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"Ricky Bobby wins! You'll never see anything like that in a hundred lifetimes! It was completely illegal and in no way will count, but man that was something!"

Films or film franchises with their own pages


  • The main characters of 21 Jump Street are tasked with going undercover in a local high school in order to bust a drug ring being run by the students and faculty, their youthful look being the reason why they are chosen. They try their best to behave the way they did when they were in high school years prior, but on the first day, they're met with a student culture which has evolved and radically changed since they left. Students no longer act in social cliques, and are unimpressed with their environmentally unfriendly and fuel inefficient car. Jenko's attempts to assert dominance by punching a guy arguing with him only shock and disgust the other students, and his further attempts to mock the guy by accusing him of being gay only further buries Jenko when it turns out the guy is actually gay.
    • Furthermore, many of the students and faculty have trouble buying that Jenko is high school aged because his muscular development is far beyond that of a normal 17/18-year-old. He has to explain that he was held back a few years to get them to believe he's a high schooler.
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    • Hanson and Penhall get distracted during an argument, resulting in the Big Bad shooting and killing them both. Even in a comical movie like this one, a ruthless criminal isn't going to just let you stand by and talk when you are the only thing stopping them from escaping.
  • The people infected by the rage virus in 28 Days Later still have physical needs, but are too insane to address them. It doesn't take long for all of the infected to die of mass starvation a few weeks after the initial outbreak.
  • Several times throughout Annie (2014).
    • Pepper, the oldest foster kid, hides her feelings behind affected cynicism. But her real feelings come out early on, when she points out that she's almost thirteen, and almost nobody wants to adopt a teenager.
    • Unlike other versions, this one depicts the bureaucracy around adoption. Just getting Annie to move in with Stacks temporarily involves lots of paperwork, and an eye is kept on Ms. Hannigan by social service workers. (Hannigan is still terrible, but the girls cover for her in front of the city inspectors because they'd rather not have to move to yet another home.)
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    • As mentioned elsewhere, the educational system has failed Annie. The movie starts with her in school giving an essay. But she can't read and can only write a little besides her own name.
    • A political analyst whose paycheck depends on his client winning might just do anything to make that happen.
    • Trying to kidnap a famous girl in New York City in a car in the age of smartphones and helicopters does not go very well at all.
  • The A-Team: The team clears their name, and the bad guy, a rogue CIA agent, is taken away by his employer to a nonspecific future. Then the team is arrested for breaking out of jail, and because the Government needs someone to blame for all the damage they've done. They should have bought Wrongful Accusation Insurance.
  • A cut scene from the original script for Ace Ventura: Pet Detective had Ace trying to dispatch Einhorn's Mooks by releasing a metal hook that is hanging from some chains, causing it to swing downward towards the bad guys. Instead of just rendering the men unconscious or sending them to the floor, the momentum and weight of the chains would actually decapitate the goons, causing a horrified Ace to scream that he just wanted to knock them out.
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  • American History X: After learning the error of his ways, a former member of a Neo-Nazi gang is shot dead by the black boy he pissed off at the beginning. In real life, Easily Forgiven is very rare, and requires at the very least some attempt to make amends to the people you wronged. Ironically, the boy who is shot to death was mostly a Jerkass when he was a Neo-Nazi, while the older brother who survives his own redemption committed actual atrocities.
  • Played for Laughs in Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (like everything else in this movie) after the absurdly over-the-top fight scene between the news teams.
    Ron: Boy...that escalated quickly. I mean, that really got out of hand fast.
    Champ: It jumped up a notch.
    Ron: It did, didn't it?
    Brick: Yeah. I stabbed a man in the heart.
    Ron: I saw that! Brick killed a guy! Did you throw a trident?
    Brick: Yeah! There were horses and a man on fire, and I killed a guy with a trident.
    Ron: Brick, I've been meaning to talk to you about that. You should find yourself a safe house or a relative close by. Lay low for a while, because you're probably wanted for murder.
  • Related: Angelina Jolie did an interview where she took fans' questions submitted online, and one of them was (to paraphrase), "Based on your background in action/spy movies, what would you suggest do if you suspected your partner of cheating?" Her response? "I'd just leave. If you have to play those kinds of games, clearly it's not working out. So just leave."
  • The alternate ending of Army of Darkness shows that just because a sleep is magical in nature, it doesn't stop you from oversleeping just like you could every other time.
    • Ash's reaction to time displacement is similar to Marty Mcfly's. Seeing as he's just lost all his friends, has only a dead end job waiting for him back in the 1980's, was behind the times in his attitudes, and can practically be a god in medieval Europe with his martial arts prowess and tech-know-how, you might think Ash would accept the offer to stay and become king. Nope. He's leaping at the opportunity to return to the one time he's familiar with through the whole film, and he only sticks around long enough to stop the deadites and save people.
  • Atomic Blonde has main character Lorraine undergoing the effects of taking part in car crashes and various fights.
    • The movie is told in flashback after all this action. Thus, the first sight of Lorraine is rising from a bathtub with a body covered in bruises, a black eye and her knuckles cracked and swollen.
    • Lorraine engages in a brutal five-minute plus fight with several men in a stairway and an apartment, taking various blows while smashing up furniture. By the time it's done, a bloodied Lorraine can barely stand let alone fight.
  • In The Awaken Punch, a 1970's Kung Fu movie, the hero tracks down the leader of the gangsters responsible for murdering his family and kidnapping his love interest and kills him after a brutal fight. S.O.P., right? Well, then he gets arrested for nine major offenses, including the deaths of six other gang members. The End!
  • The Back to the Future films:
  • This was demonstrated over the course of the Tim Burton Batman films too: Bruce Wayne learns that slaying the man who murdered his parents in the first movie doesn't automatically make him feel better, and he spends the second movie violently lashing out at and killing even more criminals, until he finally learns to control his anger in the third movie.
  • As in the animated original, in Beauty and the Beast, Beast had just taken Belle prisoner and been a near-total asshat to her, and then he has the audacity to ask her out for dinner. Never mind that he put in an effort to be polite about it, Stockholm Syndrome has no effect on her, and also as in the animated original, she angrily—and quite understandably—refuses him.
    Belle: You take me as your prisoner, and now you want to have dinner with me? Are you insane?
  • In Beverly Hills Cop II, Chief Lutz is an egotistical moron who's abusive to everyone around him and takes credit for "solving" the Alphabet Crimes. In the film's climax, Lutz and the Mayor of Beverly Hills show up to find that Axel, Taggert and Rosewood have uncovered how the Alphabet Crimes were all a massive mix of insurance fraud and gun running scheme. Rather than be happy they stopped a huge gun shipment, Lutz refuses to listen to any of the obvious evidence they bring, insists he still "solved" the crime (despite the true perpetrator being pushed into a squad car), screams at the trio for showing him up and vows to drive all three of them off the force and into jail. At which point, the Mayor announces he's sick and tired of Lutz's abusive attitude to his own men and obvious incompetence and fires Lutz on the spot (adding he wishes he'd done it months ago).
  • In Big Daddy, Sonny convinces his own cynical father that he has learned to be a responsible adult and everyone in the courtroom applauds... only for the judge to point out Sonny has broken the law by "kidnapping" Julian and should still go to the jail. Kevin, Julian's biological father steps in and refuses to press charges. In the end, Sonny is still refused custody of Julian due to his actions but he stays friends with Julian while Julian goes with Kevin.
  • In the finale of Big Game, Oskari finally manages to draw a bow properly and shoots at Morris. Cue gratuituous slo-mo, epic music and... arrow bouncing off harmlessly. Like every Secret Service agent, Morris is wearing a kevlar vest, after all.note 
  • Big Trouble in Little China: At the start of the climactic battle, Jack lets off a blast from his semi-automatic weapon into the ceiling, causing debris to fall on him and knock him unconscious.
  • Brightburn
    • It doesn't matter how awesome your parenting is otherwise, nothing could prepare you for a kid developing superpowers, becoming influenced by technology beyond human understanding and suddenly revealing that his nature wasn't as human as you thought. Kyle and Tori did a great job raising Brandon, but are completely blindsided by the aforementioned factors and ultimately handle it... poorly.
    • Being a Flying Brick means that you can't just slam into someone at full speed and expect them to come out fine. Case in point with Chief Deputy Deever, who's turned into paste as soon as Brandon hits him.
    • What you think of as a Grand Romantic Gesture can come off as extremely creepy if you're not careful about it. Caitlyn is rightfully freaked out by Brandon intruding in her bedroom and messing with her laptop.
    • A heartbreaking example. Near the end of the movie, after Tori Breyer was calmed down her son Brandon after his rampage, she takes off his mask and hugs him. She tell him that, despite all he has done she still thinks there is good in him, and Brandon tells her he wants to do good. As they hug, Tori tries to stab Brandon in the back using a shard of the alien spacecraft that can hurt him. Despite the love she has for her son, after seeing the damage he has caused she can't trust him. Even more tragically, it is implied that Tori did get through to Brandon, but being betrayed by her destroyed whatever good he had left in him. After she tries to stab him he killed her, and went on a rampage across the world massacring more people.
  • Played subtly at the start of Blazing Saddles. No, quicksand is not an all-consuming demonic force of nature that swallows up everything in its path, and you won't even go in up to your neck, even if your waist does go under. The two men who sink in the quicksand pit are even able to get themselves out with just enough effort. That said, one thing quicksand is is a construction hazard, and the railroad company is forced to find a different path for the track as soon as the quicksand pit is discovered in its path.
    • Bart spends part of the movie trying to earn acceptance by a bunch of racist rubes, which to his frustration, doesn't happen overnight. His first day on patrol gets him called a "nigger" by an old lady. When Bart brings down an outlaw, the old lady does apologize, but still would prefer not be seen with him in public. Personal prejudices can be overcome, but it rarely happens overnight.
  • Bodyguards & Assassins: The final assassin is a highly-skilled martial artist. Death in close quarters, he mows down a lot of bodyguards, including several named characters. One of the last survivors gets his hands on a pistol and pumps the assassin full of lead, ending his streak.
  • The Book of Masters: The main character is The Chosen One and finds himself fighting the forces of evil. However, he is a young stone-cutter, not very strong and with poor fighting skills, and in combat he can’t hold his ground against the village drunkards, let alone invincible armed soldiers. But then he gets himself a shining Cool Sword that can cut through stone… and he still can’t last a minute against invincible armed soldiers, because he is as inexperienced as before and vastly outnumbered. He ends up giving that sword away without having properly used it.
  • In Bowfinger, Bobby Bowfinger is trying to film his dream project Chubby Rain, despite having No Budget. But Bowfinger convinces his crew it can work, saying "Movies cost millions of dollars you say? That's after gross net deduction profit percentage deferment ten percent of the nut. Cash, every movie costs $2,184". Turns out no it doesn't, Bowfinger goes broke during production, so he has to steal Daisy's credit card to finance the rest of the film.
  • The Brady Bunch Movie has the Brady family being lauded by the judges for their act and get a high score in the show. That doesn't necessarily mean the audience agrees.
  • The Break-Up. When the couple in question splits at the beginning of the film, they neither engage in wacky hijinks intended to make the other jealous before either reconciling nor one of them realizes that he/she is better paired with the opposite sex friend who's been pining after them for years. Instead, her efforts to make him jealous only alienate him even more and by the time she admits what her true intentions were—to force him to get his act together and appreciate her—he plays this trope straight also, asking her why she didn't simply tell him that instead of expecting him to be a mind reader. When he finally does make the typical grand gesture, instead of falling into his arms, she tearfully admits that she no longer feels the same way. When they part ways for good, she actually has the decency to admit to her role in the relationship's failure (unlike many movies which will make the woman blameless). Their final meeting in the film's epilogue indicate that even though they've made peace with each other, there's no sign of reconciliation.
  • In Bring Me the Head of the Machine Gun Woman, Santiago attempts to buy a gun, but is told that he can't without a licence. In the end, he has to settle for an airsoft pistol: the most realistic looking replica the clerk is allowed to sell him.
  • Zig-zagged in Bruce Almighty.
    • Bruce kneels down in the middle of the freeway, gets hit by a truck and is instantly killed. The reality of what happens when you do that is lampshaded by God. However, he then wakes up in a hospital and is greeted by a doctor who says "somebody up there must like you".
    • When Bruce actually gains God's powers temporarily, the trope is played straight as part of delivering the film's aesop: that God can't say yes to every prayer. Pulling the Moon closer to Earth to make a more romantic scene results in widespread flooding and other natural disasters, and granting everyone's prayers to win the state lottery results in thousands of winners receiving $17 each, causing a riot over accusations that the lottery is rigged.
    • One deleted scene has Bruce answering lots of prayers individually. Another one has God showing Bruce that they only benefited in the short-term, not in the long-term. For instance, one boy who was the constant victim of bullying prayed for strength to climb a rope. He got strong enough to fend off his bullies...and became a bully himself, eventually becoming a pro wrestler, testing positive for steroids, and ending up managing a fast food joint, when he originally would have channeled his memories of bullying into becoming a best-selling author.
  • The low-budget film A Cadaver Christmas has a group of people fighting zombies in a university campus that's empty for the holidays. At the end of it, the survivors have managed to incapacitate all the zombies and hauled the bodies out to burn them. Cue a police patrol arriving to investigate the bonfire and the main characters arrested under suspicion of mass murder.
  • Cast Away doesn't shy away from pointing out how unrealistic desert island survival is in television. At one point, the main character is shown having rather severe diarrhea thanks to a diet mainly consisting of coconuts and coconut milk.
    "Gotta love crab. In the nick of time too. I couldn't take much more of those coconuts. Coconut milk is a natural laxative. That's something Gilligan never told us."
  • Chappie:
    • The police laugh Vincent off when he tries to sell them on the Moose, because why do they need a giant robot that can take on military bases and aircraft to fight street crime?
    • A fight between a normal human without heavy weapons and a Super Strong, Super Tough robot ends about as poorly for the human as you might expect. Which is exactly what happens in the final confrontation between Vincent and Chappie.
  • The slasher movie Cherry Falls subverts Death by Sex by having the kids throw an orgy after discovering the killer is targeting virgins. "Curses, foiled again!", right? Well, no; an Axe-Crazy murderer isn't going to simply take their ball and go home just because their prey found a loophole... and now they're all trapped in one place when the killer decides to abandon the original M.O.
  • Chronicle
    • The whole film is this to Spider-Man and other teen superheroes. In that story, the angsty teenage outcast who gets superpowers winds up learning about his great responsibility and heroically fighting all manner of dastardly evil. Andrew, however, acts exactly like one would expect an angsty teenage outcast to act when given superpowers. It doesn't help that instead of an Uncle Ben, Andrew is stuck with an abusive, raging alchoholic for a parental figure.
    • As the only one who both survives and learns his lesson, Matt is a Reconstruction. Also, considering that he actually cares about his cousin and was trying to steer him in the right direction, he might be the real Uncle Ben of the story.
    • The movie also plays things much more different than classic depictions of teens displaying their powers. In the mall, while the three kids are just messing around, it's pretty funny and cool to see their powers. During the trucker scene, it is decidedly not funny.
    • Andrew attempts to rob the neighborhood thugs by disguising himself with his dad's old uniform, including a face concealing mask. They all knew it was him.
  • In Cinderella (2015), it shows exactly what would happen if a magically enchanted coach, coachmen, horses and footmen all revert to the original form while on the move. Cinderella is almost squashed inside the pumpkin while it shrinks. Some of the mice revert back to normal first, causing them to cling to the reins for dear life. The goose's hands becoming wings again causes the already unstable carriage to lose control.
  • In The Clearing (2004), a kidnapper gets away with the ransom money after killing his prisoner anyway. A short time later, he is caught when he actually tries to spend the money. The clerk calls in the bill's serial number.
