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    The Elder Scrolls 
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • Morrowind:
      • The Infinity +1 Sword Eltonbrand and the legendary shield Spellbreaker can only be acquired if the player is a vampire. If the player gets cured without completing the quests to get these items, they will be impossible to acquire as you cannot contract vampirism a second time.
      • The master trainer for enchantment, Qorwynn, is lost if you kill him. Of course, this is true for anyone else, so why is it a problem here? Qorwynn is a hostile Altmer spellcaster in a dungeon filled with nearly-identical hostile Altmer spellcasters, with no indication, anywhere in the game, that there is anything special about him. The only way to get training from him is to use magic to calm him down first, and there is absolutely no reason anyone would do this without a guide. Kill him, and you'll have to grind to 100 enchantment yourself if you want it.
    • Oblivion:
      • The game makes great effort to keep any quest from being lost for good through completing other quests — although this does cause some confusion, such as a thieves' guild quest where you steal from the Archmage. No big oddity there, until you realize that at this point, a decent number of player characters are the Archmage. And while it's pretty good at not having missable quests, it's not good at all with items. Specifically, one of the guild merchants sells a bunch of rare items. He's the only person in the game you can get these items from. You have to kill him for a quest. He also sells a bunch of rare spells, but you can get those again once you're done with the quest line.
      • There's another guild merchant with a unique spell that only he sells. And he's killed as part of a quest. If you didn't buy the spell from him before he dies, it really is lost forever - no other spell in the game has that type of effect!
      • Another example in the Knights of Nine expansion, in order to receive master level training from a trainer requires a recommendation from an advanced level trainer. It just so happens that advanced trainers in restoration get killed during the Knights of Nine story line and their replacements do not give you the recommendation.
      • The main quest requires the player to sacrifice a Daedric artifact - those are one-of-a-kind items obtained through completing a quest. Once sacrificed for the quest, the artifact can never be recovered. To add insult to injury, most such artifacts are not very useful, of limited scope, or only good for entertainment value - but the main quest points the player towards the quest that gives Azura's Star, the best Daedric artifact in the game.
      • Also, upon completion of the game, all of the random Oblivion gates in the world disappear, forever. To be fair, this makes perfect sense, but since the items you receive from in game drops and the enchantments you get from the Sigil Stones are based on player level, anyone who runs through the main quest quickly before doing any side quests will lose the best enchantments in the game.
      • If you murder someone ingame (whether deliberately or not), the next time you sleep you'll be visited by Lucien Lachance of the game's assassins guild. He'll give you a dagger called the Blade of Woe and instruct you to kill a man named Rufio to be welcomed to the Dark Brotherhood. You don't have to do it, but the dagger he gives you counts as a quest item - meaning it's stuck in your inventory - until the end of the Dark Brotherhood questline. If you have no intention of joining the Brotherhood, and you don't want to carry the Blade of Woe around indefinitely, you can kill Lucien as soon as he gives you the quest. On the plus side, you can now drop the Blade. On the negative side, you can NEVER join the Dark Brotherhood at any point in the game, making the guild and all its related quests lost forever.
      • Another offshoot Daedric prince quest, in a realized case of having one's cake or eating it, Clavicus Vile offers to give you his amazing Masque of Clavicus Vile — headgear that increases social prowess (very) slightly — in exchange for the Umbra Sword, one of the game's (two?) optional Infinity Plus One Swords, which you must retrieve from a woman (named Umbra) who is under the direct influence of the sword's former wielder... Umbra (a difficult fight, unless you're a powerful Mage). Incidentally, Clavicus Vile gives you an artifact (actually, it just sort of appears in your inventory), styled after his faithful, demonic companion, that advises you to abscond with the sword, both because he's clearly ripping you off, and because the sword may tip the overall greater balance of power (in both Oblivion and the Aedric Realms) in his favor, which would naturally result in a war that would destroy the world. In combination with Azura's Star, it is one of the most useful items ingame, as the sword — in addition to high attack power — is enchanted with a potent 60-second Soul Trap that will trap the soul of anything previously struck by the sword itself that is either felled or dies. Taking the sword effectively leaves the quest open indefinitely, and the demon-dog-statue-thing will remain in your inventory and can't be removed. Arbitrarily, if the player chooses to take the Masque, the sword is, of course, lost for good. This quest entirely subverts the concept of absolute, 100% Completion for the entire game. note 
      • Most of the better quest rewards are levelled to your character (as well as gold rewards, but this isn't much of a problem), unfortunately these reward items do not scale with you as you level; the item you get is the one you're stuck with throughout the game. Higher-level versions of these items are completely unobtainable if you complete them at lower levels.
      • In addition, there is a house that is in the middle of nowhere with no map marker that has about nothing of value in it, save for two bandits. This isn't interesting by itself, but it's very likely that it will be destroyed by an Oblivion gate as you proceed in the main quest (and it's even possible that it will be destroyed while you're inside, at least giving you a shot to take anything you left inside). So after that, the interior of the house is impossible to access without cheating, and so is anything you may have left in there. Oops...
      • During the main quest, Mankar Camoran kidnaps an Argonian priest named Jeelius for a human (well, lizard-man) sacrifice, and you're forced to kill Jeelius yourself to prove your supposed loyalty to Camoran's cult. If you choose to save Jeelius and attack the villains, you face a difficult battle with the angry cultists (especially since you're forced to surrender all of your weapons and armor when you enter the cult's base). If you succeed, Jeelius will return to the Temple of the One and, in gratitude, offer you free skill boosts in magic. While you can certainly reach the maximum levels of the magic schools without saving him, it's your only chance to do so—if you kill him, he won't revive and you'll never get to talk to him again.
    • Skyrim
      • Prior to the 1.4 patch, the Thalmor embassy was home to a rare gemstone called a Stone of Barenziah, and visiting the embassy without claiming the stone prevented you from completing a quest which required you to find all 24 of them. The 1.4 patch remedied this by moving the stone into the cave you use to escape the embassy, which can be revisited. To note though it was possible to jump a fence on horseback at a certain point prior to the patch to get the stone.
      • Skuldafn Temple, a dungeon visited during the main quest line, contains a word wall and a unique Dragon Priest mask, both of which can be lost since Skuldafn can only be visited once.
