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    Arsenal Firearms AF2011-A1 
Everything is better when you put more barrels on it. It's like adding more bacon.
Description, Killing Floor 2

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/af2011.jpg
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/af2011_a1_5.jpg
Top: Standard Model; Bottom: Dueller Prismatic model

The Arsenal Firearms AF2011-A1 (with Standard, Dueller, and Dueller Prismatic variants) is an Italian double-barreled semi-automatic handgun. It is a derivative of the M1911 pistol, and is, in simple terms, two side-by-side M1911 pistols merged into a single body. Much of the mechanisms either come in pairs or have been welded together into a double-sized one. The magazine is similarly two side-by-side M1911 magazines held together by their base.

In case it wasn't obvious, Rule of Cool is the only reason this weapon exists, as it does nothing that a standard 1911 (or comparable weapon) can't, apart from the dubiously-practical expenditure of two rounds at a time.

Film

  • In Spectre, Hinx carries an AF2011 Dueller Prismatic, which he only uses once. Possibly its first appearance in film.
  • Apppears in Resident Evil: The Final Chapter as Christian uses two skull-painted AF2011 Dueller Prismatics as his main firearms. Alice and Razor are also seen wielding them at one point.
  • Weasel brandishes one during Deadpool 2.

Live-Action TV

  • In the Gotham episode "Heroes Rise: All Will Be Judged", Gordon can be seen loading one, though it never gets used.

Web Video

Video Games

  • It is one of the newest weapons added in the Infinite Onslaught update for Killing Floor 2, meant for the Gunslinger perk. Owing to its ridiculous size for a 1911-based pistol, it uses the same animations as the Desert Eagle. Just like every other handgun in the game, it can also be dual-wielded.
  • Appears as a usable weapon in Counter-Strike Online 2, possibly its first appearance in any media.
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    Auto Mag/AMT Automag 
"Well, this is the .44 Magnum Auto Mag, and it holds a 300 grain cartridge. And if properly used, it can remove the fingerprints."
Harry Callahan, Sudden Impact

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/unknown_697.jpeg
The .44 Auto Mag was the first semi-automatic pistol to use a cartridge as heavy as .44 Magnum (.44 AMP, Auto Magnum Pistol). It went through several different manufacturers, the first of which was the Auto Mag Corporation (AMC). It was never a real money-maker thanks to flawed production and business decisions. Namely, production was rushed and it was massively underpriced in an attempt to convince investors that the pistol was a hot seller. The idea failed spectacularly, with investors unconvinced, AMP losing more than $1,000 per unit on each sale, and the entire design team walking out in protest. The fact that it was the only pistol on Earth that took its particular caliber of ammunition also did not help, since commercially-loaded ammunition was rare and the only other way to get the correct caliber was to modify cases for other ammunition (.308 or .30-06) and reload by hand.

AMC later rebranded itself as Arcadia Machine and Tool, or AMT, and continued to manufacture pistols. Their newer designs look more like enlarged M1911s than the original Auto Mag, hence identified by the term Automag instead of Auto Mag. The new Automag series consisted of the II in .22 Magnum, the III in .30 Carbine and 9mm Winchester Magnum, the IV in .45 WinMag and 10mm Auto, and the V in .50 Action Express, but all production ceased in 2001, a few years after AMT's own bankruptcy. Recently, there's been another attempt to bring the pistol back to market, and you can now reserve one for a cool $3,500.

Anime and Manga

  • Mizuho Inada was issued one in the manga version of Battle Royale. She was so off in la-la land that she never got a chance to use it...and it fell into the hands of Kazuo Kiriyama.
  • Shows up in City Hunter in the hands of two different one-time villains. The first is an amateur who uses it as his regular handgun, but the second is implied to have brought that only because his regular pistol (chambered for an unspecified .38 cartridge) had little effect on Umibozu, and by chance the Automag was the first powerful pistol he got his hands on.
  • Nicolas Wong uses an Automag as his main weapon in Psycho-Pass: The Movie.

Film

  • Used by Clint Eastwood in the Dirty Harry movie Sudden Impact. The Mafia sent a hit squad after him, so Inspector Callahan decided he needed more firepower. The producers had such a hard time getting it that they had to contact the original designer, who had enough spare parts to assemble two in his basement. Rumor has it, during the climactic scene at a pier, a diver had to be kept on stand-by because Eastwood got frustrated with constant jams that ruined takes and routinely threw it into the water. The attempt to invoke The Red Stapler effect with the gun and revive production, like how the series did with the Smith & Wesson Model 29 Revolver, failed.
  • Used by Burt Reynolds in Malone.
  • Beverly Hills Cop II featured the Auto Mag and its spent cartridge cases as a plot device to locate the Alphabet Bandit.

Literature

  • It's Mack Bolan's signature weapon, "Big Thunder", in the early parts of The Executioner novel series, when he wanted a hand weapon with greater intimidation factor and range than his Beretta Brigadier. As a weapons expert, Bolan would have no problems handloading his rounds.
  • The Automag III with reloaded .30 shells was the weapon of choice for Hanse Fletcher in C.R. Jahn's Underground.

Video Games

Web Comics

    Borchardt C93 
The C93 was the first mass-produced semi-automatic pistol. The design of its toggle lock mechanism served as the precursor for the now legendary P08.
Description, Battlefield 1

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/borchadt.jpeg

The very first mass-produced semi-automatic pistol, this weapon was designed by Hugo Borchardt and used the same toggle lock system that would later be used by the Luger. In fact, Georg Luger was Borchardt's assistant and modified the design of the C93 and scaled it down to create the Luger. The weapon was considered by the American and Swiss militaries, but they found that while it was accurate and fired rapidly, it was heavy, poorly balanced, had too much recoil, its grip was unergonomic and it was too expensive. Allegedly, when Hugo Borchardt was asked to modify the design to address the issues of the C93, he was insulted by the request and refused to make any changes, believing it to be perfect as-is, hence the job came down to Georg Luger instead.

In addition to its design influencing the Luger, its 7.65mm cartridge was the basis for several automatic pistol cartridges, including the .30 Luger and the 9mm Parabellum. While being the first mass-produced semi-auto pistol, the total number of C93s produced is relatively low compared to those that come after it due to the weapon's technical issues, with about 3,000 total manufactured between two companies.

Anime and Manga

  • Steamboy. Alfred Svenson uses one to shoot Ray's grandfather.
  • Golden Kamuy has a C93 as Lt. Tsurumi's main sidearm.

Film

  • Russian film Planet of Storms (aka Planeta Bur / Планета бурь). Engineer Allan Kern carries one.

Video Games

    COP 357 Derringer 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/unknown_656.jpeg

Designed as a backup weapon that could fire the same rounds as a police officer's .357 Magnum service revolver (the name "COP" stands for "Compact Off-duty Police"), though its heavy weight (relative to its compact size), even heavier trigger pull and substantial recoil turned out to be a problem. Nevertheless, the COP's four muzzles make it a distinctively menacing weapon for the silver screen.

