing spells have limits to what they can do. The Conjurer's guild delves heavily into this, and Haurchefant, Moenbryda, Conrad and multiple others all die decisively because they suffered wounds too immediately-lethal or severe for healing magic to save them, and several characters spend chunks of the story Put on a Bus because they suffer injuries that are too deep for the quick patch-job that magical healing can do, and need to spend time in proper hospitals under doctor care. Moreover, injuries and the like still leave after-effects on several occasions, such as with Radovan, the Gunbreaker job trainer, whose body seizes up in paralysis several times because he'd been on the receiving end of Electric Torture at a Garlean prison for years before escaping.
    • The Warrior of Light has reality strike them every now and then as well. Sometimes their allies will outright force them to take a rest, because god-slaying walking armageddon or not, they're still only mortal and have mortal limits, those limits are just a bit higher than a normal person's. They're also not immune to poisons or drugs, which results in at least one scenario where you get laid out because of a spiked drink.
    • In a solo instance, Krile, who is of the Lalafell race, gets grabbed by a magitek deathclaw (basically a giant metal steampunk hand) and you have to break her out of it. Once freed, she ends up spending the rest of the duty and questline having to sit out and recover, because while the claws were made for restraint, they were made for restraining larger races, so it nearly ended up crushing her smaller frame.
    • The "Return To Ivalice" raid shows that when the people of Rabanastre saw their brothers in Doma and Ala Mhigo rise up and reclaim their home from the rule of the Garleans, they too rose up in defiance. However, while the Domans and Ala Mhigans succeeded because they had the Eorzean Alliance to assist them and the Garleans ruling their lands were either incompetent, or were essentially left to their own devices due to various factors, the Rabanastre people were not so lucky, and so when they rebelled against Garleans, they were defeated easily because they simply lacked resources or mainpower to take on a more focused military force. Even when they used auracite to even the odds, the demonic beings inside the auracite then used their wielders to bring ruin to both sides. When you arrive in Rabanastre, its clear that the people never stood a chance against the crushing might of the Empire and the auracite wielding monsters; just because their neighbors succeeded doesn't mean they were guaranteed success.
    • In a world that's still in the middle-ages tech-wise, the country to advance technology is usually the one to have an edge. Garlemald's discovery of ceruleum and magitek put them on par with the other nations in spite of having no ability to use magic, and developing an active airship fleet, which nobody else could do, gave them an air force that could easily wipe out and subjugate resistant countries. The only reason the empire's conquest stalled is because their airship fleet - including the Agrias flagship - ran afoul of Midgardsomr, father of dragonkind and a being on level with a god as well as a massive swarm of angry dragons he summoned, who wiped said fleet out. Cid defecting to Eorzea with the knowledge of tech, combined with Garlemald's weakened military leverage, was a major reason Eorzea was the first and only country to beat the Garleans back.
    • Speaking of Garlean tech, the game shows how Technology Marches On in regards to military might. Nearly every time you encounter the Garleans in a special kind of story instance or dungeon, they're actively breaking out new war machines, which then become common as the prototypes show enough signs of success and easy enough cost to make to mass-produce, by the end of Stormblood, there's no less than 20 new magitek machines that have been created since the start of 1.0 when they just had airships and magitek armor, to the point that the final dungeon of the Stormblood story looks more like World War I than a battle you'd expect out of a Final Fantasy game. And more concerningly, after being repeatedly driven back and humiliated by "savages", the more unscrupulous elements of the empire decide tech isn't good enough, and begin to delve into genetic engineering, bioweapons, and chemical warfare.
  • Final Fantasy XV,
    • After a particularly brutal Wham Episode the party's resident Team Mom and healer Ignis goes blind. Instead of being a Handicapped Badass, they promptly and immediately become The Millstone as you're forced to help them get through a tough dungeon with no assistance. And even when the character tries to fight, they just end up flailing wildly, more often than not hitting the player's party. And the character is fully aware of how unhelpful they've become, too. It takes the ten-year Time Skip and constant practice for Ignis to get any semblance of his talent back. Even then, he still uses a cane to walk.
    • On a slightly more humorous note, your party members are not immune to friendly fire when you use magic. So, for example, using a Thunder spell sees them all paralysed by the electricity, using Blizzard sees them all shivering from the cold, and using a Blizzard spell while standing in water causes everyone to get stuck.
  • Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War has several examples, most of which predate what would later become series cliches.
    • The typical Fire Emblem plot of "Prince invades evil empires, kills their dictators and everyone lives happily ever after" doesn't end so well here. Both Verdane and Augustria end up crippled by Sigurd's actions, and even one generation later neither country has fully recovered. Sigurd becomes hated by many within both nations because of this, and it isn't until the Grannvale Empire is corrupted by the Loptyr cult and cause the Child Hunts that his son rises up to save the realm, at which point they change their views on Sigurd's actions.
    • Although the Crusaders saved the land from Loptyr, they inadvertently created a political system based around those with their Holy Blood. This meant that the most influential families and houses were ones with a Crusader as their founder like Chalphny and Friege. Conversely, the other houses that lack Holy Blood found themselves being treated as lesser than their neighbours, building up years of animosity between groups like Verdane and Agustria towards those with Holy Blood. As a result, the minute one of the major houses displays a sign a weakness, the lesser houses attack with the goal of gaining power as a result of what they see as a unbalanced and biased political structure.
    • Unlike almost every game in the series where the Religion of Evil operates freely, the Loptyr Cult has been almost completely wiped out at the start of the first generation, with its few members trying to bring about the revival of their dark god in secrecy. This is because the Cult was so evil in the past that once the Crusaders arose and stopped them, society went above and beyond to ensure that the Cult was wiped out, since nobody would ever tolerate an evil religion to exist. In fact, the only reason the religion exists at all is because its few surviving members adapted to the new situation and manipulated events to ensure their return.
    • Said followers are not happy at what they see as being mistreated for believing in something and having been forced to suffer for their faith, and for the first time in the series, the game averts the cult being born evil, with Seliph learning that its members were more Driven to Villainy by the hatred they received.
    • Eldigan is of the Camus Archetype, fighting Sigurd's army under orders of King Chagall. He used to be friends with Sigurd and his sister is part of your army, so normally Fire Emblem recruitment logic applies, right? Well, Lachesis can convince him to think twice about Chagall's orders, causing him to retreat to question him, upon which he's immediately executed for treason by Chagall since Eldigan disobeyed orders. The only consolation is that you don't have to personally kill him. If instead you attempt to have Sigurd speak to him, Sigurd tries to appeal to their friendship to stop the fighting, but Eldigan refuses because as much as Sigurd is his best friend, Sigurd still is a threat to his home and lord and won't back down from doing his duty.
    • Keeping Heroic Lineage going ends up requiring a lot of incest, both of the Kissing Cousins and Brother-Sister variety.
    • Travant ambushes and kills Quan and Ethlyn while on route to help Sigurd on the grounds that their actions would bring ruin to Thracia. In doing so however, he ends up turning them into martyrs in their homeland and he becomes incredibly unpopular thanks to what his own people see as a betrayal to one of his loyal and good-hearted lords. The result is that their son Leif is able to muster up a rebellion who overthrows Travant, because as the son of the two, he is seen more favorably than Travant is.
  • Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance plays out like a typical High Fantasy story, with a group of mercenaries and a secret princess going on a world trip and gathering allies before defeating the bad guy and liberating their hometown. The direct sequel Radiant Dawn then shows all the ugly aftermath of this. Crimea's nobles don't like suddenly answering to a Queen whose existence was a secret until she led the liberation, and her soft-heartedness leads to unrest and insurrection. Daein's citizens had no interest in the Mad King's War, and launch a liberation campaign of their own to regain sovereignty from an abusive suzerain. Begnion's apostle made a deep cut into the senate's corruption and openly pledged to do much more; all this did was consolidate them against her and ended up with her removed from power, the senators feeling free to commit all sorts of atrocities with their overwhelmingly powerful military. The Laguz nations find themselves needing to fight a war while having no cultural knowledge of the logistics and consequences of doing so, and the lingering Fantastic Racism throws more fuel to the fire. The unrest and upheavals in every corner of the continent results in a world war or would have, if not for a timely Diabolus ex Machina.
  • Late in the story mode of Fire Emblem Warriors, a villain has the protagonists' mother on an altar ready to sacrifice, and says he'll spare her if they set down their swords and step away. They hesitate, but do so, only for the villain to pull an I Lied and sacrifice her anyway... or try to. He didn't make the rest of the army put down their weapons, not even the expert marksman wielding a divine bow that can manipulate wind. Takumi puts an arrow through the villain's hand before lampshading how short-sighted that was.
  • Fire Emblem: Three Houses:
    • Students who don't have combat experience will express some nasty These Hands Have Killed shock if they finish an enemy during their first real battle.
    • Unlike previous games in the series, you cannot get married until after the final battle. You haven't had enough time to get to know your potential love interests during the first act and post time skip, there is a war happening and no time to be getting married.
    • After the time skip, classmates meet for battle, this time as enemies, not friends. Previous Fire Emblem games often allow you to spare them or convince them to join your side. But here? Characters, even those with a high support, are still your enemy and must be stopped. They don't magically retreat when you beat them, get away with injuries or surrender. You kill them and nothing can be done about it.
    • Characters who had been recruited into your house have negative effects of staying loyal to a house that is now fighting against their homes, families and friends. Some like Ferdinard have their entire family history damaged while others like Ingrid express guilt over betraying their home. Even Byleth isn't exempt from this. If they join the Black Eagles, Leonnie will call them a traitor because they sided with Edelgard who was partially responsible for their father Jeralt's death.
    • While previous Fire Emblem protagonists bounce back quickly in the face of trauma and hardship with little long-term effects on their mental health, this is not the case with Dimitri whose trauma of being a Sole Survivor witnessing several loved ones die a violent death and several events in the story ended up twisting his sanity and turning him into a Sociopathic Hero. Unless Byleth is there to assist him in the Blue Lions route, Dimitri will end up getting himself killed with his self-destructive behaviour.
  • Five Nights at Freddy's:
    • In the original game, Freddy Fazbear's Pizza suffered a combination of highly violent events, including a man murdering five children, blood and mucus leaking from the animatronics, and the bite incident of 1987. The restaurant is set to close a few months after the game is set.
      • The Custom Night allows you to set the difficulty of the separate animatronics, from a number between 1 to 9. After you beat the Custom Night, you get fired for tampering with the animatronics.
    • In Five Nights at Freddy's 3, set thirty years after the original game, the management of Fazbear's Fright insists on using the old wiring of Freddy Fazbear's Pizza, despite it being very outdated and in a state of extreme disrepair. This ends up causing a fire that burns the whole place down, as shown in the game's good ending.
    • The climax of Five Nights at Freddy's: Sister Location has the player character killed when Ennard scoops out their internal organs to use as a disguise to escape Circus Baby's Entertainment and Rental. The Custom Night's minigames reveal that Ennard never realised that human skin doesn't last long after its owner has been killed, and as such people quickly notice his skin turning purple.
  • For Honor: Killing Apollyon doesn't stop all of her manipulations and plans cold. By the time she dies, the factions have been at war for years and aren't going to stop just because the Chess Master is dead. She even lampshades this by asking the Orochi if they thought everyone would just go home after she was dead.
    • Runa interrogates a Samurai Mook for information, forgetting she can't speak his language, and learns nothing.
    • This actually happens during a few of the heroes' multiplayer executions. Such as the Lawbringer preparing to give his wounded opponent the coup de grace, only for them to fall over and die from their injuries before he can. Or the Warlord getting his sword stuck in someone's chest after ramming it through them and having trouble getting it out.
  • Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon:
    • Weapons degrade and break when used, with no means of repairing them. The end result of this is that you can end up wielding a broken stick against the Final Boss. On the other hand, it's still entirely possible to win under these circumstances.
    • The robot character PF dies when her batteries run out (as does Crow), since there's no way to recharge or replace them, and nobody who knows how to do so.
  • Friday the 13th: The Game: Counsellors can leap through windows as a last-ditch attempt to escape Jason. If the window is closed, or positioned on the second story, or both, the player will injure, or possibly kill, themselves.

    G-H 
  • In Get Dumped, Michi's boyfriend Arashi has decided to break up with her and she's desperate to win him back on their last date. Except that it turns out there's no magical formula to do so; sometimes someone just doesn't love you the way you love them, as painful as it may be. In addition, Arashi points out to Michi in the true ending that her obsession with spending as much time as possible with him and putting him on a pedestal has left her with no time to have a life of her own and unable to act normally around him, and that she's more in love with her idealized image of him than with the real him.
  • Geneforge: Completing quests for one faction still doesn't prevent you from accepting and completing tasks from opposing ones. They will inevitably catch up to your playing as a double agent and snuff you out in full force.
  • Ghost Recon: Future Soldier
    • Adaptive camo is your primary means of hiding from enemies. Most other games would simply say "you're invisible" and leave it at that, but not one under the Tom Clancy brand. One of the two major things shown about it is that it only works on non-living objects - your characters' weapons, equipment and clothes are all cloaked, but bare skin isn't, thus they take precautions to cover as much of their bodies as they can. The other is that it also doesn't work if the thing trying to be cloaked moves too fast - you yourselves cannot move faster than a crouch-walk without losing camo (AI teammates notwithstanding, and that's assuming you're not playing multiplayer or the PC version's hardcore difficulty where moving at all drops it), firing a gun temporarily knocks it out from the movement of your gun's bolt and hammer and the like, and your autonomous drone's own camo only works while the drone itself is inactive and strapped to your belt or in ground-crawler mode, rather than in its flight mode where its propellers would be moving too fast for the system to work. The issue of aiming an invisible gun is also addressed, with the regular ironsights and the actual crosshair on powered and/or magnified optics left uncloaked. And, all be told, just like real camouflage it isn't perfect - get too close and people will notice something's off (as several missions do by having civilians running around, who will stop and stare or start to panic when they notice the mostly-invisible figures passing through). There's also only so much it can do against enhanced vision or sensors, as well; while it does actively cloak your heat signature to counter thermal vision, backscatter X-ray optics, or "magnetic view", see through it just fine. Tanks are also able to see right through it, so whenever you find one on patrol you need to put something solid between you and it even with camo up.
    • Tanks themselves are subject to this as well. A more standard Call of Duty clone would give you a rocket launcher with a nearby infinite supply of ammo, C4 charges, or anything to just take care of tanks yourself every time you came across them - even the original Ghost Recon frequently had enemy tanks that you yourself had to destroy with anti-tank weaponry, and friendly tanks who would go down just as easily to enemy AT soldiers if you didn't scout ahead and take them out first. This game, however, is barely willing to let you get away with this on an IFV (a smaller and much more thinly-armored vehicle compared to a tank); as highly-trained and extensively-kitted as you are, you're still a four-man team against a tank. Just about every time a tank shows up, your best bet to surviving the next five seconds is simply sitting tight and letting it pass. Even when you do get into trouble with one, you still can't take it out yourself - every time, you simply need to keep your head down and hold out until air support can drop a bomb on it for you.
  • Ghost Trick
    • The country the game takes place in hasn't used the death penalty for several years, with the result that when the need to carry out an execution arises, they have to use a very old electric chair. Said chair short-circuits and blows up when the guards try to fire a test charge through it.
    • At one point, you have to try to help an innocent man escape from prison. It's later pointed out that regardless of whether or not the escapee's guilty of the crime they were convicted for, escaping from prison is still a crime; had Cabanela not stopped Jowd's escape, it would have caused Jowd problems even if he did manage to prove his innocence.
    • Making a hard hat hit a guy in the face with the force of a moving bullet leads to exactly what you think will happen. Also, if you trick an item in front of Yomiel, he will notice and cut his monologue short, resulting in another non-standard game over.
    • As Cabanela and several others point out, if you want to become the head of a special investigation unit - or get any major unelected civil post really - you're going to need a pretty spotless career record to have any chance of getting the position. This ties back into the above about catching Jowd when he tries to escape from prison - Cabanela doesn't believe Jowd is guilty of what he was imprisoned for in the first place, and his obsession with his spotless record is because becoming the head of that special investigation unit is the best way Cabanela can think of to get Jowd off the hook legally.
  • God of War (PS4):
    • Kratos's apparent downgrade of combat prowess from the previous games makes sense as Kratos has spent years trying to live in peace. He's not as good as he used to be because he is out of shape.
    • A good portion of the game has Kratos keeping his dark past from his son and deliberately keeping himself distant from Atreus as a well-meaning attempt to protect the boy from him. Because of Kratos's refusal to properly communicate this, Atreus naturally perceives his father's cold attitude as Kratos hating and disapproving of him.
    • Freya thinks that explaining her intentions and telling Baldur that she genuinely loved him would be enough for the latter to forgive her. Baldur remains furious and still wants revenge for what she had done. A simple explanation was not enough to make up for Baldur's suffering.
  • God Eater:
    • Fellow God Eater Eric der Vogelweid decides to take the time to introduce himself to to the player character midway through his first mission with the player character. As a result, an Ogretail sneaks up on him and attacks, killing him before the player or Soma can save him. Even if the player had been able to react fast enough, Eric would of been likely killed anyway. Not paying attention during a mission is easy way to die after all.
    • The God Eaters get to live somewhat comfortable lives in Fenrir, but that's because they have a role to play for the Fenrir command. As a result, the normal people, or even families of God Eaters such as Kota's, are living in slums or relatively poorer living conditions. Its shown that the people frequently are protesting Fenrir's policies because the living conditions just kinda suck for normal people, and Fenrir can only do so much to keep them happy.
    • After The Calamity wiped Fenrir HQ off the map, Fenrir Credits suddenly had no backing. Ever remaining administrative unit, all having been briefed on such possibilities, realized an economic crisis right then would doom humanity completely and made it clear they'd continue honoring the currency 1:1.
    • The first God Eaters were hailed as Super Soldiers and heroes for being able to fight Aragami. The stronger second-generation New Types were regarded with a bit more suspicion, for being both stronger and more unstable. Post-Calamity, what remains of humanity is terrified of the conclusively superhuman Adaptive God Eaters. Thus, any AGE is shackled in their cell anywhere except the battlefield and treated like dirt by the fearful populace.
      • Exactly because of this, all Chrysanthemum has to do is treat the Pennywort AGEs like human beings and Hilda has them eating out of her palm. They're completely aware they're being played, but it's not an offer they can refuse.
  • Granblue Fantasy:
    • Lecia heads off on her own to confront the heroes personally, in order to understand where their strength comes from. However, while she was gone, Ghandarva lead an attack that devastated Amalthea. While Lecia is vital in defeating Ghandarva, she's still punished for abandoning her post and is strongly recommended by Monika to resign her position as Captain.
    • The Grand Blues Channel quest "Bittersweet Symphony" has the captain set up a band of different musicians in the crew with different styles, and places the meek member in the leader role. The outcome? He's unable to get any of them to cooperate or compromise after days of practice, and the thing ends up a failure.
  • Grand Theft Auto IV,
    • The game's Final Bosses are hardly any tougher than any of the other random Mooks you've been killing. They have slightly more health thanks to body armor, but other than that, they're no tougher, and will likely go down quickly.
    • In previous games, using a Pay n' Spray to alter your car at any moment would automatically dispel your wanted meter to zero, even when the cops had you in their sights. Do it in plain sight here with cops watching you, and that won't fly at all: they naturally saw you going into the shop, so of course they're not going to be fooled by a sudden new paint job.
  • In Grand Theft Auto V, after spending five years being a meth addict, Johnny from The Lost And The Damned was killed easily by Trevor.
    • In a more humorous example of this trope, pressing the jump button next to a surface too tall to climb will lead to you smacking off it and landing flat on your ass.
    • The Merryweather Heist. As badass as the crew are, even they know they won't survive if they keep the nuclear device they stole, because just about every military force in America would try to snuff them. They make the wise move to put it back.
    • The premise of the "Legal Trouble" mission is that a lawyer has taken the only analogue copy of a film Michael has been co-producing, prompting him to go and chase her down to get it back. At the end of the mission, Michael's co-producer points out that - in the age of modern filmmaking - they've got several copies of the film saved digitally.
    • Similar to the GTA IV example above, the final antagonists pose no threat and are killed in rather offhanded ways without any real build-up for final confrontation.
    • Constantly jumping into and out of cars means that the main characters don't wear seatbelts. Which means that if you hit something at high speed, you're going out the windshield.
    • Parachuting out of an aircraft doesn't make that aircraft disappear, it just means that there's now an uncontrolled aircraft that's going to crash somewhere. See online videos for hours worth of abandoned aircraft crashing into that car the player parachuted down to steal, the escorted vehicle that has to reach the destination untouched, the player who just landed, the player still parachuting down...
      • Adding onto this, in real life, an aircraft crashing, no matter what kind, will result in someone calling the police, so try not to act too surprised when you suddenly get a two-star wanted level when your abandoned plane plows into a residential neighborhood.
    • Even if you take the best crew, and do the stealthiest approach that ensures no one dies, you still have to escape the police in a heist. Even if everything goes right, you are committing a robbery in the middle of a metropolitan area in broad daylight.
    • During the Merryweather plane job, Trevor has to fly by the military base. If he climbs too high, and that can be just high enough to avoid crashing into a big tree or a bridge, he winds up on their radar, and if he stays on their radar for too long, the military will immediately attack him since an unidentified aircraft is on their radar. Similarly, Trevor's crash into the Merryweather jet has materials falling out of the plane automatically, since the air pressure proceeds to suck all the heavy equipment out. When the military try to force Trevor to head to the military base, Trevor tries to invoke the threat of ground casualties if they shoot him down. The second Trevor is over the desert, the military shoot him down.
    • Steve Haines's use of the protagonists to further his career predictably has the Agency and the Bureau catch on to him. While the two agencies are at each other's throats, and they both are shown to have plenty of corruption, Haines's superiors are predictably not corrupt and begin to investigate him. Destroying the evidence the FIB have on him similarly doesn't work out too well, as the Bureau immediately suspects Haines of being behind the raid.
      • If Option C is not chosen, Haines proceeds to out Norton's corruption to the public, and Norton will soon be fired. Despite Norton being one of the most sympathetic authority figures in the series, the deal with Michael was still corrupt in the first place.
    • As a result of the trio's various antics, the Bureau and the Agency begin to start going after them hard. Norton points out to Trevor during the Kortz Center shootout that if Norton dies, the Bureau will immediacy begin to aggressively pursue them, and Michael points out that Haines is still alive and will try to blame all of the criminal acts he committed on them. Keeping Dave alive is the only way to avoid the government's wrath as there is no way for the protagonists to escape two government agencies. This argument is similarly used in Option C for keeping Norton alive, as the gang kills a well-known millionaire and a top FIB agent respectively, something that would not go unnoticed, unlike the Triad's and a gang leader would.
    • In Option C, killing Haines gets Trevor a two star wanted level. Despite the fact that Haines is a corrupt and evil individual, Trevor still murdered a federal agent, possibly on live TV depending on how the player approaches it.