  • In Commando, Sully is slaughtering cops left and right during the mall shootout. His money man decides to join in. Just as the money man draws his gun, a cop quickly shoots him dead.
  • Count Yorga
    • In an age where vampires are pretty commonplace in fiction, it doesn't take the protagonists long to consider the possibility that Yorga is one after seeing Erica's bite wounds and odd behavior. Of course they likewise are quick to doubt it too for being so fantastical.
    • After Yorga kidnaps Erica, her boyfriend Paul, rashly goes to his manor in the hopes of saving her. As you can imagine, he's just an average human up against supernatural monster with centuries of experience with hardly any plan. Paul barely makes it inside before Yorga promptly chokes him to death, has his back broken and later fed to Yorga's brides. Even Hayes later lampshades how suicidal that move was.
    • When Michael and Hayes are talking about vampires, Hayes is the first to admit they're quite tough, especially ones that have lived for centuries due to years of accumulated knowledge, combined with the supernatural strength. Which is why the two decided to attack him during the daytime. It's only because Yorga hypnotized Donna into coming to him that forced their hand to coming at night. Hayes likewise notes that Paul and Erica maybe have become vampires, and if so, they'll have to kill them due to the fact they won't be the people they were anymore.
    • Hayes's girlfriend convinces him to try and call the police when she cites a baby was found dead in a swamp with its neck chewed up. He attempts it but but due to a rash of similar calls, they don't believe him.
    • Hayes confronts Yorga after he brings him down into his throne room where his brides are sleeping in which his friend Erica, is now among them. When checking for a pulse he doesn't find any. Of course just because he studied up on vampires, doesn't mean he's mentally prepared for it. Yorga quickly gets into his head as a result and causes him to hesitate allowing his brides to get the jump on Hayes.
    • Yorga ends up meeting his end due to trying to rush at Micheal and choke him, running right into the stake he was holding out.
    • In a bit of fantastical version of this trope, Micheal manages to kill Yorga in the final confrontation. Does that means the vampire curse is lifted? Nope! Erica and the unnamed woman were drained of their blood and are, more or less, dead. The curse only resurrecting them into nothing but fanged walking corpses running on an instinct to feed on blood. Even with Yorga dead, there was no way to reverse it and bring them back to who they were as humans since the window to do so had long closed. Likewise killing him doesn't prevent them from coming after Micheal.
    • Likewise in the end, Micheal really should've considered that Yorga may have bitten Donna as she was in his house long since sundown by the time Hayes and he got there. He only finds out just as she bares her fangs and pounces at him.
  • Crank: High Voltage has a rare version Played for Laughs. At the end of the previous film, as Chevilos is falling several thousands of feet to his apparent death he phones his girlfriend and leaves a heartfelt goodbye to her. When he reunites with her in the second movie, he discovers that she never heard any of it - turns out falling that fast with that level of wind kicking up drowned out everything he said. An amusing case in a film that otherwise tries to be as over-the-top as it can.
  • In The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015), as Solo finds out, not being strapped in during a boat chase will make you fall out during a sharp, high-speed turn.
    • Illya and Gaby are both rendered briefly unconscious after suffering a motorcycle/car crash and are noticeably stunned and groggy afterwards
    • Solo and Kuryakin debate what to do with Uncle Rudy who is dangerous to leave alive but the United States might be interested in their talents. They both bitterly note that if they turn the latter in, they will likely have their crimes erased and be rewarded. Their debate ended when the electric chair they strapped Uncle Rudy to starts to work again.
  • Daredevil
    • In the climax, after having been stabbed by Elektra and a rather brutal fight with Bullseye he can barely stand but decides to confront Big Bad Kingpin anyway and... gets beaten to a bloody pulp rather quickly. However Daredevil ultimately manages to win anyway, but only thanks to a Chekhov's Gun and a crippling lucky hit.
    • Matt trashes a bar full of criminals, then reveals a massive amount of painkillers for his injuries. His super senses let him fight crime but also make it impossible to sleep outside of a sensory deprivation tank.
    • Elektra's battle with Bullseye does not go her way at all as she barely lands any hits. Because he murdered her father, she spends the entire fight trying to stab him and scowling while he smiles and purposely invokes her wrath. Combined with her previous fighting with Daredevil wearing her out a bit, her years of martial arts training don't help when she's too angry to think straight and blindly swings and lashes her sai at him. The only reason she won her fights with Matt is because he wasn't trying to hurt her. Bullseye, despite thinking her pretty and wanting to kiss her, has no qualms doing so. He wins not by being a better fighter, but by not letting vengeful wrath get in his way.
  • The Dark Knight Trilogy
    • Batman Begins has Bruce's first Stealth Hi/Bye going less than smoothly, with him narrowly evading arrest and also injuring himself in the process.
    • The Scarecrow's defeat is simple but effective. It doesn't matter how much of a scary badass you are, taking a Taser to the face will cause anyone to run away screaming.
    • In The Dark Knight the mob don't take a guy dressed as a clown seriously... until after he shows just how dangerous he really is.
    • The Dark Knight has an accountant for Wayne Enterprises discover Bruce's identity as Batman simply by going through files on how Bruce's money is spent, and locating the blueprints for the "Tumbler" Batmobile in Wayne Enterprises' archives. On the other hand, this knowledge doesn't do him any good, because, as Lucius Fox points out, he is attempting to blackmail a billionaire who is also a ruthless vigilante; There is no possible way this will end well for him, and he concedes.
    • Also, Harvey Dent/Two-Face falls a couple of stories but lands wrong and dies of a broken neck.
    • The Dark Knight Rises explores the idea that a normal human being (no matter how Badass Normal or Crazy-Prepared) couldn't continue indefinitely as Batman due to the physical strain, the psychological breakdown, and the increasing likelihood of incarceration or death.
    • Also Talia's death from injuries sustained in a two-story drop in a truck, contrary to how it would not normally be fatal to characters in action movies.
    • Just because you are a master hand-to-hand combatant with genius tactical skills hopped up on anesthetic gas does not mean you're any less vulnerable to heavy weapons.
    • Batman and Bane's first fight. Rather than a spectacular, choreographed showdown, it's short, brutal and sees Batman, who has been out of practice for eight years and sports a bad leg, easily defeated with his punches having no effect on Bane.
  • The film Daybreakers has this in the form of the basic plot. 95% of humanity becomes vampiric, causing blood to have a much greater importance. However, with billions of vampires on the planet and with nowhere near that many regular humans, there's nowhere near enough blood to go around, and the central conflict revolves around both this and finding a way to cure humanity's rampant vampirism.
  • Days of Wine and Roses depicts a married couple, Joe and Kristen, battling with alcoholism. Joe decides to sober up and joins Alcoholics Anonymous. He tries to get Kristen to sober up as well, but she clearly doesn't want to be helped and instead, he ends up relapsing. Joe does manage to get back on the wagon, but has to separate from his wife, and on top of that, live with the guilt that he was the one who got her to start drinking in the first place.
  • Deadpool (2016) may be a Denser and Wackier film with the Merc With The Mouth as the title character, but there are still moments where reality certainly hits:
    • In the beginning, Deadpool manages to score a One-Hit Polykill via Boom, Headshot! with three Mooks. But the third Mook survives as the bullet failed to penetrate his skull due to momentum loss after the first two penetration.
    • In the process of becoming Deadpool, Wade spends a lot of time snarking at Ajax in between tortures. When his powers finally activate, Ajax decides to torture him again in retaliation.
    • Even with his healing factor, Deadpool still feels pain and severe injuries takes a longer time to heal.
      • Wade loses his first fight with Francis, despite having his powers, because he's suffering from a weekend's deprivation of oxygen, food, and water.
    • Blind Al (who is blind) tries to assemble Ikea furniture. The instructions for those are pictures. It's not stable.
    • At the very end of the film Deadpool has Ajax at his mercy and with no reason left to keep him alive is ready to finally kill him, but Colossus attempts to talk Wade out of it. Unfortunately for Colossus, talking isn't a free action for him as Deadpool shoots Ajax dead in the middle of his speech.
  • Deadpool 2:
    • At one point Deadpool gets into a fight with Cable on a moving car. Cable shoots him and he slices the bullet in the usual slow motion fashion looking badass. Cable keeps firing while Deadpool twirls his katana to deflect them until Cable runs out...and it's revealed near all of them ended up hitting Deadpool right in the chest.
      Deadpool: (Panting) Whew...yeah. Your bullets. They're really fast.
    • To throw Deadpool some kind of bone, it's possible that Wade did hit them all... it's just that doing that makes shrapnel that is still moving very fast. Any hit that's fast enough to strike a bullet in flight and cut through it is also going to lack the energy to change its direction in any meaningful way.
    • Trying to parachute to a convoy in a city against winds is a bad idea if you don't have luck on your side or Healing Factor to take the damage. Just ask most of the X-Force.
  • Death Sentence zig-zags the trope. The film is a revenge tale which, instead of following the Everyman protagonist on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge against the gang responsible for his son's death, has him kill the gang member who committed the murder and kick off a conflict that puts him, his wife and his other son in danger. However, in the climactic action scene he seems to have developed Improbable Aiming Skills while vastly outnumbered. Reality then ensues again when he's seen back in his house, mortally wounded. While he does manage to take out almost the entire gang singlehandedly, he sustains mortal wounds in the process and the movie ends with him returning home to bleed out.
  • This trope is present in the first Death Wish movie. Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), an average middle class guy, turns into a murderous Vigilante Man after his wife is killed and his daughter raped into catatonia by a gang of street punks. Unlike most movies about vigilantism, Kersey never gets to meet, let alone kill, those responsible. After all, how would he even know what they looked like?
    • And unlike the sequels, Kersey isn't a Crazy-Prepared fearless survivalist armed to the teeth. He's just a guy who has never killed anyone before, armed with a low-caliber revolver a friend gave him. The first time he kills a criminal, he runs home and throws up from the shock.
  • The Departed runs on this trope—deaths are abrupt and meaningless, there are no last-minute speeches, and it all happens so damn fast for the characters that they have no time to react.
    • The Infernal Affairs Trilogy (the source inspiration) is even more so in that the one death in the aforementioned remake that actually has meaning to it never happens in the original.
    • Additionally, no one imagines for even a second that Costello could double down and have two Moles instead of just one, thus averting No Plans, No Prototype, No Backup.
  • After the huge Bar Brawl in Desperado, El Mariachia and the last thug left pull guns on each other simultaneously only to realize they're out of ammo. It takes several tries for either of them to find a gun that still has any ammo left after all the shooting that went on.
  • Detective Pikachu:
    • As a kid, Tim wanted to be a Pokemon trainer and go to the leagues like many of his peers. As Tim himself somberly says, things just didn't work out and his current job is in some office cubicle.
    • The underground cage fighting arena really strips away the frills and shows that Pokémon battles amount to professional fighting at best, and cockfighting at worst.
    • The film doesn't shy away from deconstructing the Pokemon 'verse, but the biggest one is the Pikachu vs Charizard fight. In the games, most trainers wouldn't think twice about it—in fact, since Pikachu has a type advantage, it's pretty clearly in his favor. But it's still a mouse vs a dragon over ten times its size. Even worse since Detective Pikachu's amnesia includes forgetting how to use his powers plus Charizard being hopped up on the R substance, which puts Pikacku in danger of being killed.
    • As Charizard's owner finds out the hard way, having easily breakable vials of chemicals that induce berserker states in Pokemon in your jacket is not exactly the best of ideas. Especially in a crowded area such as say, a fight club full of Pokemon?
    • There are plenty of background shots depicting Pokemon doing things other than the standard battling. Charmander is seen helping someone cook food with its flame tail. Machamp acting as a crossing guard. A group of Loudreds assisting disc jockeys in a club. Growlithe, Arcanine and Snubbull as police dogs.
    • Tim tries to capture a Cubone in the opening scene, only to find out that walking up to an emotional wild animal is a very bad idea. The Cubone refuses to accept Tim as its trainer, busts out of the Pokeball, and promptly attacks him.
    • Psyduck's iconic Power Incontinence is usually played as a cute little quirk, but this movie shows how frustrating raising something with uncontrollable psychic powers can be. The characters are constantly trying to keep Psyduck calm, and Detective Pikachu outright compares him to a time bomb.
    • As the group are trying hard to avoid being crushed and falling when the giant Torterra gardens rise up, they get separated by a crack in the ground forcing Tim and Pikachu to jump to the cliff where Lucy and Psyduck are. Since they can't get a running start with the landscape closing in behind them, Tim just barely clears the gap and grabs the edge, nearly slipping off if not for Lucy pulling him up. It later becomes moot anyway as the rumbling from the makeshift earthquake cause the cliff to break off and send the group tumbling into the nearby river. Plus since they were near a rocky terrain as the earthquakes were going on, Pikachu is beaned by one of the rocks rolling down the hill and mortally wounded as a result.
  • Die Hard: Yes, the franchise got very insane later on, but the first had many instances of this:
    • John McClane witnesses a bunch of terrorists take his wife and her co-workers hostage. Does he immediately rise to the occasion and defeat the terrorists? No, he knows he's out of his element and tries to call for help multiple times. He is forced into fighting the terrorists because the police are too incompetent and he is stuck on the top floors of a high rise.
    • The film subverts the Made of Iron and Nerves of Steel action hero. A night of battling terrorists with no armor and truly bare feet leaves a you a physical wreck, and for all his wisecracks, McClane is clearly scared out of his mind.
    • McClane himself lampshades what would have happened if he'd tried to stop Hans from killing Takagi when McClane was outgunned and outnumbered.
    McClane: Why didn't you try and stop him, John...Because then you'd be dead too, asshole!
    • John's firing a gun into the air to scare the hostages off the roof before the bomb went off resulted in him being mistaken for a terrorist by the FBI. Had the building not blown up, the FBI agents could have easily killed McClane.
    • In Die Hard with a Vengeance John has to explain how to use a gun to Zeus, since he's a civilian and has never used one. Since the explanation is rushed, and under very stressful conditions, John forgets that things that seem obvious to him (like the need to manually chamber the first round) wouldn't occur to someone who's never held a firearm before. Needless to say Zeus's attempt to shoot Simon does not go as planned.
    • McClane weaponizes this to kill Thomas Gabriel in the fourth film. John has been injured and is being held at gunpoint by Gabriel. There's just two things A)Gabriel is forcing the gun directly into McClane, which at that close a distance would instantly travel through the body of the person shot, and B)Gabriel is standing directly behind McClane. John forces Gabriel to fire the gun, causing both of them to take the bullet, but while John takes it in a non-vital area and hangs on until medical aid arrives shortly after, Gabriel gets killed instantly.
    • In the climax of Die Hard 2, John McClane comes face to face with the main villain, Col. Stuart, who has been previously shown to be much more skilled in hand-to-hand combat. Additionally, John is worn out and heavily injured from fighting Major Grant mere seconds ago. Sorry folks, but there isn't any Heroic Second Wind here: Stuart utterly hands John his ass with little difficulty, resulting in the villains nearly getting away with their plan.
    • Also from Die Hard 2, the villains holding Dulles International aren't using the threat of a bomb, plague virus or something else horrific yet convoluted to try and extort the government. They simply take control of the airport's ATC. The effectiveness in this is shown to deadly and horrifying effect when they shut down the airport's runway lights and impersonate air traffic control to give false landing information to a passenger jet. The jet crashes, killing all the passengers onboard.
  • In The Dirty Dozen, Major Reisman is tasked with turning a group of crazy, disobedient military prisoners into an elite fighting unit. This works during a training exercise but when they try it in real life things quickly start falling apart. The biggest setback is caused by The Sociopath going Ax-Crazy - what did they expect?
  • With the Dirty Harry films, the fifth one - The Dead Pool - actually shows the corpses of men that Harry shoots to get out of a sticky situation being removed after the incident.