Anime & Manga

  • Standard carry gun of Lumiere, in the anime Kiddy Grade.
  • Nina uses one during the neo-Nazi arc in Monster.
  • Shows up in City Hunter as Reika's gun, but only when she's not in the police (the one time we see her in her cop days she carried the M60 service revolver).

Film

  • This is the gun Leon shoots Holden with in the opening scene of Blade Runnernote , likely inspiring its use in the other sci-fi shows mentioned below.
  • The Matrix Reloaded. Persephone uses this on one of the Merovingian's mooks.
  • The Big Bad tries to pull one of these out of his coat pocket at the end of Bad Boys in an attempt to finish off the protagonists when their backs are turned. Unfortunately for him, Will Smith is quicker on the draw.
  • Used by Devon Aoki's character in War
  • A COP 357 is one of the many weapons carried by the Winter Soldier in Captain America: The Winter Soldier.
  • One is found and used by Jenko and Schmidt during the car chase in 21 Jump Street.

Live-Action TV

  • Battlestar Galactica. Under the fiction model name of 'Stallion', this was a civilian gun used by various criminal types (such as Tom Zarek's men), and by Romo Lampkin to threaten Lee Adama in "Sine Qua Non".
  • Stargate SG-1. A night-guard on an alien planet uses one to menace our heroes in "Bad Guys".

Literature

  • KGB agent Natalia Tiemerovna uses a COP at one stage in The Survivalist action-adventure novels by Jerry Ahern. John Rourke also has one among his impressive armoury.

Video Games

  • The COP's distinctive four-barreled design appears in Team Fortress 2 as the basis for the Shortstop, an alternative primary weapon that can be found or created for the Scout class. Unlike the COP, it appears to fire ratshot or snakeshot, as each pull of the trigger fires a four-pellet spread. The Shortstop is also much larger than the COP.
  • Hitman (2016) features a concealable 5mm pistol based on the COP. It only has one barrel, but is silent, has a five round magazine and cannot be reloaded. It also can't be detected during a patdown, making it extremely useful for smuggling into a restricted area.

    FP-45 Liberator 
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/liberator.jpg

A resistance weapon developed during World War II, this disposable pistol was dropped into France, China, and Greece to be found and used by partisan forces and civilians as a Ranged Emergency Weapon. Described as "a great weapon with which to obtain another weapon", the intention was for a rebel fighter to get up close to an occupying soldier and use it to take him out and obtain his weapon.

The Liberator was incredibly cheap and quick to manufacture; It was said that it took longer to reload than it did to assemble. Chambered in .45 ACP, it had an unrifled barrel, making its range pitiful. While this gun was certainly produced in much higher numbers than any other gun listed here with roughly a million examples produced in the span of two months, it didn't see much use in the war as much of the military high command was skeptical about the practicality of dropping large numbers of Liberators into Europe and Britain outright refused to airdrop them due to the logistical impracticality of doing so. After they were rejected by the military, half of the weapons were sent to the OSS who didn't see much practicality in the guns either and usually preferred to equip their operatives with better weapons. A few examples saw use in Greece and the Pacific theater, most notably the Philippines where the guns would continue to be used by police officers as an issued weapon after the war. Most of the guns were destroyed by the OSS and British military after the war without ever seeing use, making any surviving examples sought after collectibles.

Live Action TV

  • R. Lee Ermey fires one at a melon on Mail Call.
  • One customer brings on in on Cajun Pawn Stars, having won it in a poker game. The gun turns out to be worth a lot more than he expected.

Video Games

    Heckler & Koch Mark 23 
A large-caliber combat pistol developed at the behest of U.S. Special Operations Command. The "Mk" designation indicates that the development project was a Navy initiative. It has the 45-caliber size and "cock-and-lock" design favored by U.S. soldiers and comes with a high-performance laser aiming module and specially developed suppressor. Holds 12 rounds. Proved indispensable to Snake during his infiltration of Shadow Moses in 2005. Maintains its high stopping power from medium range and has a slightly larger magazine capacity than other weapons of the same caliber.

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/snakesolidsnake.jpeg

If you believe fiction, this is the gun for badass spies and special operatives; a big, blocky, serious-looking weapon, it's often seen on Tom Clancy covers being brandished by an "Operator." The Mark 23 was originally developed for US SOCOM special forces, and is basically a giant USP chambered in .45 ACP with a heavier slidenote . Note that the SOCOM version of the Mark 23 has "USSOCOM" engraved on the slide, while a civilian Mark 23 does not.

While the Mark 23 isn't rare in the sense of low manufacture, it's another case, like the Desert Eagle, of being seen far more often than it should be. SOCOMs might have been procured for use, but the special forces operators hated them; although the pistol was very accurate and reliable in extreme environments, it was also excessively large and heavy (a loaded Mark 23 with the full SOCOM kit weighs as much as an empty MP5 and is over a foot long) and the ergonomics were terrible. It's a bad sign when your gun gets nicknamed "the world's only crew-served pistol". Part of this excess was because it was designed to be used as a primary weapon in place of a rifle or sub-machine gun.

Most SOCOM Mark 23s spent peaceful careers sitting in storage racks while less accurate and durable but more sensibly-proportioned sidearms were used instead. Military production was just under 2,000 units total, while the civilian version was discontinued in July 2010. However, although a failure, the Mark 23's best traits were carried on into the tremendously successful USP; in particular, the USP Tactical, a variant with a slightly-extended, threaded barrel, does just about everything the Mark 23 does at half the weight and in three different calibers.

Anime & Manga

  • Lehm from Jormungand uses a Mk. 23 as his primary sidearm. He is rather large and burly, which might explain how he handles the weight so well.
  • As if it weren't massive enough already, Eva Unit 02 uses one scaled up for use by a 40 meter-tall (maybe) biomech.

Films — Live-Action

Live-Action TV

  • Used in Supernatural by three characters: Gordon, Future!Dean, and Sam, when he didn't have his soul. Seems to be a motif of it being used by dark characters.
  • Mike uses it quite a few times in Breaking Bad, generally in situations requiring its massive suppressor and where concealing a weapon is definitely not a priority.

