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  • Up:
    • Young Carl, determined to impress Ellie, attempts to walk across an old wooden beam in a decrepit house to retrieve his balloon. He takes a single step and the rotted beam promptly breaks.
    • The reason Russell is collecting badges is because he wants his deadbeat father to finally show up at his final Wilderness Explorer ceremony. His father never showed up, but we are treated to a heartwarming scene between Russell and Carl, who became a father figure to him.
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    • Early on, when Carl hits the man who knocked over his mailbox in the head with his cane, the man is seriously injured and bleeding, and Carl gets into legal trouble.
  • As The Incredibles is an active Deconstruction of the Superhero Genre, many of the narrative protections afforded to heroes and villains are revoked in this story.
    • Invoked when Helen explains to her children that the mercenaries on Nomanisan Island are the kind who won't care what age their targets are.
    • "NO CAPES!": At one point Mr. Incredible is talking with Edna Mode, a superhero costume designer, about getting a new costume. Edna responds with the above when he asks for a cape, citing 5 different incidents when supers were killed when their capes snagged on, or got caught in, something or other. And at the end of the movie, this fate befalls Syndrome and leads him to his Turbine Blender death.
    • Mr. Incredible saves a suicidal man... who promptly sues him for the injuries he caused the man in the rescue. He then stops a train about to fall off of the destroyed tracks... and is sued for damages to said train. Superheroes being held legally responsible for the collateral damage they inadvertently cause is the reason they disappear. The Good Samaritan Laws that exist today to specifically prevent such suits was not enacted during the film's timeframe, leaving superheroes wide open for such lawsuits.
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    • Syndrome's Villain: Exit, Stage Left We Will Meet Again speech where he taunts that he will get Jack-Jack someday is interrupted when Mr. Incredible takes a pot-shot at him with a thrown car, which sends him into a Turbine Blender. Mr. Incredible has just gone through a prolonged fight with the Omnidroid where most of his family was in mortal danger, and Syndrome crossed the final line by going to the Parr family's home and holding his youngest child hostage. No parent would let the attacker of their family just walk away like that.
      • This is actually the third aversion of Talking Is a Free Action. The first time is during an old story Frozone tells Mr. Incredible about a villain who had Frozone at gunpoint and started monologuing (we don't hear the end, but it's heavily implied that Frozone took advantage of the opening). The second time is during Mr. Incredible's first encounter with Syndrome (less successful than the final time mentioned above, but A for effort).
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    • Syndrome trying to be a superhero when in reality he's merely a shady inventor who specializes in constructing fancy gadgets. It goes horribly wrong because while he does know how to use the weapons he has, his nerves get the better of him the moment something doesn't go according to plan, like when his robot "opponent" (see below) recognizes him as a genuine threat and takes out the failsafe shutdown.
    • Syndrome programs a combat robot with learning capabilities that can locate and target specific threats, and also crafts a remote for him to control it, all specifically to be a Paper Tiger he can "fight" against. The Omnidroid recognizes the remote he uses—complete with the off switch—as a threat and moves to take Syndrome out.
    • When Dash fights one of the villain's Mooks, he hits the guy with a flurry of punches... that do almost nothing, since, Super Speed or not, he's a ten-year-old hitting a full-grown man.note 
    • Dash vs the Velocipods, with all of its Family Unfriendly Deaths, is a reality check to High Speed Battles. The first Velocipod gets into a fistfight with Dash as his vehicle is still moving, throws Dash flying off the vehicle, and then flies into a cliff since he was too distracted to notice that he was about to fly right into it. The second Velocipod slices through a palm tree, which comes down on the third one behind him, and then his crippled momentum causes him to crash anyway. The fourth Velocipod does some fancy evasive maneuvers to dodge some rock formations and runs into them anyway. The last two try the clever ploy of trapping Dash between them in a narrow cave... or, rather, the sixth one did, and his uninformed comrade crashed into him when Dash went underwater.
    • After Syndrome's acts of terrorism became known to the public, government officials freeze all of his private assets, crippling virtually all of his resources.