  • The first third or so of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, the missions set in Los Santos, has CJ following in his predecessors' footsteps by doing whatever he's told by whoever tells him without question. The rest of the game, from his exile from Santos up to at least returning to it after San Fierro and Las Venturas, is all about him learning his horribly violent and destructive actions have actual consequences. Help his aspiring rapper friend by breaking into the mansion of a professional rapper, killing his entire security detail, stealing his lyric book, and later brutally murdering the rapper's manager? Said rapper attempts to commit suicide after CJ's aspiring rapper friend makes it big with obviously-stolen lyrics. Kill everyone who had concrete proof of a Dirty Cop's dealings? When said cop finally goes to trial, he gets off scot free due to the lack of evidence, resulting in riots. The first half also has this come up much quicker, possibly as foreshadowing to the above - one mission has you set a Ballas stronghold on fire, then immediately have to brave those flames to rescue an innocent woman you accidentally trapped in the building. She goes on to be the first character you can date in the game, though there's the implication that it's because she only knows you as the man who saved her from a burning Balla stronghold and not as the crazy Grove Street OG who set it alight in the first place.
  • Half-Life:
    • Half-Life laughs at the Easily Thwarted Alien Invasion trope: the scientists come up with a Clever Plan to shut down the Xenian's teleporters and prevent them from sending additional troops over. Long story short: the Clever Plan fails. It turns out that advanced alien civilizations are also smart enough to cover the weak points in their invasion strategies and come up with Clever Plans of their own. Who knew?
    • Gordon Freeman kills a chunk of an alien invasion and almost a whole battalion of soldiers, fights through a warzone, and goes to the aliens' homeworld and kills their leader, all by himself. Unlike nearly every other video game ever, stories of his exploits spread to make him a living legend Shrouded in Myth, and by Half-Life 2 somewhere in the ballpark of two decades later, La Résistance instantly rallies around him, the Vortigaunts practically worship him, and the new alien invaders target him on sight and relentlessly try to kill him, because they know exactly what's coming for them.
    • The back-story for Half-Life 2 showed what would really happen if an advanced alien empire actually decided to invade Earth. It resulted in a Curb-Stomp Battle that lasted only seven hours before humanity surrendered. The only reason humanity survived afterwards was because Dr. Breen convinced the Combine that they were worth more as soldiers & slaves than as corpses.
    • Half-Life 2 is all about fighting back against an oppressive regime, taking the fight to them, killing their figurehead and destroying their main stronghold. Episode One is all about how severely damaging a colossal alien structure powered by an exotic, dangerous substance has destructively explosive consequences. Episode Two is all about how losing one leader and one stronghold is a mere inconvenience to an interdimensional empire, and that a counterattack would be swift and terrible.
  • Halo:
    • A minor one: the Arbiter's armor might look cool, but it's quickly explained that his armor is very out of date compared to the more common armor of the Covenant forces. This results in weaker shields, and the built-in camouflage being very short compared to the standard armor of the other Covenant forces. Even if the armor has practical uses, the armor was made first and foremost to be a symbol to the Covenant forces to see, so its actual military application will be behind as a result.
    • In Halo: Reach, most of the deaths of Noble Team count as this. Jorge blows up a Covenant super-carrier, and Carter crashes a dropship into a Scarab. Both of these have little effect on the overall Covenant war machine; they still keep coming (Jorge's instance, in particular, is demonstrated immediately - the player gets to watch the first super-carrier break up for just a few seconds before at least a dozen more start jumping into the system in sequence). Emile takes down one Elite, and is then quickly killed by one behind him. Kat is a genius Super Soldier in high-powered armor, but if her shields are down and she's not paying attention to her surroundings, she can be shot in the head and killed like anybody else. Noble 6 is finally overwhelmed by the endless Covenant forces, and makes a Last Stand taking as many Covenant with him/her as (s)he can. Jun is the only member of the team to survive the events of the game, because he was sent to escort Dr. Halsey off the planet right away.
    • The backstory takes the time to explain a lot of the realities behind creating super-soldiers out of pre-teens. Two standouts come from the Powered Armor they wear - what happens when an unmodified human wears a half-ton suit of armor that moves in response to their thoughts and tries to move his arm? The armor moves its arm from one spot to another in a flash, their arm gets liquefied, and then they promptly paste the rest of themselves convulsing in pain from that. SPARTANs can only wear the armor safely because of their improved reflexes and advanced materials grafted onto their bones to make them virtually unbreakable - but that also came with the risk that the prepubescent candidates for the program could have their bones essentially pulverize themselves once growth spurts started hitting them; 30 of the first 75 children abducted to become SPARTAN-IIs were killed from complications during or following the augmentation process, and another 12 were crippled badly enough that they couldn't serve on the front lines.
      • Also, the armor itself is ludicrously expensive (one admiral once complains that the cost for a single SPARTAN could produce a small fleet of ships), and only the SPARTANs' proven effectiveness keeps them in the game. Which doesn't mean there aren't various factions trying to exploit them and/or create knockoffs, with varying levels of success.
    • This also comes up in regards to cloning. The quickest and most common manner is creation of "flash clones", which are designed to age at a hundred times the rate of a natural-born human - the result being a human that lacks the muscle memory of their progenitor and, within a month or so of creation, will begin degenerating until they invariably die of some manner of neurological or physiological disease. Flash cloning is as such usually restricted to the creation of new organs for someone in need of a transplant, programmed to start aging at the normal rate once they've been transplanted. There are also two notable cases where the short life for a flash clone is not a hindrance: first, ONI is able to draw suspicion away from themselves for the kidnapping of the children that became the SPARTAN-IIs by replacing them with flash clones - for all their parents knew, their children suddenly died of natural causes early in their lives. It also allows for the only confirmed case in the series of there being both a live person (Dr. Catherine Halsey) and a "smart" AI based on them (Cortana) - creation of such AIs is done by scanning the neural pathways of a human brain in a manner which destroys that brain, so naturally most brains used for the purpose are taken from corpses, but a flash clone's brain would work just as well.
    • AIs themselves are also subject to this. "Dumb" AIs are programmed in a more traditional fashion, and while they are very well-versed in whatever they're designed to do, they can't learn new things or adapt under changing circumstances. "Smart" AIs are instead created by replicating the neural pathways of a human brain on a nano-scale, giving them more human-like abilities to learn - but since their "brain" is artificial, that gives it a hard limit on what it can learn and process before it starts devoting so much processing power to analyzing and processing what it already knows that it overloads itself and can no longer function under normal parameters. "Smart" AIs, as such, have a lifespan of about seven years - and any that get close or even go beyond that time limit start to go rampant.
    • In the wake of the defeat and dissolution of the Covenant, the alien species that formed it almost immediately begin suffering civil strife in the post-war aftermath, and many of the constituent species are suddenly having to adjust to the removal of what was the center of their culture, politics, religion and military for upwards of three and a half millennia. Both the Sanghelli (Elites) and the Jiralhanae (Brutes) are dealing with civil wars, with the Sanghelli in particular dealing with a faction that wants to re-establish the Covenant. The only species to thrive after the end of the war are the Kig-Yar (Jackals), who as Hired Guns had no real investment in the Covenant, and thus were able to adjust quickly to its fall.
    • A subtle example in Halo 2, relating to the aforementioned Scarabs. The Scarabs that the Chief/Arbiter encounters in this game are noticeably different from the ones later in the series - they're larger, more cumbersome, and are piloted by conventional crews instead of giant Lekgolo colonies. From when the Covenant first arrive in Earth orbit, it's established quite quickly that they weren't actually expecting to encounter humanity there - and the following game reveals that the real reason the Prophet of Regret came to Earth with such a tiny fleet was to dig up a Forerunner artifact, the Prophet of Truth having conveniently neglected to inform him that it was their enemy's homeworld. Therefore, it's quite likely that, in contrast to the more combat-ready variants in later games, the Scarabs seen in Halo 2 were actually excavation equipment hastily repurposed for combat; the Covenant equivalent of a human army driving a construction excavator into a war zone. Predictably, the Scarab, while tough, is completely unsuited to traversing the narrow, rubble-filled streets of New Mombasa and ultimately winds up trapping itself at the end of a canal, allowing the Chief to board it and take it out of commission. It appears the Covenant learned their lesson somewhat, as all the Scarabs seen in Halo 3, besides being more agile, engage the Chief in wide-open areas in which they can easily turn to face threats, making boarding them without disabling them first nigh-impossible.
  • In Harvest Moon 64, if the player romances Elli, they can see a unique event where Elli's grandmother Ellen dies. And not of anything violent or preventable; Ellen just dies of old age. That doesn't stop Elli from going into a deep depression about her grandmother dying, requiring the player character to keep helping Elli work through it by talking to her and being there for her. And it takes almost a full season of time before Elli starts to feel better, even if the farmer is there for her every day. Just because We All Die Someday doesn't make it hurt any less.
  • A lot of the fails in the Henry Stickmin Series happen because of the eponymous character being hit with this trope, which the fail screen often lampshades if you do:
    • One example is when being chased by prison guards in Complex. If Henry chooses to shoot back at them, he ends up crashing into a tree, because he wasn't keeping his eyes on the road.
    • When Henry tries to liquefy himself to bust through the walls in Diamond, he ends up becoming just plain liquid water as he has no solid objects to hold his body firm and intact.
    • Henry tries to use a Falcon Punch to get past a guard in Diamond only for him to realize that he is not a superhuman capable of doing such feats and makes a normal, weak punch, promptly getting the guard's attention.
    • Henry likewise tries to use a Falcon Kick on the guard in the records room, and is actually successful in replicating the attack - the only problem is he then incinerates himself with it.
    • In one of the stealth options to take the diamond, Henry just drops to the ground, only to end up both injuring himself and alarming the museum. The game even mocks you for thinking it will work.
    • In the final stealth option, Henry attempts to use the guard's rifle to shoot him down, only to end up missing all of his bullets. After all, First-Person Shooter games never address the problems of inexperience with firearms, the weight of the weapon, the recoil during firing, or even the shooter's requirement to retain proper aim of the weapon, making it look easy in the eyes of FPS gamers.
    • Another option one has Henry attempting to jump far away from the guard, but because he's carrying such a large diamond, he only manages to jump a small distance before falling.
    • In the epic option, Henry tries to use a gun from a museum exhibit to shoot down the two guards, only for it to fail because it is just a museum exhibit, meaning it has no ammo.
    • Diamond, when choosing the invisibility pill to get into the museum, Henry falls off the roof since he can't see a thing now - eyesight requires light to be refracted by the cornea and lens, then absorbed by the rod and cone cells of the retina, which naturally won't happen if you are invisible and the light goes straight through you.
    • In Complex, choosing to steal a boat has Henry using it to escape The Wall, only for the crew on-board to realize they're in the middle of an unscheduled departure.
    • Another option at the same point is to steal a rocket to escape. Doing so will have Henry jump in, and - having absolutely no idea how to work a rocket launch - end up deploying the parachute first before igniting the boosters, which immediately sends the rocket careening back into the ground.
    • One of the options to get down an elevator shaft in Complex is for Henry to bungee-jump all the way to the bottom. He ends up ripping his own body in half because he used an ordinary rope, instead of the specialized bungee rope that can help sustain his fall.
    • During the Hallway Showoff segment in Complex, if you choose Henry with a sniper rifle and Ellie with a crossbow, Henry will try to "360 noscope them" by jumping out of cover and spinning, only to end up shooting Ellie. It's hard to make out specific details while you're spinning around at a fast speed, after all, and even if you can get the number of rotations correct normally, the addition of a large and heavy sniper rifle will make it harder to get it right. There's a reason that even passing the muzzle of a gun over anyone or anything you don't intend to shoot, even with your finger away from the trigger, is considered a gross violation of gun safety, after all.