Video Games

  • In the Metal Gear series, this is Solid Snake's signature weapon. He starts using it in the original Metal Gear Solid game, replacing the Beretta 92 he used in the first two games, and gives Raiden another one in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty. It can be found again in Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots in the same spot as in the original. In both the first and second game the weapon's size and weight is acknowledged, by Nastasha and Snake respectively, but both Hand Wave it, saying it "shouldn't be a problem for you."
    • Word of God says part of the reason they chose the SOCOM was because it was hard to handle and really big. Hard to handle makes Snake look cooler for being able to use it while still taking full advantage of its capabilities; really big makes it easier to render recognizably with the graphical capabilities of the PS1 (especially with the light attached, which makes it into basically a big black rectangle. Six polys, next!).
  • The Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six video games feature the Mark 23 Mod 0 in every installment, with the exception of Lockdown and Siege, often alongside the more sensible USP40.
  • SWAT 3 likewise features the Mark 23 as a higher capacity, silenced alternative to the default M1911.
  • Hayden Tenno in darkSector starts out with a Mark 23 (with "Mark 24 Cal 45 auto" on the slide), called the "Tekna 9mm", and can later upgrade it into a larger machine-pistol variation called the "Tekna Burst".
  • In Soldier of Fortune 2, Mullins can pick a Mark 23 with one of three Gun Accessories at the start of a mission: a Hollywood Silencer, a Laser Sight, or an Infinite Flashlight. It's objectively better than the 1911 A1 that everyone else uses because of those accessories and the higher mag capacity, and the tactical light is often a better choice for navigating dark areas than the Thermal/Night-Vision Goggles – in one non-combat level, you get an empty Mark 23 with a light attached to go through a Blackout Basement. The Idle Animation shows Mullins twirling it around his finger, a stunningly bad idea with a 17-inch long weapon of any sort, more so with a 5-pound gun that has a 4.8-pound single-action trigger pull.
  • Shows up in Delta Force 2, as the default sidearm to replace the 1911 from the original game, available with a suppressor; the devs, interestingly, chose not to model the weapon with its distinctive underbarrel LAM. It returns for Land Warrior, Task Force Dagger, and Xtreme, this time with the LAM present but unusable.
  • Added to Killing Floor during a summer event. Like the other pistols, it can be used Guns Akimbo. It has more power than most other pistols, competing with the Desert Eagle while having a higher capacity, but its reload is among the slowest of the semi-auto pistols to compensate.
  • A 4-star Tactical Doll in Girls' Frontline. She is depicted as a possessive USA-themed catgirl for some reason. As the real-life weapon was marketed as an offensive pistol, her kit entirely revolves around firepower. She passively buffs the raw damage of other dolls, and she can take it even higher with her active skill. Even her personality can be considered aggressive, constantly flirting with the Commander and making a fuss when another girl appears to get close to them.
  • Daniel Cross carries one in the present day sections of Assassin's Creed III. Desmond divests him of it during the final assault on Abstergo and the player can make use of it.
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    High Standard HDM 
"You won't want to use those guns you are carrying. They make far too much noise."
Manon Batiste, who immediately hands Lt. Powell a Hi-Standard pistol, Medal of Honor: Allied Assault
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hi_standard_hd_silenced.jpg

A semi-automatic pistol with an integral silencer, used most famously by the OSS during World War II. Derived from High Standard's HD pistol, the weapon was first demonstrated to President Franklin D. Roosevelt by head of the Office of Strategic Services "Wild Bill" Donovan in order to gain approval. The demonstration, which involved firing 10 live rounds around the US president, in essence, showed that the pistol was a Real Life case of a Hollywood Silencer, as Roosevelt never even realized that the gun was being fired around him until Donovan told him. 2,600 weapons were produced, and, following the conclusion of the war, continued to see service with the US Military and CIA well into the early Cold War.

Video Games

  • A common sight in early Medal of Honor games, due to the main characters being members of the OSS.
    • In Medal of Honor: Allied Assault and the Breakthrough expansion, the weapon is used thrice by Powell when working behind enemy lines, and by Baker when infiltrating an Axis freighter carrying important enemy documents. Unrealistically for its .22 caliber, it is shot-for-shot the most powerful pistol in the game, but also the slowest due to having to manually rack the slide after every shot.
    • It appears in several missions in Medal of Honor: Frontline, identified in-game as simply the "Silenced Pistol" and misidentified in the manual as the the completely unrelated Webley & Scott M1905. Contrasting to Allied Assault, it's only about as powerful as your other sidearm options, but it's not noticeably slower than they are either.
  • A Downloadable Content weapon in Sniper Elite III and Sniper Elite 4. Compared to the Welrod, it has a higher rate of fire, but is still ineffective in a firefight.
  • Appears in Mafia III as one of Lincoln's available pistols. Compared to the other pistols in-game, this one encourages a stealthy approach during missions, thanks to the integrated silencer.

    Howdah Pistols 
"Lancaster pistols are made with either 2 or 4 barrels; they possess the following advantages over the revolver....Having no projecting parts they are safer; they shoot truer than the revolver, owing to there being no escape of gas between cylinder and barrel; for the same reason they may be supported on the left arm when firing, which cannot be done with safety with a revolver; they cannot jam; and lastly the mechanism, being well protected, is little, if at all, affected by sand, wet or dirt. These pistols were carried in Sudan by officers of the Royal Irish and others who all speak very highly of them."
Major Herbert Kitchener, after the first Sudan campaign

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lancasterpistolhandcannon_5185.jpg
Howdah pistols were large-caliber, multi-barreled firearms. They were usually carried by Great White Hunters and British Army officers as a sidearm in the colonies, to be fired as a last resort weapon against tigers or lions. Their name comes from the howdah, a carriage platform carried on the back of elephants, which the British were particularly fond of hunting from.

One notable Howdah design was the Lancaster pistol. Designed by Charles Lancaster, it made good use of the patented "Lancaster Oval Bore": instead of conventional cut spiral rifling, it had a slight ovalization of the bore on a spiral track, which was nearly impossible to foul by firing the smoky black powder of the time. It was able to fire large revolver cartridges, from .38 S&W to .455 Webley. The Lancaster pistol didn't suffer from gas leaks unlike revolvers, as there was no gap between the chamber and barrel. It also fired faster than standard-issue Adams revolvers, especially when fitted with a Tranter revolver's double-trigger.

The pistols' immense stopping power was also helpful against charging Zulus. Modern ammunition at the time tended to go straight through charging warriors, who would keep on going until they were incapacitated. However, the Lancaster pistol's heavy bullets would lodge in its targets' bodies and stop them, if not killing them outright. During the early 1880s British-Egyptian campaign in Sudan, Major (future Field Marshal and Lord) Kitchener spoke highly of the Lancaster pistols carried by officers, as being far superior in accuracy and reliability to revolvers. It continued to see use as a frontline weapon until World War I, when it was superseded by cheaper revolvers and automatics in more reasonable calibers.

Film

Literature

  • Tim is given a "four shot" that fits the description of a Howdah Pistol in the story within a story within a story in The Wind Through the Keyhole by his teacher to complement his father's axe on his quest. It's described as being a foot long and is quite effective the one time he fires it. After the events of the story, Tim apparently carried it for the next ten years before becoming a gunslinger and upgrading to a revolver.

Video Games

  • Appears in Battlefield 1 as the Howdah Pistol.
  • The Duelist Revolver in The Order: 1886 is based on the Lancaster, albeit with two barrels and a cylinder.
  • The Lancaster appears as a usable weapon in Assassin's Creed: Syndicate.
  • The two-barreled version appears in the loading screen of the mission "Omerta" as a stand in for the Lupara for Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven.
  • Available in Hard West. It falls under the same category as derringers, which means that, unlike with other weapon categories, any character armed with it can shoot and perform another action afterwards, including firing again.