    • While it was satisfying to watch Bob throw his Mean Boss Huph through several walls, the former gets fired instantly for his act. Even after Rick cleaned up Bob's mess and made sure he didn't get sued or arrested, the latter didn't get his job back due to workplace violence being a ground for immediate termination everywhere.
    • Bob using just a fraction of his Super Strength on a regular human leaves Huph in the hospital in a full-body cast, and it's lucky he wasn't killed.
    • Huph not getting called out for his callousness may also count. This is due to the fact that no company in the world, in real life, would permit office employees to engage in fights with muggers or criminals directly (barring there being no other choice) as there is both the threat of legal liability and the very legitimate fear of harm to the employee, fellow employees, customers or the company itself. The only exception is specially-trained security guards who not only know how to deal with such a situation, but have signed legally binding contracts that, under most circumstances, exempt their employers from legal liability in the event that injury or death occurs from the normal duties of the job (although Huph should have at least called the police).
    • Even when you're living rubber and capable of shapeshifting, Helen still can't override how aging and diet affects the size of her butt. Likewise, Bob is visibly paunchy despite his strength and overall toughness.
    • One of the downsides of Super Strength is that when you want to do a little weight training, normal gym equipment just doesn't cut it. Bob has to sneak into a nearby rail yard to use train cars as weights.
    • Syndrome gets sucked into the plane's engine, causing the already damaged plane to catch fire and explode — and since it was hovering above the Parrs' house, the wreckage falls right on it, completely destroying the house.
    • The film also shows that despite the things that superpowers can do, it doesn't mean that the heroes don't feel pain. Bob visibly winces before catching an oncoming train, and whilst holding the R.V. to the plane, Helen cries out in pain when she lets go. Just because they can do those things, it doesn't mean it doesn't hurt.
    • Violet may be able to turn invisible, but it doesn't mean her civilian clothes can.
    • When Syndrome starts firing homing missles at the plane Helen, Violet and Dash are on, Helen demands that Violet creates a force field around the plane. This goes horrendously to say the least; Violet, under intense pressure and fear, is an anxious teenager who has been conditioned since she was born not to use her powers and rarely practices, so she mentally can’t bring herself to conjure a big enough force field effectively in a life-or-death scenario.
    • When Dash embraces his super speed for the first time, he encounters several doses of reality, like running into a bunch of bugs which splatter all over his face or finding out that pausing for a few seconds while running on water will cause him to promptly sink.
    • The movie shows the difficulty in fighting adversaries willing to use lethal force against you. Although the Incredibles aren't intentionally trying to kill anyone, the movie shows how some of their actions in battle result in deaths of several henchmen in their effort to take them down quickly.
    • A major idea throughout is that, competent and powerful as the superheroes are, what they do is very dangerous and should not be attempted by people who aren't prepared to take it seriously.
  • Incredibles 2:
    • The opening battle gives us a twofer. The whole family suits up at the end of the first movie, implying they'll take the Underminer on as a family. However, Bob and Helen are Good Parents who wouldn't purposely endanger their children, so they are told to stay back and look after Jack-Jack and keep the civilians out of the line of fire. Furthermore, the family is without work and, since the end of the prior movie involved Syndrome's aircraft being brought down on the Parrs' house, have to live in a hotel room with what they could salvage from the wreckage.
    • Even though the family saved the day in the first film and garnered a positive public reaction, their subsequent battle with the Underminer and the resulting collateral damage quickly soured their public image. It shows how fickle public opinion can be and how it often takes a concerted effort to promote a positive and accurate representation of Supers.
    • It's pointed out that going after the Underminer for robbing the bank wasn't really necessary because the money in the vault was insured and can easily be replaced.
    • After spending years as the bread-winner and generally dreaming of reliving his super-heroic past instead of living in the present, Bob is terribly, terribly unsuited to life as a stay-at-home dad, even with his superpowers. Caring for a normal baby is tiring enough, but caring for Jack-Jack, who won the Superpower Lottery and has Power Incontinence? Good luck. That's not even going into Barrier Warrior Emo Teen Violet and Super Speed Keet Dash. He does gets the hang of it eventually, but he still need help from his family, Lucius, and Edna.