    • This happens in Die Hard 2 - corpses are seen being removed after gunfights.
    • In Gran Torino, Walt deals with gang members in his area by threatening them with a shotgun. When they retaliate with a drive-by shooting, he retaliates by ambushing and beating some some of the gang members, and they respond by abducting and brutalizing one of the people he's trying to protect. It's a horrifyingly realistic portrayal of the Cycle of Revenge that would actually ensue if a vigilante tried to go to war with a group of violent thugs.
    • The Dirty Harry films were practically built with this trope. Harry is a Cowboy Cop who happens to be a total arsehole with almost no friends; he's legendary but pretty much a Broken Ace. One of the first film's most famous scenes involved him tracking down a man who managed to avoid getting sent to prison and belting the shit out of him. Not only was Harry promptly the subject of justifiable rage by his captain, but the criminal expressed a desire to sue.
    • Harry's propensity towards overkill also bites him in the ass in the first film. Harry tries to capture the Scorpio killer, a Long-Distance Spree Killer who uses a marksman rifle to shoot at people from rooftops by setting up a sting where he and his partner attempt to ambush him from an adjacent roof. Harry's choice of weapon for this is a Winchester Model 70 chambered in .458 Winchester Magnum, a cartridge typically used for killing big game. However, such a bullet produces not only a massive amount of recoil, but fires on a parabolic trajectory, making it a poor choice for distance shooting. Needless to say, Harry misses every shot, and the Scorpio killer gets away, killing another police officer in the process.
  • Dog Day Afternoon practically runs on this, mostly because it was based on real life events. What happens when you try to rob a bank without double checking your information and not really thinking things through? You end up with no money, lots of hostages, a partner having a nervous breakdown, a media frenzy, panicking family members, and increasingly tense negotiations with the authorities. Sonny manages to last twelve hours. When it's down to the last few moments, the FBI enact their plan by killing Sal - the far more dangerous of the two criminals - and arresting Sonny at gunpoint. It turns out that having an explosive personality and being a media darling doesn't make you immune from the law. The film even ends with him being read his Miranda Rights!
  • Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead has a positive example. Sue Ellen lies about her age and gets a job at a fashion firm. Eventually, she ends up impressing her boss Rose with innovative ideas. However, her bitchy co-worker Carolyn exposes Sue Ellen's real age to Rose...but instead of being impressed, Rose calls Carolyn out for thinking that backstabbing an employee — especially one who is trying to save their company — will earn her favor.
  • A minor example in Dracula Untold, but the first time Mehmet breaks off a stake, he has to discard it since it didn't have a sharp end.
    • In a move crossing over with Too Dumb to Live, when Mehmet's men are too afraid of what they've seen Dracula do to want to fight him, he declares you can't fear what you can't see and blindfolds his entire army. Unsurprisingly, Dracula has an even easier time, and one could argue that Vlad's human army could have wiped them out at that point.
  • Dr. Terror's House of Horrors: If you drive a Wooden Stake through your wife's heart, the police will arrest you.
  • In 8 Mile, Cheddar Bob generally shows how holding the Idiot Ball in the real world can get you killed (his friends bail him out but repeatedly chastise him for it). Purest example being when Cheddar Bob shows what happens when Artistic License – Gun Safety is applied to real life.
  • Enchanted:
    • Giselle, a Disney Princess brought into the real world, is a Friend to All Living Things who can summon animals with singing. In her fantasy world, she was often surrounded by friendly woodland animals like squirrels, rabbits, and deer fauns, but when in New York, she tries out her summoning song again. The result? She still summons animals, but the species you'd be more likely to find in grungy New York, such as pigeons, rats, and cockroaches.
    • After inviting Giselle to sleep on the couch in his apartment, Robert has his daughter Morgan stay and sleep in his room for the night because all Robert knows about Giselle is that she is a stranger who thinks she is a princess.
    • Prince Edward abruptly stops in a middle of a path to start singing. He promptly gets knocked over by several cyclists.
  • The climax of the Epic Movie features the four siblings arriving to battle the White Bitch... only to find out that their army pulled a Screw This, I'm Outta Here! after Susan threw up all over the soldiers the night before. The four of them gloriously charge the White Bitch's army... and get slaughtered without landing a single hit. They only survive and win thanks to a Plot Device.
    • To a lesser extent, when Captain Jack Swallows takes Edward to his ship, Edward is fascinated by the life of a pirate (set to a song). Jack then points to the side, revealing that the ship isn't real and a part of a theme park.
  • Escape from L.A. Snake goads some mooks to see how fast they can shoot, by getting them to put their guns and not fire till his can hits the ground. When he flips it he shoots them all while they're distracted by their eyes on the can.
  • In the film version of Ender's Game, when Ender and his team beat the final test, they were initially pleased and jumping for joy. But once they realized it wasn't a test simulation and they really did bring a species to extermination, they were horrified.
  • In “Fab Five: The Texas Cheerleading Scandal,” the cheerleading coach Ms. Ward attempts many times to stand up to and punish the titular girls for their rule breaking behavior. This just ends with her getting fired by the principal. This is due to the Fab Five getting away with their behavior due to the ringleader being the Principal's daughter.
  • In Fargo, Wade, whose daughter has been kidnapped, tries to be a Papa Wolf. He ignores his son-in-law Jerry (who says that the kidnappers gave specific instructions about him being the one who made contact and delivered the money) and charges off to the drop-off himself with a concealed pistol. His Clint Eastwood act when interacting with Showalter is completely ineffective, resulting in the latter shooting and killing him out of sheer exasperation, and exacerbates the danger to his daughter's life even further.
    • In contrast to the usual portrayal of psychopaths in fiction, who are usually depicted as intelligent and calculating, Gaear Grimsrud fits many realistic criteria of low-functioning Antisocial Personality Disorder. He is violently impulsive and often takes the most direct solution to problems, even if they clearly aren't the best ones, so long as they advance his goals in the short-term. Though more capable than his partner Carl and generally more competent in criminal acts, his tendency to leave a trail of corpses in his wake is what puts Marge Gunderson on their trail. By the time the movie hits its climax, he murders the woman he kidnaps for an incredibly petty reason and in counter to all logic, and his brilliant idea to feed corpses into a wood chipper, coupled with the fact that he tries to run from an armed police officer by fleeing into the winter woods with little more than a pair of longjohns and a trapper cap on (even if he escaped, he'd still freeze to death), demonstrate a lack of foresight and disorganized thought common in low-functioning APD.
  • The Fate of the Furious has Roman spot a bright orange Lamborghini in Mr. Nobody's collection and asks to use it on the next mission. He's denied, but they let him use it for the next mission. Said mission takes place in a polar region where the Lamborghini is completely unsuited for the terrain. Also, the car's bright orange paint job makes it an easily visible target.
  • In Final Justice, some dialogue near the start of the film explains that Sheriff Geronimo was involved in a shootout in Dallas, during which he killed a lot of people ("I bagged my limit that day, that's for sure!") including a senator's brother who was "doing dirty." Sounds like the climax of a typical cop movie, except that instead of riding off into the sunset as the big hero, Geronimo ended up Reassigned to Antarctica, and with an Achey Scar inside him that forces him to drink Maalox or milk after every meal to prevent it from hurting too much.
    • To say nothing about how his continued Cowboy Cop antics in a foreign country frequently lands him in police custody. Turns out, most governments don't like it when a foreigner decides to start shooting bad guys without warning.
  • In Friday Night Lights, Boobie gets hurt playing football, and his doctor tells him to rest so as not to exacerbate the injury. But then, Boobie decides that the Permian Panthers need him too badly in a crucial game, and decides to play through his injury. Not long after he gets on the field, the injury takes him right back out, and this time it's so bad that it ends his football career before he's even out of high school. If a trained medical professional tells you not to do something, listen to them!
  • In Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning, the killer isn't Jason Voorhees, but a copycat who, while obviously insane, is just a regular person and lacks Jason's inhuman durability or resistance to pain. In the final confrontation, Tommy Jarvis is able to severely injure and subsequently kill the man.
  • In G.B.F., after Tanner isn't allowed to attend prom with another guy, Fawcett sets up an alternate 'inclusive' prom, whilst the school-sanctioned prom prides itself as supporting 'family values'. The runners of the school-sanctioned prom then set up homophobic posters, and it seems like it's going to be the two sides sniping at each other... only for the principal to haul McKenize, Caprice, Brent, and the rest of the school prom planners into his office to severely reprimand them for the posters, and then cancel the school prom instead of suspending all of them. And on top of that, the alternate prom is still allowed to be held as it's an outside project beyond the principal's jurisdiction.
  • Ghostbusters (1984) ended with a triumphant victory for the heroes, but the sequel shows the aftermath. The defeat of Gozer calmed the psychic dimension, allowing the ghosts to rest at peace once again and putting the ghostbusting services out of business. On top of that, the amount of property damage, code violations (thank you, Walter Peck for doing your job), and other offenses committed throughout the first movie have come back to haunt them in the form of multiple lawsuits suing them into bankruptcy. At the start of the second movie, they're working odd jobs from TV show hosts to children's parties.
    • In the first movie, the Ghostbusters rush up the stairs of Dana's apartment to defeat Gozer. 18 floors later, and the quartet are completely winded. There's a reason buildings weren't built past six stories before the invention of elevators.
    • A positive example in the 2009 video game (and de facto third movie): Because of the Statue of Liberty incident in the second film more than proving that, yes, the supernatural is a real threat, the city has now hired the 'Busters as contractors with Hero Insurance to cover the damages they cause.
  • G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra
    • After The Reveal, the Commander and Destro are promptly captured. Despite Ana breaking free of her mind control, she's still under arrest until they can figure out how to get the nanites out.
    • Both times the Joes save a city, they're arrested immediately afterward for freaking out the cops with supertech antics. The French make it clear that they'd rather have lost Paris than been rescued by the Joes. Zartan didn't seem confident enough in his POTUS disguise to pull anything similar, so he pays off Ripcord's Hero Insurance and sends him back to The Pit.
  • As funny as Tiffany Haddish's character is in the movie Girls Trip, nobody in real life with her attitude would be able to hold a job for long, and she fares no better in fiction. When Dina physically assaults her coworker for eating her yogurt, she is promptly fired for it. Apparently, it wasn't the first time she had physically assaulted a coworker either. Dina's manager even tells her to grow up.
  • Towards the end of Gladiator, Commodus stabs Maximus in order to get an unfair advantage during their match. But since Maximus is a veteran general, and Commodus only occasionally indulged in swordplay, Maximus still beats him although he dies from the stab wound anyway.
    • The hulking German Chieftain at the beginning is not killed in an epic one-to-one against Maximus. In fact, they don't even fight or share a scene together. The Chieftain is killed by being stabbed multiple times by nameless Roman soldiers.
  • In The Godfather, there are no big gunfights, no epic Last Stands. A man caught unprepared by armed and ready ambushers indeed has no chance. For example, in Sonny Corleone's death, there is no Heroic Second Wind where he gets up and takes some of his attackers with him, no final speech, just getting shot and shot again until he's dead. Similarly, Authority Equals Asskicking is not in action; the four other Dons don't get any final speeches, any epic fight scenes, just simple assassinations. This even holds true in the video game adaptation; all except one, who barely has time to gasp, "I knew it would be you," before you blow him away.
    • Physically confronting a domestic abuser does not end the abuse, even if you're a Mafia don with the ability to make your sister's abuser truly suffer. Unless you order a hit on the guy at the end of the movie.
  • Godzilla (2014) has a few of these:
    • Godzilla is shown having trouble with both Hokmuto and Femuto when they gain up on him, because they work well together and being outnumbered in a fight is a massive disadvantage, no matter how strong you are. Otherwise, he outright destroys them when going one-on-one with them, since the fight is now a contest of strength that Godzilla has in spades.
    • The military is more than willing to let the public know about giant monsters the moment two of them appear and turn Honolulu into a friggin' battleground. It's a national crisis, and there's no way in hell that the military can cover it up (not that they wanted to in the first place).
    • Godzilla's so massive he is able to create a tsunami just by rising from the ocean, since all that water the kaiju's displacing has to go somewhere.
    • When Ford destroys Femuto and Hokmuto's nest, he is flung several yards into the air via explosion, likely breaking a few bones in his body.
    • We actually get to see the monsters' rampage/fight from a civilian standpoint and it is terrifying. They are beings that can destroy whole city blocks with one good punch, and it is not a fun time to try surviving such things.
  • Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019):
    • Humans are naturally terrified after the discovery of Godzilla and that there are more monsters as ancient and big as Godzilla populating our earth. They have been on high alert since San Francisco and MONARCH has gone public and publicized their mission, actively recruiting civilian operatives.
    • Because of their size, Rodan and King Ghidorah cause massive damage from the shockwave and wind they generate simply by flapping their wings or flying at high speeds.
    • All the flyers have gigantic wingspreads for their proportions. They would need it as anything that huge will need an extremely large wingspread just to fly.
    • Mark Russell is among the many who don't see Godzilla as a hero for causing death and destruction five years prior. Especially since Mark lost his son Andrew.
    • Ghidorah, having three heads, has occasional disagreements between the heads, as one would expect a creature with three separate minds controlling one body.
    • The Oxygen Destroyer kills all the fish around Isla de Mara. In The Stinger, it reveals the fishermen have lost their livelihood and are desperate enough to accept any money offer from Jonah after they dredge up one of Ghidorah's heads.
    • Godzilla intercepts Ghidorah at one point and drags him underwater to continue their fight, where Godzilla, amphibious creature, is easily able to dominate the fight compared to Ghidorah whose massive wings only got in its way.
  • In The Golden Child, the Big Bad Sardo Numspa attempts to have Jarrell arrested, claiming that the latter stole a dagger from him. Numpsa needs the dagger to kill The Chosen One, and he believes that either Jarrell will give him the dagger to avoid arrest, or that the police will simply hand it over to him after arresting Jarrell. Jarrell gleefully agrees to be arrested, then takes a moment to explain the rules of evidence handling to Numpsa: Jarrell will be arrested, and the dagger held in police custody as evidence for his trial, which might not happen for months, maybe even over a year. Since Numpsa has to kill the child within a specific time frame that's closing fast, this means that Numpsa would have to storm police headquarters to get a hold of the dagger instead of fighting a few lightly armed members of a secret society. Numpsa is forced to publicly back off of his accusations and let Jarrell go free rather than risk storming a police station.
  • In Good Burger, Ed and Dexter both discover their rival Kurt is using illegal food additives in his burgers. Ed, rather than try to take a sample with him to report Kurt to the police, dumps it into the meat supply, causing a very public disaster that leads to Kurt's arrest. When Dexter asks him why, Ed rapidly explains to Dexter that just bringing the evidence to the police won't automatically result in his arrest, since Kurt could easily hire a lawyer to protect himself. Never mind that said lawyer could probably weave a convincing case against the two for breaking and entering Kurt's property. Dexter was shocked that Ed thought of that.
  • Goodfellas: Sure, Billy Batts was acting like a jerkass to Tommy DeVito, and Tommy kills him as a result. But killing an officially made member of the The Mafia without permission from his bosses is a big no-no, even if the offender had valid reasons. The murder of Bentvena would cost Tommy his life as well.
  • In A Good Old Fashioned Orgy, people learn that trying to have a Two-Person Pool Party is very difficult and uncomfortable.
  • The Great Muppet Caper actually features consequences for Worst News Judgement Ever. In the movie, Kermit and Fozzie are reporters for a metropolitan newspaper, and their first article is a front-page banner story about identical twins (them) joining the paper, completely missing Lady Holiday, the fashion queen of London, getting robbed right behind them, while all the rival newspapers end up covering the robbery. Their editor is so furious, Kermit is barely able to talk him out of firing them.