Web Original

    IMI / MRI Desert Eagle 
As expensive as it is powerful, the Desert Eagle is an iconic pistol that is difficult to master but surprisingly accurate at long range.
Description, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/de_mark_i_357_magnum.jpg
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/de_mark_vii_44_magnum.jpg
https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/de_mark_xix_50_ae.jpeg
The Hollywood Hand Cannon. note 

This Hand Cannon is among the most powerful production semi-automatic pistols out there. Designed and marketed by Minnesota-based company Magnum Research, Inc., and manufactured by contractor Israel Military Industries until 2009 (when production was moved to MRI's Pillager, MN facility). It is chambered in .357 Magnum, .440 Cor-bon, .41 Magnum, .44 Magnum, and .50 Action Express, and can easily be swapped between each caliber. It is fed by 9 (.357 Magnum), 8 (.41/.44 Magnum) or 7-round magazines (.50 AE and .440 Cor-bon). Magnum Research also offers it in a wide variety of finishes, ranging from standard chrome to gold to titanium/gold tiger stripes, and a model with an elongated, 10-inch barrel. Unlike most other handguns, it is gas-operated, using a rotating-bolt mechanism and direct gas impingement operation usually found on rifles, allowing it to fire much larger rounds than standard blowback handguns. They weigh about four and a half pounds unloaded, almost twice as much as a comparable pistol.

The Desert Eagle is a very temperamental pistol with a well-established reputation as a jam-o-matic. It stops working at the slightest hint of dirt, and its gas-operated mechanism sucks up dirt like a vacuum cleaner. Its bulky grip and excessive weight make it difficult to shoot and very impractical to carry for anyone not built like Arnold Schwarzenegger or Dolph Lundgren, and it often suffers misfeeds when chambered in rimmed .357 and .44 Magnum cartridges (which is why rimmed rounds are generally used by revolvers while rimless ammo is predominant for automatics). It is also one of the more expensive handguns on the market, going for about US$1500 for the base modelnote . Adding to that, .50 Action Express ammunition is incredibly expensive. As a result, the "Deagle" is little more than a range toy for people with more money than sense (and possibly other deficiencies).

Despite all this, the Desert Eagle is the weapon of choice for media badasses across the spectrum, sometimes even being depicted as a standard issue military sidearm. In fan fiction, it's a good sign the wielder is a Mary Sue of some kind, much like a gratuitous katana.

Anime & Manga

Comic Books

  • A particularly egregious offender is the Immortal Iron Fist one shot Orson Randal and The Green Mist of Death. This story takes place sometime around the 1920s, before the Desert Eagle was even invented and likely before anyone involved in its design was born.
  • Deadpool here! Alongside my sweet katanas, I also dual-wield two gorgeous shiny Deagles. Double the guns, twice the fun! Yeah, it can get messy sometimes, but hey, if they didn't turn into sobbing balls of surrender before my razor-sharp wit and my fantastic booty, it's their own fault. Oh, and if you're not agreeing with my choice of weapons, good ol' Ryan Reynolds managed his twin Deagles just fine.

Films — Live-Action

  • RoboCop:
    • Shows up in the original RoboCop; normal ones are used, but there's also a special one with a large barrel extension that can take a suppressor. This was originally supposed to be Robocop's gun, but when the suit was finished it became clear the weapon looked like a toy in his hand and the even larger Auto-9 was built based on a Beretta 93R.
    • Shows up again in RoboCop 2 used by Hob to shoot Murphy. Doesn't affect him physically, but he hesitates at being shot by a child. In the opening scene, one crook takes one from a gun store that he's looting, noting that he really likes it.
    • The Rehabs in RoboCop 3 use them as their standard sidearm.
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger uses them a lot, no doubt because it's big enough to look impressive even in his large hands. He's used them in Commando, Eraser and Last Action Hero, and used a weapon (a fictional Hand Cannon called the "Podbyrin 9.2mm") that was a very ironic combination of a Desert Eagle and Walther P38 in Red Heatnote .
  • Standard-issue for Agents of The Matrix. They fire Desert Eagles one-handed, and the magazine capacity is increased to 12 or 13. Well, at least they don't have Bottomless Magazines, even though there's really no reason (other than stylish reloading) such things couldn't be programmed into the eponymous Lotus-Eater Machine.
  • Bullet Tooth Tony and his "Desert Eagle point five-oh" in Snatch., of course.
    The fact that you have Replica written down the sides of your guns, (closeup of the word Replica along the barrel) and the fact that I have Desert Eagle Point Five-Oh written down the side of mine, (close up of Desert Eagle along the barrel) should precipitate your balls into shrinking, along with your presence. Now... fuck off.
  • In Frank Goddamn Miller's film version of Will Eisner's The Spirit, The Octopus not only goes Guns Akimbo with the Desert Eagle, but he later wields a double-barreled version of it.
  • In The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day, the McManus twins trade in their suppressed Beretta 92 pistols for some custom made Desert Eagles. And those silenced Berettas were acquired by trading in the Desert Eagles wielded by two Russian mob dudes who tried to murder them near the beginning of the original movie.
  • A few appear in the Charlie's Angels movies. Including one carved from a piece of soap by Bosley with his bare teeth.
  • L.J. in Resident Evil: Apocalypse has a pair of gold-plated .44 Magnum Mark XIX Desert Eagles. Too bad he's useless in a fight.
  • Borat is shown a gold plated one when he asks a gun shop owner for a recommendation for a weapon with which to kill Jews. Since he's not a US citizen, he can't legally buy it, so he buys a grizzly bear instead.
  • What appears to be a double-barreled version of this gun (which even can have its two barrels swivel sway from each other to target individual targets, and in reality a Beretta with Desert Eagle-style prop slides) is used by Chudnofsky on The Green Hornet.

Literature

Live-Action TV

  • Jayne has one that River wields in the Firefly episode "Out of Gas". ...Five hundred years in the future. River also gets her hands on assumedly the same one in the episode "Objects in Space" (which she mistakes for a branch).
  • Shows up in an episode of CSI, and one of the immediate conclusions by one of the cast members is that the shooter must've been Compensating for Something.
  • In the final season of The Shield, when Vic resigns from the LAPD he naturally has to turn in his service pistol, and from that point on uses his personal gun. As he says: ".357 Desert Eagle, cross-draw."
  • Used by Jon Sable in the 1980s TV series Sable.
  • In an episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Benson is talking to a slightly-unhinged stalker at a gun range, where the stalker girl is firing a chrome-finished .50AE Desert Eagle. Benson notes that the gun is "a little hardcore", and then further notes that the 14 round mag the woman is using is illegal in New York City.
  • Will shoots one brought in by a friend in Sons of Guns.