    • Despite the family's heroic efforts at the end of the first film, the law against supers operating in public doesn't just get reversed immediately. However, it did spawn a movement to have the ban reconsidered.
    • When the Deavors choose someone to show that the ban should be reconsidered, Elastigirl is considered the ideal hero for bringing Supers back in the public's good graces because, thanks to the very nature of her powers, she's far less of a Destructive Savior than her husband or Frozone.
    • Elastigirl's first act for the movement is stopping a runaway train. Like many other moments in movies like this, she unhooks the engine from the rest of the train and stops it. After she stops it, however, the engine comes back, almost bumping the other side off the rail. In many a movie, the hero has unhitched the train and never explains what happens to the cars they unhitch.
    • Violet learns that her crush, Tony, does not remember her thanks to Bob. It was unintentional on his part, but Violet is furious because she just got the courage to finally ask him out on a date, only for him to completely forget about her due to his memory being wiped. For the first time, she's having to face the real and unfair consequences of being a superhero and trying to have a normal teenage life. She impulsively decides to renounce being a superhero and tries to destroy her supersuit by stuffing it down the kitchen sink garbage disposer. However, she quickly discovers just how sturdy Edna's creations can be.
      • Also, while Tony was initially shocked at finding out that Violet's a Super, he later felt regretful that he just ran away instead of trying to talk to her about it.
    • Winston states that an important part of his plan to re-introduce Supers is Hero Insurance because Supers are still only human and will make mistakes, so he's setting up malpractice insurance just like many high-risk professions have in real life.
    • The raccoon, despite being somewhat anthropomorphic, is portrayed as an actual wild animal, snarling, hissing and spitting at Jack-Jack during their fight.
    • Elastigirl has difficulty hanging onto a jet in mid-flight, and it takes her and Voyd multiple tries to finally get Helen on the plane.
    • A threefold one occurs when Elastigirl and Evelyn are falling from the plane. First, there's the acknowledgment that Soft Water doesn't apply and Evelyn hitting the surface will kill her. Secondly, Voyd can't just immediately portal Elastigirl and Evelyn back to the ship because it's been shown that objects leave her portals at the same speed they enter, so Voyd has to wait for Helen to slow down Evelyn's velocity. Finally, Voyd recognizes that even with Helen's parachute technique, they are both too close to the water to decelerate in time, and thus she shifts her final portal so they emerge horizontally to give them more time to slow down.
  • Brave:
    • Merida abuses a loophole so that she can get out of an arranged marriage. Not only does this cause a massive argument with Queen Elinor (leading to Merida's bow getting burnt and her running away), the resulting humiliation to sons of the various clan lords royally pisses the clan lords off, and almost causes a civil war to break out. In short, the Loophole Abuse made everything go From Bad to Worse.
    • Merida, a skilled archer, shoots at the bear Mor'du and hits him... and has little or no effect on him. Annoying Arrows is a reality when the bow is light enough to be drawn by an average-sized teenage girl, however strong she may be, and the target is an unbelievably massive bear.
    • This movie gives a realistic portrayal of the repercussions of parents trying to mold their older children into being what the parents want them to be. That is, Merida is understandably resentful towards her mother for forcing her to be a prim and proper lady.
  • Ratatouille:
    • After everything seems set for a Happily Ever After, it gets derailed into more of a Bittersweet Ending. Despite everyone's efforts to revive Gusteau's, it's shut down for good when the Health Inspector is eventually freed from the closet he was tied up in, who is entirely unmoved by the fact that the rats cooking food in the kitchen are perfectly sanitary. Rats in a restaurant, in any context, are a massive health code violation. Remy, Linguini, and Colette do bounce back and open up another restaurant (with a strong hint that it's financed by now-former food critic Anton Ego), keeping it from falling into a full Downer Ending.
    • Anton Ego's positive review of Gusteau's, in light of the rat infestation, causes him to lose both his credibility and job.