  • In the infamous ending of The Great Silence; the hero valiantly confronts the gang of bounty hunters lead by the villainous Loco, despite being injured, outnumbered, and knowing he's walking straight into a trap. There's no last minute rescue, no high-action shoot-out with the gang, not even a valiant last stand, they just shoot him down before he even has a chance to draw his gun.
  • Green Lantern hilariously averts the typical Paper-Thin Disguise when Hal visits Carol wearing his costume and a Domino Mask.
    Carol: I've known you my whole life! I've seen you NAKED! You don't think I would recognize you because I can't see your cheekbones?!
  • Hairspray
    • Invoked with Edna's mother. She forbids Tracy from auditioning for a spot on the Corny Collins Show. This is because she believes that since Tracy is overweight, she will get rejected and her feelings will get hurt. Anyone who grew up in the 60s will know how difficult it was for people who didn't meet Hollywood's standards of beauty to break into the entertainment industry.
    • Invoked again with Tracy in the scene with her father, after the latter is thrown out of their house for supposedly cheating on Edna. While having a conversation with Wilbur about the cancellation of Negro Day on the Corny Collins show, Tracy says that despite her optimistic views, she later accepts how unfair life can be. She also speaks about how fairness won't happen because people want it to.
  • In He's Just Not That Into You, Janine goes into a fit of rage over Ben's infidelity, flinging his clothes around and ultimately smashing a mirror—and her fit ends instantly as she realizes that she now has a huge mess to clean up.
  • The film version of A History of Violence does not shy away from realistically portraying the consequences of violence. Deaths are abrupt, bloody, and disturbing. When the teenage Jack snaps and fights back against the school bully, the next scene we see is him at home, suspended, with possible criminal charges hanging over his head.
  • The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
    • This happens to poor Thorin. He is surrounded by fire, accompanied by an epic soundtrack, carries the shield that gave him his nickname and charges Azog, who is responsible for the deaths of Thorin's grandfather and possibly his father as well. Azog also happens to be seated on a huge Warg. Cue Thorin being thrown to the ground several times and then actually picked up and nearly crushed between the Warg's jaws. He sustained serious injuries and would have died if it weren't for Bilbo.
    • The Company, rather than taking on large opponents and overwhelming numbers, are forced to retreat more than once.
    • Silencing an orc witness is not as easy as it seems, since Kíli's aim was off and the victim's screams soon alerted the rest of the orc pack where the dwarves were.
    • All the build up Smaug got in the previous films proved how unimportant he became the moment he got killed. Life goes on and the humans have a war with the Orcs to settle.
  • In Home Alone, Marv (the dumber half of the "Wet Bandits") thinks that flooding the houses that they rob is an immensely clever Calling Card. This means that when they're arrested, the cops easily identify which houses they hit. (And no doubt add destruction-of-property charges to the burglary charges.)
  • Hot Fuzz is all about this for the first half, with Nicholas Angel explaining over and over to his new partner Danny how reality just doesn't work like action movies, such as when Angel has to take physical therapy after taking down a deranged Father Christmas (the hand's still a bit stiff). Then the second half plays it for laughs, invoking every single trope he'd shot down earlier. He is right about at least one thing, though: you can't have an action sequence that huge and spectacular without an absolute mountain of paperwork to deal with afterwards, both in terms of processing all the arrests and the sheer amount of property damage. In short, it's double subverted.
  • Ang Lee's Hulk shows events with realistic consequences.
    • After spending thirty years in prison for killing his wife, David Banner grew a Beard of Evil that is unshaved. He also deeply regretted the accidental death of Edith, which made him have a mental breakdown alongside losing his son to Mrs. Krenzler.
    • General Ross threatens Bruce to go to jail because he doesn't want him to end up like David.
  • The Hunger Games:
    • Firearms are completely banned from the titular games, because in that setting they would give any tribute a ridiculous advantage with very little effort. Also, a large part of the games is them being marketed to Capitol citizens who want a good show, and just watching teenagers shoot each other year after year would be boring.
    • In The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, given that District 13's original expertise involved military hardware, it's no surprise that firearms are in abundance. Even Gale trades his crossbow for a gun when he joins a covert mission to rescue Peeta and the other Victors.
    • The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2:
      • When Katniss tries swaying the remaining pro-Capitol "loyalists" in District 2, one of them just fires a pistol point-blank at her chest. A good thing though that her outfit was designed to be bulletproof, even if it left her with some injuries.
      • When Katniss and Gale try to sneak into Snow's manor by posing as refugees, they disguise themselves with hooded cloaks to make sure nobody sees their faces. Unfortunately, Peacekeepers are in the crowd, checking every refugee who passes through. Also, the rebels get the same idea as Katniss.
      • The ending. The rebellion is ultimately successful, but it came at the cost of thousands of innocent lives, including Katniss's sister Primrose. After all is said and done, Katniss is left to live alone in the charred remnants of District 12 since she and her mother can hardly be around each other without being reminded of the family member they lost. Peeta follows her to District 12 to care for her and they end up married with children, but this doesn't erase the PTSD that resulted of living through a war that she inadvertently set off.
  • Indiana Jones:
    • Indy's Establishing Character Moment in Raiders of the Lost Ark. A swordsman makes the crowd around himself and Indy part, displaying some impressive sword skills. Indy, not impressed, simply pulls out his gun and shoots the swordsman dead. (Bonus Real Life points for why Indy does this: Harrison Ford was supposed to fight the swordsman in an epic battle; however, Ford was sick and talked Spielberg into having him just shoot the swordsman instead. Ford's look of disdain reflects in-character as well as ending the frustration of setting up the original take.)
    • In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, when Donovan shoots Henry Jones Sr. to force Indy to bring back the Grail.
    Donovan: (points a gun at Indy) The Grail is mine. And you're going to get it for me.
    Indy: Shooting me won't get you anywhere.
    Donovan: (Beat) You know something, Doctor Jones? You're absolutely right. (shoots Henry in the stomach)
  • Inglourious Basterds:
    • Zoller continually makes hostile advances on Shosanna, eventually culminating in her shooting him when he threatens to learn the truth of her plans. After a while, it turns out that Zoller is not dead, and Shosanna has second thoughts, so she goes to him—and gets shot dead in return.
    • When the characters get their cover blown in a bar full of armed enemies, despite some witty banter during the ensuing Mexican Standoff, none except Hammersmark (who is still shot in the leg), make it out alive. Yep, even Michael Fassbender's character, who we spent the last 15 minutes getting to know, and a legendary Nazi killer built up at the beginning died anticlimactically.
    • It doesn't matter how fluent you are in another language, there are so many nuances and differences even in phrases that are similar that can tip off someone. Hicox uses the incorrect hand gesture when ordering a drink and uses the wrong accent, tipping off the Nazis around him that he is not to be trusted.
  • It (2017) :
    • Georgie being Dead All Along — turns out getting an arm ripped off isn't something most people could survive, let alone a prepubescent child.
    • Before one of the visits into the house on Neibolt Street, Richie grabs a glass bottle and smashes it against the railing to try and invoke the movie trick of making a makeshift knife from a broken bottle. After doing it, though, all Richie is left with is the neck of the bottle that he was holding on to.
    • Kids swearing.It happens and the movie doesn't pretend otherwise. Especially when this is taking place in the 80s.
  • The Interview: Dave and Aaron junk their original plan to kill Kim Jong Un, instead deciding to expose his atrocities in their interview with Kim to make North Koreans question their leader. Kim Jong Un briefly appears blindsided by the accusations... but instead of caving in, Kim skillfully deflects Dave's questions before pointing out all the things wrong in America, like its high prison population. Dave suddenly appears horribly out of his depth, and obviously doesn't fully understand these issues or how to respond since his specialty is celebrity interviews and he is not a political expert. However, Dave had another ace up his sleeve.
  • Ip Man:
    • Master Liu, who's been kicking arse and taking names in one-on-one duels, tries to up the difficulty to take three karateka at once. It doesn't end well.
    • Ip attempts Training the Peaceful Villagers so that his friend's factory workers can defend themselves against the bandits. It doesn't work.
    • At the end, after beating General Miura, Ip Man stands around and thinks of the cost of war. Then, as promised, he is shot for not throwing the match. He survives, but it's still a very striking moment.
    • In Ip Man 2, Master Hung is an Old Master... which means he doesn't have the stamina to keep up with the younger Twister.
  • I Spit on Your Grave: For a horror film, there's actually quite a bit that's Truth in Television.
    • In the remake:
      • saying you're sorry for raping, torturing and trying to kill your victim doesn't really cut it. In Jennifer's words: "It's just not GOOD ENOUGH!"
      • Even if you're a cold-blooded murderer and rapist, if you're a parent and find that your kid has been kidnapped, you're going to panic.
    • In the second film:
      • After Katie's second escape, having been horribly raped and tortured, even the simple act of standing is painful for her at first. Injuries take time to heal, and by the end of the film, Katie still has visible scars on her face.
    • In the third film:
      • Yes, it has been several years and she apparently got away with her revenge. But that doesn't mean you automatically get better. Jennifer is shown to have nightmares and flashbacks. She eventually decides to seek help.
      • No longer being a successful writer means you have to find other means of employment. She works in an office, lives in a low-rent apartment, and doesn't own a car. Building a new life is not easy and involves a lot of work.
      • Even if someone has a history of domestic abuse, if there's no evidence that someone killed their ex-girlfriend, you have to release him.
    • You might be able to temporarily frighten a rapist into stopping, or even apologizing. In time though he'll get right back to raping his stepdaughter.
      • No matter how careful you are to leave no traces behind, killing two people (and attempting to kill a third) that have clear connections to the rape support group you're a member of is guaranteed to bring the police right to you.
      • Even if you try to be nice and talk someone down, if someone pulls a knife, you get out of Dodge fast, which is what Jennifer's office co-worker did.
      • Sure, you've been able to torture and kill two men and had killed another five in the past. That doesn't necessarily mean that following a guy who is larger and physically stronger with no real plan is a good idea. It ends with her being beaten to a pulp, sexually assaulted and nearly raped and killed.
      • The lead investigator tries to bluff Jennifer into confessing after questioning her about the incident in the alley. Jennifer wisely clams up, asks for a lawyer and gets out on bail. Just because police say "we've got you" doesn't really mean that they do. Plus, her answers to her questions about what led to being attacked in the alley are perfectly plausible and reasonable.
      • Walking long distances in heels isn't very comfortable. Jennifer removes hers and walks barefoot at one point.
      • It doesn't matter how sympathetic you are or what has happened to you. If you're armed with a weapon and about to stab someone to death, you're gonna get shot if you don't follow a police officer's orders to stop.
      • Just because the court orders you to attend therapy doesn't mean it'll make you better, as Jennifer demonstrates after her last session.
  • Jackie Chan protagonists engage in as much of the Theatrics of Pain as the people he defeats. Turns out getting punched and punching people hurts, even for a trained martial artist.
  • Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back begins with Dante and Randall finally calling the cops on the titular duo for loitering and drug-dealing.
  • John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum: The director, an experienced stunt-man, designed the armoury fight scene around averting The Blade Always Lands Pointy End In. John and his foes all grab knives off of the walls and chuck them at each other and only some have the blade stabbing them while others just have the hilt strike them and the blade falls to the floor. A few of the knives that do hit are also not that severe as the momentum from a thrown knife isn't always going to be enough.
  • Jumanji, of all things, has several examples, most relating to firearms.
    • Van Pelt at one point visits a gun store to restock on ammunition. It turns out that even a well-stocked gun store in the late nineties will not have rounds for a Winchester lever-action shotgun that went out of production in 1903 on the shelf. Van Pelt grumbles about this but takes it in stride and opts for a replacement weapon.
    • When attempting to walk out with his new-found weapon, Van Pelt runs into the then-freshly-enacted Brady Bill. Even movie villains have to wait when buying a gun from a legitimate dealer. However, it turns out gold is a damn near universal way around the most vicious of bureaucrats.
    • The first time Van Pelt uses his new shotgun, he mísses a few shots which, for an experienced hunter should be very simple to make. Turns out firing an unfamiliar weapon with an improperly set sight is just as tricky for a magically generated Great White Hunter as for the rest of us.
  • The Jungle Book (2016): King Louie orders the Bandar-Log to throw Baloo off the cliff. Thing is, he's a bear and they're monkeys. As long as he puts forth any effort at all, they're not going to be able to move him. He barely even seems bothered by their efforts, picking monkeys off of him casually while talking with King Louie.
    • In the ensuing chase between Mowgli and King Louie, the Gigantopithecus indiscriminately knocks over walls and columns in an ancient temble in an attempt to catch him. Eventually, all this structural damage causes the temple to collapse on top of the giant ape.
  • Jurassic World:
    • The Indominus Rex is kept alone in a paddock too small for her, with her only positive connection being the crane that brings her food. She killed and ate her sibling. It's no surprise that she went mad from the isolation.
    • Owen's velociraptors are imprinted on him since their birth. As a result, they are far less sociopathic than the velociraptors from Jurassic Park. And even though they accept Owen as their pack alpha, he knows they are still vicious, dangerous animals that are easily capable of killing him.
    • A theme park full of live dinosaurs might seem like an idea so cool it would never lose its appeal, but as the park has been open and operating for years, the public at large steadily becomes used to the idea of a dinosaur zoo. As they get used to it, they start getting bored of the same old attractions, leaving InGen at risk of slipping into negative profits with the park. Hence why they are starting to explore astoundingly misguided ideas like making their own genetically-engineered superpredator dinosaurs as park attractions, or exploring military applications for velociraptors as a secondary means of income.
  • The Karate Kid Part II:
    • It turns out that the Crane kick is just as ridiculous as it looks, and if you are capable of performing other techniques... you really should. Chozen demonstrates how it leaves you unbalanced and open, and looking like an idiot.
    • Zigzagged with Chozen and Daniel. While Daniel has only been training with Miyagi for a few months, Chozen has been training his whole life with his equally-skilled grandfather. While Daniel is a prodigy, Chozen has had more time to hone his craft as well as gaining skill in more specialized fields like spear usage and knife fighting. On the other hand, Daniel is still a martial artist who knows how to punch and kick. When they fight in the climax, Chozen is clearly the superior fighter, but is heavily injured and slowed down by the hits Daniel manages to get in.
    • The final fight between Daniel and Chozen is not a beautifully choreographed martial arts spectacle. It is a simple, brutal, knock-down drag-out brawl between two young men hell-bent on killing each other.
    • Saving people from a hurricane is hard work, and going out in wind and rain is going to leave you with hypothermia. Even if you're pumped up on enough adrenaline to kill a hippo, sooner or later your body will give up. Daniel finds this out the hard way.
  • Keanu ends with the main characters going to jail for the crimes they committed trying to get Keanu back.
  • From the Kick-Ass movies:
    • First movie:
      • When Dave has his first sortie as Kick-Ass, he gets stabbed in the gut for the effort, just to be run over by a car mere seconds later.
      • The other would-be superhero at the start of the film who seems to think he can fly. Gravity doesn't agree with him.
      • When Big Daddy gets killed.
      • Hit-Girl spends much of the movie being awesomely lethal. Then in the climatic battle, she finally runs out of ammo and throwing weapons and we remember that she's an eleven-year-old girl in a somewhat realistic state of panic and the only thing keeping the bad guys from destroying her now is their uncertainty about whether she's still armed. After being saved by Dave coming with heavy firepower, she tries to engage in hand to hand with Frank D'Amico, only he's a full-grown man who also knows martial arts and promptly drops her, and has to be rescued by Kick-Ass and the bazooka.
      • In the same final battle, Kick-Ass and Chris fight each other. Being not trained martial artists, their fight is absolutely pathetic and ends in a mutual knock-out.
      • Hit-Girl notes that getting shot in a real confrontation hurts more than when Big Daddy shot her in training. (She was wearing a bullet-proof vest on both occasions). He wanted to prepare her for the reality of being shot, but he used low impact rounds.