Tabletop Games

  • Chambered with the .50 Action Express, the Desert Eagle is the most powerful and expensive semi-automatic pistol in GURPS: High-Tech, but is the hardest to use and has one of the smallest magazines.
  • It's perhaps the most powerful pistol on the gun list in Feng Shui, and has the highest capacity.

Video Games

  • It appears as the most powerful pistol in many First Person Shooters and Third Person Shooters; it's very unlikely to appear with its real name, and often has enough accuracy and power to be used as an ersatz sniper rifle. In first person shooters especially, this is partly because the gun is blocky and angular, and thus easy to make in 3D. Whether its physical appearance will match up with the stats it should have (i.e. featuring a version not available in .50 AE but giving it the usual 7-round capacity anyway) depends on the degree of realism the game is going for.
  • Counter-Strike. For Valve's attempts at nerfing it, it's still the best handgun in the game.
    • They finally succeeded in Global Offensive, the damage is still there, but the recoil requires very slow and accurate firing.
  • Ballistic Weapons has three pistols based on the Desert Eagle. One is a gun company's recreation of the Desert Eagle (in the vein of gun companies recreating old and popular designs in the past, such as perfect copies of tommy guns and MP40s), and the other two are semi-modernized (in the game's universe) ones.
  • Max Payne: At least Max holds the gun with both hands in the first game, as it really has a mean kick. In the second game, however, he dual-wields them with ease. It's also the preferred handgun for Mona Sax, and she can dual-wield them as well.
  • Call of Duty 4 multiplayer. Only two of them appear in single-player mode, and one is owned by the Big Bad.
    • Your reward for reaching the final rank in multiplayer, Commander (level 55), is a golden one. Between that and its regular chrome version, it's the most popular sidearm primarily because it's the only one to deal more damage than the others, but this comes with higher recoil and a slightly slower reload.
  • Modern Warfare 2 has them as well, and it's also possible to use akimbo Desert Eagles.
  • Modern Warfare 3 also has them, and in the single-player campaign Yuri usually starts with one. Captain Price also takes up one as his new sidearm of choice after being disavowed from Task Force 141, replacing his old M1911.
  • Quite prevalent in the Grand Theft Auto series:
    • The Desert Eagle is Lance Vance's Weapon of Choice in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City. Diaz uses one to Shoot the Television in a cutscene as well. It was intended that the player could use it as well, but was Dummied Out, probably in favor of the Python revolver.
    • Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas: It's a rare pickup in most cities, can be purchased after a few missions in Las Venturas, and if CJ sprays all 100 gang tags in Los Santos, a few Grove Street homies will wield it. It's hideously expensive and gives very little ammo per pickup or purchase, but then again, there's the Ammu-Nation shooting range bug. Strangely, after Carl reaches Gangster proficiency, its firepower increases; it's the only gun in the game that has that effect.
    • The gun also shows up (as the "Combat Pistol") in Grand Theft Auto IV. It's not as much of a Hand Cannon this time around — it's clearly based on the less-powerful .357 Magnum version, and takes three shots to take down an enemy. With the above-mentioned AMT AutoMag added in the Ballad of Gay Tony DLC, it's also no longer the most powerful handgun.
    • The Desert Eagle shows up again in Grand Theft Auto V. Despite being labeled the ".50 Pistol", it has the ammo capacity of the .357 Magnum variant. While a shot to the body won't kill an enemy instantly, they will be downed and eventually bleed to death.
  • One of the mascot weapons of the Far Cry series, showing up in every game since the beginning, where it was the "Falcon 357" in the original game and the "Jungle Falcon" in its console spinoffs. In Far Cry 2 it's the "Eagle .50" and has "Deagle .50AE Pistol" engraved on the slide. Far Cry 3 and Far Cry 4 continue the tradition by offering it as the D50 as the final pistol to be unlocked. Initially absent from Far Cry 5, but a later patch added it in due to popular demand.
  • The .357 Magnum version is common in Jagged Alliance 2. The .44 Magnum and .50 Action Express versions are added in the unofficial v1.13 patch, and buying ammo for the gun from the arms-dealing website mocks you for carrying around such an impractical, heavy, and huge handgun instead of a rifle.
  • The "Heavy Pistol" in City of Heroes is based on this.
  • EA's James Bond video games use this jarringly; despite its ridiculously expensive nature, it's often the standard sidearm for mooks in a few of the games. Even odder, said mooks usually use the "under 50 dollars on the black market" AK-47 as their primary weapon.
  • Usable in Soldier of Fortune as the "Silver Talon." Yields a messy result with headshots.
  • Appears in the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. games as the "Black Kite" firing .45 ACP (there is no Desert Eagle variant chambered for that). More bizarrely, in Shadow of Chernobyl, there's a unique version called the Big Ben, which fires 9x39mm SP or PAB sniper and assault rifle rounds, far beyond even the .50AE.
  • Replacement for the Colt Python in Half-Life: Opposing Force, used by both "Otis" security guards and HECU Engineers. And you, of course - it's powerful and accurate (moreso with the toggle-able Laser Sight), and ammo is more available than in Half-Life 1 (though it's still not everywhere).
  • Added in the Rainbow Six games starting with Rogue Spear, as the most powerful handgun available until the Vegas games, where it's only the second most powerful (the most powerful happens to be a revolver that isn't used for anything besides hunting really large game like elephants). Notable in that most games in the series that feature it include both the usual .50 version, as well as the slightly-weaker but higher-capacity .357 version as well. Siege introduces the Desert Eagle (under the D-50 name) for both Navy SEAL Operators, Blackbeard and Valkyrie. Its high damage and fast semi-automatic rate of fire is matched with low magazine capacity and high recoil, which makes this an extremely tough but rewarding gun to use.
  • A variant turns up in Left 4 Dead 2, called the Desert Cobranote ; it's got power on par with the sniper rifles, but hampered by heavy recoil and a low magazine capacity, making it poor against hordes. It's a consistent One-Hit Kill on the regular zombies no matter where it hits (VERY important in Realism mode, where even the similarly-damaging sniper rifles are as effective as harsh language outside of headshots), you don't lose any accuracy or fire rate when incapacitated like with the regular handguns, and it's worth it just to hear Nick sput out an excited "Niiiice" when he picks one up.
  • Surprisingly easy to get in 7.62 High Caliber, with a minor rebel in an early mission carrying a .44 one.
  • In Just Cause 2, the most basic peashooter is a Deagle with a more angled grip and increased capacity (12 shots by default, 24 at max upgrades); some cutscenes where it's fired have it eject rifle cartridges, and Rico is able to pair it up with any other one-handed weapon.