      • The quest involving Potema the Wolf Queen is split into two parts; first you interrupt the ceremony where a gathering of necromancers attempt to resurrect her, then you have to kill her for good. The second part will only trigger when your character levels up, so it's possible to lock yourself out of this quest if you hit max level (81) before finishing the first part. This has since been remedied by Patch 1.9, which allows you to break the level cap by resetting a Skill Tree that has reached 100, but keeping the levels and Perks obtained with it.
      • Clavicus Vile returns with a quest that mirrors the one in Oblivion. You can have either the the Masque of Clavicus Vile, a piece of heavy headgear, or the Rueful Axe, a reasonably powerful two-handed weapon.
      • Vile and Vaermina can both potentially screw the player out of the Oblivion Walker Achievement, as all of their quests can be completed by NOT obtaining their respective Daedric Artifacts (Namira's Quest can also end in a similar way, but it's explicitly said to have been failed, so the player would not be led astray). The game has a total of 15 Daedric Artifacts one can obtain in a single playthrough note  and the Achievement requires 15 artifacts to be in the possession of any one dragonborn. Clavicus Vile is particularly vile about this because his quests is presented like Hircine and Azura's quests, leading you to believe both items are daedric artifacts when only the Masque is. note  Mehrunes Dagon's quest can also end with his artifact, Mehrunes' Razor, becoming unobtainable if you let Silas live. Unlike Vaermina's or Vile's quests, this does not offer a unique reward (a useful follower for the former and a unique axe for the latter), so there is no real reason not to kill Silas (unless you make the rare choice of roleplaying a Dragonborn who is actually a good guy).
      • Many Quests can be lost forever in a single playthrough because of certain player choices. In the Civil War Question you MUST choose one side to go with. While you get a chance to change your mind halfway through, you must still lock yourself into one of two sides. This can then permanently change the Jarls of the holds you visit. Similarly, if you choose to destroy the Dark Brotherhood instead of joining them, be prepared to miss out on a lot of equipment that are quest-specific (such as the Ancient Shrouded Armor), plotlines, characters (notably, the only master-level trainer of the Alchemy skill is Babette, a NPC who only appears if you join the faction) and followers.
      • Certain quests can be lost forever if you do other quests before them. The most obvious of these is Narfi's quest, as he is the target of the Dark Brotherhood. The same quests can also be lost if a random encounter happens and kills the quest giver. Quest Items however are a little better about it, as they can never be dropped from your inventory once acquired (although some Fetch Quest can let you drop the items, but they are usually common items that respawn every so often).
      • The Dawnguard expansion gives you the option to talk Serana into curing her vampirism. However, approaching the topic carelessly can result in the option being lost permanently. On the other hand, if you do have her cured, it then becomes impossible to become a Vampire Lord.

    Final Fantasy 
  • The Final Fantasy series has a huge amount of missable stuff:
    • Final Fantasy II:
      • You can permanently lose the Blood Sword, a gimmick weapon that works wonders on the final bossnote . It's in Paul's stash, which he'll share with you if you ask him about the key term "Cyclone." But you can only learn that term from Hilda, and you must do it after the cyclone appears and before you call the wyvern so you can enter it.
      • In the PSP version, there's an Amano art gallery you can unlock as you play through that requires, among other things, 100% bestiary completion. Unfortunately for you, partway through the game all encounters on the overworld become harder—with absolutely no warning beforehand, incidentally—meaning that if you failed to hunt down and kill those monsters before breaking the seal on Ultima...well, sucks to be you.
      • If you want more than one character to learn Osmose, you're going to have to grind either the Coliseum, Fynn Castle, the Cyclone, or Castle Palamecia while they're available—those are the only places to find Wizards, a rare (and in early areas, horrifyingly fast and powerful) random encounter that will even more rarely drop the tome needed to learn Osmose, and once you complete them, you can't go back. As wise use of Osmose can make characters effectively immortal, you have good incentive to do this. Have fun grinding!
    • Final Fantasy IV is generally in love with this trope. 90% of the cast will enter the party for just a single dungeon, and then leave forever based upon the random swings of the plot. Unless you've played the game before, you'll never guess when your little mages that are holding an ultra-rare staff are just going to run off without a moment's notice, so you'd better unequip them before that certain plot point. There are a few areas where the game is twice as hard as it should be only because you're stuck with a weak party because your entire A-team was taken away by a shipwreck. Or where you're just stuck with pathetic semi-useless characters (Tellah, Edward). The DS remake expands this to the one-use skill teaching items called Augments, and combines it with a little Guide Dang It!. If you give Augments to non-permanent characters, you're never going to be able to use that skill again. Also, if you don't give the exact number of Augments to the right people before the plot takes them away, you can never get some other skills. Example: If you didn't give three Augments to Porom and Palom before they leave, you're never going to get Dualcast. This is doubly cruel for those who have played the game before, since it just goes against common sense to give skills to characters that aren't going to be around in the end game.
    • Final Fantasy IV: The After Years takes this Up to Eleven. Didn't get the needed parts to repair the airship in Rydia's Tale, including two that are dropped by specific enemies which only appear in one deserted room during a specific lunar cycle with the same drop rate as the PinkTail? Sorry, Calca and Brina will have to be scrapped for replacement parts. Lost a battle and didn't reload your save when playing as any of the Eblan Four or picked the wrong dialogue option as Gekkou? Sorry, that ninja is permanently dead. Don't have a party of Cecil, Ceodore and Rosa when Golbez makes his Heroic Sacrifice? Sorry, you can't save him. Also, in the final chapter it's possible to permanently kill brainwashed Shiva and Ramuh if you hit them while they're calming down, which is easy to do by accident if you have an action queued up right when the dialogue that tells you to stop attacking them pops up.
    • Final Fantasy V is plagued with a plethora of missables, to the point where it's extremely unlikely that you'll get everything if you don't look it up or know beforehand.
      • Firstly, a lot of bestiary entries are easy to pass over. Special mention goes to the monsters in the Torna Canal—the entire section takes about 10 seconds to navigate, and when you reach the end of the section, you're forced into a cutscene that throws you into a different area. You can never go back to the canal again, making it extremely easy to miss the Sucker and Octokraken if you didn't encounter one while you were there.