    • Linguini reveals his secret to the kitchen, only to have everyone, even the waiter and Colette, all walk out due to feeling betrayed. Linguini spent the whole film appearing like a hidden gem in the rough to the kitchen, magnificently rising to the occasion after Colette teaches him the ropes... just to reveal that he has no talent and is relying on an animal of all things to cook. Only Colette (the only one he was really emotionally connected to) chooses to come back.
    • Linguini and Colette's Falling-in-Love Montage is rudely interrupted when Remy falls off Linguini's head, and is abruptly faced with the very real danger of being a rat in the middle of the street.
  • Monsters University
    • Towards the climax of the film, Mike and Sulley are about to be kicked out of Monsters University for failing to meet the academic standards of the school. But then, they perform a feat of scaring wizardry the likes of which the entire monster world has never seen before, one that was thought to have been impossible. Impressive as it might have been, they still get expelled. The most Mike and Sulley get for all their trouble is a pat on the back and a "good luck" from Dean Hardscrabble.
    • At first, Sulley impresses all the teachers with his natural scaring ability. But because he didn't spend any time studying, when he is properly evaluated, he finds that a single great roar can't account for every child.
      Prof. Knight: One scary face does not a scarer make, Mr. Sullivan.
    • Also, Mike clearly has passion and knowledge for Scaring, but he lacked natural talent and physical ability, meaning that he is incapable of being scary by himself since children find him too cute-looking.
    • A more lighthearted version in the end of the movie as well: The pair do get to work at Monsters Inc... as mail clerks, because they don't have the qualifications to immediately be scarers. However, as the years go by, they work their way up to becoming the top team in the company through hard work and determination like many people do.
    • Likewise, while Mike doesn't get to be a scarer like he wished, his hard studies do make him an asset to those that have the necessary appearance. So what does he do? Become a coach, first to his fraternity to help them through the scare games which ultimately allows his frat mates to join the scare program in the following semester and eventually become scarers later in life, and eventually Sulley's main assistant when they're hired for the main floor.
  • Coco:
    • Even though Miguel is a plucky, street-smart Kid Hero, he needs a lot of help from the adults in order to make it out of the Land of the Dead. In fact, part of his Character Development is realizing that, while his older family members are flawed individuals, he shouldn't reject their legitimate help.
    • Imelda has spent the majority of her life and all of her afterlife believing that her husband abandoned her and left her to raise their daughter on her own. Even when she finds out that he eventually regretted it and actually tried to come home but was murdered before he could do so, she doesn't forgive him immediately. Several decades' worth of resentment and anger can't simply disappear overnight, and Héctor still left her and Coco in the first place. In the epilogue, however, which takes place a year later, she is shown to have reconciled with him and they have rekindled their romance. She did eventually forgive him, but she needed time in order to do so.
    • Héctor gives a realistic response when asked if fame was worth leaving their family behind. They genuinely regretted leaving and they never got over their homesickness.
    • Dante attempts to save Miguel after Ernesto throws the boy off a roof but due to Dante's smaller size, he isn't strong enough to halt the fall. Pepita, who is much larger than both of them, is the one who ends up saving Miguel.
  • Toy Story
    • Painfully enforced for Buzz with the four words from a TV commercial box, "NOT A FLYING TOY". Buzz constantly tries to fly throughout the film (since he initially believes he's a real Space Ranger), but constantly falls out of the air unless he can manage to glide. Even then, he can't do it for long and it entirely depends on him climbing something first. The first time was just luck since he had his eyes closed and was caught by various objects. The second time he tried to do it by climbing from a stairway banister and plummeted as soon as he jumped from the railing.
    • Through most of the movie, Buzz genuinely believes he's a real space ranger. However, when shown that he's indeed a real toy, he goes through an existential crisis since his beliefs have been shattered and he doesn't know what to do. It eventually takes some heart to heart from Woody that making his owner, Andy, happy is more of a noble goal to snap him out of it.
    • When Woody and Buzz first meet Sid's toys, they're mis-mashes of various toys cobbled together, which completely terrifies the former. When he actually talks to them, however, they turn out to be friendly because freaky appearances don't automatically make them monsters.