    • Second movie:
      • Chris' first attempt at being a supervillain as the Motherfucker involves him holding two .45s Gangsta Style. When he shoots one, the recoil gets him hit with the gun on the nose.
      • Ralph D'Amico, Chris' jailed uncle, confronts his nephew on how you shouldn't act like Chris does as the Motherfucker, or the police will hunt them down. Later in the movie, the police, including the corrupt cops on the Mafia's payroll, cracks down on superheroes and supervillains alike due his actions. Also, we see how dangerous a mafia boss actually is, even when jailed.
      • The Motherfucker tracks down Night Bitch by simply noticing she was bragging of bagging Kick-Ass on Facebook.
      • The crackdown against the superheroes after Mother Russia massacres dozens of people.
      • When the police is sent to round-up the superheroes, they're easily tracked through their internet connections, with the only exceptions being those who actually thought of re-routing them.
      • In the final battle, Hit-Girl, now fifteen, fights Mother Russia. Both are trained and have combat experience... But Mother Russia is taller, stronger and has more experience, and utterly annihilates her until the adrenaline shot reverses the situation.
      • In the same battle we see a MMA expert with no actual combat experience against Hit-Girl, who is trained to kill and has experience in doing it. The MMA expert is killed with his own finger.
      • Kick-Ass and the Motherfucker fight again, only Kick-Ass is now trained and has a lot of experience. The Motherfucker is on the run for pretty much the whole confrontation.
  • In The Kid (2000), Rusty wins the fight with the bullies and saves the three-legged dog from being blown up. Cue cheering and Awesome Music. Not so fast. Not only is Rusty hauled into the principal's office for fighting; when he gets home, his father, quite cruelly, lets him know that his mother is dying and accuses the boy of trying to kill her faster with the stunt he pulled.
  • The film Killing Them Softly also does not glamorize assassinations or organized crime. The main character isn't shy about voicing displeasure at his partner and former friend's bad habits, and rather than give him a chance, quickly sets him up to be arrested rather than risking him jeopardizing them all. The hits shown are quick, brutal, and pragmatic. No Sonny Corleone bloodbaths, just fast, violent executions.
  • Towards the beginning of Kindergarten Cop, when John Kimble arrests Cullen Crisp in the beauty salon, he is not wearing a uniform. It's a total win for reality that the security guards call his badge in to verify its authenticity.
  • Kingsman: The Secret Service:
    • Eggsy has a huge IQ, did well in primary school, was good enough at gymnastics to be considered for the olympics and was capable of excelling in the Royal Marines training program - yet at the start of the film he's an unemployed petty criminal due to a lack of jobs where he lives, an abusive stepfather, and a need to take care of his mother. It's a depressing fact of life that even if you have everything going for you, you can still fail to get far due to a poor environment and unfavorable circumstances.
    • Harry Hart is a One-Man Army and is put out of commission for some time thanks to something as mundane as a bullet to the head from the Non-Action Big Bad. There isn't even any fanfare about it. Just in case you were beginning to think Galahad was an Invincible Hero.
    • And despite being a bunch of assholes and himself being a badass secret agent, Harry is still horrified at having been manipulated into killing a building full of innocent people against his will.
  • The point of Last Action Hero. Jack Slater gets plucked out of his outrageously over-the-top action movie universe and dropped into our plain old real world. He finds out cars don't dramatically explode when you shoot the trunk and breaking a window with your fist actually causes injury to your hand.
    • When Jack meets Danny's mother, he finds he prefers real-life women who have more depth, intelligence and warmth than the average action flick chick.
    • Unfortunately, Benedict also gets out into the real world and invokes this for malicious reasons. After initially being shocked at the young age and haggard appearance of a prostitute, he realizes that he can murder a stranger and the police don't immediately respond. This leads to his revelation that, in the real world, the bad guys can win.
    • Slater gets shot, and it's fatal enough that he could risk dying from it without proper medical attention. Then he goes back into his own reality, where gunshots that aren't instantly lethal are Only a Flesh Wound.
  • The Lethal Weapon series:
    • The second movie has the Big Bad flaunting his Diplomatic Impunity in the faces of the heroes. In the climax, said diplomat is trying to actively gun down cops, saying that his diplomatic immunity will protect him. Murtagh just revokes it, and suffers no consequences for it. No sane government would harbor a criminal with such a long rap sheet, especially one that includes attempted murder of police officers; doing so could be considered an act of war. Plus, diplomatic immunity only prevents people from being prosecuted. They can still be shot dead in self-defense.
    • Martin Riggs, for all his amusing antics and badassery, has between his experiences in Vietnam and the death of his wife become an incredibly troubled human being. We see him contemplate suicide more than once, and a deleted scene from the first film shows him picking up a prostitute for the sole purpose of just having someone to talk to. As one would expect, it takes four films, spanning the course of about a decade and a half, before he begins to turn his life around and approach something close to a stable, healthy existence.
    • Hero Insurance is not part of the package when you join the police service. In the fourth film, Riggs racks up all the expenses Murtaugh has had over the series — rebuilding large parts of his house twice, buying a new boat, and sending two kids to college — and realizes that there is no way Murtaugh could afford to do all that on a sergeant's salary, thus suspecting him of being a Dirty Cop. This is compounded when Riggs confronts Murtaugh, and Murtaugh fails to offer an alternative explanation.
      • Conversely, Murtaugh is deeply hurt at the accusations of corruption and it takes most of the film for Riggs and Murtaugh to start talking to each other again. Some things can't be said, no matter how close you are.
  • Little (2019)
    • As a child, Jordan tries to boss her employees around, but nobody takes her seriously due to her age.
    • When April is seen spanking Jordan (as a child), the policeman attempts to page the other police for help. Subverted as the others don't show up.
    • Child Protective Services knocks on Jordan's door and tells April that if Jordan isn't enrolled in school, somebody will go to jail.
    • When Jordan tries to convince April that she (as a kid) is in fact her, April doesn’t believe her. April even wants to call the police.
    • Jordan forgot how it was like to be a child when she was magically aged into a child, so it makes sense that she would still do adult like behavior in a teenage girl’s body.
    • Since Jordan was bullied as a child, she grew up to have serious self-esteem issues, a serious inferiority complex, and constantly thinking that everybody is out to get her. This is sadly Truth in Television for many bullying victims.
    • It makes sense that Jordan wasn't willing to return to her old middle school when she was transformed into a child...she was traumatized by the bullying she went through!
  • Mad Max:
    • The After the End classic The Road Warrior has Mad Max use his iconic double barreled sawn-off sparingly. The reason being that because industrial society is no longer around, not only is fuel rare, but shotgun shells are too. By the time of the next film, Max has all but given up its use and the use of firearms in combat is pretty much extinct, because nobody can make the bullets or maintain the guns anymore.
    • The progressive deterioration of society — and of Max personally — is seen in vivid detail throughout the franchise. At the start of the first movie, Max is a member of one of the last organized police forces on Earth (or at least Australia) and is doing his best to take care of his wife and child. At the start of the second movie, Max is wearing the remains of his police uniform, driving a battered pursuit cruiser for which he must salvage fuel, and is just barely hanging on. He wears a leg brace and has a pronounced limp due to an injury received in the first film. By the third movie, he's still limping from that injury, and has been forced to trade in the car for a wagon pulled by a team of camels — and promptly loses even that in his first encounter with an organized enemy.
    • Fury Road demonstrates why you don't just pull an object you've been stabbed with out of your side, as Furiosa finds out the hard way in the climax. She quickly begins losing blood at a rapid rate and looks like death warmed over, and within a few minutes develops a pneumothorax (which, just like in real life, makes a hell of an unpleasant sound as she tries to breathe) and nearly exsanguinates before Max, who who earlier was established as a universal donor, is able to give her a transfusion.
  • Regarding Splendid Angharad's leg injury. When they first meet, Max accidentally grazes it when he fires warning shots at her. At first she seems just fine save for a little bleeding, but over time the bleeding gets worse and the pain bothers her more and more. It comes to a head when all hands are needed to shake off pursuers and she jumps out of the rig to help her rescuers, but her leg injury ensures that she can't get a proper foothold to climb back in, which leads to her falling to her death.
  • Also regarding Furiosa's War Rig. Her destination is at least a day's journey, but driving a huge, gas-guzzling rig non-stop across a sweltering hot desert eventually over-heats the engine, forcing the group to stop to let the engine cool off before they can continue. Considering their pursuers, this is a problem. Generally speaking, everything involving the nature of a chase through harsh environments; especially illustrated by the War Rig. Drove through a sand-lightning-tornado-storm? Rig needs to have the sand taken out of the intakes. Rig's engine block is on fire? Need to lower the plow to apply dust to extinguish it. Stuck in a quagmire? Place the engine covers under the wheels for traction. Overdo the direct oil injection boosts? The engines fail and need fixing. The rig doesn't run on miracles; it's an engine and it needs to be maintained.
  • Maleficent has several examples:
    • Are you pushing sixty and overweight, yet still insist on leading your army in battle? Prepare to get one-shot by the enemy's younger, more powerful leader, especially since she's magical. And even if you survive, the wounds combined with exertion will be enough to kill you for good.
    • It does not matter how much of a badass you are—having two of your major limbs (her wings) burned off will leave you in excruciating pain. Maleficent is also barely able to stand in the aftermath, spends a lot of time just recovering from her wounds, and has to fashion a walking stick because her center of balance has been thrown off.
    • Want to hand over a newborn baby to a group of three people who are always bickering and have never raised a baby? Don't be surprised when they end up neglecting or unintentionally mistreating the baby simply out of a lack of knowledge, or when their squabbles distract them from noticing that she's in danger.
    • As soon as Maleficent hears that the fairies and Aurora have hidden somewhere in the Moors, she averts the Sorting Algorithm of Evil by sending her second-in-command to find them instead of relying on incompetent grunts. This second-in-command is able to find them in less than a day. Hiding right under your enemy's nose isn't as simple as picking a quiet little cottage on the edge of their territory—you either have to put a lot of work into it, or your enemy has to be a complete idiot, for you not to be discovered.
  • In Man of the Year, an equivalent of Jon Stewart stages an Independent run for President, and appears to win in a landslide. It's later revealed that his "victory" was due to a glitch in the voting machines, and, like every third party candidate since 1968, he won a tiny fraction of the popular vote and didn't carry a single state.
  • The Matrix ends with Neo running to escape the Agents and make it to a hotel room so he can log out. He opens the door, and Smith is there waiting with his gun out at point-blank. He unceremoniously shoots Neo through the chest many times. Neo comes back, though, to fit with the whole Kung-Fu Jesus theme.
  • The Matrix Revolutions features a fight between Neo and Smith-possessed Bane in the Real World. Since virtually all their combat training has been uploaded into their minds and is dependent on the physics of the Matrix, they don't have access to any of it. Their fight is brutal, dirty, and devoid of art. No fancy gravity-defying acrobatics here; just two desperate men beating the crap out of each other with whatever weapons are at hand.
  • In Max Keeble's Big Move, Max becomes a Bully Hunter who goes after his school bullies with pranks, thinking that he can get away with all of it because he'll be moving to a new city. Turns out Max isn't moving, and now he has to deal with the consequences. Among them, the bullies didn't suddenly reform; they're furious once they find out Max was behind the pranks, and execute Revenge by Proxy, which makes Max's friends hate his guts. The Almighty Janitor even calls Max a Dirty Coward who decided to "hit and run" rather than find a constructive way to deal with the bullies.
  • Mean Girls,
    • Janis reveals her Evil Plan about all the things Cady did to Regina in front of all the girls who were victimized by Regina George. Rather than anyone condemning Janis for this, the other girls cheer for Janis, due to them being victimized for Regina (and it being In-Universe Take That, Scrappy! moment).
    • After Regina realizes what was done to her, she ends up feeling hurt when she realizes that nobody really likes her. It goes to show that just because someone is a complete jerk to people, doesn't mean that he or she will be completely happy with being disliked.
  • The generally lighthearted comedy The Men Who Stare at Goats takes a dark turn when it references the real MK-ULTRA experiments: A soldier is driven into psychosis with LSD and disorienting lights. He goes on a rampage and is Driven to Suicide. Later on, it revisits the theme when the protagonists discover a working application of all that "research": sleep deprivation torture via loud nonstop music and strobe lights.
  • Mission: Impossible Film Series:
    • The famous Cable Drop scene in the first movie was the result of the heroes with their high tech gear breaking into a high tech vault nearly getting screwed because there was a rat in the vents, which made the guy holding the rappelling rope sneeze. At the end of the scene, they're nearly done in by simply dropping something.
    • In Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, Ethan tries to escape from a hospital. Rather than a Stealth Hi/Bye, his pursuers almost immediately spot him outside on a window ledge, then point out he's likely to hurt himself even worse trying to jump. He jumps anyway, but sure enough, he misses the passing truck he was aiming for and just barely escapes being hit by another car.
    • Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation:
      • After their shenanigans in the previous films (Namely the whole "Clipping a building in San Francisco with an ICBM as it crashed into the bay" thing), the IMF is still being investigated, and is shut down. ...aaand is reinstated at the end of the film, acknowledging that there are missions only they can handle. On top of that, the witch-hunting bureaucrat who had them shut down is forced to claim the whole thing was All Part of the Show, due to the possibility of the Syndicate having infiltrated the highest levels of government.
      • Ethan runs down a narrow hallway while bad guys try to shoot him, kicking up a bunch of dramatic debris but not stopping him. Then we find he did, in fact, get wounded, though he survives.
      • Benji keeps passing the lie detector tests Hunley frequently gives him to check his loyalties. However, those tests are at best unreliable, and Hunley presumably knows a well-trained person can fool them. Like Benji.
      • The mission in Morocco is full of this. Ilsa even lampshades the impossibility of the mission before it begins. During the mission itself, Ilsa hacks the water gates control and reboots it in order to stop the strong current from obstructing Ethan. The engineers quickly notice the problem and reverse the whole process before locking it down, preventing Ilsa from hacking it further. The resuming strong water current proves to be just a touch more than even Ethan himself can handle — he successfully completes his task, but runs out of air just before he can escape. If not for Ilsa diving in to save him, Ethan would've died down there for sure. The mission really is impossible.
      • Ethan drowns and is resuscitated in Morocco and spends a good chunk of the ensuing car and motorcycle chase driving at full speed while thoroughly discombobulated and suffering from a patchy memory. Averted in that due to his resulting state of oxygen-deprived calm recklessness he is operating at 110% and makes mincemeat of all his opponents via some of the most intense stunts in the series to date.
      Benji: [watches Hunt take the driver's seat] Whoa, whoa, whoa, are you sure you wanna drive? A minute ago you were dead!
      Hunt: [eyes unfocused and clearly out of it] What are you talking about?
      Benji: [gets in the car] This is not gonna end well.
      • During the Morocco motorcycle chase, a Syndicate mook pulls out a gun, turns to aim at Ethan, and smashes headlong into a car he didn't see coming.
    • Mission: Impossible – Fallout:
      • Julia has spent close to a decade undercover, away from Ethan; it's understandable that she would find new love and remarry.
      • A HALO jump is dangerous enough as it is. It's an even more terrible idea to jump straight into a storm cloud crackling with lightning. Walker cockily does exactly that (after disconnecting Hunt's oxygen!) and almost instantly gets stunned by a lightning strike, nearly dooming him and Ethan who has to save his ass.
      • Even with Lane captured, there are still many members of the Syndicate still at large; the remaining members formed another terrorist group called the Apostles, which is as dangerous as when Lane was in charge.note  Just removing the leader of a terrorist organization doesn't make the organization itself disappear.