    • Two of the options Henry could use to enter the Airship is to use either the C4 or the acid. Both of them fail, the former because Henry didn't take cover and got knocked off the airship by the blast debris, and the latter because the wind blew the acid onto Henry's legs.
  • In Hotline Miami the player character starts suffering some horrific PTSD hallucinations as a result of all the ultraviolence he takes part in.
    • On a larger scale, any single hit from a melee weapon or gun (barring the use of a certain mask) will insta-kill the player by pasting his skull. Likewise, the mooks of the game all go down from a single hit to the head.

    I-J 
  • Iji:
    • Going One Woman Army and slaughtering everyone in your path, then asking the enemy leaders to leave peacefully goes about as well as expected, and does serious psychological damage to Iji. Even in a Pacifist Run neither the Tasen or the Komato are going to just pack up and leave, because they're fighting for their own reasons. And despite Iji's efforts, she's still one person in a war, most people dying no matter what she does.
    • The horrible deconstruction of the Alien Invasion trope. There's no sneaky infiltration or Old School Dogfights with alien vessels or a heroic Last Stand against swarms of invaders. The Tasen do just what you expect of a civilisation capable of interstellar travel meeting an unfamiliar, possibly hostile world; they park their fleet in orbit and fire on everything at once, devastating the entire surface of the planet. And because No Biochemical Barriers is very much not in effect, they didn't even need to preserve the biosphere. Iji isn't fighting to save the Earth from destruction, she's fighting to save what they missed.
    • Both the new endings in 1.7 are the result of this. In the Perfect Pacifist ending, sparing Iosa results in her killing both Iji and Tor while their guards are down after the final boss battle. Asha might have been deranged enough to kill himself over wounded pride, but of course the murderous psychopath holds more of a grudge. It's a cold comfort that reality also bites Iosa, as Tor's 2IC was watching and she's facing insubordination and mutiny charges. In the Total Berserker ending, getting too trigger-happy and killing the only person who can call off a planet-sterilizing orbital strike ends exactly how you'd expect.
  • Injustice: Gods Among Us
    • Harley Quinn allying with Batman and helping fight the Regime did not fix the fact she helped the Joker cause the incident that set the whole story of the game into effect. Several of Batman's allies point out that she could easily slip back into her old ways, and that she isn't excused for her actions. Harley herself even admits that she hasn't quite gotten over her villain phase and struggles with the mental damage that came from it.
    • It turns out the whole "superstitious cowardly lot" thing only works when nobody knows who you are. Thanks to Superman revealing Batman's secret identity in the tie-in comics, criminals simply aren't afraid of him anymore.
    • The way Superman does it is Actually Pretty Funny; Batman, being Batman, disables the Watchtower's power and sends it plummeting out of orbit seconds before Superman outs his identity to the world. So what does Superman do? He gets Cyborg, who's basically a living supercomputer, to post "Batman is Bruce Wayne" on Twitter.
    • This is further enforced by one of Scarecrow's intros with him in Injustice 2:
    Scarecrow: I used to fear the Batman.
    Batman: You still should.
    Scarecrow: Nobody's afraid of Bruce Wayne.
  • inFAMOUS 2 shows that Cole's best friend Zeke wasn't Easily Forgiven for betraying Cole to have powers in the first game. While Zeke's had a change of heart, he also has to do everything he can to make it up to Cole, since he is still very wary of Zeke after what he did. In fact, it took near the end of the game for Cole to fully forgive him and reconcile.
  • Augustine spends the entirety of inFAMOUS: Second Son kicking puppies with wild abandon and abusing her power to suspend people's rights. When there are Bio-Terrorists to "protect" people from, she gets away with it. When a Good-Karma Delsin undermines her rhetoric by fighting the DUP's oppression and ultimately subduing her for the military to take away? He doesn't even have to follow it up; a backlog of very public human rights abuses means she's screwed.
  • Inside: During the final stage of the game, you become part of and take control of a giant Body of Bodies. While said monster may be able to smash its way through walls and windows, that doesn't mean that doing so doesn't hurt it - every time you do so, expect to hear a lot of moans and groans of pain. In addition, given how big and heavy said monster is, it manages to crush humans it lands on and break floors by sheer accident.

    K-L 
  • Kaiserreich: Legacy of the Weltkrieg:
    • If the Chinese Triads take over the Legation Cities, it usually results in several major powers (including Japan and the Entente) deciding that a collection of cities run by a ruthless criminal syndicate is something they cannot allow on their borders, so they declare war on the Triads. Oddly enough, the ragtag Chinese gangsters tend to get horribly fucked in the resulting war, as unlike Japan and the Entente, they don't have things like organized armies and a navy and air force.
    • If the Entente succeeds in retaking Britain and restoring the United Kingdom and doesn't ban the socialist-leaning Progressive Party, then they will run in and almost certainly win the first general election. The British people have lived under a socialist regime for more than a decade until now, a regime that came into being because of massive popular resentment against the monarchy and a brutal reprisal against a miner's strike.
  • Kerbal Space Program, as an extremely accurate simulation of space flight, has plenty. Parachutes are realistically portrayed. They aren't foolproof. Parachutes won't deploy properly if you are traveling too fast (i.e: still firing off a rocket), aren't oriented properly and for reasons that should be obvious, don't work in a zero-atmosphere environment like space. It's recommended you don't try building your favorite sci-fi show's iconic spaceships at first. Disappointment, and plenty of explodiness, will probably ensue.
  • killer7
    • KAEDE is the only one of the Smiths to lack an Unorthodox Reload (while everyone else just effortlessly flings empty shells and magazines out of their guns and slaps in new ammo in less than a second, she takes the time to slide her magazine in properly). Unfortunately, this also means that she has the slowest reload in the game, and if she reloads while zoomed in, it causes her to fumble with the magazine while putting it in, making it take even longer. This eventually proves to be her downfall in the fight with the Handsome Men, as Handsome Light Brown reloads faster and takes her out while she's reloading.
    • Kevin, in turn, is probably the easiest of the Smiths to aim with because he settles for throwing knives instead of a gun. While this means he has a slower fire rate than most of the others since he effectively has to "reload" after every toss, he won't be stuck with an actual reload at an inconvenient time and he doesn't have to worry about recoil throwing off his aim.
    • Since your main resource for healing and upgrading is the blood of your enemies, how easy or hard it is to get that blood also depends on this. Kevin, again, sits on one extreme, with his knives causing noticeable amounts of the stuff to bleed from whoever you hit with them, because that's how knife wounds work. On the other extreme is MASK - except for the few enemy types that only he can kill, MASK never gets blood from enemies, because even in cases where his grenade launchers could cause wounds that would bleed if they were made with a knife or a regular bullet, the heat generated by the grenades' explosions would instantly cauterize them.
  • In Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, during the House of Valor questline (focusing on Gladiator Games), the reigning Champion, who has been sabotaging all of your fights, sends the Player Character meet with an "agent" in a secluded spot. The agent is an assassin meant to kill you, but with a fairly easy persuasion check you can just tell him that you've been slaughtering entire teams of hardened, deadly gladiators almost singlehandedly. The assassin will realize he's vastly out of his league and promptly hightail it out of there.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • Early on in the first game, Sora ends up in a Heads I Win, Tails You Lose fight against both Leon and later Cloud. While Sora will eventually grow up into an army-destroying Keyblade Master, he's just beginning his quest and can barely take out the most basic of Heartless without having issues. Going up a seasoned warrior like Leon with no support is a difficult battle, and even if you manage to win, Sora exerted himself so hard to pull it off that he passes out anyway. Same for Cloud, even if you manage to win in the difficult story fight with him, he's both a veteran warrior and supercharged with Darkness. Hades backstabbing him by letting Cerberus into the arena is the only reason Sora survived the encounter.
    • Later on in the series, Master Yen Sid tells both Sora and Riku that they'll effectively have to reset their training from Step 1 to prepare for the final battle with Master Xehanort, as while their self-taught Keyblade styles have been sufficient for Heartless and Nobodies, fighting another Keyblade wielder is a different matter, especially one as dangerous as Xehanort who could already keep pace in an uneven fight against multiple other master-level Keyblade wielders. Not to mention that not having official training doesn't let them tap into the truest of a Keyblade's powers like Formchanging and Shotlocks, both of which are remedied by the time of III.
    • In Dream Drop Distance Yen Sid has Lea and Kairi trained for the upcoming Keyblade War so as to fill the requirement for the seven warriors of light. However there's not near enough time to really train the two before the events of the third game. Sure Lea has some combat experience with his chakrams but not so much with a keyblade and Kairi only got hers in the second game before being summoned to be trained. So when the confrontation with the 13 Seekers of Darkness take place, they're utterly overwhelmed and it takes a Reset Button from Sora (with the help of Kairi) to try again and do somewhat better the second time.
    • Related to the above; when you use a power to an extent beyond what it's meant for, something will probably go wrong. The "power of waking" Sora eventually succeeds in unlocking is meant to dive into the world inside a lost heart and restore that heart to its former existence. But when all of Sora's friends are blown into the abyss, Sora uses that power to chase their hearts across many actual worlds, pursuing the Heartless called the Lich to save those hearts. The force of his using that power actually causes time to rewind a bit in the Keyblade Graveyard, and all this is most certainly NOT how the power of waking is meant to be used. Young Xehanort mocks Sora with the claim that he's condemned his heart to the very abyss he saved his friends from, and Mickey warns him after the final battle that he might not come back if he does it one more time. Sora accepts the risks, dives back to save Kairi (successfully), and apparently disappears as a result. How and when he's coming back for the next saga is still a mystery.
  • In Episode 3 of King's Quest (2015), Graham learns from a magic mirror that his future wife is locked away in a tower on the other side of the world. He grabs a ring and sets off. When he arrives and climbs to the top of the tower, he finds two princesses and immediately proposes to one of them. She immediately rejects him on the not entirely unreasonable grounds that she has absolutely no idea who he is. When he goes to propose to the other one, she cuts him off by pointing out that she was present when he proposed the first time, and also points out that she doesn't really like the idea of being Graham's Plan B. Courtly true love just leads Graham to an embarrassing Epic Fail.
  • The final boss of Kunio-tachi no Banka is the only enemy in the entire game to use a gun. Unless you're at full health, if you get shot by that gun you will die - being one of the two toughest high-school brawlers in Japan doesn't mean you're tough enough to shrug off bullet wounds.
  • The Last of Us: Ellie is very handy with a knife when an enemy is focused on Joel. However, she's significantly smaller than any of the game's enemies and lacks the strength and reach to effectively take them on in melee combat without the element of surprise. She won't try it as an NPC, and if the player tries it while playing as her, it won't end well.
  • The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel: Just because Rean has just acquired a Super Robot and has knowledge of how to pilot it implanted in his head, doesn't necessarily mean that he can pilot it effectively. Sure he could take on a Real Robot and coast on through the superior firepower that his mech has, but against a guy who has more experience in piloting his own super robot? Tough luck. Cue the Bolivian Army Ending of the first game.
  • Some games in the The Legend of Zelda have hidden caves that you can access by chopping up a fern or blowing up part of a cliff. These areas are inhabited by old men who will typically give you a reward for finding them, but sometimes they will take some of your money as compensation for their destroyed door.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time loves this trope:
    • Early on Link has to prove his worth for Mido, but once this is accomplished, this doesn't endear Link to Mido one bit. It's not until a whole seven years later that Mido has anything remotely nice to say about Link.