    • Earlier in the film, Woody accidentally knocks Buzz out of Andy's room through an upper window (he meant to knock him into a space behind a desk) by using RC. RC, being sentient, knows when someone's controlling him and it doesn't take long for him to inform the others what happened, turning them against Woody. They take a long time to trust the cowboy again, and it takes Buzz corroborating Woody's account before they even consider forgiving Woody for what they viewed as a selfish act of treachery.
      • Likewise, the little stunt keeps the others from trusting Woody and foils an attempt get back home (though Buzz's Heroic BSoD doesn't really help, either) as well as in the climax, when he needs RC to help Buzz reach the moving van but forgets to explain things in his haste.
    • In the climax, Woody uses RC to help Buzz reach the moving van, but the jostling from the other toys causes the controls (and RC by extension) to go out of control. Even when he's finally able to control it properly, Andy had been probably playing with it beforehand, and the little car being pushed to its limits causes the batteries to die at a critical moment.
      • Also in the climax, the toys try to use Slinky to pull Woody, Buzz and RC to the moving van, but his thin metal coil can only take so much, and he can't pull them back since his body doesn't act like a rubber band when he's holding onto something.
      • Again in the climax, after the RC/Slink plan doesn't work, the duo remember the match Woody's carrying and the rocket Buzz is tied to. Woody ignites it and is set to light the fuse... and a passing car blows out the match. Though the duo manage to get it lit via the sunlight reflecting off of Buzz's dome, it isn't until they're about to take off that Woody realizes that the rocket he lit is a firecracker, which means...
        Woody: Wait a minute, I just lit a rocket. Rockets explode!
  • Toy Story 2
    • Jessie reveals that she was abandoned in a box for years by her original owner, Emily. While she ends up happy with Andy, she still has some issues. In Toy Story 3, she has a panic attack when she thinks Andy was about to throw her away, claiming it to be like Emily all over again, and in Toy Story of Terror!, she's revealed to be downright claustrophobic, freaking out if she's trapped in a box.
    • This one actually becomes a main theme of the series going forward: sure, the toys won't age and are essentially immortal as long as they keep themselves together, but their owners aren't and will eventually get older, outgrow them, and find other interests. This is a fact Woody grapples with numerous times, starting with this movie.
    • On the flipside, however, we have Stinky Pete, a toy that was never being played with since he spent most of his life in his box, causing him to become bitter. So his motives in the film are understandable, because while being on display in a museum is just trading one case for another, at least it's something resembling a purpose in life. When Woody and his friends foil that and stick him in a girl's backpack, supplementary material reveals he's actually happy because he was finally played with for once.
    • At the beginning, Rex fails a Buzz Lightyear video game because his short arms can't reach the pads quick enough to press the fire button needed at a critical moment.
    • During the journey, Buzz's group have to get into a toy store, but their size presents some problems. For starters, getting across a busy street is very daunting, so they manage to do so via going under traffic cones. That almost gets them run over at points since the drivers on the road think they're part of roadway work, which in turn cause some accidents. At one point, this causes a truck transporting a concrete tube to have the tube snap from its binds and roll off the flatbed, with Potato Head unaware that he's about to get crushed. When they reach the automatic door at the store, their initial jumping on the pad doesn't register it since they're not heavy enough on their own. They all have to jump all at once to get it to open.
    • After Al swipes Woody, he gets a toy repairman to bring him back to mint condition, which is needed for his deal with a toy museum. Since Woody is a very old toy, the job is rather extensive and once it's done, the cleaner promptly tells Al that his work is meant for display only and a toy like Woody wouldn't survive any more of the rougher moments of child's play. This fact finally becomes relevant in Toy Story 4.
    • In the climax, Woody confronts Pete with the latter easily knocking him down. Woody with his floppy cloth limbs wasn't built for strength, after all, and Pete's bulkier plastic design allows him to easily overcome Woody, not to mention that he still has his pickaxe accessory. It's only when Buzz and the other toys show up at the last moment that Woody is saved.
    • Since the toys are sentient and left the luggage, Al loses out on his deal with a Japanese toy museum at the end of the movie since the events of the climax kept Woody, Jesse, Bullseye and Pete from arriving in the shipping he had sent them in.