      • A number of Summons are found in hidden areas. Shiva is lost forever if you enter Galuf's World without getting her from her secret dungeon, thus robbing your entire Summon skill set of an ice attack for the rest of the game. Ramuh is found as a random encounter on the world map and isn't available until The Very Definitely Final Dungeon if you miss it. Catoblepas is found the same way in a hidden area, and is lost forever if you don't look for it before going to the Merged World.
      • Around half of the Bard's Songs are permanently missable, and you have to go out of your way to find the majority of them. Mana's Paean is the most egregious of these—it's available by talking to a random NPC for a tiny stint at the beginning of the Merged World... and then the area where you get it is consumed by the Void in the segment right after.
      • There are a lot of highly strategic items in the game that are incredibly easy to pass over. A few of them are Steals as well, making them even easier to miss.
    • Final Fantasy VI:
      • The Atma/Ultima Weapon sword can only be found in the cave leading to the Sealed Gate. This cave is rendered inaccessible when the entire continent suddenly takes to the air. The GBA version gives you a second chance to get this item.
      • One of the characters in your party, the moogle Mog, can dance to change the terrain and cause various other effects in battle. At one point in the game (in the World of Balance section, before the World of Ruin), you have the choice to save Mog from falling off a cliff, causing him to join your party at that time, or getting an accessory that will halve the MP cost of spells. If you choose not to get Mog at that time, you can still get him to join again later in the game. However, one of his dances, the Water Rondo/Harmony, can only be obtained when he's fighting in water. Since there is no area where you fight in water in the World of Ruin, if you choose to get the accessory, Mog's Water Rondo will be lost forever. The GBA remake added a second chance to learn the dance with the Bonus Boss fight against Leviathan, but again, once Leviathan is dead, bye bye Water Rondo/Harmony.
      • If you don't wait for Shadow on the Floating Continent, you lose him permanently as a party member.
      • You can permanently miss out on the Ifrit Magicite... but that would require you to deliberately ignore the thing and move on without it.
      • Some of Strago's Lores can only be obtained from bosses giving you only one opportunity to learn it.
      • It is nearly impossible to obtain all of Gau's Rage skills unless you know exactly what enemies must be encountered and when. There are several areas in this game which eventually become inaccessible, including the World of Balance, and missing even a single unique encounter in one of those areas means you can never collect all of Gau's rages.
      • Due to the way the game handles Interceptor, the dog that randomly protects Shadow and counterattacks, he can be transferred to any enemy that casts the spell Rippler on Shadow: this is because Interceptor is essentially a permanent hidden Shadow-exclusive status effect that can be transferred along with any other status effects with the said spell. If you kill Interceptor's new best friend, the dog is lost for the rest of the game.
    • Final Fantasy VII:
      • The Wutai sidequest must be started before disc three, as it suddenly becomes inaccessible after disc two due to a sudden plot development. Missing it means you also miss the HP Absorb and MP Absorb Materia.
      • You only have one chance to acquire Barret's ultimate weapon, and it doesn't appear unless he is in your party at the time. All items located at Shinra Headquarters, including Cait Sith's ultimate weapon, are missable because you only get to visit there twice.
      • Ghost Hands, one-use items which drain MP from the enemy, are only obtainable before Shinra levels Sector 7.
      • While the Gelnika can be visited any time, the Turks are unavailable during disc three, so the fight with them can potentially be missed. And all of the Turks carry unique pieces of equipment that must be stolen during the fights against them on disc two. Furthermore, if the player completed Wutai, they have the option of skipping the final showdown with them at Midgar, thus losing the aforementioned equipment.
      • Two Enemy Skills (i.e. Blue Magic) have very small windows to obtain - "Trine" and "Pandora's Box". Trine is used by two non-repeatable bosses (Materia Keeper and Godo, the latter being the only one accessible after getting all four Enemy Skill materiasnote ), and Stilva, an enemy found in Gaea's Cliffs, an area that becomes inaccessible after a certain point.note  Pandora's Box is a much more extreme case: it's only carried by an undead dragon in the final dungeon (usually the first undead dragon you encounter), and is immune to Manipulate. Said dragon only casts the spell upon death, and will never use the spell on that save file ever again. This also happens if the monster has insufficient MP; if you petrified it with White Wind and if you miss it, your only recourse is to reload your save before the fight and try again.
      • The Leviathan Scales are found in a chest in Junon Underwater Reactor; if you miss them, you can't obtain the Oritsuru (Yuffie's second-best weapon) and the Steal as Well Materia.
      • Many, many materia are missable if you don't pick them up at the first opportunity or miss the wrong sidequest. This includes Comet, Ultima, Morph, W-Item, one of the Enemy Skill Materia, Added Effect, MP Turbo, Steal as Well, MP Absorb, Elemental, Ifrit, Ramuh, Bahamut, Neo Bahamut, Leviathan, and Luck Plus.
      • All four of the Huge Materias can be lost in their respective sequences, sometimes with more content alongside them. 1) Fail to catch up to the train that's heading to into North Corel and watch it crash into the town, costing you the chance to get the Huge Materia and the Ultima materia. If you manage to catch up to the train but fail to stop it, you'll be able to get Ultima, but you’ll need to buy it I nstead of being given it to you for free, and the Huge Materia will still be lost. 2) Lose the mandatory Fort Condor battle minigame and Shinra's forces will invade it, costing you its Huge Materia, access to Fort Condor itself and the Phoenix Materia in one fell swoop (though at least Phoenix can be dug up from Bone Village). 3) Let the submarine get away in the shooting minigame and the Huge Materia it carries is lost forever. . 4) If you don't input the code to shut down the rocket that's heading towards Meteor, its Huge Materia will forever be lost.
      • If Aerith/Aeris is equipped with any unique items before her death, you'll lose them permanently for the rest of the game.