    • The Chosen Hero (you) are too young and sealed away in a safe spot for seven years... which leaves the rest of the land vulnerable to being taken over by the evil overlord, who isn't about to do so polite a thing as to sit around waiting for you to be ready for the evil confrontation. Ganon does get lazy eventually, though, and this is what makes it possible for him to be beaten.
    • Link defeats Ganondorf and goes back to his childhood where he foils Ganondorf's plot to assassinate the king and steal the Ocarina of Time. With all that done, Link is free to go home, right? Nope, having mentally developed into a warrior and now being stuck in a child's body, he is now well aware Kokiri Forest isn't his home anymore, and his quest having been fulfilled leaves him with a sense of wanderlust. And with no big bad left to grow up to fight, he instead spends the rest of his life becoming a master swordsman, until becoming the Hero's Shade/Golden Wolf in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess to pass off the techiques he developed, and because he has a regret, possibly even resentment, that his heroism was "erased" by not remaining in the timeline where he defeated Ganondorf directly.
    • A slightly contested one; when time travel creates branching paths, it opens up lots of variables and possibilities, even though they all add up to the same result, there would inevitably be at least one timeline where Link doesn't succeed. This is the basis of the third timeline revealed in Hyrule Historia, where Link failing to kill Ganondorf and dying results in drastic measures being taken that causes Hyrule to suffer a slow but steady decline that future cycles only seem to slow, not fix.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild goes for a more realistic approach than previous Zelda games. Thus this trope will be in effect quite a lot.
    • Link will not be able to find the supplies he needs just by cutting grass and breaking pots. Instead, he can only scavenge them from places where one would expect to find them, like taking arrows from bow-wielding Bokoblins and restoring health by eating the meat gathered by hunting animals. He also doesn't hold items dramatically in the air whenever he collects them.
    • Unlike most other Zelda games, you are free to ignore where the story tells you to go and even skip to the final boss, missing out on a lot of secrets and Link's origin. In real life, you are not restricted to follow a plot, but you won't be able to find answers to your questions unless you search them out.
    • If you're caught in a thunderstorm, your metallic sword can actually act as a lightning rod and draw lightning towards you. If you're expecting it to act as the lightning version of the Skyward Strike from the battle against Demise in Skyward Sword, you'd be sadly mistaken, as it actually does damage you.
    • Going into freezing cold environs without wearing heavy insulated clothing will be bad for your health. Likewise, wearing clothing that's too thick (or nothing at all) and letting the sun beam down on Link in a desert biome will cause him to overheat. In addition, equipping a flame weapon will keep Link warm in colder climates, and ice weapons will keep Link cool in hotter climates.
    • As usual, Link can kick open treasure chests, but doing this while barefoot will hurt.
    • Trying to use bomb arrows in the rain will make them useless, due to their fuses being wet. Conversely, trying to use bomb arrows in deserts and volcanoes is ill-advised, as the heat will cause them to explode in your face.
    • Weapon types play an important role in resource gathering.
      • Small blades like swords and spears will dull and break quickly if swung against trees. Swinging an axe at them or blasting them with Remote Bombs is more effective, however.
      • Trying to use bladed weapons to mine ores will be time-consuming, in addition to wearing your weapons down quickly. Using blunt weapons like sledgehammers, heavy axes or Drillshafts will let you mine the resources much more quickly, and with much less wear-and-tear on your chosen weapon.
    • Gerudo Town only admits women, as per tradition, requiring Link to be Disguised in Drag to enter. This is true even after saving the town from Vah Naboris. Just because the Gerudo are thankful Link saved their town doesn't mean they'll bend the rules for him. For that matter, just because their leader Riju is okay with Link being in her town doesn't mean the rest of the town would agree with her.
      • The logistics of a Ladyland are also given a bit of a realistic spin. Part of the male ban is so Gerudo women go out to see the world in their desire to find mates, thus a lot of marketeers if you small talk with them will vent about being separated from their husbands and male children when they came back home to sell their wares, a class is held to help them acclimate to actually talking with men, and if you find female Gerudo on the road, they seem a bit quick to romanticize any male they find, and some that Link helps hook up with men seem to form relationships of questionable (though implied to be happy and loving offscreen) nature.
    • Going by the memories, Link used to be a One-Man Army capable of killing even several Lynels and only have a slight abrasion to show for it. A hundred years in a healing stasis has left Link so atrophied that he initially can't even take out a camp of Bokoblins in a straight up fight without difficulty and has to fight smart, stealthy and dirty. Even in the endgame with the Master Sword, Hylian Shield, and fully-upgraded armor, killing even a single Lynel is a slip-up-and-die battle, showing just how far his near-death experience and the following time out of the fight has degraded his skills.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
    • Wolf Link is not welcome most places. Even assuming that people aren't scared of normal wolves, Link's green fur, the triforce markings on his head, and rough hairstyle makes Talo call him out as a monster and everyone in Kakariko run and hide indoors, Rusl will flat out attack him and being Wolf Form in Hyrule Castle town results in being surrounded by guards (though they'll never hurt you, Zant's takeover apparently only left the cowards). The only normal people who want anything to do with Wolf Link is a Cloud Cuckoo Lander, a Nature Lover living in Faron woods, Gorons who probably don't have anything to fear from Wolves, and other animals.
    • Unlike past companions, Link is at first immensely distrustful of Midna, having been grabbed by something that looks similar to her and transformed into an entirely different creature. He starts growling at her both when she first approaches him and when she breaks him free and jumps on top of him to use him as a mount, snarking and mocking his prediciment all the while. It's not until after the first dungeon that he seems to start adjusting to her presence, and not until she almost dies that he starts to consider her a genuine friend.
    • On the way to the second dungeon, Link has to contend with hostile Gorons who want to keep him off their mountain because a Fused Shadow has turned their chieftain into a monster. Gorons are literal living boulders and can roll into Link at the speed of a car, it doesn't matter how many times it's attempted, he can't muscle past them until he goes to find out how Mayor Bo did it (by cheating with the iron boots). Even after getting the boots, Link has to challenge their elder to a Sumo match to get into the dungeon, and even with the boots it's still entirely possible to lose to the absolutely ancient and obviously atrophied-with-age Goron.
  • Leisure Suit Larry
    • Leisure Suit Larry 1: In the Land of the Lounge Lizards can have you get an STD that destroys your genitals from unprotected sex with a prostitute, be shot by a clerk for stealing from his shop, and try to leave a cab without paying its cabby only to get beaten by him.
    • A non-lethal example happens in Leisure Suit Larry 2: Looking for Love (in Several Wrong Places), where Larry goes to the home of Eve (the woman he ended the previous game with with) only for her to not only forget about him but angrily demand he gets his stuff out of her garage before going away. Turns out having what was a one-night stand with a woman doesn't mean she'll stay fond of you, let alone remember you. This happens again with the next game, which has Larry's wife from the last game tell him she's dumping him for another woman. As Larry learns the hard way, you saving a woman's island doesn't mean the two of you won't have any marital problems or that any annoying behavior of yours she notices after getting to know you won't offend her.
    • Patti in Leisure Suit Larry 3: Passionate Patti in Pursuit of the Pulsating Pectorals can try to offer sex for a male stripper, only to get shot down by said stripper refusing then pointing out how her experience has made her a STD risk. Patti gets told upfront that the stripper won't touch her unless she shows him what is, in his words, a clean bill of health.
  • The Liar Princess and the Blind Prince: The Princess, who is actually a wolf that has hunted for her food all her life in the forest, gives the Prince raw meat, thinking he'll enjoy it, and is completely caught off guard when he spits it out instead. The Prince has to explain to her that people eat meat after cooking it, because eating it raw will make them sick.
  • The Indie RPG LISA is a complete Deconstruction of the No Woman's Land and a Post-apocalyptic world ala Fist of the North Star. When all the women mysterously died out under the "Great White Flash", society crumbled instantly, and the entire male population is doomed to eventual extinction of the human race. This leads the men to insane, amoral acts as a way to cope with themselves before dying off. Electricity is out, so all the health restoring items are jerky and other foods that don't require refrigeration. Water is now filthy and alcohol is now a safer choice. When party members die in battle, they stay dead. Campfires are more common than the safer tents, but leaves players open for predators, thefts, and kidnappings. The main character Brad himself isn't exactly an ideal father. Finally, Buddy being the only living female left on the planet leaves her an open target for nearly the entire population. While others want to keep her around to give hope by repopulating the Earth, some want her for some nefarious plans. Even worse, Buddy simply wants to have her own life around but everyone, no matter how well-intentioned they were, controlled her, leaving her quite resentful to most of the males.
  • Frequently in The Long Dark:
    • Fighting a wolf in hand-to-hand combat, even with a weapon, will almost always result in extreme injury or even death. It's impossible to fight back against a bear, which will just pin you down and rip you to shreds as your character screams in pain and terror.
    • Eating uncooked meat will result in getting food poisoning, and drinking untreated water will result in getting dysentry.
    • The cold is a constant threat and even just a few minutes of exposure can cause great harm. If you catch hypothermia, getting better from it will require several hours of rest and keeping your temperature above a certain level.

    M 
  • Drive around like a maniac like you do in that other open-world crime game while playing Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven and the police will chase after you. They won't just blow your head off for a traffic violation, though. Pull over and pay for a ticket and you can go on your merry way. Don't, and they'll start chasing you to arrest you. Pull out a gun or act too violent on the road, and then they will use lethal force, just like cops in real life.
  • Mafia III:
    • As you play as a (half) black man in 1960s Louisiana, not only do normal white people not trust you, but no other race does, either. You can't even walk in front of the (white) police without raising some suspicion, and they are all too happy for an excuse to beat you up.
    • If enemies see Lincoln, they'll be hostile to him. If they hear a gunshot or find a dead body, they'll go looking around and attack Clay when they see him.
    • The people running Marcano's businesses aren't blindly loyal to him; if faced with death, they will offer to work for Lincoln Clay instead.
    • If you kill the witnesses of your crimes, nobody will report them to the police.
    • When Lincoln is asked for the most striking Vietnam memory, his tale is that of brutally torturing a Vietcong soldier's mother to make him surrender.
    • The hastily-planned loosing of a safe with explosives ends up with Danny Burke getting his leg crushed by the falling safe.
    • The fact that the Marcano crime family helped organize the opening bank heist does not stop them from killing the rest of the heist crew except Lincoln, who lives after the bullet merely graces his skull, leaving him with a permanent scar.
    • In the final mission, Sal Marcano's death is not the result of a spectacular boss fight, but rather Sal, depressed after losing his son and criminal enterprise, begging Lincoln to shoot him or shooting himself.
    • The Commission does not care if the Marcano crime family is replaced by the Clay Mob, as long as the new mob pays its kickback.
  • Mario Kart 7 has golden tires as one of the final unlockables. They're remarkably terrible and close to useless in terms of actual driveability, being literally made of solid gold.
  • Mark of the Ninja: Rock Beats Laser is averted, in gameplay and as a plot point. Elites can't be stealth killed with your sword unless you stun them first, but die easy if you trick a fellow mook into shooting them for you. The only reason your ninja clan has survived into the modern era, despite not using firearms and body armour, is because they have a trump card in the form of a poisonous flower that acts as a Psycho Serum that gives you magic powers. Also, the game begins as a result of your clan trying to rob advanced gears from a well-armed security company (due to the aforementioned flowers being all dead without replacement) without getting help from their sole member that can use said magic powers, and possibly use violence against said company's personnel as well. They, predictably, got caught, and the company retaliates as a result.