    • In the ending, the protagonists take a luggage cart home and dump it on the sidewalk in Andy's neighborhood. The next morning, the neighbors are huddled around it, utterly confused as to how it even got there.
  • Toy Story 3
    • As warned by Pete in the second film, Andy eventually did get older and the movie opens with him at 18. While he still has the toybox in his room, he just keeps it as a memento of his childhood and hasn't played with the toys in a long time. Even though Woody ended the second film expecting this, when the time finally did come, it's a tough experience for him and the rest of Andy's toys.
    • The second movie introduced Buster, a puppy dog Andy got at the end of the first movie who would aid Woody briefly at the start of the movie. In this one, when the toys sans Woody are accidentally put into a garbage bag after a mix-up, Woody calls for Buster to help again. But since years have passed, not surprisingly Buster is much older, slower and not as lively as he was seen prior. Falling asleep and rolling over right on top of Woody when he tries to ride him again.
    • When the protagonists are put into the Caterpillar room at the daycare, they find out that it's a pre-school type room and the kids are toddlers. Since the protagonists are used to being played with by older kids, they find themselves treated pretty roughly.
    • As noted in Lotso's backstory, his owner was just a child and didn't know that the toys are sentient, in accordance with The Masquerade. So of course she wasn't being vindictive when she accidentally left them him, Baby and Chuckles during a picnic outing as he keeps trying frame the incident. Additionally, the picnic was during a road trip, so more it's likely that the parents couldn't retrieve them since they wouldn't know where they stopped in the first place, and that's if they decided that looking for three toys was worth the time and expense. Even then, her getting a replacement Lotso was just a logical thing to do since she did love him and it took days for Lotso, Baby and Chuckles to get back to their owner's home.
    • During the escape from Sunnyside, Potato Head is separated from his toy body and has to use his parts on a tortilla to get back to the others. He ends up having to deal with a bird that keep trying to eat him and ends up having to put his pieces on a cucumber.
    • Chatter Telephone notes that previous escape attempts from Sunnyside failed due to lone toys facing off against Lotso's more organized and entrenched group. The protagonists get further than most because they're more experienced with working together. On the other hand, Lotso's group have long since identified certain exits are and manage to cut them off once they've nearly escaped.
    • Before the climax, Baby turns on Lotso and throws him in the dumpster. However, when Woody opens the lid of the dumpster to let another toy escape, Lotso manages to resurface and pulls Woody into the dumpster with him, setting up the climax.
    • And in said climax, the heroes take pity on Lotso while trying to get out of the furnace and save him. So he has a change of heart to help them in their time of need, right? Nope! He just uses it as an opportunity to get rid of the group once and for all. Luckily, the group are saved by the aliens and their handling of a giant claw. When Potato Head and Hamm suggest paying back Lotso for the betrayal, Woody tells them to forget it. If Lotso isn't going to give up his stubborn and misguided beliefs when they keep telling him to, he's not worth any more of their time.
      • Indeed, karma comes to Lotso not long afterward. While Woody's group knows to look around if any humans are heading their way before making a move, allowing them to hide when needed, Lotso doesn't and is instantly found when trying to play dormant and gets strapped to the front of a dumpster truck by an adult who loved the toy as a kid. "Where's your kid now?" indeed, eh Lots?
  • Toy Story 4
    • As the film opens, it does show the usual tragedy of a hero, namely you can't save everyone. Woody had went down to rescue RC when he set to be given away. While he does manage, Bo ended up being pick for a salvation bin. Woody went to save her, but ultimately she decided to be given away, much to his heartbreak.
    • While Bonnie does love having Woody as part of her group of toys, he isn't her favorite since she would have a different style of playing with her toys than Andy. Plus, a child can only play with so many toys, to the point where one or two are bound to get sidelined. Bonnie even lampshades this, establishing why she's playing with Woody less and less.
    • Likewise, Woody is used to being a leader during his days with Andy since he was the favorite. But since becoming Bonnie's toy, he eventually learn this isn't the case with her group of toys. He admits it's just a force of habit and gladly backs off when told as such.