    • Final Fantasy VIII:
      • Many of the Guardian Forces in the game can only be drawn from bosses and secret bosses (Siren from Elvoret, Carbuncle from the Iguions, Pandemona from Fujin, Leviathan from NORG, Alexander from Edea in Disc 2, and Eden from the Ultima Weapon), which are by definition a one-shot deal. You get a second shot at many of these (except in the Japanese version, for some reason) with a different batch of bosses, but only at the very last stage of the game, by which point their usefulness has become rather limited; and if you miss them a second time anyway, they're gone for good.
      • Upon arrival to the 4th disc, all of the towns in the game are locked off, which also seals off quite a few sidequests and, by extension, unique rewards. This includes Guardian Forces like Odin (and by extension Gilgamesh), Cactuar, Tonberry, Bahamut and Eden (Though Eden has the aforementioned safety net).
    • Final Fantasy IX:
      • Excalibur 2, Steiner's Infinity +1 Sword, which is only attainable in the game's final dungeon...and vanishes if it takes more than twelve hours, from the start of the game, to get there. Perhaps less obnoxious than most examples of the trope in that it is meant to be an award for speed running through the game, rather than an arbitrarily unobtainable item. (There technically is a way to make the sword reappear and get another shot at grabbing it, but it requires making the in-game clock overflow, which takes two years of play time.)
      • One particularly big example is the end of Disc 3/start of Disc 4, where a good deal of the towns, such as Conde Petie, on the map become unaccessible because of the plot.
      • Disc 3-4 transition closes up Esto Gaza, the only place you get Scissor Fangs. The other one is synthetized with a one-shot (but thankfully unmissable) weapon, the Dragon's Claws, and the Tiger Claws, which can only be bought on Daguerreo, during the events of disc three. If you get to disc four without either Scissor Fangs or Tiger Claws, bye-bye Aura flair.
      • Scissor Fangs be damned, Esto Gaza is also the only place in the game that sells the Octagon Rod, which is the only item that teaches Vivi all 3 of his -aga spells, making him a lot less useful if you miss it since without them, he has no way to hit multple enemies late in the game without either wasting a ton of MP to do it, having a chance to miss enemies entirely or damaging the party members that don't have armor that absorb Shadow-elemental attacks in the process.
    • Final Fantasy X:
      • A pair of oddball items that are a result of a programming mistake are missable; namely, the weapon with No Encounters (dropped by Geosgaeno) and the shield with Magic Counter (sold by the hovercraft on your first visit to the Calm Lands). However, these aren't exactly crucial to the game and merely serve as collector's items.
      • The Master Sphere item. In the NA and original versions, you're limited to 10 (which can't be missed). In the International release, they are rare drops from the Dark Aeons and Penance (and his arms). This lets you get 99 (by killing Penance's arms and then running away), but once you kill Penance for good, this opportunity is gone.
      • Anything that is available within Home, Bevelle, or any other plot important areas that you can't get to. In the case of the second place mentioned, there are two items available during a boss battle. If you don't take advantage of Revive Kills Zombie at the very beginning of the battle, you'll miss at least one of them by being forced to swim right past it.
      • Some of the Al Bhed Primers can be technically missed as they are found in the aforementioned unrevisitable locations, but Compilation Spheres allow you to get them if you did miss them. However, it requires multiple save files to compile the Primers between, so if you only have one save, you're out of luck.
    • Final Fantasy X-2 ups the ante and features numerous examples of one-time Guide Dang It! items - especially completion percentage points, which can be lost forever if you ever use the scene skip feature during a plot scene. All the more frustrating, they are required in order to achieve 100% completion, which has a reward beyond bragging rights. However, they are only lost for the rest of the current playthrough; starting a New Game+ allows you to see these again, as well as carry over completion percentage so you can still obtain 100%.
    • Final Fantasy XII:
      • The Zodiac Spear, which, unless you avoid opening four arbitrary chests earlier in the game, can only be acquired from a chest that's only there 10% of the time and only has the dang spear 1% of the time. (That's nearly 700 reloads, on average.) Also, some items, such as Slime Oil, are only available en mass from spam-stealing from a certain gone-after-you-defeat-it-once enemy (Though you can obtain the only one that is actually required by completing 90 tiers of racing, much later in the game).
      • The chest holding the Demonsbane sword, obtained from the Tomb of Raithwall, will only appear if you defeat the first Demon Wall, —the one you're supposed to run away from, since its stats and abilities are far beyond what normal progression would allow your party. Even if you do defeat it, prepare to run back and forth from the entrance to the chamber where the chest appears, as there's a random chance of the chest containing Knots of Rust instead... and that's if the chest even appears at all.
    • In Final Fantasy XIII, virtually every single item before chapter 11 becomes this as soon as you leave its respective area. Fortunately, most of the items you can miss are either inconsequential or can be found/bought later, but there are a few weapons/accessories that can only be found in these chapters, so if you miss them, guess what? Bye-bye Treasure Hunter achievement!
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    Pokémon 
  • In general:
    • In the main series of games, you have only one chance at capturing certain incredibly rare Legendary Pokémon (although you can trade for them with other cartridges). Of course, the fact that you usually challenge these Pokémon to battles, and can fight them at any time in the games, makes it unlikely that anyone actually will miss them, because most players just save before the fight and reload until they capture them. This has largely been remedied overtime, with rematches becoming available after defeating the Elite Four starting with Pokémon Platinum.
    • For Pokémon that evolve via leveling up but haven't for whatever reason, hitting level 100 permanently bars that Pokémon from ever being able to evolve.
    • Mythical Pokémon, such as Mew. Although nowadays they're more Temporary Online Content, events that gave them (or items used to access them in-game) out were location-based. Usually, there will only be one event per generation of the game to get these in a particular area of the world. If you miss it, you have to either trade with someone who managed to get one to add it to your Pokédex, or else use a cheat device for it. While some games do contain glitches that allow these Pokémon to be obtained without the need of events, hacks, etc, they tend to be very complicated and/or risky.
    • In another sense of the trope, if you're raising a certain Pokémon, it can lose certain attacks forever if you evolve it too early (or too late in the games without the Move Tutor). Pokémon that evolve with an evolution stone are particularly guilty of this, as evolving one usually results in the pre-evolution's movelist being completely lost and replaced with a much shorter movelist consisting largely of sucky moves, forcing the player to level grind until they get the moves they want before evolving.