  • Mass Effect: Andromeda: The trip from the Milky Way to Andromeda took 600 years. As a result, while the Initiative's destination might have seemed like a good place to start new colonies 600 years ago, by the time anyone actually gets there, things have changed a lot.
    • Due to your Player Character's father sacrificing himself to save the PC and making Scott/Sara the new Pathfinder, the leadership of the Andromeda Initative have an Ensign Newbie as the Human Pathfinder instead of the experienced soldier they were hoping for and at least one of them is extremely vocal about it; the others have accepted that you're their best shot at this point and are much more supportive, ex. giving you a Cool Starship because inexperienced or not, you're the only Pathfinder they have.
    • The angara, the species native to the cluster the game takes place in, had a brutal First Contact with the kett who preceded to oppress and outright murder them for eighty years. So, naturally, they don't trust the Milky Way species right out of the gate and it takes a major victory against the kett and the rescue of a major angaran leader before they become open to diplomatic relations. Even then, some angara are suspicious of the Initative and their resident anti-alien faction still tries to kill you even as you help the angaran resistance fight the kett. Even in another galaxy, people still have different opinions when confronted with the same situation.
    • Vetra's Loyalty Mission ends with the party confronting a crime lord who's holding her sister hostage. Said crime lord is an entirely normal human, lacking even specialized armor or biotic powers, so the minute the fight starts, she's gunned down the same as her henchmen.
    • A side-quest on Kadara has Ryder track down a geologist for a "businessman". They eventually find his body in the cave he'd been gathering samples in. Ryder wonders what, on a crapsack world filled with violent scavengers and hungry creatures, was the cause of death. As SAM states, it's gravity. He fell and broke his neck.
  • Mass Effect:
    • Wrex's family armor, instead of being equippable and possibly the best piece of armor for Wrex, is obsolete by the time he retrieves it three centuries after his father's death. It turns out that he only wants it for sentimental reasons. In a setting where new advances in weapons and armor are constantly being developed, old pieces of technology don't hold up very well.
    • At the beginning of the game, Ambassador Udina attempts to expose Saren's operations and crimes to the council. However the only evidence to his argument is Shepard's "vision" and possibly one unreliable eyewitness. This goes about as well as you'd expect. Saren even points out the audacity of such a claim, since even if Shepard was their top spec-ops soldier instead, no civilized court could accept a dream as hard evidence. One dialog option can even have Shepard point this out. With that said, when solid evidence is obtained of Saren's crimes, the Council immediately dismisses him from the Spectres.
  • Mass Effect 2
    • You can ignore the loyalty sidequests, but what do you think will happen when you take a team of people who aren't properly motivated to fight millennia-old Eldritch Abomination servants?
    • Or if you ignore the upgrades, what do you think will happen when a mere frigate with little in the way of weapons and armor is going to do against a race of aliens that cleaved your ship in half at the beginning of the game? Or, if you're feeling extra stupid, make dumb choices about the roles each of your teammates have during the final mission?
    • Ashley and Kaidan show what happens when a close ally is left in the dark when there are people who want them out of the picture. After two years of mourning, they are not even remotely happy when everything available to them says that Shepard faked their death to join a known terrorist group and they're not inclined to believe that Shepard was the first proven resurrection in recorded history or that Cerberus really wouldn't do anything to alter Shepard even if it was true. Of course, this is the one time in the series when Shepard isn't even allowed to make a token verbal defense, like pointing out that they weren't in touch because they'd been in a medical coma for two years as their body was rebuilt due to all the damage they'd suffered from being spaced and crashing into a planet from orbit.
    • Ever wonder why real spacesuits have as much of their life-support system stored inside the suit as they can? The destruction of the Normandy and Shepard's subsequent suffocation before re-entry shows you just how dangerous external air hoses would be in the off chance that they got snagged on something.
    • The Normandy's destruction is also notable as a reminder that even Shepard is mortal. By the end of the first game, Shepard has killed entire armies... but having their ship blown out from under them is just as fatal as it would have been at first level, and it's only the quick intervention of Cerberus that lets you continue using the same character.
    • A Captain is supposed to lead and make firm decisions, not take a neutral route and hope problems fix themselves. This can potentially get Wrex killed by Ashley; if Shepherd both refuses to help the Krogans cure the Genophage but also refuses to destroy the cure, Wrex gets impatient and Ashley shoots him in "defense" of her captain. If you don't make the call, eventually someone else will make the call for you and you'll have to deal with the consequences.
    • Not stopping the reckless teenager from joining an assault against a renowned vigilante leads to the poor dude unceremoniously biting it the second he enters the fray.
    • Delaying the final mission after your crew has been abducted leads to their messy liquefaction at the hands of the Collectors.
    • After the events of the first game, the council, and most people across the galaxy switched to using Thermal Clips as a way to deal with their weapons overheating in combat. In reality, as cool as having a weapon never running out of ammo is, the heating system was a huge double-edged sword that made it possible for soldiers to be defenseless should their weapons overheat at the wrong time. Thermal Clips at least allow soldiers to use their weapons more consistently without fear of them overheating, and can be salvaged for their weapons since they are all designed to be used by any weapon.
  • Mass Effect 3
    • In the Eva Core fight, if you fail to gun her down before she gets to Shepard, you catch a Hot Blade through the face, and die. No medigel, no Heroic Resolve, no barriers biotic or kinetic, nothing will save you.
    • The Extended Cut adds the Refusal ending, in which Shepard refuses to accept the options that the Catalyst provides. This promptly leads to the armada fighting for the Crucible to be completely wiped out, heralding the fall of galactic civilization once again at the hands of the Reapers. What else would you have expected from rallying the galaxy into devoting their resources into constructing and protecting a superweapon regarded as the last hope against the Reapers… and then deciding not to use it?
    • While Take Your Time is in full effect for most of the series, there are two notable exceptions in the third game, which drive home the fact that when you receive word that the enemy is besieging a school full of biotic students or searching for a bomb that can destroy much of a planet, you cannot afford to wait around.
    • Similar to the second game's suicide mission, you should not assume that Ashley or Kaidan will simply take your word that you aren't being controlled by Cerberus, especially not when Cerberus troops are being turned into Husks. How much effort you put into regaining their trust determines whether they survive the standoff at the Citadel.
    • In preparation for the war against the geth, the quarians have armed every single one of their 50,000 ships, and some have the kind of guns dreadnoughts have. You'd think that'd be a hell of an advantage against the geth... except it isn't, because what the ships don't have is good armour, so they've just become even more vulnerable. Worse, by arming all the ships, the quarians forced the geth to target and destroy ships that they normally would have ignored if they hadn't been armed.
      • It's actually even worse than that. By arming all of their, previously noncombatant, ships, the Quarians effectively doubled or possibly tripled their offensive capabilities before re-engaging with hostilities with the Geth. This sudden increase in total firepower, combined with a newly developed technology that specifically hoses the Geth made the entire Geth Collective defect to the Reapers as a means of ensuring their own survival. Under Reaper control, the Geth would engage every Quarian ship down to the last man, armed or not. They wouldn't have any choice in the matter because, due to the fact that they are a machine race, being subservient to the Reapers means that they are simply avatars of the Reapers, rather than unwilling slaves.
    • The finale of the game brought us the long-awaited confrontation between Shepard and Harbinger. Feeling pumped up and ready to take on the leader of the Reapers? Harbinger utterly massacres the entire assault team with little effort from miles away, Shepard included (though they survive, barely). What exactly did you think was going to happen when foot soldiers go up against a 2-km tall Reaper dreadnought?
      • The entire final battle is like this. No matter how many War Assets you've amassed, you're still facing an entire fleet of reapers. Even ground battles against their (expendable) husks go rather poorly, and the heavy weaponry intended to destroy the one(!) Destroyer in the way of the Conduit into the Citadel is mostly wiped out before it can even get into place, and interference prevents the few shots actually fired from landing on target until EDI finds a way around that. And then when you finally seem to be home free, guess who shows up?
    • As pointed out by Nyreen in Omega, Dating Catwoman might seem like a good idea, but that kind of relationship tends to result in conflicts because of the differing ideologies and often won't last long.
    • One might expect the different races to start cooperating once the Reapers arrive and it becomes apparent that everyone is royally fucked unless they start working together. HA HA HA— No. Just about every race Shepard asks for help wants something first: the turians want the krogan to help, the krogan want a cure for the genophage, the salarians want the krogan to not get the cure, the asari are focused on their own fight, the hanar, drell, volus and elcor are basically nonentities, the batarians want the humans to get fucked, the quarians are too focused on wiping out the geth and getting their homeworld back to care about the Reapers, and the geth would have helped, but the quarians trying to kill them all drove them straight into the arms of the Reapers, because it was that or get killed.
    • In the "Citadel" DLC, the Big Bad, Shepard's clone, intends to take Shepard's place. The trope comes into play in two places: the first is the plan to break into the Citadel's archives, because even though the clone's DNA is identical, other forms of identification like fingerprints aren't, and so have to be replaced for the scheme to work. The second is when Shepard points out the single greatest flaw in the plan: the clone only looks like Shepard. S/he doesn't have Shepard's memories or personality. There's no way in hell s/he'd be able to fool anyone who knows Shepard well, like Admiral Hackett.
  • Max Payne:
    • Reality ensued all over poor Vinnie, a mob lieutenant with more enemies than friends and such an incurable fanboy for a cartoon Kid Hero that he'll cosplay without hesitation. Doing so straps him into explosives, and since that puts him in an Enemy Mine situation with Max, you figure The Hero should be able to save his life. And he did. Temporarily.
    • In the third game, the favela Gang Bangers can threaten Max because of their numbers and Max's Cutscene Incompetence. They are still an untrained rabble, however, and are utterly dominated by trained, better-equipped paramilitaries or military police special forces.
    • You could say that reality ensues every time you exit bullet time in the middle of a jump in 3 and land with an audible thud. Or when you don't consider your trajectory properly and, thanks to Euphoria, collapse over an inconvenient couch or slam roughly into a wall and drop straight out of bullet time, struggling to stand up while continuing to take pot shots. Max's experience in this game is much more tactile than the previous games.
      • Leap down a flight of stairs and Max will slide down them and smack into whatever's at the bottom.
    • At one point, a character suicide bombs some mooks. Rather than leave a few burnt corpses, it results in the victims going from mooks to messes.
    • Max spends most of the first two games popping painkillers in his mouth like M&Ms in order to restore his health. Sure enough, come 3, he's addicted.
    • After you defeat the final boss of 3, Max and DeSilva let him live because they already have more than enough to put him away for a while. He even gloats that he'll walk. At which point, Max cripples him because it was even more believable than him managing to survive a plane explosion unscathed. Soon after, he's found dead in his prison cell. Officials comment on whether he committed suicide because he was politically ruined, or if the prison guards decided to execute him for sponsoring an illegal organ trade. Either way, the media decides he's old news.
    • If you find a gun with a laser sight in 3, it will shake violently whenever you do anything, making it very difficult to aim with.
  • MechWarrior
  • Megadimension Neptunia VII plays this for laughs by applying it unexpectedly. Arfoire assumes direct control of a Dark CPU, a skyscraper-sized humanoid. The protagonists scout her out as she chases them, and find out she's moving a lot slower than they expected. Arfoire has no idea of her new body's physics and keeps tripping over.
    • Battling against one runs into this trope in a slew of ways as well. A special field is required just so the party can get high enough to take a proper shot at them. Dark CPUs are so big that basic attacks would be pointless, only special attacks can be used (and certain specials that require being grounded are still unusable). Despite violating the Square-Cube Law, the Dark CPU is still so massive that simply jumping straight up and falling back to earth produces enough of an impact to injure everyone present. And so on.