    • That said, while Dolly is an efficient manager of the toys, efficient managers can get caught up in procedure over people — which is why Woody, not Dolly, recognizes that Bonnie really needs a toy companion.
    • While Andy's speech to Bonnie in the last film about how important Woody was to him was certainly heartfelt and meaningful, it was also something that a child of Bonnie's age could not fully grasp the weight of. As such, she feels she has no reason to take special care and attention of Woody now that he's her toy.
    • Bonnie's first day of kindergarten quickly overwhelms her, and it doesn't help her case that she isn't allowed to take any toys with her to comfort herself.
    • Toys wear down over time. If you pull on a toy's pull-string hard enough, you risk ripping out the voice box.
    • The minor difference between Woody and Buzz's voice-boxes in this film actually highlights an interesting reversal on the long-lasting appeal of old-fashioned versus newer toys. Namely, Woody's voice box runs on a mini-record and still sounds crisp despite being over half a century old. Meanwhile, Buzz's voice box, which uses an electronic speaker, sounds noticeably aged and distorted after more than two decades of wear.
    • It takes more than a Rousing Speech to get someone to overcome their demons. Despite Bo's speech about how great a daredevil he is, Duke Caboom is still haunted by how disappointed his kid was by his meager stunt skills and loses confidence.
    • Gabby Gabby has become obsessed with Harmony, the granddaughter of the antique shop owner, believing that she will one day take her as her own toy. Gabby Gabby insists she's been practicing playtime with Harmony and has staked her entire life on being loved by Harmony, or at least the perception of Harmony she has developed in her own mind. When she does get her chance to be taken in by Harmony, the young girl looks her over for a moment, but dismissively casts her aside, proving that Gabby Gabby's perception of Harmony was just that - a perception.
    • Instead of trying to find her parents by herself, the lost little girl who adopts Gabby Gabby tries asking a police officer for help to find them. The police officer effectively reunites the girl with her family in less than a minute.
    • Ultimately in the end, Woody decides to stay with Bo as the events of the movie showed that while he does care for Bonnie, she really just needs someone who can look out for her during her younger years, a prospect both Jessie and Buzz as well as Bonnie's previous toys can fulfill without him. Essentially, it's the equivalent of retiring from a job and passing over the reigns to somebody else.
  • Cars:
    • Lightning forces his truck driver, Mack, to drive him to his next race non-stop through the night despite Mack complaining about drowsiness, though Lightning claims he'll keep talking to him through the trip. Next scene, Lightning himself falls asleep and Mack keeps nodding off and nearly does fall asleep en route thanks to some punk Hot Rodders. He's only snapped awake when one of them sneezes. Mack himself even lampshades how dangerous driving while drowsy is.
    • After Lightning accidentally falls out of Mack's trailer, he tries desperately to catch up to him. The thing is, he's on a highway with other similar looking trailer trucks at night (as highways tend to have a lot of shipping trucks at that time), plus Lightning's "headlights" are just stickers. He eventually thinks he sees Mack and catches up to him... and it's someone else entirely. Since he didn't bother learning the route to his destination, Lightning takes the wrong exit and gets lost.
    • Lighting's arrested after accidentally vandalizing Radiator Springs, given community service by the local judge, and takes it rather poorly. He thinks to just speed off once the boot is taken off his wheel... however, he only gets as far as the town limits before he suddenly loses power and finds the Sheriff and Sally there waiting for him. They inform him they siphoned his gas the night before while he was sleeping, since they pretty much figured he'd pull a stunt like this before he served his sentence. They even correctly guessed where he would coast to a stop in order to greet him.
    • When Lightning is forced to re-pave the road he accidentally destroyed while zooming around Radiator Springs for community service, he tries to speed up the job to get it out of the way quicker so he can legally leave the town. However, the tar machine is only effective when pulled slowly, so his first attempt is a mess not even fit to ride on. And after his race with Doc, he now has to remove all the jagged asphalt and re-do the road correctly, making him stay in the town for even longer than if he just did the job right in the first place.