    • In almost every Gym, the puzzle(s) may force you to battle a Gym Trainer due to messing up, or there might be an alternate path that goes around the Trainers. Whatever the reason for there being a way to defeat the Leader before one or more of the Gym Trainers, once you defeat the Leader, ALL the Trainers in the Gym will act as if you'd won against them — meaning all the experience and money you'd get from battling with them is lost forever.
    • A similar issue occurs when you're in an area currently under the control of the resident evil team. It's generally possible to sneak past a lot of the Grunts (or Employees for Aether), but once you've beaten the Boss or Admin at the end of the area, all of them will pack up and leave, taking any experience or money they give out with them.
    • Certain items necessary for Pokémon to hold while being traded to evolve have a nasty habit of being only availiable once per game. If you rely on the GTS for getting trade evos via self-trading, you better pray that nothing goes wrong, or else you'll be giving someone a free Porygon-Z with no way to get one of your own without restarting the entire game all over again just to get another Dubious Disc. Later games do make these items buyable in the Battle facilities, but these tend to be rather expensive and locked off until the post-game, and if you lost, say, the only Protector in Pokémon X and Y trying to get yourself a Rhyperior before then... well, you better hope someone will trade you one for the Golem you didn't want.
  • Pokémon Red and Blue/Pokémon Yellow/Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen:
    • Once you speak to the captain of the S.S. Anne and obtain the Cut HM, it leaves port and never returns, so you can't fight any of the trainers there or obtain any of the items. Or see the infamous truck (which, in the remakes, has the only Lava Cookie in the game stashed nearby).
    • In Pokémon FireRed/LeafGreen, due to a Game-Breaking Bug, if a wild Legendary Pokémon (i.e. Raikou and Entei, the only ones in the game that naturally learn it in the wild) uses Roar, they are treated as if they had fainted, disappearing from the save file altogether. Thankfully, Suicune's moveset was carried over from Pokémon Crystal (where it isn't a "Get Back Here!" Boss), it will not have Roar when fought, and can be caught through hard work and determination without having to worry accidentally deleting itself.
  • Pokémon Gold and Silver/Pokémon Crystal/Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver:
    • In Pokémon Crystal, knocking out Raikou, Entei, and/or Suicune not only deletes that Pokémon from the game world, but also renders Ho-Oh completely inaccessible without trading, as catching all three beasts is needed to make the rest of the Tin Tower accessible.
    • Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver also had the Pokéwalker route "Beyond the Sea", unlocked after doing a trade on the GTS. Due to Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection shutting down for the Gen IV and Gen V games, "Beyond the Sea" cannot be unlocked to those that have not yet unlocked it.
    • Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection's shutdown also made the World Ability Ribbon, a Tower Ribbon that is obtained by completing the Wi-Fi Battle Tower challenge in these games (as well as Platinum), unobtainable.
  • In Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, Team Magma/Aqua's base is permanently sealed off after a certain point, so if you didn't already get the Master Ball, it's lost forever. This was changed in Emerald and Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, where the base remains open (and, even better for ORAS, going back is actually a requirement at one point later on).
  • In Pokémon Diamond and Pearl and Pokémon Platinum, there is a hidden HP Up at Lake Valor that can only be found while the lake is dried up by the Galactic Bomb. The HP Up is located near the northwestern-most part of the dried-up lake with the dozen Magikarp. If you return to Lake Valor when the lake is filled with water again, you can't get it. It's not as damning as most of the other examples here, since HP Ups can be readily bought at the Veilstone Department Store (albeit for a very high price).
  • Some medals in Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 require the use of the Global Link to obtain. As the Global Link for Gen V shut down not long after their release, those medals are forevermore up there with the event Pokémon in the "you should've been in the right place in the right year, bucko" department. On December 10, 2013, the Pokémon Dream World was also shut down, dragging down with it many, many features that could only be done online, such as growing berries and finding Pokémon with their Hidden Abilities.
  • Pokémon Colosseum: Mirakle B., a minor trainer in Colosseum (with a unique model and a sped up version of Miror B's battle music) appears in his cave after you beat him, but disappears eventually. Seeing as how you would never go through a now empty dungeon, pretty much no one is going to see him without being told.
  • The game cartridges for Generation I and II die eventually due to the save file and clock being kept up with by an internal button-cell battery. You can't save a game to a dead cart, the clock in Gen II games won't work, and on many of those cartridges that still have save files, Espeon and Umbreon are impossible to get, as they evolve based on the clock. Lapras can also become lost forever in Gen II, since it only appears in Union Cave on a certain day of the week... which, of course, relies on the clock. You can change the batery to fix it, but your save will be lost without backing it up first. On the bright side, the Gen II games show symptoms of a dying battery (the clock stopping), allowing you to transfer your Pokémon to a separate game before performing the procedure. In addition, the Virtual Console rereleases (being emulations) make this a non-issue.
  • In Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, Electrode can only be obtained through the traps in Team Rocket's Castle while it's there. Once Episode RR ends and the castle disappears, that save file will never be able to obtain Electrode without trading from another game. (Wild Electrode and Voltorb do not appear anywhere else in-game.)


Other examples:

  • Age of Pirates 2: City of Abandoned Ships is mostly a sandbox game, but it does have two of what you could call main quest lines, one for one of the nations and the other for the pirates. You can do both, but only if you finish the national quest line first. If you even talk to one of the pirate bosses the governor general will refuse to give you missions because of your ties with pirates (nevermind that you keep sinking their ships left and right). That means you will never be able to access some of the game's features, such as the ability to capture towns, that are only unlocked during the national quest line. You are of course given no prior warning or afterwards notification whatsoever that you're being screwed over like that, on the contrary, your character gushes like a schoolgirl in both conversation and journal at how great it is to be given an opportunity to work for the great pirate lord Henry Morgan. Hm.
  • Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura:
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    • You get a very limited window of opportunity to recruit the Dog into your party, who is one of the strongest melee combatants in the game, needs no items, wields no weapons and thus suffers no durability damage, no matter what he attacks. The recruitment window is limited because as soon as you arrive in Ashbury the Dog's introductory event begins. Unfortunately, that event involves a halfling kicking the Dog while it's down and there is nothing to stop the Dog from dying this way. If you don't immediately run over to the halfling after arriving at the town and chase him away, the dog will die and you will never get another chance at recruiting him. It is virtually impossible to know this on your first playthrough without consulting a guide of some sort, leaving it entirely up to luck, whether you by chance go in the right direction to encounter the halfling in time to save the Dog or not.
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    • Lava Rocks. There are very few of these items in the game (three or so), all of them found in the Wheel Clan caverns. There is no obvious significance to these items so it is likely that a player will simply sell them after picking them up. Considering that the item stock of most vendors is on rotation this will lead to the Lava Rocks being destroyed once the vendor's stock changes. However, these rocks are the only things that a certain dwarven god accepts as offerings, and without his blessing it is impossible to complete the chain of blessings necessary to gain access to Velorien's blessing of ultimate power, which in and of itself is an unlikely feat without the use of Guide Dang It!.
  • Baldur's Gate II:
    • The Flail of Many Heads was available as a sequence of components early in the game, which weren't too difficult to find. However they could only be assembled in that one location, which upon completion was locked off forever. Particularly galling since there was a shop specifically for the purpose of assembling such items, but the shopkeeper ignored the Flail components, so it would be entirely possible to lose the item while trying to get it assembled.
    • In the expansion pack your butler could put the Flail together for you, but since that required you to carry around three useless but valuable items (which took up three times as much space as a weapon which actually worked) for the entirety of the game- when you weren't even aware the possibility existed- not many players took advantage of this.
    • In the expansion, if you happen to have kept the Flail, you can also acquire two more heads for said butler to attach, completing the flail, and as you add each head it grows in power, dealing more damage and providing better abilities. Theoretically. The catch? When the final head is added, the Flail begins granting Free Action while it's equipped. That would be fine, except that free action prevents all changes to your movement speed, good or bad. While you're immune to the (by now rather weak) movement-stopping spells like Web and Entangle, you're also "immune" to spells like Haste, and the Boots of Speed. Since both of these are especially useful for melee fighters, who are most likely to be using the flail...Suffice it to say that many experienced players avoid applying the final upgrade, considering the Flail more useful with one head missing. Sadly, once you perform the upgrade (without knowing what the "improved" flail will give) there's no way to downgrade it again other than editing your inventory with an external program or reverting to an earlier save. Since Free Action is a relatively uncommon effect, it's not immediately obvious to many players that they've effectively received a debuff, so they may overwrite their previous saves before realising the problem.
    • Certain dungeons (The Planar Prison, the Sahaugin City, etc.) cannot be returned to once you leave them, and any items contained therein are perpetually missed.
    • The Big Metal Unit in the Throne of Bhaal expansion is the supreme king of this trope. First, it requires you to collect the Gold Pantaloons from the first game, carry your character over to the second game, collect the Silver Pantaloons in the second game (which requires you to be a colossal dick, something you're not likely to do unless you're doing an evil-aligned playthrough,) carry your character over again into Throne of Bhaal and collect the Bronze Pantalets before going to a special blacksmith in Amkethran to forge them all together. This is justified, however, in that the item is intended as an easter egg to challenge extremely dedicated players. More details can be read about it on Baldurdash.org.
    • If you bring a full team to help break Imoen out of Spellhold, and Yoshimo isn't one of them, odds are good you're going to end up leaving one of them in the depths of the Asylum maze without any meaningful way to get them back until the expansion.
  • Baten Kaitos:
    • The first game. As if getting 100% Completion wasn't hard enough (there are 1,000 distinct items to collect), many of the items are one-shots, and some can only be acquired by letting other items age, in real time, over days or weeks, and you have to take a picture of every single enemy in the game, including one-shot bosses.
      • In order to get 100% completion, you must take pictures of every character in your party. Every time you do so, there is a small chance that said character's photo will have a particular feature; this is called a rare shot, and naturally, you must also take rare shots of every character in your party. It so happens that in ONE particular boss battle, one character's appearance will notably change. Not only must you take a picture of that character in that state, but you must ALSO get the rare shot, and the only chance you have to get both of these pictures is in that one boss battle!
      • Diadem. Within a relatively short time frame, you have four bosses to photograph, six Auras obtained during a plot event through counter-intuitive means, each of which transforms 5 times over the course of the game and a merchant who sells a unique item and disappears after a plot event. Said merchant also blends in to the stylised background. Thats 41 items total.
      • Those transforming items? After the game's first big Wham Episode, the party gets scattered across the five continents. If the characters have transforming magnus (particularly the Auras) in their decks and you don't get them back before they change twice, you'll miss a transformation. Also, to get back four of the five missing party members, you have to fight four minibosses, one which must be faced with nobody but Xelha in your party. If she doesn't have a camera, then that boss' photo is lost. And if you left an Aura in the deck of the final party member, you'd better start speedrunning to get that character back (doesn't help that you have to go through two That One Boss fights, as well as two long dungeons to get there).
      • The Alfard Empire in general. The enemies you face there change every time the plot demands you go there, and then there's the Phantom Goldoba... Just to be on the safe side, visit the room in the front of the ship last. There are no items in there, and you have to visit every room before the boss appears, so make sure you get all the items before entering that room.
      • On your first trip to Mira, you have to go through a portal, keeping up with a character who will later become a party member while enemies try to assault you. You can shoot them down to keep from getting into battles with them, and shooting down an entire formation will net you a reward. If you miss a reward you want early, you can just intentionally fall too far behind to start over, but the reward for the very final group is Secret Recipe 4, which can't be obtained anywhere else. (The reward for group 10 of 13 is also essential, as it is Lyude's Level IV special move and by the time it appears as a random drop, it's probably no stronger than your regular attack magnus.) Just don't shoot down everything, because you won't run into those enemies again and you need to add their photographs to the list. And one of those enemies has a random drop that can only be obtained from it!