  • Same as above, Postal 2 features it, named at gun stores as the "Old Faithful combat pistol", as the basic handgun. The only one, in fact, until later mods and updates added alternatives; in the current versions it's the middle ground for the pistols, killing people in two or three shots and being by far the easiest to acquire ammo for (since it's still the only pistol NPCs use), with better accuracy than the Glock and more common ammo than the Python, but not having the benefits of a Secondary Fire mode like the Glock's fire selector or the Python's execution bar.
  • The heavy pistol in All Points Bulletin is clearly modeled after the Desert Eagle.
  • Meryl Silverburgh in the Metal Gear series uses a Desert Eagle as her signature weapon. In Metal Gear Solid, Snake points out to her that she could have picked something more sensible from the armory, to which she defiantly replies that she used them since she was a little girl, affirming her role as a hot blooded youngster who wants to be a hero, as opposed to Snake being a remorseful veteran. By Metal Gear Solid 4 she carries two (one with a long barrel and scope), and is now a veteran badass who's actually very good with them. It's used prominently in the same cutscene when Johnny rescues her with a .50 BMG anti-materiel sniper rifle while in close quarters. Snake himself can use the standard version by purchasing it from Drebin or stolen from Dwarf Gekko in Act 4, and the scoped version by either obtaining the Fox emblem (complete the game in under six hours with no kills, alerts, deaths or used healing items on file) or entering a cheat code.
  • Contract J.A.C.K. has one of these.
  • Leon Scott Kennedy can pick up a .50 AE version of the gun with custom wooden grips and a two-tone finish in Resident Evil 2, and can upgrade it to the long-barrel version near the end of the game. He begins the novelization with the long barrel one.
  • Dead Frontier has one of these under the name "Desert Fox" as the second most powerful and difficult to use handgun.
  • Shows up as a weapon Jackie can get his hands on in the video game adaptation of The Darkness. Its ubiquity in films and games and the like is also mocked at one point - when you're in a Mafia safehouse, you can listen to a guy gleefully describing to one of his buddies a scene from an action movie he had just seen; in it, the hero uses two Deagles to shoot up a room full of mooks. The guy's friend says that that sounds like the stupidest movie ever.
  • Appears in several Fallout games as a fairly common early-game weapon that is not all that powerful. The "N99" 10mm pistol in Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas also looks to be somewhat inspired by the Deagle, particularly in the design of the slide.
  • Scarface: The World Is Yours. Advertised as a one hit kill. Very effective.
  • In the obscure rail-shooter Endgame, the .50 AE version of the Desert Eagle is Jade's main weapon.
  • Appears in Saints Row 2 as the "GDHCnote  .50", holding as many bullets as the real-world .44 version and used solely by FBI agents. Once the player grabs one, s/he can naturally dual-wield them. The ".45 Shepherd" in Saints Row: The Third and the default ".45 Fletcher" skin for the Heavy Pistol in Saints Row IV also seem to be heavily based on the Desert Eagle, the latter moreso.
  • All of the gangsters you face in the first levels of Splinter Cell Conviction carry these as their standard sidearm. What's even weirder is that the PMC mooks you face later in the game tend to carry more believable pistols such as the USP45 or M9, showing that they're actual professionals and not just gangsters trying to look tough.
    • One showed up Chaos Theory as Douglas Shetland's sidearm of choice. Double Agent had Moss carry one in a chest holster as well. Most of its appearances in the franchise are as bad guy guns.
  • Appears as the "Hand Cannon" in Killing Floor, as an alternative to the standard 9mm pistol. In earlier versions of the game, Sharpshooters at the highest level spawned with two of them; and, as of the 2013 summer event, you can now buy gold-plated, tiger-striped versions. It reappears in Killing Floor 2 as the Gunslinger's tier 3 weapon, mostly unchanged except for the capacity reduced to the .50 AE version's proper 7 shots and a KF2 logo on the grips.
  • Combat Arms features 4 variants of the Desert Eagle, the standard Desert Eagle, Desert Eagle Black, Desert Eagle Special Edition (similar to the standard except features a black slide and an engraving on the side), and the Desert Eagle Gold (a gold Deagle with a two-tone tiger stripe pattern).
  • The SOP38 handgun in Serious Sam 3: BFE is a Desert Eagle only in looks; it's quite different under the hood. It's chambered in .45 ACP, and holds 10 rounds that can be fired as fast as the user can pull the trigger. It works as an improved version of the Schofield revolvers from the classic games, having about the same fire rate as the dual-wielded revolvers with only slightly less ammo and a faster reload (about equal as reloading a single revolver), but the player has to use the sights (whereupon Sam walks a little slower) to negate its natural spread.
  • Captain Martin Walker of Spec Ops: The Line starts with a Desert Eagle in sections where he loses all his prior weapons. Notably, this only occurs in scenes where he's by himself. In other scenes when he's with his teammates, his sidearm (drawn out of the same holster) is the realistic Beretta M9. Considering Konrad's rant about Walker having delusions of being a fantasy action hero, this makes it an odd case of invoking this trope intentionally.
  • Ebony and Ivory in DmC: Devil May Cry are based from this gun, with stylized grips twisting into sharp points, scrollwork engravings at the bore of each pistol, and each also sports a ring hammer.
  • The standard pistol skin in Champions Online appears to be based on the Desert Eagle, only with a longer barrel. Expect pistol-packing NPCs (soldiers, cops, even street gang Mooks) to be armed either with these, or with laser pistols. Probably justified, in a world with so many superhumans.
  • Appears in all of the Hitman games, barring Absolution and Hitman (2016), in the hands of various Mooks. Contracts has a gold plated version and, like all other pistols in the game, can be wielded Guns Akimbo if you can find them. Early concept art shows that a pair of them were originally going to be 47's signature pistols before they settled on the Silverballers.
  • A Desert Eagle, labeled in-game as "DE50AE7", is available in Parasite Eve. Give Wayne 300 Junk and ask him for a pistol.
  • In Time Crisis 5, both new Player Characters use two-toned Desert Eagles with muzzle brakes as their main handgun.
  • A Mark XIX is the "Deagle" in PAYDAY 2, somehow managing to cram ten rounds into its basic magazine (the .357 magazine holds at most nine) and with unique mod options such as various compensators, a lengthened barrel, an extended magazine, and as of the Gage Mod Courier DLC a scope mount to attach on top of the existing scope mount to allow the use of the same sights that assault rifles get. As of the release of the Fugitive skill tree, it's now possible to dual-wield Deagles.
  • Persona 5: One of the Protagonist's equippable handguns is a "Sand hawk", which has the appearance of a Desert Eagle with a chrome finish.
  • In Dies Irae, Shirou Yusa's and Eri Honjou's have Desert Eagles as their weapon of choice. Unfortunately, against the overpowered individuals they end up facing off against, they rarely end up all that useful beyond simply providing a distraction.