    • In another scene, the protagonists discover the villains have an airborne battleship and wonder how they were able to procure one. Cut to the villains having a Seinfeldian Conversation about having bought the thing on finance and its effect on their budget overheads.
    • A Cosmic Retcon is applied to the nations, changing their government structure. Lowee now has a lot in common with an RPG class system, with aptitude tests needed to get any sort of job, and when you do, it's all you do. This is a horrific dystopia that gives the guy on top far too much power and prevents those under him from organizing any ability to do something about it.
  • More than a few enemy descriptions in the Mega Man Legacy Collection compilations or in Mega Man 11 mention the corners that Wily had to cut when making them due to time, resource and budget constraints. Even when you're an evil genius, building an army of Killer Robots every other year or so is incredibly costly.
  • Mega Man Zero shows that just marching up and killing the dictatorial leader of a dystopian nation-city isn't going to magically solve everyone's problems. The first time it happens, the Four Guardians simply keep his death a secret and everything in Neo Arcadia continues on as normal, and when said leader is brought back as a puppet leader for Dr. Weil and Zero kills him again, Weil publicizes his death to demonize Zero (because even as a dystopian hellhole, the populace have still been propagandized for years and won't just change their minds at the drop of a hat) before stepping up and taking the reigns himself, turning Neo Arcadia into even more of a nightmarish hellhole.
  • Mega Man Battle Network:
    • The need for proper computer security is hammered in repeatedly, as every almost single incident in the game is caused by black-hat terrorists hacking every element of the heavily networked and computerized world.
    • MegaMan.EXE may be the strongest NetNavi in the world, but Lan himself is just a normal preteen. Multiple times across all six games the usually thuggish, expertly trained and morally unscrupulous villains actively try to kill Lan with their own two hands or with deathtraps that Megaman can't save him from, requiring a Big Damn Heroes from a more physically powerful character. Battle Network 5 even explicitly opens with the villains ambushing Lan and his friends and stealing their Navis to make sure they can't interfere, Lan and Megaman only escape because the villains Failed a Spot Check because Lan passed out behind a dividing wall.
    • In the second game, Lan goes to a foreign country. At the airport, a random NPC offers him a ride to the town. Lan takes it, and gets his battle chips stolen. This is why you don't talk to strangers, kids.
  • The Mental Series has the three protagonists kill their way through four games to get to where they need to be. This is all glossed over until the fifth and final game (befittingly entitled Murder Most Foul), where the three are now the most wanted criminals in the country after all the murders that they have committed.
  • Mega Man Legends 2 combines this with Bag of Spilling as Roll is forced to sheepishly admit that she had to sell all of Mega Man Volnutt's weapons and gear, all high-end and worthwhile, to pay for all of the repairs done to the Flutter, which was damaged near the end of Mega Man Legends. They're Diggers and they just came out of the last game empty-handed and broke (The Bonnes took the gigantic crystal for themselves)
  • Mega Man X5 revolves around the Maverick Hunters attempting to prevent the Eurasia Colony from crashing into the Earth by destroying it. However, even if the player succeeds in destroying it, pieces of the colony still make it through the atmosphere and crash into Earth anyway. It's not the near-extinction-level event that it's implied the entire intact colony colliding with Earth would be, but Mega Man X6 makes it clear that even in the good ending the aftermath is still devastating.
  • Mega Man 11 has Mega Man utilize an old prototype of Wily's Double Gear system made during his university days, after Wily decides to revisit the concept in his next world domination bid. While this initially gives him a slight leg-up on his opponents (who are only equipped with either a Speed or Power Gear,) Wily eventually unveils his perfected Double Gear system, which can run indefinitely, making it objectively superior to Mega Man's years-old, antiquated prototype.
  • Metal Gear:
    • In Metal Gear Solid 3 there's a point where you see The End out in the open and defenseless. If you're quick you can shoot him in the head, averting a boss battle with him later. Or since he's old, you can just wait a week (according to the PS2 internal clock) and he'll die of natural causes. On the other hand, the area is then manned by twenty guards instead of one boss character.
      • Also of note is the camo system. If you decide to hide yourself in a bunch of tall grass but you still have that blue camo you used for the water, you are going to get spotted. Likewise, even if your current camo matches up perfectly with the environment, standing up and running around is going to make you much more noticeable than if you properly crawl through or simply stay in your hiding spot until the enemy passes by.
      • Any meat you keep in your inventory for too long will start to decompose, as Snake has no way of preserving it while on missions. Having him eat the rotten meat anyway will work as well as you'd expect. The only way to keep meat that won't expire is to catch live animals, but not everything is small enough for you to carry around on you, and you can only carry three at most.
      • Snake does the Janitor Impersonation Infiltration routine twice, once as a scientist and once as a maintenance technician. It works fine with the soldiers, who don't know every single scientist or janitor, but if one of the real scientists or technicians gets a single good look at Snake's face they'll realize he's an impostor and your cover will be blown.
      • Don't use a fake death pill while in somewhat deep water, or you'll drown before you get the chance to use a revival pill.
      • Likewise, one of the single most dangerous parts of the Virtuous Mission portion of the game is the Dremuchij swampland, simply for the fact that most of that portion of the level is deep mud. Snake, obviously, can't breathe mud any better than he can breathe water, as you'll quickly discover when one of the gavials in the area knocks you over into it and Snake immediately drowns.
    • Metal Gear Solid 4, even though one of the game's "features" was an expanded arsenal of firearms and associated controls, only on the lowest difficulty, "Liquid Easy", can Snake take enough damage to get away with anything approaching a stand-up or run-and-gun fight, as he's still one old operator against however many enemies, whether human or Gekko.
      • Mention also goes to the game's Final Boss, which goes from a two-part nostalgia trip, to a romanticist revisit of Snake Eater, to a sad scene of two ragged, tired old men slowly slugging their fists at each other.
    • Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance showed that just because Snake and allies shut down the Patriots and their System, the war economy couldn't stop cold. It just went on to the next leg of the arms race, cybernization and nanomachines. Courtney even points out that the other cyborgs Raiden fights are basically SOP troops under another name - only, since there's no System to suppress their emotions or prevent them from knowingly committing atrocities, they're even less predictable than the guys from four years ago.
    • Metal Gear Solid 2 had Solidus Snake point out that, while the huge Metal Gear/sea craft Arsenal Gear was an impressive weapons platform complete with an army of Metal Gear RAYs and a full complement of high-yield nuclear weapons in addition to its information control capabilities, without a proper naval and air escort it was completely useless. "A floating coffin", as he put it.
    • And of course there's the whole stealth aspect of the series. Super Soldier or not, and no matter how badass the previous cutscene made you look, you're still just one guy against a heavily-armed compound full of guards. You're not going last very long without some sneaking, trickery and guerrilla tactics.
    • Try rolling up some stairs and you'll bash your head against them and tumble back down. Raiden can at least cartwheel down stairs without knocking himself on his ass, because his cartwheel doubles as a jump, but only insofar as he can cross short gaps if his destination is level with or below where he starts from - trying to cartwheel up a set of stairs has the same result as Snake trying to roll along them.
    • Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain includes Dynamic Difficulty in the form of enemy soldiers adapting their tactics around yours, making it increasingly difficult to use a single preferred strategy of infiltration. To name a few examples: if they see too many comrades or prisoners being Fulton extracted, they will start reacting to the appearance of Fulton balloons more quickly and even start employing sharpshooters. If you like to go for headshots, they will use sturdier helmets, but if you prefer body shots, they will start using body armor and riot shields. If you prefer to use CQC, they will start carrying shotguns. In many cases, you can send soldiers from Mother Base to intercept supplies of tools the enemies use to counter particular strategies, but you can only stop a few at a time, and only temporarily.
      • Take Your Time is quietly averted during the mission to rescue Kaz Miller. Take more than an in-game day to rescue him and Kaz will have died before you arrive, giving you a Non-Standard Game Over. That's what happens when an amputee is left to bleed to death: he bleeds to death.
  • Metroid:
    • A Space Pirate Log in Metroid Prime reveals that their Science Team tried to make their own versions of Samus's Chozo technology for their use, including the Morph Ball. For reference, the Morph Ball is a device that compacts Samus into a sphere almost one meter in diameter without any lasting physical harm. However, the mechanics of this technology are a mystery even In-Universe (except maybe to Samus), the species that developed the original is endangered if not extinct, and the Pirates are only working off what they've seen in action (not to mention the one person who uses it hunts them for a living). Their attempts at replicating the Morph Ball end up lethally mutilating their test subjects; Science Team deemed it a hopeless investment and moved on from it (which is saying something for Science Team). The closest any non-Chozo entity has come to safely replicating the Morph Ball is Sylux's Lockjaw, which is stolen Galactic Federation technology, and the Federation is Samus's most frequent contractor.
    • While the outcome is the same as in the original game, Samus Returns shows Samus being prepared to kill the Baby Metroid as soon it hatches. Even ignoring that Samus was sent to SR388 to exterminate the Metroids because they've been repeatedly used as living WMDs, one should still be cautious around the newborn spawn of a hostile animal. Samus only dissipates her Charge Beam after enough time to conclude that the hatchling means no harm.
    • Super Metroid features Crocomire, who is defeated by being backed onto an unstable bridge and has its skin gruesomely melted off in acid. After it vanishes off-screen, the ominous pre-boss room theme starts playing. After Samus runs over to the spiked wall, the boss theme starts playing again, which seems to indicate that Crocomire is still alive and ready for another round. The skeleton of Crocomire breaks down the wall... only to comically collapse and die before it can do anything else.
    • Metroid Fusion has two cases.
      • One that makes up a major part of gameplay is the emergence of the X parasites, which are revealed to have been kept in check by the Metroids - the same ones Samus wiped out over the previous two games. Turns out you can't just entirely remove a species from its food chain and expect what's left to sort itself out without severe repercussions to its ecosystem.
      • At the end of the game, Samus is forced to draw a line in the sand by destroying SR388 with the BSL space station. While her planet-destroying exploits have been ignored in the past because the likes of Zebes and Phaaze were space pirate bases or other extremely dangerous places and their presence wouldn't be missed, the Federation had vested interest in SR388 and it was one of their space stations used for extremely dangerous black-ops bioweapon research. Samus' final narration states she fully expects to be court-martialed or declared an outlaw for what likely amounts to an act of terrorism against the Federation's interests.
  • Mindshadow (an adventure game released in 1984) - At one point fairly early in the game, you tie a vine around some rocks near a cliff to climb down. If you're carrying too many items (which, given the genre's "take anything that's not nailed down" mentality, is fairly likely), the vine will snap under the load, resulting in a game over.
  • Minecraft.
    • Swords can be made of (in order of ascending rarity) wood, stone, iron, gold, and diamond. For the most part, the rarer starting materials result in stronger weapons, except golden swords deal as much damage as wooden swords and break even faster. It came as quite a surprise when the players realized the second-rarest material made the weakest weapon, and a lot of people thought it was a bug... until they remembered gold is one of the softest metals in the world; just like in real life, gold weapons are only good for decorative purposes. However, gold is also used in conjunction with redstone in a number of craftable items that are considerably more useful, such as powered track. While gold is a terrible material to make armor, weapons or blunt instruments out of, it is well known as an integral component in precision electronic devices.