    • Baten Kaitos Origins seemingly goes out of its way to avert it...though it isn't perfect. The "Tub-Time Greythorne" and "Warm Cheers" magnus (and by extension "Icy Jeers" which it ages into, and also by extension the sidequest that uses it) are missable after a certain plot event that occurs very late in the game. There are also four enemies that can be missed for your enemy list; one is the Ballet Dancer, the only random encounter in a one-time area that doesn't show up later in the Coliseum, but the really nasty ones are Valara, Nasca, and Heughes - the player is offered an option for whether to fight them. Saying "no" robs you of a perfect enemy list, saying "yes" robs you of the best ending. Thankfully, the player's magnus and enemy listings can be carried over to a New Game+, so even these things aren't strictly gone forever, and considering that there are only around 650 magnus to collect and about 130 enemies, it certainly did a better job than its predecessor.
  • BoxxyQuest: The Gathering Storm loves this trope with all its heart. Here are some notable examples, but it’s by no means all of them.
    • Several of the Bitcoins are only available during very small windows. For instance, one of them can only be gotten when Cornelia leaves her bedroom door open after a specific cutscene in Chapter 2. Another requires you to have a bottle of Rum in your inventory when talking to someone at the Fanon Party, which happens once and can’t be revisited.
    • A few of the Inbox sidequests actually go away if you don’t finish them before beating the main story. This is never mentioned anywhere beforehand. Even worse, the “Epic Souvenir” quest disappears after the very next chapter. Did we mention that clearing every Inbox mission is required to unlock the Sky Abyss and get the best ending?
      • Speaking of the “Epic Souvenir” quest, let’s hope you picked up a glowstick at the Vocaloid concert and remembered to get it signed backstage. If not, then you won’t have the item the quest giver needs, so you can say goodbye to the True Ending for that playthrough.
      • One of the missable Inbox quests is also part of the running Deep Web subplot, so if you don’t do it when you have the chance, then you’ll lose out on the game’s biggest Bonus Dungeon and all of the treasures inside.
    • After reading all this, it probably sounds like a good idea to do every sidequest as soon as it becomes available, right? Well, thinking like that is how you miss the Astral Error. It’s hidden behind a locked door in the 4chan Code Room, which you only get to visit once. But the key is in Twitch, which you also visit once, and that visit happens pretty well after the Code Room mission shows up at the Inbox. So you can only find the Astral Error, (and fight not_intended), if you wait to do that particular sidequest.
      • By the way? This Code Room quest is the same as the Deep Web one we were talking about earlier. So basically, you’ll miss a Bonus Dungeon if you do the quest too early, but you’ll miss another Bonus Dungeon if you wait too long. Yeah, there’s a reason why this game is said to have so much replayability.
    • Naturally, any items in The Spire are lost once you beat the dungeon and return to the future. This also applies to items in Her World, although there isn't really anything that special in there.
  • Breath of Fire III has the Beast Spear, a weapon for Garr. It has far more attack power than any of his other weapons (his next closest weapon is a good 40 points weaker than the Beast Spear), though it also weighs a lot and drains a bit of his HP every turn, which for some makes it Awesome, but Impractical. Anyway, it can only be obtained by examining the ashes of a Duel Boss before leaving the room where you fought him. Take one step outside, and the weapon is gone for good.
  • Anything in Zeal in Chrono Trigger.
    • Opening the sealed chests in the Middle Ages before opening them in the Present. You also miss the opportunity to upgrade certain weapons and armor if you don't allow the pendant to react to the chests.
    • You can take the Swallow or the Safe Helm, but not both. You can buy Safe Helms later, but if you pass up on the Swallow, you won't get another shot.
    • You can get Magus to join your party, ONLY if you refuse to fight him at a certain point. If the question presented didn't already seem like a "But Thou Must!", his boss theme plays while you make the choice, basically telling players that there is no point in saying no... except that there is. And in the DS version, you can only get his Bestiary entry for this fight if you do kill him... which, of course, means he can't join your party unless you do another NG+.
  • Chrono Cross:
    • There's many a time when making a choice that enables you to get one character will result in you losing another: for example, opting not to save Kid at Guldove will let you recruit Glenn, but any chance of recruiting Razzly is — you guessed it — lost forever. There's a New Game + option that seemingly makes up for this, but it only becomes available about halfway through the game.
    • It's VERY easy to lose Razzly's Level 7 ability for good. Fight an adjacent boss with her in the party? Fail to witness tragedy? Good bye Raz-Flower. And the most powerful combo attack (Infinity plus one spell?) in the game.
    • Say yes to Kid when she first offers to join? Well, you just lost Leena. Answer one or both of the questions she asked earlier wrong? Well, you just lost her best tech.
  • Corruption of Laetitia:
    • There are some one-time dungeons in this game, such as the hallway created by Malayna's deadly sins and the Tower of Revelation, meaning the player only has one chance to grab the items inside.
    • Arowar and the nearby marsh are mutually exclusive locations, and choosing to go to one locks the player out of the other. It's also possible to lose several sidequests in Arowar if the player chooses to raze it rather than avoid civilian casualties.
  • Dark Cloud 2:
    • You can take pictures of various enemies and items, many of which are temporary, including one-shot bosses.
    • A glitch in Chapter 3 can cause chests that contain Fruits of Eden, a valuable item that increases your characters' maximum HP, to be lost forever. One set of chests will disappear if you fail to open them immediately after they appear; if you open another (specific) chest before a later chapter, a chest that should appear in that later chapter will never appear at all. Thankfully, the rest of the chests in the game appear to be free of glitches.
    • The Moon Flower Palace, the Chapter 7 dungeon, goes away at the end of said chapter, taking its Medals and Invention Ideas with it if the player doesn't complete it by that deadline. You also lose the ability to use time travel, so any missed treasures and photos from the future sections are gone for good.
  • In Dark Souls, it is very easy to miss items or events permanently if you don't know what you're doing. Usually, this means killing an NPC, which will render anything they sell or give as a present unavailable. Except... you have to kill certain NPC's in order to save other NPC's, and some items are only available by killing otherwise friendly NPC's. Joining Covenants and getting access to their rewards sometimes requires joining before killing certain bosses; kill those bosses and you can't ever join. In the first game, there are special weapons that can only be obtained by cutting off the tail of draconic bosses. Did you not cut off the tail? Too bad, the weapon's gone. However, the item is only rendered lost on that playthrough: starting a New Game+ will reset everything and give you another chance (the enemies will be a lot harder though).