      • Even with Atlee out of the picture, MI6 still wouldn't bring Ilsa Faust in because she failed to capture or kill Solomon Lane, who was turned over to the IMF at the end of the last film. Her going deep undercover and participating in many of Lane's acts of terrorism means she is also a wanted woman as well, leaving her no choice but to go on the run for two straight years until she either manages to kill Lane or bring him back to the British government by herself.
      • Hunley vs. August Walker. Not only is Hunley a somewhat pudgy bureaucrat and Walker a hulking CIA agent with a reputation for brutality, Hunley was well aware of what kind of dude Walker was before deciding to take him on in single hand-to-hand combat. Walker basically guts him, leaving him just alive enough to kick Hunt's ass into high gear before dying.
      • In a more lighthearted tone, restrooms (especially those near a party) are not a private space where Ethan and his target can be isolated indefinitely. Several times during the apprehension of "John Lark", Ethan is bothered by unrelated civilians who come and go and risk ruining the mission by discovering the mess they've made. He is notably pestered by a group of drunks who can see their feet under the stalls doors, and assume than Ethan is having an orgy with Walker and Lark.
      • Fuel isn't pure water, where you get doused in it and you will only end up wet. August Walker is shot in half of his face by aerial fuel from a burst helicopter fuel pipe, and it's excruciatingly painful, chemically burning him.
      • You cannot just shoot out the locks on locked boxes if you don't know the contents inside them. There might be flammable, explosive materials, or in this case, a nuclear bomb inside them which will result in an explosion if the bullet or the shrapnel hit them.
      • Walker cracks "John Lark" over the head with a lap top which knocks him out but breaks the screen and makes it completely useless. "Lark" also regains consciousness shortly afterwards as knocking someone out with blunt force only works for a brief period.
  • The film version of The Mist shows what would really happen if the monsters that the usual armed with self defense weapons and store supplies Ragtag Bunch of Misfits could survive against and kill went up against a real military. The army kills the monsters with a combination of heavy equipment, armored support and save any survivors they can. After movie after movie of this not happening, it's pretty striking to see. It also shows exactly why this doesn't happen elsewhere: the trials and battles of our heroes become meaningless.
  • The climax of The Music Man has everyone gathered around the marching band that Harold Hill's swindled into existence, everyone excited to see what he's done, maybe with the audience almost expecting something miraculously good and... yeah, the kids sound terrible because they've been taught that they can just "think" about practicing and didn't even rehearse. Fortunately for Hill, their parents are taken in at the idea of their children playing instruments.
  • My Cousin Vinny: As a courtroom comedy that works to be accurate on the legal side (to the point that it is often shown in law school), this is a given:
    • Vinny's cousin and his friend are arrested by cops who think they killed a store clerk. The two think they're being held because they forgot to pay for an item in the store. When they're being interviewed by the cops, they don't bother to ask for a lawyer, remain silent, or even ask what they are being charged with, and promptly wind up on trial for murder.
    • Vinny lies about his history as an attorney (or rather his lack thereof) to Judge Chamberlain. Of course, Vinny assumes that the judge wouldn't bother to contact the state of New York and verify Vinny's legal history. After seeing Vinny's obvious inexperience and unfamiliarity with court proceedings, the judge does just that and Vinny almost winds up in major legal trouble due to his lies.
    • Vinny's antics in the courtroom are not tolerated by the judge and result in him being sent to the jail for contempt of court. Three times.
    • Towards the end of the movie, Vinny invokes this trope on all of the major witnesses, discrediting them by simply using their own words against them via pointing out how reality works. For example, Vinny has one witness discredited after she says she saw his cousin committing the crime, only for Vinny to show the court that she's so near-sighted that she can't see even with her glasses on; all Vinny has to do is have someone at a distance ask how many fingers he's holding up. Another witness gets discredited after claiming he was cooking grits and saw the event happening, to which Vinny discredits by pointing out that grits take longer than five minutes to make because the piping system means it takes longer then ten minutes to get his food ready, and that unless somehow magic was involved, he couldn't have seen the events of the crime and have made grits at the same time. The last witness gets discredited when Vinny simply points out that there was no way he could of seen the crime take place, because not only did he have an incredibly dirty screen, he had several trees blocking the view.
  • In Mystery Men, Joker Immunity and Cardboard Prisons don't exist. When Captain Amazing complains about the quality of the villains he fights and asks about his old rogues gallery, he learns that all of them are exiled, dead, or serving life sentences.
    • As a Deconstruction of superhero movies, there's quite a bit of reality going on in this movie. Such as the superheroes in town, 99% of whom are losers in silly costumes, or the fact that the heroes spend 2/3 of the movie getting repeatedly beaten up, since they're in way over their heads.
  • At the end of Need for Speed, Tobey proves his innocence in Pete's death (as well as Dino's involvement in same) by winning the De Leon race in the car Dino used to kill Pete... and gets sent to jail for six months for illegal street racing. No Wrongful Accusation Insurance here. Lampshaded by the Monarch: "A couple of months in the slammer to prove your innocence? Was it worth it, kid?"
  • In Neighbors, Pete tries his hardest to convince Teddy that, despite his fraternity achievements being Serious Business to him, they don't matter a whole lot outside of college, and that he needs to focus less on Delta Psi shenanigans and more on what he'll do after graduation. By the end, Teddy realizes that Pete was right, and he starts attending night school to make up for lost time.
  • The same thing happens in Ur-Example Night of the Living Dead (1968), actually; the outbreak is all but over in 24 hours. Doesn't help the characters, though, who are all dead due to either their own mistakes, personality flaws, or just bad luck.
  • In Ninja Assassin, the ninjas easily kill their way through their many opponents... until they lose the advantages of darkness and surprise and have to fight soldiers with automatic weapons.
  • In Werner Herzog's remake of Nosferatu, Van Helsing kills Dracula. He is then arrested for murdering a foreign dignitary. End of film.
    • In another Herzog film, Incident At Loch Ness, the skeezy producer shooting a film about finding the Loch Ness Monster attempts to put in some gratuitous fan service by shooting some footage of a beautiful woman in a barely-there bikini taking a swim in the Loch. It takes less than ten seconds for her to come out a shivering, shaking mess, nearly hypothermic from the Loch's frigid water.
  • In Once Upon a Deadpool, after Vanessa tells him to kiss her, Deadpool abruptly stops the story, expecting to reenact The Princess Bride's "kissing story" exchange with Fred Savage. After an awkward silence, Savage realizes Deadpool's intent and tells him he's old enough not to let such things bother him anymore.
  • The Other Guys
  • Pacific Rim
    • A brief shot in the prologue shows heavy equipment in Manila dealing with a previously unrecognized hazard of Kaiju attacks: a hill-sized mound of giant monster shit.
    • Hannibal Chau's business is built on the ensuing reality of having large Kaiju corpses to get rid of. The aforementioned dung goes for large amounts of money because it's high in phosphorus, making it an incredible fertilizer. He also sells all sorts of Kaiju organs as miracle cures, capitalizing on people's superstitions and religious beliefs about the Kaiju (see below).
    • There are multiple shots of people using the bones as structural support for buildings, including a temple with a skull for the entrance.
    • Society has been changed by the Kaiju's arrival. A religion has formed claiming the Kaiju are the gods' way of showing their wrath towards humanity, and Word of God says that there are fringe animal rights fanatics who claim killing the Kaiju is cruelty to animals.
    • No matter how good the pilots or advanced a Jaeger is, two-to-one are extremely bad odds for anyone unless they're really lucky or pull a kamikaze move.
    • Jeagers are kick-ass Humongous Mecha, and the pinnacles of human technological design. But given the sheer amount of resources it takes to make one (the world's most industrially advanced nations can make, at most, three ), they become increasingly difficult to replace. Before long, this strain combined with the rate of losses makes continuing the Jeager program completely untennable.
  • There are a few lovely instances of this in Pain and Gain:
    • Daniel Lugo finds that taking another guy's money isn't as easy as making him sign over everything he owns over a phone. He later finds out he needs a notary to transfer the entire assets of a guy like Victor Kernshaw's entire financial estate. The scheme very nearly falls apart there, until he finds out a friend of his is a notary public and gets him to do it for him.
    • While Victor Kernshaw is found beaten and nearly run over, he tells the police that he was kidnapped and the police don't believe him. When the cops find him, he's drunk (though made forcibly so by the Sun Gym Gang), he's ranting about how his kidnappers were bodybuilder ninjas, there are burnt sex toys found at the scene and he's Colombian. The cops assume that this was either a drug-related incident gone south or a kinky sex-act gone wrong. Kernshaw's abrasive attitude (and the fact that he's SUCH a Jerkass that he wasn't even reported missing) doesn't win him any points either (though one can hardly blame him at this point).
    • One of the Sun Gym Gang's victims is accidentally killed thanks to a tranquilizer overdose. Two direct injections of a sedative intended for veterinary use with horses tends to do that.
  • Pixels shows that while humans are sending messages of peace into space, the aliens are not humans and can easily understand it completely wrongly.
  • Pirates of the Caribbean:
    • The first film ends with Will rescuing Jack from being hanged, in dramatic and public fashion. The second film opens with Will being arrested for doing so, albeit some time later.
    • As is Elizabeth. Being the daughter of a governor does not give you the right to aid and abet a known felon.
    • In the interim, it seems that the Royal Navy doesn't like it when you sacrifice your top-of-the-line warship to catch one pirate by recklessly pursuing him through a hurricane. And, when you resign your commission as a Commodore, unless you got some money stashed somewhere, you might have to hire yourself out as a deckhand, since no one's going to just give you a job right out.
      • As a matter of fact, Norrington is also being accused of aiding and abetting a known felon, since he refused to arrest all of the above at the end of the first film.
    • Early in the third film, Will tries to make a secret deal with the Pirate Lord Sao Feng. Knowing that Will would be double-crossing both Barbossa and Jack by doing so, Sao Feng's immediate response is to ask why he shouldn't expect to be betrayed as well.
    • The events of the first two films, specifically the attempts of Will, Barbossa, Pintel, Ragetti and Elizabeth to kill Jack lead to him initially refusing to sail with them in the third film. He only agrees to do so due to Barbossa possessing a chart that will allow him to escape Davy Jones's Locker.
    • The crew of the Black Pearl get into a Mexican Standoff right after getting out of Davy Jones's Locker by flipping the ship upside down. All the crew's guns end up with wet gunpowder as a result, leaving them unable to fire.
    • Film four: Barbossa shows up with a peg-leg, something often depicted in pirate movies such as those with Long John Silver. Thing is, most of the time these movie peg-legged pirates do not have a crutch to support them, despite them having to walk around with a stiff pole where the leg once was. Film four's Barbossa is not one of these pirates.
  • In Pitch Perfect, Beca tries to spice up their boring routine mid-performance without telling the others - the audience picks up and appears interested but it's perceived as an unpolished stunt and it throws the rest of the girls off their game.
  • Planes, Trains and Automobiles:
    • After being pulled over in their burned-up car for speeding (due to not knowing the actual speed because of the melted speedometer), Del says that if the car is impounded due to being unfit for the road from the fire damage, he won't be able to get Neal home in time for Thanksgiving. The car is impounded anyway, and they're forced to find some other transportation home.
    • As Neal points out to Del, you can't rent a car with shower curtain rings.
    • Del’s reaction whenever he takes his shoes off loses its hilarity once you realize he’s been homeless for nearly eight years.
  • The May-September romantic comedy Prime doesn't shy away from the rather realistic problems that can arise in relationships with a significant age difference—she's 37, established financially and professionally, and ready to have a baby. He's 23, just starting out in life. As much as they adore each other, they ultimately cannot overcome their differences and break up.
  • Prince Caspian:
    • Miraz's villainous actions all come back to bite him. Comments from the other lords makes it clear that Miraz has made several attempts at the throne, making the other lords cautious. His forcing Glozelle to make his archers fire on Telmarine soldiers during the castle battle undermines his authority over the military. The news that he murdered his much-beloved brother Caspian IX is the final straw, and Sopespian kills him at the first opportunity he gets.
    • Also unlike in the books, the four Pevensies have not recovered from growing up in Narnia and then thrown back into England again without warning. All four of them struggle with essentially being adults in children's bodies, are isolated from their peers and resentful of everything they lost, with Peter becoming unbearably arrogant and Susan pushing everyone away. Returning to Narnia to find all their friends dead, their castle in ruins and everyone thinking 'the old Kings and Queens' are just myths, also causes them to doubt their place in the land, previous influence and Peter has to reconcile his old position as High King with new Narnia.
  • In The Producers, Max ends up causing Leo to go into hysterics. In an attempt to get him to stop, Max tries splashing water in his face, and then slapping him. This only causes Leo to freak out even more.
    Leo: I'm wet! I'm hysterical and I'm wet! (slap) I'm in pain! I'm wet... AND I'M STILL HYSTERICAL!
  • In The Professional, Mathilda spends a good portion of the movie training under Léon's tutelage to become an assassin. Later, after Léon dies, she asks Tony to let her work as a hitwoman for him, but he vehemently refuses to allow a 12-year-old girl to kill people for him and sends her back to school.
    • In addition, the film sets up the protagonist, having finished her training, tracking down her target after a chance encounter. Utilizing her new found training, she loads up her guns, slips into the building, and is promptly caught by the bad guy. Because she's 12 and naive, while he is a grown man and has been doing the same thing for years.
  • Pulp Fiction:
    • Vincent Vega names a trope by accidentally shooting Marvin in the face. While Vincent claims the car went over a bump, he was still waving around a loaded gun with his finger on the trigger. It was only a matter of time before somebody got shot.
    • Upon seeing Marsellus Wallace out in the street, Butch tries to run Marsellus over with his car. Butch hits and injures Marsellus, but not much, since he barely had any room to punch the gas. Also, Butch injures himself in the collision because he wasn't wearing a seat belt.
      • Later in the same scene, Stray Shots Strike Nothing is averted. Marsellus pulls out a gun and shoots at Butch, but his aim is awful thanks being in a large amount of pain, as can be expected from someone who was just hit by a car. As a result, one of the bullets Marsellus fires hits a random woman in the leg; the woman had nothing at all to do with the conflict, she was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.
  • In the 4th Rambo film, we meet a group of pacifistic missionaries who travel into Burma hoping to offer aid to the viciously persecuted Karen people. Nearly all of them are dead by the end. Some may count this as Unfortunate Implications by suggesting that pacifism doesn't work, but in Real Life, the Burmese monks who tried passively resisting the S.P.D.C. have been all but wiped out. Kinda proving the point...
    • In a scene that attracted the ire of some Moral Guardians from the same film, Rambo at one point gets his hands on a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a jeep. He points it towards a man who is less than a foot in front of the barrel. Being that this is a machine gun capable of tearing apart concrete and unarmored cars, Ludicrous Gibs ensue, as opposed to the more typical but less realistic depiction of a couple of squibs and an exaggerated agony pose.
    • In First Blood, Rambo does not "go Rambo" with an M60 until the last few scenes of the film. For most of the film, he uses stealth and his surroundings to avoid or outmaneuver and neutralize the small town police officers, never going after them head-on. Later in the film, when Rambo is being pursued by the National Guard, he's still leagues above them in terms of experience, training and skill but they put him on the run through sheer numbers and superior firepower. He barely manages to avoid getting killed by the National Guard for those reasons, even though they are barely better trained or motivated than the policemen who were chasing him.
  • Ready or Not (2019):
    • The villains are a wealthy family who occasionally engage in Hunting the Most Dangerous Game as part of a Deal with the Devil, and are armed to the teeth in order to do so. Except it's been a few decades since they actually had to hunt someone in order to complete the ritual, meaning that they're incredibly rusty at doing so. And on top of this, they're all a bunch of lazy, entitled rich jerks used to having others wait on them, with the usual vices this implies. So instead of being one person faced against a remorselessly efficient team of hunters, as this trope usually is, it turns out the hunt is a lot more even-sided.