Web Original

  • Burt from We're Alive has Shirley, a silver-plated Desert Eagle that once belonged to his wife that he keeps with him as a reminder of her. Apparently both Burt and his wife were big on the competition circuit, so having such a weapon could be justified as a flashy show piece. But once the Zombie Apocalypse begins, Burt still relies on Shirley as his Weapon of Choice.
  • In the Whateley Universe, this is the preferred weapon of the second Nightgaunt, who gets very upset when one gets destroyed (he aimed it at Lancer's eye at point-blank range, and the blowback from Lancer's PK field wrecked the barrel). Since he usually strikes from ambush, often in the manner described above, he isn't too worried about the cost of ammunition (he hardly uses any, and when he does, it almost always hits the target for a kill). The fact that he does have to take time to aim it and brace his arms is a minor plot point in Alya and the Birthday Brawl, as it gives Vamp time to grab his power gems off of his belt and escape.

Western Animation

  • Barry from Archer has a nickel finished Desert Eagle Mk VII, which he talks TO, not with. He also has a subscription to Desert Eagle Magazine. Lana uses one on occaision, which fits her Johnny Bench-ian, steam-shovelly, Truckasaurus hands. President Calderon of San Marcos prefers it as his sidearm of choice, but never bothers to reload it, instead having an underling hand him a fresh pistol whenever he runs dry.

    Nambu Type 94 
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To the right, a decent early production Type 94, and to the left, the pitiful late war Type 94
A compact pistol allegedly developed for export to South America but in truth made as a cheap military side-arm, the Type 94 pistol is considered by many to be the worst military side-arm ever designed in the history of modern warfare. Kijiro Nambu's previous pistol, the Type 14, had been met with some complaints concerning trigger group reliability in the field and poor handling and size for vehicle usage. So in 1934, Nambu created a compact six-shot pistol firing the same 8x22mm cartridge.

Unlike the Type 14, the Type 94 had a concealed hammer (in the style of the Colt Hammerless pocket models), whose spring didn't weaken with sustained firing and guaranteed that the pistol would function reliably. Like the Type 14, the Type 94 had a complicated assemblynote  and used a locked breech recoil system relying on a locking block assembly similar to that of the modern Beretta 92. During firing, the locking block kept the barrel and slide together until the slide forced the block into its recess in the frame. At that point, the barrel stopped and the slide continued to the rear under its own momentum, extracting and ejecting the spent round. The return stroke of the slide chambered a fresh cartridge, got the locking block back into place and locked the system into battery until the next trigger pull. The Type 94 also had a magazine safety built into the frame to prevent firing should the magazine not be properly seated, such that one had to slap the magazine after inserting it to ensure proper feeding and trigger functionality.

The Type 94 is criticized as difficult to disassemble, underpowered (the bottle-necked 8x22mm Nambu is comparable to the .380 ACP, and much weaker than the 9x19mm and .45 ACP), and relatively unsafe. Similarly to the Luger, the trigger sear is exposed on the left side of the frame; one can unintentionally cause the Type 94 to shoot without pulling the trigger by carelessly handling itnote  (Probably the source of an Urban Legend that the Type 94 was intended as a suicide special or as a surprise weapon for those feigning surrender).

The Type 94 was used by both Japanese tank crews and pilots of both Army and Navy air services, all of whom preferred compact pistols that could easily fit or be maneuvered in vehicles. As with most WWII-era Japanese firearms, production quality decreased toward the end of the war. Several hundred Type 94s continued to serve in other countries through The Vietnam War.

Anime

  • The strangest appearances for this gun must have been in Captain Harlock, where it's shown being wielded by Earth Defense Force crewmen on space ships.

Film

Literature

  • In Neuromancer, Riviera attempts to save himself from being kidnapped with one.

Video Games

  • Appears as the standard Japanese sidearm in Commandos 2: Men Of Courage. In gameplay terms, it's functionally the same as the Luger and the only difference is its cosmetic appearance in the inventory menu. In terms of stopping power, all three pistols are identical.

    SIG P210 
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A single action 9x19mm pistol (also available in .22LR and the obsolete .30 Luger calibers) first introduced in 1947, this is, hands-down, one of the best 9mm pistols ever devised, as well as one of the finest target pistols ever produced. Like the CZ-75, the slide rides inside of the frame, contributing to its legendary, target pistol-like accuracy (production models included the paper target used to "sight-in" the gun at 50 yards, often showing a 2" or smaller group). It was the service pistol of the Swiss Army and the Danish Army starting from 1949. It was replaced by the Swiss in 1975 with the double-action SIG P220, and is also on the way out with the Danish: after 70 years of service, it is scheduled to be replaced in 2019 with the SIG P320 X-Carry.

The pistol is very common in shooting sports, and will often fetch prices in excess of $2,000 on the open market for used models (two to five times what a modern 9mm pistol will go for). SIG reintroduced the pistol to the civilian market in 2017 (including a version that replaces the heel magazine release with a button at thumb level on the side, as tends to be preferred by American shooters), although its heavily machined and hand-fitted nature means prices aren't likely to go down anytime soon.

Anime & Manga

Comics

  • An issue of The Punisher in the 1980's featured Frank getting one of these from an old woman in his neighborhood. Unfortunately, it's the .30 Luger version, which means he's out of luck as far as actually shooting it.

Film

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    Vektor CP1 
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Designed by the South African based Lyttleton Engineering Works (now Denel) and entering the market in 1996, the Vektor CP1 is a unique-looking semi-automatic handgun. Aimed at the conceal carry market, the gun has few sharp edges, to keep from snagging on clothing, making it look like it jumped right out of a science fiction film. Also unique is the weapon's safety, located at the front of the trigger guard.

Unfortunately, in 2000, it was discovered that some of the pistols had a flawed safety that could cause the weapon to discharge if dropped. CP1s in South Africa were fixed and returned, but since Denel didn't have enough infrastructure in foreign markets for this, they instead offered a cash refund to any who returned the weapon. This recall ended any potential the weapon had in the United States (its primary market), and also led to the weapon's end of production just a year later in 2001.

The CP1 was available in 9x19mm Para, 9x21mm IMI, and .40 S&W.

Anime & Manga

Films — Live-Action

Live-Action TV

    Welrod 
A silenced British pistol. Not much use in a fire fight, but perfect for picking of targets without being detected.
Description, Sniper Elite V2

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_23.jpeg

This pistol is quite a mystery. It was conceived during the Second World War as a concealable and silent sidearm for use by resistance members, special forces operatives, and anyone else trying to keep a low profile.

There were two major variants. The first one is, oddly enough, the Mark II (chambered in .32 ACP, eight rounds per magazine), while the Mark 1 came later (chambered in 9mm, six rounds per mag). One version using Roman numerals and the other using Indo-Arabic numerals for the model numbers were intentional, though what if any significance this had is completely unknown. Other than the round chambered, the only differences between the two are the Mark 1 added a trigger guard and moved the front sight to the middle of the weapon. Some 2800 were made in total, used by the SOE, OSS and other resistance groups.