    • When parrots were first introduced in Snapshot 17w15a, they were tamed with cookies, likely due to being the closest thing Minecraft has to a cracker. This was a bit problematic as the cookies were clearly chocolate chip and chocolate is actually poisonous to parrots. They tried to anticipate the problem by adding a splash screen in the same update that said "Don't feed chocolate to parrots!", but decided to instead invoke this trope in 1.12-pre3 by making cookies insta-kill parrots, complete with poison particles as it dies. Now you have to tame them with seeds, which are a far more reasonable parrot food.
    • Hostile mobs with a known weakness to environmental conditions (such as sun or rain) will actively seek shelter from those conditions. Skeletons and Endermen won't pursue you into an area hazardous to them.
  • Monster Hunter:
    • 3/Tri/TriG/3U has a quest that pits you against the colossal Elder Dragon Jhen Mohran, chasing it down with a Sandship. Contrary to environmental damage not normally appearing in the game, Jhen actually can and will destroy the Sandship if you don't learn how to use its armaments to hold it off, resulting in a quest failure.
    • World is set in the New World, where the only human settlement is the Research Commission's base in Astera. While it's fairly safe, it must be self-sufficient, as getting a ship there and back is a very risky proposition that depends entirely on the tides cooperating, which often doesn't happen for years at a time. Resources are pretty tight, and everywhere outside Astera's walls is untamed and dangerous wilderness; it's not the sort of place where you want to be having kids. It doesn't stop accidents happening, and with the vicious currents, sometimes they simply have to grow up in the New World.
      • The supply provisioner notes that when the first fleet founded Astera, being a temporary research outpost with a small population, they tried to be a moneyless society. Things quickly got too personal so they had the second fleet bring a few crates of currency so business stayed business and grudges didn't form.
      • In the crossover event with The Witcher, when the Commission tries to pay Gerald a hefty bounty for killing a Leshen, he's forced to turn them down. As he notes, whilst what they're offering him might be a small fortune, it's in a currency none of the kingdoms in his world recognize, meaning it'd be worthless the minute he returns.
    • Spin-off Monster Hunter Stories:
      • For the first time, it's shown what happens when a large monster breaks into a settlement, and it's terrifying. Just in the minutes it took the town militia to respond, a Nargacuga destroys several buildings and causes multiple human fatalities. A year later, the town is still fixing some of the damage.
      • The game takes place in the same world as the main series, and it's immediately pointed out that while bonding with monsters is a traditional practice for Riders, the rest of the world views the ability to tame and ride such destructive creatures with all the fear and suspicion one would expect.
  • MORDHAU:
    • Armor is not useless, and in fact it will save your life in the frontlines if you cannot dodge or parry something. And sharp weapons will have a terrible time going through metal, while doing a number on cloth and flesh. This is especially true of helmets; if you think you can show off that face and hairdo you spend a while on prepare to have your skull repeatedly split in half, impaled, reduced to chunks and separated from the rest of your body.
    • The stamina system makes sure to cover the fact that parrying, swinging and blocking, a battle in general, is a terribly tiring affair. If you're too tired to hold your weapon properly you're going to drop it as soon as you try to catch yet another attack with it.
  • Mortal Kombat:
    • Mortal Kombat 9 is the first game in the series where Johnny Cage performs his infamous Groin Attack against female Kombatants. In previous games, he'd do his split but not punch them, under the assumption that it wouldn't have the same effect on someone lacking testicles (despite the fact that he'd perform the move on robots in Mortal Kombat Gold, which realistically would hurt him more than the robot). In reality, getting hit down there hurts women just as much as it does men, and 9 finally reflected that. No idea why it still works on the robot characters, though.
    • For all of its emphasis on Gorn, a tie-in comic to Mortal Kombat X shows some surprisingly realistic consequences for Kotal Kahn. He earned his nickname of "the Blood God" by drinking the blood of his enemies, even encouraging a Central American tribe to do the same with Spanish invaders. When Kotal Kahn went into the future, he found the tribesmen were all dead because they weren't used to the diseases in the Spaniards' blood, which effectively wiped out their civilization.
    • Brutalities, in general, are essentially what would happen if the special moves acted in real life (i.e. D'Vorah's and Reptile's acid burning the flesh off someone, Kotal Kahn's macahuitl cutting someone in half, etc.).
    • Mortal Kombat X takes place 25 years after the events of the original trilogy, and the returning Earthrealm characters are appropriately older with their adult children joining the fight. While the Edenians are relatively unchanged due to their slower aging, and the divine and undead characters don't age at all, the older humans are at least 50 (Kano is 60, as he was already 35 in the first game) and they look it.
    • Sonya Blade has been established as a Frontline General since Mortal Kombat X. This catches up to her in Mortal Kombat 11 and she ends up KIA, which is the last thing you want happening to a leader and exactly why modern generals do not lead from the front.
    • Mortal Kombat 11 examines Kitana's desires in her arcade ending. She gets to go back in time and view Edenia in its prime. However, despite being Edenian royalty and Edenian by blood, their cultures, attitudes, cuisines and tradition is utterly foreign to her. Turns out, the abuse and restriction from Kitana learning of her heritage is also what shaped her into the woman she is today; and she can't simply unlearn or change that; coming to accept that she is really an Outworlder. However, it doesn't end all negatively, for Kitana will learn the Ancient Edenian ways to make Outworld a much better place in the meanwhile.
    • Losing his wife causes Jax to become a recluse. When someone loses their Living Emotional Crutch who helped them get over their trauma and PTSD, they do not take it well. And knowing his daughter is out there fighting supernatural forces, Jax had a panic attack due to the sheer stress of being unable to reach Jacqui when Earth's communications went down. It makes him very susceptible to Kronika's charisma and promises to change the past.
  • The MOTHER trilogy is no stranger to this either, being devoted to deconstructing the RPG genre:
    • Various adults will question the party's free-range nature, with some pointing out that they should be in school.
    • In EarthBound Beginnings:
      • The game pits Ninten and co. against three giant robots, each more powerful than the last. In a normal RPG, the heroes would defeat the robots with their strength & abilities alone after a challenging battle. As it turns out, giant robots tend to be very resilient and very powerful. These three can instantly KO a single party member, and can only be damaged by heavy artillery or another giant robot.
      • Related to the above, the fight against R7038 ends up leaving Teddy in critical condition, presumably dead in the original 1989 version. Being beaten to a pulp by a robot the size of a large building will do that to you.
      • The Bla Bla Gang stops attacking the party once Teddy joins. Sounds reasonable enough. However, as soon as Teddy leaves the party, the gang members go right back to assaulting the heroes at the slightest provocation. Just because Teddy was acquainted with you doesn't mean that his gang members will consider you an ally.
    • In EarthBound:
      • Ness gets a bike early on, which allows him to get around faster as opposed to just walking everywhere. Once Paula joins him, he can't use the bike anymore. Because it only has one seat.
      • Buzz Buzz is basically the Exposition Fairy and tells Ness of his upcoming journey to save the world. He's also a powerful PSI user and is necessary to defeat the first Starman you meet. Despite this, he is still a bug, and no amount of PSI can stop him from dying when he gets swatted.
      • After Ness defeats Frank Fly and forces the Sharks to disband, he earns the key to the Traveler's Shack and can access Giant Step from there. After completing the dungeon, he is immediately arrested for trespassing. Then, given the trilogy's setting, Ness gets subjected to a police beating (he manages to defeat the police, though).
      • Jeff has a very strained relationship with his father, Dr. Andonuts, since the latter's been absent from most of his son's life. Anyone with a working grasp of human psychology (or has watched Neon Genesis Evangelion) will know that reuniting with an absent parent is a very strained process, as the parent is essentially a stranger to their kid.
      • Many of Ness's enemies show up in Magicant (a world inside Ness's mind), calling Ness out for killing them and their acquaintances. This is inevitable, as what kind of mentally composed person in real life shows no remorse over harming others?
      • Near the end of the game, Giygas pulls a last-minute invasion on Onett, implied to be the start of his conquest of Earth. At this point, Giygas's men have been dropping like flies because of Ness, who's already awakened his true potential and is growing closer and closer to achieving victory. Given this, it's understandable that Giygas would panic and throw in everything he's got to try and stop the kid.
      • After Giygas is finally defeated, you'd expect Porky to be left at the mercy of Ness and his friends, begging for, well, mercy. Guess you forgot that Porky's a devious, borderline-psychopathic child who always finds a way to bail out. Porky proceeds to travel to a different era, and decides to taunt Ness about it twice, as expected from a kid of his nature.
      • Though it was Bowdlerized pretty handily in the US release, Porky's descent into villainy comes from a grounded place in the original translation. An early game scene implies his father's a deadbeat lowlife whose idea of punishment is close to abusive, and the second Porky steals the Mani-Mani statue and starts serving Giygas, his father joins him to ween off his success without so much as telling his family where they're going, only to be left alone when Porky takes Monotoli's chopper to make his escape from Fourside. In the ending, his dad's drowning his sorrows in a "coffee shop" without even thinking of returning home and his mom's started an affair and doesn't even seem to care where her son and husband got to. With a trainwreck family like that, Porky becoming a sociopathic monster serving an Eldritch Abomination isn't surprising in the least.
      • After Giygas' defeat, a boy in Onett taunts Ness about all the homework he'll have to make up after skipping possibly weeks of school to go save the world.
    • In MOTHER 3:
      • After Lucas loses his mother, the trauma he experiences is portrayed disturbingly realistically. He is virtually catatonic for much of the first three chapters, seldomly talking and spending most of his time crying in solitude. As an adolescent, meanwhile, he has several flashbacks of his mom when she was still alive, and chapter six can be interpreted as a product of his grieving imagination. Overall, Lucas forgoes both Angst? What Angst? and Wangst, instead mourning his mother's death as any other person would.
      • On the subject of Hinawa's murder, Flint's immediate response to it is also very realistic for someone like him. He's not afraid to put up a fight and get his hands dirty, and spends the first half of chapter one literally fighting his way through a burning forest. So, when he hears that his wife was found mauled to death, his aggressive side kicks in and he physically lashes out at everything & everyone around him.
      • After Lucas learns that Claus is the Masked Man, the inevitable "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight occurs. However, Lucas can't do anything to fight back for most of the fight. This is a kid who's lost most of his family at a young age, and has been sent to hell and back trying to save the world, all because he is one of a select few people who can use PK Love. Seeing that his final challenge is to relive one of his darkest memories is clearly gonna trigger something in him.
      • Then, when Claus finally regains his senses, he kills himself. Why? His mother died when he was young, his own life nearly ended during a failed revenge attempt, and for most of his life he was the mindless slave of a Psychopathic Manchild. Given the fact that he is still a youth with a developing brain, he instantly jumps to the first (and easiest) solution he can come up with: suicide.
  • Myst III: Exile: Saavedro's plan hinges entirely on Atrus being the one to come after him, and he's so certain that this will be the case that he never bothers to check once the player has followed him. When he's finally confronted with the reality, he flips his shit.
    • Similarly, the fact that you're not Atrus doesn't mean Saavedro's just going to let you go. Once in Narayan, you have to find a solution that works for all parties, because if you don't, this trope will hit you hard: and in most of the options, literally. If you go back to Tomahna without finding a solution, Saavedro will follow and kill you, Atrus and his family. If you leave Saavedro on the platform but go back to him, he'll kill you. If you do as he asks and flip the switches, he'll throw the Releeshahn book into the water and leave. If you get the book back but leave him stuck between the platforms, Atrus will call you out for it. You have to get the book back and let Saavedro go home to get the ideal ending.
    • After Myst firmly established Sirrus and Achenar as a pair of psychopaths who tortured and murdered hundreds of people, is it really so surprising that there's at least one person out there who came looking for revenge?
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