    • Unlike Stevens the butler, the maids are too young to have been involved in the last game of Hide-and-Seek. When two of the maids are accidentally killed by the Le Domases in the process of trying to kill Grace, the third takes to hiding in a dumbwaiter, terrified that she's next.
    • Grace stops choking Stevens and leaves immediately after he stops moving. As she's driving his car away, he starts getting up, having only passed out momentarily.
    • After striking Tony twice with his old fashioned lantern, Grace carelessly tosses it away, causing it to start a fire.
    • Charity insists she'd rather die than lose the Le Domas' wealth. When presented with the reality of actually dying, she starts begging to be spared.
  • In Red, after Moses is shot in the shoulder, they have to seek medical attention from someone who knows what they are doing.
    • When Victoria was shot in the abdomen by the Secret Service, they chose to stay behind as the injury made it hard for them to walk, much less complete the mission.
    • Cooper attempts to jump onto a car he is chasing but is almost immediately thrown off.
  • In the Macaulay Culkin movie Richie Rich, Van Dough spends the entire movie trying to break into the Rich family vault so he can steal their money. By the time he actually makes it in, however, he finds that it's full of nothing but keepsakes and photo albums, leading to this:
    Van Dough: But where's the gold... the diamonds... the negotiable bearer bonds? The money! [points his gun at them] Where is the money?!
    • The tones the Riches use make it clear they can't believe Van Dough could be in business and seriously believe the richest family on Earth maintains their wealth by hoarding their fortunes in a vault rather than smartly investing it.
    • This is in contrast to the Richie Rich comics where his mansion indeed has vaults stuffed with cash and valuables. Which is of course what makes the scene work so well.
  • Requiem for a Dream: Drugs Are Bad and Descent into Addiction have never been more realistically portrayed. After they begin seriously delving into drug usage, things spiral out of control and none of the core cast of characters turn out okay. Harry's drug usage costs him his arm and all of his closest relationships, Marion is trapped in a cycle of forced prostitution to pay for heroin and using it to cope with the degrading sex acts she has to perform, Tyrone is thrown in prison where he has to perform hard labor while suffering from both withdrawal and abuse from racist guardsnote , and Sara is institutionalized and, after enduring methamphetamine psychosis and ECT, retreats into a delusion when she no longer has an incentive to be a part of the real world.
  • In The Returner when Mizoguchi attempts to perform a Bullet Catch. While he's fast enough to catch the bullet it still goes right through his hand and into his head.
  • Rocky V is basically a whole movie about reality ensuing. After three previous Rocky movies saying "you're too banged up to fight" only to have him climb back in the ring and win, in this movie it sticks after fighting the steroid powered Drago and Rocky really has to retire. Then we see how quickly a house full of fiscally irresponsible people can lose money on shady investments. It didn't go over so well with fans.
    • In the final street fight, Tommy Gunn expects an easy victory against Rocky, as he's the newly crowned heavyweight champion of the world and in his prime while Rocky is old and out of shape. Thing is, it's a street fight and Rocky used to be a legbreaker, and a series of dirty moves and generally knowing where to hit when bare-knuckled ends up causing Tommy's defeat.
    • Rocky IV has consistently been considered the point where the franchise jumped the shark in part because of Ivan Drago, a stereotypical Soviet and walking Cold War propaganda device with a metal-crushing punch but not much backstory who exists so that the United States can figuratively defeat the Soviet Union on its own turf through the all-American Rocky. In Creed II, Drago becomes one of the most tragic characters in the franchise when we find out that as such an embodiment of all things Soviet, losing in such a way ruined his reputation and destroyed his life. He starts the film living in poverty in the Ukraine, tirelessly training his son Viktor to restore his honor with his wife having divorced him in the wake of his defeat.
  • In the film adaptation of Rurouni Kenshin, Sanosuke's BFS falls squarely into Awesome, but Impractical territory. It certainly looks cool enough, but the damn thing is so big and cumbersome that Kenshin easily evades each of Sanosuke's strokes with little effort.
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. The World
    • After Scott manages to knock Gideon away, he stops for a chat with Ramona and Knives. Only for Gideon to stab him through the chest. Lots of gaming tropes are played straight in this setting, but Talking Is a Free Action is apparently not one of them.
    • An alternate ending that was never filmed would have had it be revealed that Scott and Ramona were arrested for having murdered seven people.
  • Scream begins with the death of a teenager as per the hundreds of slasher movies that have come before it. Scary, but hardly harrowing. Then the girl's parents come home. Their panic over the state of the house and realization that something terrible has happened to their child suddenly makes the whole thing horribly real.
    • The third movie has a much more humorous example. Shortly before the climax, the killer throws his knife at Dewey. Cue slow- motion as the knife reaches him..... Only for it to bounce off his head and cause him to tumble down the stairs, instead of impaling him through the skull like what normally happens in fiction.
    • Additionally, throughout the franchise, the various Ghostfaces sometimes have trouble tripping over things and maneuvering (while at others are mercilessly capable). Given they are all wearing flimsy dime store Halloween costumes that black out their vision, it makes sense.
  • Serenity:
    Operative: I want to resolve this like civilized men. I'm not threatening you. I'm unarmed-
    Mal: Good. [draws his gun and shoots him]
    Operative: [leaping back up and grabbing Mal from behind] I am, however, wearing full body armour. I'm not a moron.
  • Seven Psychopaths ends with Marty managing to overcome his writer's block and finish his screenplay, implying his life is finally taking a turn for the better...only for the stinger to imply he's even more miserable than when he started. As much as the events of the film managed to re-invigorate his creativity, they were also incredibly traumatizing, and its aftermath (along with two of his friends dying trying to protect him) likely deepened his depression rather than cured it.
    • In the stinger one of the psychopaths called Marty, threatening to have him killed because Marty broke a promise that he made earlier in the film. Marty showed little to no resistance at the threat and even went as far as accepting it. Clearly showcasing that his survivor's guilt has drove him to the point of suicide.
  • Being a parody of a Zombie Apocalypse, Shaun of the Dead shows how easily it can be controlled not only by poking fun of the genre but it also goes out of its way to deconstruct the common cliches within:
    • By the end of the movie the army comes and guns down all the zombies: a few days later, the city is reclaimed, the few remaining zombies are rounded up, and life goes back to almost normal for the remaining characters.
    • Shaun and company learn during the last few scenes of the film that just because you have a gun, it isn't an automatic Infinity +1 Sword, especially if nobody in your group knows how to properly operate it other than himself.
    • The beginning of the film treats mercy-killing Phillip, Shaun's step-father as a lighthearted joke. Once Phillip comes close to actually dying it's treated very seriously and Shaun's mother is heartbroken by the whole ordeal, and even Shaun, who resented him for most of his life, is saddened by it.
  • She's Out of My League
    • Just because the skinny and dorky protagonist gets a smoking hot girlfriend who genuinely likes him, it doesn't mean that all of his self-esteem problems are instantly fixed. The fact that his friends and family make him feel worse about his relationship doesn't help him either.
    • The main character has a My God, What Have I Done? moment at the end of the film, and proceeds to call out his family, except his mom, about how poorly they've been treating him and making fun of him. He promptly turns to get off the plane he's on, only for the flight attendant to remind him that if he tries to get off as he is now, it would be a federal offensive and he'd be heavily fined, plus the plane is already getting ready to take off. He promptly is told to sit back down, with now his family giving him a Death Glare for his comments.
  • Shooter is kind of in love with this, with the climax being about four or five stacked up. Do not. Mess. With Bob Lee Swagger. The Attorney General (IE, the head guy at the top of all Law Enforcement in the country) had just let Swagger go since the Rifle used to frame him turned out to not be the rifle used, and as a result, he was a free man. The only people who even knew of the atrocities in Africa were all in the room, or with the Senator that had been orchestrating the whole mess. And yet, every one of them believed that Swagger would just return to his home and live out the rest of his life. WRONG. Swagger, a Marine Sniper, trained to gather intelligence and track people down, located them all when they were in one place, killed all of them and their guards effortlessly, blew the place to pieces, and made a forensically "clean" getaway. Clearly, none of them thought out the repercussions of shooting Swaggers dog. That said, the Attorney's "sadly we live in an imperfect world" speech to Swagger after he's forced to let the villains go to save Swagger is a little ambiguous, and can easily be read as a very heavy hint that the AG would actually quite like it if Swagger dished out some vigilante justice.
    • Also, the secrecy that protected them from prosecution also prevented them, implicitly, from nailing him for the dozens of mooks he killed. And it may mean that by the time anyone actually finds their little bungalow, the bodies will have been there long enough to make determining exact time of death impossible. Which would make it nigh-impossible to prosecute Swagger.
    • Swagger's recorded confession of the conspiracy's crimes, in another movie, would have been the damning evidence that would have thrown the bad guys in jail and exonerated him of his framed crimes right away. Instead, he burns it in front of the villains and allows himself to get arrested, after saving Sarah. As Swagger reasons, having that sort of evidence on a group of murderous conspirators will only make them more motivated to try and kill him.
    • And when Danny Glover's Jerkass Smug Snake Evil General character asks to be let go from the hearing, the Attorney General calmly tells him that he got calls from very important people asking just that, but procedure forces him, nay, allows him, to tell them to "fuck off".
    • After an entire film of belting out grand speeches that show how much of an irredeemable Jerkass he is, the Senator who is part of the conspiracy only gets as far as "Stop! I am a United States Senator..." on his attempted final speech to try to talk Swagger out of killing him before Swagger just says a blunt "yeah" and shoots him dead. If you frame a man with a known history to go Kill ’Em All on those who wrong him and your first meeting with him teaches him that you are a bad man, it's easy to say that it's impossible to talk him out of killing you.
  • Snake Eyes ends with the Corrupt Cop hero being praised by the media as a hero for stopping the assassination of a political whistleblower. Only for the extra attention generated by the media to bring his shady past to the forefront, leading to him getting fired, divorced, and facing prison time. Turns out that it doesn't matter if you're considered a hero, the police take allegations of corruption very seriously.
  • Spider-Man:
    • Spider-Man did a pretty harsh one for Super fights in the final confrontation in which Peter is beaten to a bloody pulp (shown in graphic detail) by the Green Goblin before turning the tide on him. The film shows exactly how devastating being beaten by a superhuman would be, made more effective by the lack of music and flashy special effects.
    • Spider-Man 2 has a scene where Peter after losing his powers runs into a burning building to save a child. However, without his powers, he is nowhere as heroic as he would've been. He is a lot weaker, needs more than one push to break down a door and nearly dies due to suffocation and breathing in soot (The trope gets slightly zigzagged as, the kid helps him get back up when he nearly falls to his death at one point). Once he is out, he is in very bad shape and hooked to an oxygen mask and coughing. One of the firefighters congratulates him for his bravery, only to find out that at least one more person was still trapped in one of the higher floors, who couldn't make it out. Despite Peter's Heroic Willpower, without his actual super powers, he couldn't save everyone.
      • Another one happens during the train scene, when Ock keeps throwing passengers at Spidey one at a time instead of throwing two or three at once (which he is fully capable of doing). Then he increases the speed of the train to max and damages the brakes, leaving him to rescue the passengers. While Spider-Man manages to stop the train in the end, the amount efforts he had to put are too much for him and he passes out due to exhaustion. While he does regain his consciousness, Doc Ock manages to knock him out again in a single punch, thus revealing he had been doing everything to tire him out and capture him, given he lured him out in the first place to deliver him to Harry.
      • In that same scene, the train full of passengers are grateful because, not only Spider-Man saved their lives while risking his own, he is also Just a Kid. When Doc Ock returns and tries to fight him again, they try and defend him by pulling a Go Through Me at him. Doc Ock simply brushes them out of his way using his Combat Tentacles and no one is left between him and Spidey.
    • Spider-Man 3: While he is under the symbiote's influence, Peter is right to point out that Eddie Brock is a sleaze by fabricating a photo, and J. Jonah Jameson fires Brock on the spot because faking a photograph is considered outright reprehensible in the news media.
    • The Amazing Spider-Man:
      • The reboot takes Spider-Man's origin and plays it for realism in a few ways (though keeps the fantastical science side).
      • While a science nerd, Peter is shown to have a number of interests besides science; while this made people accuse him of not being a nerd, it made him a far more realistic depiction of what a socially awkward teenager would look and act like.
      • After getting his superpowers, Peter struggles at first to operate and control them; his newfound strength causes him to repeatedly break anything he touches and he's constantly breaking things accidentally, he keeps getting stuck to things, and his newfound extrasensory abilities freak him out. Like Man of Steel, it's clear that this isn't something you just immediately understand, and he's understandably a nervous wreck after they kick in. On top of that, the sudden biological change burns up his metabolism, making him incredibly hungry when he gets home.
      • When Uncle Ben is killed, Peter doesn't learn instantly that Great Power Comes Great Responsibility, he just gets pissed and wants revenge. He spends the whole film coming to terms with Uncle Ben's death, but its not until George Stacy points out that vigilantism isn't very responsible that Peter realizes he has to be more than just a guy chasing down criminals.
      • As well as that, the NYPD are not useless. When Peter first brushes with the cops, they nearly take him in for ruining a sting on a car theft ring that cost a lot of time and money to set up, and when the police manage to confront him, he gets taken down by the shooters and is nearly arrested until he manages to Curb-Stomp Battle the ground officers. When he escapes, the shooters manage to land a hit on him and he's left nursing a horrible leg wound for the rest of the climax. And when given the chance, they nearly took down the Lizard without Spider-Man's help until his Healing Factor combined with a second wind allowed him to get the drop on them.
      • In the sequel, when Peter goes to reconcile with Gwen, he slowly walks across the road with soft music playing in the background in a classic romantic scene, while cars suddenly stop to avoid hitting him with brakes screeching and a motorist yelling "Hey moron, get out of the road".
      • Similarly, Gwen Stacy's death. No matter how Badass Normal they are, if an unarmed young woman runs unarmed into the middle of a fight between two superhumans, one of them completely insane, in an old and structurally unsound clocktower, they are going to get killed.
  • In Starship Troopers, the human military uses infantry rush tactics without any kind of armor support and without thought or reason under the mistaken belief that their opponents are just mindless insects. The first battle ends almost instantly in a rout, with 100,000 humans killed in the first hour.
    • One criticism that has been thrown at the film is that it is unnecessarily, excessively gory. However, it is worth noting that in real life, when insects such as ants, wasps and termites engage in combat, dismemberment is often par for the course.
  • In Starsky & Hutch, the big climatic scene includes Starsky & Hutch going off of a dock with their car to try to land on a boat. In contrast to what you expect, they MISS! Roger Ebert pointed out that it's something we've been waiting to happen for years.
  • The climatic battle in the Star Trek parody Star Wreck: In the Pirkinning opens with the leader of the enemy fleet making an overly long, very melodramatic battle speech. The other officers (on both sides) ignore him and start the fight without him.
  • Chun-Li in Street Fighter is shocked that M. Bison doesn't remember attacking her village and killing her father. While it may have been the defining moment of her life, to him it was just another evil thing he did and didn't matter one bit.
  • After the long Mind Screw that made up most of Sucker Punch, this trope takes firm hold at the very end. As it turns out, the crazed orderly who screams about how he's in control of the asylum is, in fact, simply a crazy orderly who only has power over a few of the mentally ill patients. Even the other orderlies express willingness to desert him, at the end. And when he tries to use his "ultimate authority" to escape arrest, the police completely ignore him and instead listen to Doctor Gorsky (who really is an authority figure) and make sure Babydoll is alright (because they saw him trying to rape her).
  • In The Sum of All Fears, desk jockey Jack Ryan tries to fight a big buff Neo-Nazi thug. Goes about as well as you'd expect.