The pistol itself is bolt-action, the knob needing to be twisted to the left to unlock the bolt. The magazine was used as the handle for the weapon, with a rubber covering over it and a safety lever on the grip meant to keep it in place as the user held and aimed. Conversely, when the user was not using it, the magazine/handle could be removed to aid in concealing it. The majority of the barrel is an integrated suppressor, which, alongside being bolt-action (thus removing the noise an automatic slide), allowed the gun to fire very quietly. However, the baffles inside the suppressor were made of rubber and would quickly wear, meaning that while the gun would keep firing, it would lose its suppressed ability fairly quickly unless serviced.

There are some reports of the gun still being in active service, having seen use by British special forces in The Falklands War and The Gulf War.

The Swiss company Brügger & Thomet had developed a Spiritual Successor known as the B&T VP9, which is best summed up as a modern-day Welrod. Although the pistol is designed to be used putting down dangerous and wounded animals.

Anime & Manga

  • Used briefly by Radinov in Gunsmith Cats OVA, to assasinate the chief of the Illinois branch ATF, who was working with her and her employer.

Films — Live-Action

  • A Welrod was shown in Gene's arsenal in Layer Cake.

Live-Action TV

  • Ulrich Kohl from one episode of Person of Interest was shown using a Mk I Welrod.
  • Fancy Lee uses the modern VP9 with some Abnormal Ammo (including a homing tranquillizer dart in the sixth episode) as his sidearm in Killjoys.
  • The Canadian Agents from X Company used the Mk II to assassinate French Gestapo agents.
  • The murderer in an Inspector Morse episode used one; in that case it was explained by him being a former SOE operative in WW2.

Video Games

  • Medal of Honor: Rising Sun featured this pistol in the Singapore Sling mission and multiplayer. It is inaccurately portrayed as a single-shot weapon (the model used is the Mk II, which holds eight rounds per magazine) which kills anyone in one shot and is as accurate as a sniper rifle (the real gun's max range was 23 meters and used pistol bullets slowed considerably - thus reducing stopping power - to make them quieter).
  • Sniper Elite V2 features the Mk I with a relocated front sight as one of the player's default weapons from the start of the game, and the only silenced weapon available. Accuracy at even medium range is sub-par, however - this game's all about the long-range rifle kills. It comes back in Sniper Elite III and Sniper Elite 4 with the same characteristics.
  • Day of Infamy gives the Commonwealth Officers and Snipers the ability to arm themselves with the Mk II Welrod as a sidearm. Because of its slow rate of fire, it's not ideal for a direct confrontation against the enemy, but rather to take them by surprise.
  • The Mark II version is available in Girls' Frontline as a 5-star T-Doll. Widely regarded as one of the best evasion tank in the game, owing to her incredible evasion stat and skill that reduces enemy accuracy.

    Wildey 

"Wildey's here (opens package). Fires a .457 Wildey magnum. Real stopping power."
Paul Kersey, Death Wish 3

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wildey_survivor_pistol_in_44_auto_mag_now_available_for_preorder_1.jpg

First introduced in 1973, the Wildey was one of the first gas-operated handguns. Intended primarily for hunting, it is designed to handle a variety of high-velocity, high-pressure rounds, including the 9mm and .45 Winchester Magnum, the .44 Auto Mag (from the Auto Mag pistol), and the .357, .41, .44, .45, and .475 Wildey Magnum rounds note . Similarly to the Auto Mag also mentioned on this page, the Wildey features a distinctive ribbed, ventilated barrel, which is capable of mounting scopes, and is fed by 7 or 8-round magazines. The weapon is capable of changing calibers easily.

Anime & Manga

  • Brandon Heat uses one in the anime adaptation of Gungrave.

Comic Books

  • One of Madame Masque's weapons of choice in Iron Man is a revolver chambered in .475 Wildey Magnum.

Films — Live-Action

Live-Action TV

  • Lund carries one in the Firefly episode "The Train Job".

Video Games

  • It was supposed to appear in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, but was cut, though it can still be found within the game's files. It is mistakenly referred to as a Colt 1911, and the developers apparently mistook the long ribbed barrel for an integral suppressor.
  • A scoped variant is featured in Cabela's Dangerous Hunts 2009.

    Yarygin PYa / MP-443 Grach 
Designed to replace the dated PMM pistol, the MP443 Grach pistol was developed in 1993 and fires high powered armor-piercing 9mm Russian rounds. The pistol is a combined construction of polymers and steel and has been adopted by select Special Forces units in the Russian military.
Description, Battlefield 3

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/images_3_4.jpeg
A Russian pistol developed in 1993 by Izhmekh (aka Izhevsk Mechanical Plant, hence the MP designation) for Russian military trials. It was adopted as the PYa in 2003 and was issued in small numbers to special forces units in the North Caucasus in 2008. In 2011, it entered mass production, and is now the standard sidearm of the Russian army, replacing the earlier Makarov PM. It uses the 9x19mm 7N21 cartridge, a Russian-made armor piercing variant of the 9mm round, but is also compatible with standard 9mm ammo. A civilian variant with a barrel weakened to prevent usage of the 7N21 cartridge, known as the MP-446 Viking, is also produced by Izhevsk, in both the original version and a competition variant updated to comply with IPSC regulations (including an adjustable trigger and sights and the ability to use a longer barrel); there are also less-lethal variants designed to fire rubber bullets, the MP-353 and MP-472. Among the Russian military, this gun seems to enjoy the same dubious reputation that the early M16 and Beretta M9 did in the U.S. armed forces: early production models were very unreliable, with many operators preferring to ditch it in favor of more proven designs like the Makarov PM or the OTs-27 Berdysh. The PYa has been modified several times since its inception and the problems with it have been mostly remedied, but its reputation of unreliability is still hard to shake off, especially among the Russian special forces community.

Video Games

  • Standard sidearm of the Russian Army in Battlefield: Bad Company, Battlefield 3, and Battlefield 4.
  • The standard sidearm of SVER in MAG.
  • Appears in Call of Duty: Ghosts, where in single-player and multi-player mode is semi-auto, but in Extinction mode it fires full-auto. It returns in Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, now firing two-round bursts.
  • Appears incorrectly as the Tariq in the 2010 reboot of Medal of Honor, the Opfor's standard sidearm. In reality, the Tariq is an Iraqi copy of the Beretta M951, the single-stack predecessor to the Beretta 92.
  • The civilian variant, the MP-446, appears as a usable sidearm in Splinter Cell: Conviction.
  • A variant rechambered for 9x21mm ammo appears as the standard sidearm for CSAT forces in ARMA III, under the name "Rook 40".
  • Appears as the "MP-40 Grad" in Sniper: Ghost Warrior 3.
  • The MP-443 is a usable weapon in Contract Wars.
  • Both the military and civilian versions appear in Girls' Frontline, the Viking as a two-star T-Doll and the Grach as a three-star one. Possibly owing to their ability to use overpressure versions of the 9mm cartridge, their maximum damage slightly surpasses most other handgun T-Dolls.


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