    • Speaking of said race, Doc makes a deal with Lightning that if he can beat him in a race, he'll dismiss the community service. Lightning takes him up on the offer, as he thinks it'll be easy enough to beat an older car. However, when Lightning shoots out from the starting line, Doc... doesn't do anything and only drives at a normal pace while having Mater come with him. Why? Well, he knows there's a hard curve on the track and, after seeing Lightning's racing style and "I'm the fastest" attitude, predicts he'll turn into it full speed. The result has Lightning skidding off the track and right into a cactus patch, since he does not know how to turn on dirt properly. Later in the movie Doc shows Lightning a way to turn into it without going too wide which Lightning later uses in his race later on.
    • Radiator Springs was a nice little town back in it's heyday, but that was at a time when roads that followed the landscape were commonly used because they were cheaper and easier to build. When the nearest highway was constructed to lessen travel time, it was away from the town (since modern road development creates more direct routes) and ultimately caused a lot of businesses to shut down due to lack of traffic flow, with only a handful of residents left surviving on the business from travelers lost enough to end up in Radiator Springs. It's only thanks to Lightning's endorsement that it thrives again as a tourist spot at the end of the movie.
    • While Chick Hicks, Lightning's rival, did win the Piston Cup, he did so through blatantly dirty means by causing The King to spin out once he's near the finish line to catch up to Lightning, who then abandons his lead to help the King. Since all three of the aforementioned cars were in the leading positions, the stadium's cameras were filming them and caught the entire incident live, broadcasting it to both the stadium's audience and those watching the TV broadcast of the race. Thus, when Chick goes to his award ceremony, he's booed off stage by the stadium's crowd and likewise loses his big endorsement deal with Dinoco since they don't want to be associated with a poor sportsman like him. Lightning, meanwhile, is respected for his selfless deed and is the one who's considered for said endorsement.
  • Cars 2:
    • During the race in Tokyo, Mater acts as Lightning's coach during his run, but he's also acting as a spy on the lookout for the Lemons and in contact with Holly and Finn. As multi-tasking in any context is difficult, he ends up getting his communications crossed while trying to give Lightning advice. Needless to say, it ends up confusing Lightning on the track and ultimately leads to his loss.
    • The Lemons manage to capture Finn, Holly, and Mater and were smart enough to remove their ammunition when they tied them to their trap. However, Mater, after getting over his Heroic BSoD, finds that the rotation of his machine gun still causes friction against his ropes and uses that to free himself. And then it turns they predicted even that too - or at least, the possibility they'd break free anyway; heroes often do that - and snuck a bomb onto Mater's gas filter as a back-up plan.
    • In the climax, Finn goes after Zündapp who runs to his henchboat. The henchboat tries to use a magnet to pull Finn away from Zündapp, so Finn uses that to his advantage by dropping the mines from his tires. Since they're also metal, they're pulled into the magnet and a second later, boom.
  • Cars 3
    • As the film shows, Technology Marches On and soon more upgraded race cars start hitting the track in an analogy of younger athletes. It doesn't take long for them to soon replace Lightning's fellow racers and Lightning himself starts being outclassed by some of them, least of all a rookie called Jackson Storm. In the end, while he does try to continue racing, he comes to accept that he's getting old and can't keep pace with the newer generation. However, in a similar vein to the Monsters University example above, he can help share his skills, which he ultimately does in Cruz, his trainer turned protégée whom he lets take his place in the climax of the movie. He ultimately becomes her coach.
    • Lightning's crash in the middle of a race comes about because he loses focus while trying to push himself to catch up to Jackson. When you're going at high speeds like that, a moment's hesitation is all that's needed to send you flying off the track.
    • Jackson seems like a formidable racer, but only because he uses his simulator to plan out the best way to navigate through the courses ahead of time, training himself to adjust his speed in order to push himself to the front to get his results. None of this prepares Jackson for being able to improvise and adapt to changing conditions, so when Cruz actually starts catching up to him with her more unorthodox methods taught from Lightning (who himself uses Doc's moves), he can't adapt properly to prevent her from doing so, and ultimately has to resort to trash talking and trying to ram her off the course to keep his lead, which ends up failing him.
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