  • Like the Kick-Ass movies, SUPER shows the realistic outcome of an Average Joe attempting to become a Badass Normal superhero. The injuries Frank inflicts on bad guys are bloody and gruesome since real thugs are not Made of Iron, his Paper-Thin Disguise fools neither the police nor the gangsters he's trying to take down, and in general, the public regards him with alarm and suspicion rather than love and adoration.
    • And as Boltie tragically finds out, real life gangsters and Mooks do not use A-Team Firing.
  • Played for Laughs in Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. After Ricky loses his confidence in a racing crash, his father shows up to help retrain him by, among other things, making him drive blindfolded. However, Ricky isn't a Jedi Knight, so it goes as well as can be expected.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014):
    • April is a reporter who goes to her boss with minimal evidence, ranting about mutant turtles who are also ninjas, after being told once before she needed real evidence, and promptly gets fired. She doesn't miraculously get her job back at the end either, choosing not to expose her new friends.
    • Splinter and the Turtles are self-taught from a karate book that got tossed into the sewer. Though competent against mooks due to their size and speed, Shredder is out of their league since he's better-trained and wearing Powered Armor that makes him a physical equal.
    • The sewer-surfing scene is getting to be a tradition for this franchise, but then a slight mis-timing causes all of them to reach the narrow drain at once instead of one after another. At least it's Played for Laughs.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows:
    • Rocksteady uses a machine gun on the turtles during a fight inside a cargo aircraft. The hail of bullets proceeds to tear apart the cockpit and sends half off it flying off before the jet starts a nosedive. Even Bebop called him out on it.
    • No one can understand what Casey is saying while he's wearing his hockey mask.
    • Krang is a little too big for his android body's stomach in this incarnation. So much so that after he sends Shredder off to find the artifacts for his doomsday weapon, he orders his android to stuff him in the cockpit.
    Krang: Place me back in!
    [the android tries pushing him in gently]
    Krang: Push me in, you stupid robot!
    [the android begins punching him into its stomach, and finally crams him in uncomfortably]
    Krang: You idiot!
    • Mikey raising his mechanized nun-chuck arms in celebration during a high-speed chase, resulting in their sacrifice to the gods of Low Clearance.
    • As highly trained and proficient in close combat Karai is, she is still taken down by the numerical superiority of the untrained Combat Pragmatism of April O'Neil and Vernon teaming up against her.
  • Terminator
    • The Terminator
      • Kyle Reese is all set to take on a bunch of cops before Sarah Connor talks him out of it. Being a Terminator-hunting badass doesn't shield him from reality.
      • The series rule on time travel is explained as it being difficult to send a living person back because it's harder to send living beings compared to a synthetic lifeform. As a result, while the Terminator is able to immediately act after getting sent to the past, Reese is near death when he first arrives in the past, and requires time to heal from the process.
      • At the end Reese takes on the Terminator with a metal bar. Damaged or not, it's still a near indestructible metal robot and makes him pay for it. When he sticks a bomb on it he jumps down some stairs and it still gets him killed. Turns out being six feet from a bomb isn't much better than 2.
      • When the Terminator kills two different Sarah Connors, Sarah's roommate and her roommate's boyfriend, and attack Sarah at a nightclub, the police take it very seriously. They question both Sarah and Kyle about what's going on, not believing Kyle's story about the robot-ruled future, and don't let the Terminator see Sarah when it claims to be a friend of hers. They even put up a good fight when the Terminator attacks, but sadly the Terminator is a nigh-indestructible killbot and wipes them all out.
    • Terminator 2: Judgment Day - The police haven't forgotten what happened at the West Highland police station, so when they discover that someone matching his appearance has broken into Cyberdyne they bring a much bigger SWAT team. They still don't succeed, but points for trying.
      • Towards the end of this scene, the T-800 uses a tear gas grenade launcher to shoot the SWAT members. The canisters may not explode (and because the SWAT team were wearing gas masks they wouldn't have been affected by the tear gas), but getting shot point-blank by a 40mm metal canister in the chest, even with body armor on knocks them to the floor and leaves them groaning in pain.
    • Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines continues the series Deconstruction of the Kid Hero and Chosen One. The first film ended melancholy, but hopeful, with Sarah Connor telling a recording for John in the future about his destiny to lead the human resistance after The End of the World as We Know It. In the second film, after John is born though, Sarah has clearly decided that there'll be no nuclear war if she can help it, and tried to destroy Skynet before it's created. After she'd arrested and put in a mental asylum (who don't let her out simply because she says she no longer believes in Terminators), John Connor is shown extremely maladjusted living in the normal world, having only one friend, committing crimes, and disobeying his foster parents, all due to growing up knowing about his supposed destiny, and being trained in isolation by a paranoid Sarah. Even in the third film, when Skynet has supposedly been destroyed, John has become a drifter living off the grid simply out of residual paranoia and inability to live a normal life.
    • Terminator Genisys: Having been raised from age nine by the T-800, Sarah Connor is much more competent with weapons and battle tactics, but she's also a brooding shut-in and hates the idea of being predestined to "mate" with Kyle Reese and sire John Connor. Having the foresight that Reese dies also causes Sarah to initially be distrustful of him when they do first meet.
  • Time Chasers plays its protagonist surprisingly realistically for a movie with a fantastic time-travel element. He's a mere inventor and professor who rides a bike instead of driving, so he gets his butt kicked whenever he fights due to lack of experience and training and his one attempt to get away in a stolen car simply has him crash moments later because he doesn't know how.
  • To Live and Die in L.A. has the protagonist Richard Chance abruptly shot dead in a fight with the Big Bad's henchman, Jack. Like deaths in The Departed, it's very abrupt and there is no last-minute speech. With still ten minutes left to go before the film ends, Chance's partner, John Vukovich chases after the Big Bad and eventually kills him. The film's creators did film another ending where Chance himself lived, but chose the one where he died because it fit the story and the characters better.
  • The Transformers Film Series takes a more realistic approach to the franchise, and especially the Autobot-Decepticon war.
    • Unlike the original series, named characters from both sides sometimes die. No A-Team Firing here, and the guns cause some real damage. Their sizes tend to destroy a lot of scenery, and not every human is shown to get up after being hit by a transformer. This does not exacty help their image, and humans - a race that can seemingly barely stand each other - are quick to brand every large robot as a terrorist.
    • Despite his fondness of them, even Optimus Prime wont just take it when humans keep opposing and turning against his race. While he would never fire randomly into crowds, he is willing to kill humans that assault him, or to save someone else.
    • Transformers may be big and made of metal, but so are tanks, and both can be brought down by humans with enough firepower, which is why they need their vehicle disguises. The human militaries may also come to trust Autobots as comrades, but insist on fighting alongside them to have some say in their planet's fate, as opposed to just sitting back and letting the robots duke it out like they do in most versions.
    • While people have criticized the Autobot's habit on killing most of their opponents, the Autobots are usually outnumbered, lack ways to imprison Decepticons during battle, and don't have any place they could actually lock them up. Their options on the battlefield are pretty darn limited, since unless they permanently crippled them, the Decepticons would just strike them on the back and/or escape to wreak more havok. Not to forget, Megatron's icy prison worked fine until somebody actually tried to free him. By the time of Transformers: The Last Knight, humans have built prisons for Cybertronians, but they undoubtetly cost a lot, and the fact that anti-transformer humans aren't above murdering and cutting Cybertronians apart for their own benefit makes the purpose of said prisons questionable.
  • In Tremors, it doesn't matter how big, strong, ugly, and monstrous you are. You will die if you are shot enough times, as the Gummers educate the second Graboid the hard way.
    • The Graboids are also just as susceptible to the laws of physics as anything else. The first Graboid killed is done in when it hits a concrete retaining wall at high speed. The last one is killed because it charges at Val while he's standing at the edge to a cliff, and it can't stop in time to keep itself from flying over the edge.
      • That last one was due to Val taking advantage of the Graboids' Logical Weakness. Because they hunt using sound, a loud enough noise (like an explosion) can hurt and disorient them enough to force them into retreat. Or in this case, not notice a cliff in time.
    • In Aftershocks, Burt uses a .50 cal to kill a Shrieker in order to get a car a few yards away. There's No Kill Like Overkill, right? Yeah, actually, there is. Burt and co. find this out the hard way as they get to the truck, only to discover that the bullet passed right through the Shrieker, then through several other objects. Including the engine block of their would-be getaway truck, completely ruining it.
    • In Back to Perfection, when the Graboids make a return, Nancy does the most logical thing... and calls in the authorities. As she noted in an earlier scene, the Closed Circle trope doesn't apply this time. Unfortunately for her, the door then swings the other way and bites her in the ass in two ways:
      1. The officials tell them that nobody is allowed to kill Graboids. While they are monstrous, Graboids are ultimately just animals, and their scarcity means that they're technically endangered.
      2. Tied to the above, if the Graboids can't be successfully relocated, they'll just relocate the townsfolk.
  • In Tricky People, Yello Dyno's advice for dealing with potential pedophiles is to "take three steps back" and "run like the wind," but when Lyric tries it on Reginald Charming, he easily overpowers her and frightens her into submission. She's only saved from a terrible fate by Yello Dyno himself.
  • Troy:
    • Paris boldly challenges Menelaus to a Duel to the Death over Helen's hand, convinced that he'll triumph through The Power of Love. The problem is, Paris is a skinny kid who's never been in a real fight, while Menelaus is a hulking, highly experienced combat veteran who proceeds to humiliate him while Agamemnon laughs at the show. Menelaus starts by toying with him, but when Paris manages to actually threaten him, he finally takes things seriously-and in ten seconds he has Paris on his ass with a broken nose and no sword.
      • Even before the duel begins, Agamemnon points out that they didn't bring an army of 50,000 across the Aegean to watch a duel and then go home. He agrees to let Menelaus fight Paris, but makes clear that he plans to assault the city no matter what happens.
    • When actual battle begins, the Greeks rush at the Trojan army, confident in their superior numbers. The Trojan army is deployed in a phalanx under fortified city walls, backed up by archers, with the Greeks too busy running to keep proper formation. As Achilles and Odysseus point out in disbelief even before contact is made, the outnumbered Trojans mop the floor with the Greeks.
  • The movie Unbroken has real-life Louis Zamperini go through years of abuse and torture before being released, and he didn't break. Which follows what happened in real life to a point. But the next movie, Unbroken: Path to Redemption, shows that even if you don't break in the moment, you're still going to get traumatized. He has PTSD, alcoholism to cope with the nightmares, and almost gets divorced to his beloved wife. The only thing that helps him is God, a Billy Graham crusade, and realizing that when he was adrift he promised his life to God if he would survive.
  • Underworld (2003)
    • After a few movies of battling vampires, lycans and hybrids and getting a power boost to stay on top, Selene has to face a 5-meter tall uber-lycan in the fourth film. Despite her skills, weapons and experience the fight's exactly what you would think a round between two beings of proportionate strength when one is 3 times the size and has natural weapons. Selene is knocked out in about a second. She does better in the second fight, but is still outmatched. Ultimately, she's forced to make him transform back into a human and attack him then.
    • Her new human ally has to dodge a car by jumping to the side onto pavement. Unlike most examples he is severely hurt and limps for the rest of the scene.
  • Unforgiven is all about this trope, meticulously deconstructing the Western genre while hanging lampshades all over it.
    • There's an entire scene with Little Bill and Beauchamps, where Bill explains how gunplay actually works compared to how it's portrayed in the stories.
    • William Munny. He used to be an alcohol-drenched villain whose exploits (while utterly despicable) would've made for a gripping action story — but is now just a washed up old man having to deal with the harsh realities of Western life, all while sober. At the beginning of the climax he drinks a whole bottle of whiskey in order to slip back into his old persona, and consequently has a classic (if brutally short) action shoot-out with the bad guys.
  • When the anarchist revolution begins at the end of V for Vendetta, the film briefly shows a man wearing one of V's masks robbing a corner shop at gunpoint, acknowledging that some people will resort to violence and theft in the absence of laws.
  • Warcraft.
    • After supreme leader Gul'dan cheats by using magic in a sacred single combat, many of the Orcs begin to revolt and a few openly walk away from him. Since Gul'dan is a high-powered sorcerer extremely skilled in death magic, this goes about as well as you would think.
    Gul'dan: (after draining the life from the first few rebels) Anyone else?
    • When Blackhand ambushes Lothar, Lothar pulls out a pistol on him. Blackhand, either not knowing what the weapon does or thinking he is just that badass, tries to grab it. Lothar pulls the trigger and Blackhand loses his hand.
  • At one point in The Whole Ten Yards, one of the hitmen sent against the main characters gets shot in the foot and taken hostage. After some time is spent planning a possible hostage exchange for Oz's wife, they discover that said hitman bled out and died. Oz spends the next 30 seconds wondering how that's even possible.
  • In the film of Wild Wild West, when West is up against a mook, said mook fights with elaborate kicks and punches, saying "I learned that from a Chinaman!" West simply kicks a shovel up into his hand and bashes the mook over the head, stating "I just made that up."
  • X-Men Film Series
    • X2: X-Men United:
      • During a critical scene, Rogue attempts a Big Damn Heroes moment by arriving with the X-Jet to save her friends. Unfortunately, Rogue is an inexperienced teenager, and the X-Jet is one of the most advanced aircraft on the planet. She barely manages to land without crashing, and is shown shaking and breathing heavily from the panic after doing so. She's also unable to take her hands off the controls until Storm arrives to comfort her and calm her down.
    • In The Wolverine:
      • Logan's injuries take their toll after his Healing Factor slowed down. For one, he's much more susceptible to concussions and piercing weapons.
      • Logan also gets tired and needs to rest while taking a walk with Mariko. It's established in the comics that his adamantium skeleton weighs a couple hundred pounds. Without the healing factor to repair his fatigued muscles, that's a lot of weight to carry around.
      • Several of the thugs fighting Logan in their various encounters learn it's not a smart move to punch a guy in the face when he has a metal skeleton.
      • The thugs that attack Logan throughout the movie are armed with knives and tasers, and even the Big Bad's henchmen use bows and katanas. This isn't Rule of Cool or a way of avoiding the bad guys just shooting him. Japan's gun control laws are the strictest in the world, and even powerful criminal organisations like the Yakuza only have a handful. Arming every random Mook with a gun would just have been too difficult and expensive even for a wealthy industrialist with crooked government officials in his pocket.
      • Building a huge mountain fortress and buying enough adamantium to build a 10-foot cyborgsuit with giant thermal-charged katanas can put even a major corporation in serious financial debt.
    • X-Men: Days of Future Past:
      • Including a demonstration of Required Secondary Powers, Quicksilver has to brace the back of Magneto's head to prevent him from getting severe whiplash while moving at super speed. And despite this, Magneto is still visibly ill and disoriented after moving so quickly.
      • Right after they get caught, Quicksilver also incapacitates the guards in the room, with hijinks such as crossing two guard's arms, putting one's fist in his own face, poking another one in the face, and giving another one a wedgie. This proceeds to send all of them flying, as he did it at such speeds that the sheer momentum hit them with much more force.
      • Wolverine not having his adamantium skeleton doesn't make his fight with Magneto any less of a Curbstomp Battle than usual: Magneto simply chucks pieces of rubble at him until he's unable to dodge, forcibly inserts rebar INTO his body and finally chucks him into the Potomac. For all of Wolverine's fighting prowess, it's entirely based on melee combat and Magneto has the advantage at range.
      • After he gets a head wound during his fight with Beast, Erik doesn't just put a bandage on it but has to clean and stitch it up using his powers.
    • X-Men: Apocalypse:
      • While Apocalypse may have rid the world of nuclear weapons, dialogue between Xavier and Magneto at the end indicate that the world powers are already rebuilding their arsenal.
      • The second Stinger shows a rare look at the aftermath of Wolverine's rampage through the Weapon X facility: a cleanup crew busy at work mopping up the blood and vacuuming the shells and bullets.

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