  • While very hard, it's possible to make any and all Digimon permanently inaccessible in Digimon World 3 and the PAL release Digimon World 2003. Digimon have a "requirement" to be met before you can actually recruit them, which is always a minimum and maximum level. In short, if ALL of your current Digimon are above that level, you just can't get that other Digimon. The easiest to lose like this is Veemon, the only Digimon which you cannot get in any of the starter packs and also the best rookie in the game. The max level for recruiting him is freaking 30. And you only get Mega-Level Digimon on level 40. Fortunately, the fight for recruiting him is fairly easy.
  • In Dragon Age: Origins pretty much all of your party members except Alistair and Morrigan can be lost to the ravages of this trope if you are not prepared to do the new character quests at the earliest opportunity.
    • You can even accidentally choose to kill a potential party member instead of recruiting him. D'oh!
    • When you first arrive at Lothering, two possible companions are available. If you leave Lothering and complete one of the main quests without having picked them up, it gets destroyed by the darkspawn, and you lose any quests, loot, and potential party members forever. Granted, you have no reason to do this, but it's still possible.
    • Another rather annoying example is in the Human Noble origin. If you don't go to the treasury to pick up the powerful "Family Sword" weapon before escaping the castle, it's gone for good (along with all the treasure chests that you couldn't open if you chose Warrior instead of Rogue).
    • Dragon Age: Origins is actually full of these. Random encounters and sidequest levels are often impossible to enter after the corresponding quest is solved, leaving the loot one has not picked up inaccessible. As the party inventory is far from infinite, sometimes the player will find himself unable to pick everything up without destroying some of his valuables.
      • It is worth noting that these items are vendor trash that solely exist to be sold for relatively small amounts of money. None of these items are anything you would go back to get anyways.
    • A minor but rather annoying example appears in the "Return to Ostagar" DLC. If you already looted the Magi encampment chest using the key the Hungry Deserter gave you, you will miss out on the rather powerful Corrupted Magister's Staff. On the other hand, the DLC also gives you another chance to recruit Dog.
    • The unique items that appear randomly on certain enemies/chests are lost forever if you don't get them and overwrite the saves before fighting them/entering the area they appear.
    • Near the end of Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening, the Darkspawn lead two separate attacks against the player, one on the city on Amaranthine and one the Warden's base, Vigil's Keep. The player has to choose which to save, and if you choose Amaranthine any party members currently stationed at Vigil's Keep will die in the attack. It is possible to save both Amaranthine and your soldiers at Vigil's Keep (though the keep itself is still rendered unusable for the rest of the game) but doing so requires the player to complete a lengthy sidequest that involves, among other things, collecting ore deposits. Said deposits happen to be located in places you can't return to after leaving, which means if you don't get them the first time you're there you can't finish the sidequest (and by extension, save your party members).
  • Dragon Age II is full of this. The game is split into three acts, and any quests, treasures, party members, etc. that you don't get in one act will be unobtainable in the next. It's also possible to miss or lose every party member except Varric, depending on your choices. Finally, certain areas and dungeons are inaccessible as soon as you leave them.
  • While Dragon Age: Inquisition avoids this trope for the most part (Codex entries are available in more than one source, nothing super-important is kept in chests that only Rogues can unlock, and very few quests of note are lost over time), this trope does pop up in a few other ways:
    • The one type of quest that is lost in time is personal quests, which are not available in the post-game, permanently locking out some dialogue, character development, and quest rewards. And in Blackwall's case, if you don't build his approval to the point that his personal quest triggers, he will leave the party permanently in the post-game.
    • It is only possible to choose one of the three class specializations per playthrough. Even though it's implied that the other two trainers are still hanging around Skyhaven, you can't change your mind once you make a choice. Even if you reset your skill points, you'll still have the spec you chose, just with no points invested.
  • In Dragon Quest II for iOS devices, the Princess of Moonbrooke's most powerful weapon can be missed if the player defeats the enemy in the basement of Midenhall Castle with every character's inventory full.
  • In Dragon Quest VI, you can lose a character if you tell him the wrong thing at the wrong time. To be specific, if you tell Amos the truth about him being the monster that menaces the town every night before giving him the Seeds of Reasoning that allow him to control the transformation, he'll leave the town, never to return. To be fair, a lot of the Non Player Characters in the town tell you that doing so is a bad idea, since they hail him as the town's saviour due to chasing off the monster that gave him the curse that causes him to transform every night, he never causes any major damage during his rampages, and the game itself gives you multiple prompts on whether you want to do it.
  • Dragon Quest VII does not allow you to collect certain NPC's for your island after the first or second disk, which means a certain amount of Tinymedals will always be out of your grasp. And if you don't resolve one of the towns' problems properly (which takes 3 times), the town's still ruined in the present.
  • In Dragon Quest VIII, the items in the town of Neos are lost forever after a certain major plot event occurs. The game also doesn't prevent you from selling items with finite availability. Shopkeepers are nice enough to warn you when something you're about to sell is one-of-a-kind, but they usually fail to warn you against selling items that are relatively common, but have limited availability (Rare Drops, Casino wins). Such items are often required to craft the best weapons in the game. Of course, there's seldom if ever any indication of this in-game. Therefore, most knowledgeable players follow this mantra: don't sell anything that can be used in the Pot, since it'll show you which items you can and can't use in Alchemy.
  • Dragon Quest IX featured an online shop called the DQVC that could only be accessed once per day. A large quantity of the game's Vanity Items could only be obtained by purchasing them there, and the items offered varied week to week. When the store went down, these items were then lost forever. The store and certain quests were lost forever once they closed the quest service and store with the permanent shutdown of the DS's online servers at the end of May 2014. And at least one quest required a store-only item to complete. An offline version of the store is still accessible, but only offers a very limited selection of items.
  • In EarthBound:
    • An enemy in the Stonehenge base Randomly Drops a character's Infinity +1 Sword (and his only weapon, actually). When the base boss is defeated, all enemies in the base disappear and the sword is permanently lost.
    • Ness's Infinity +1 Sword (at least the one of the two that actually works), can only be found on one enemy. In one area. This enemy only appears in the immediate area before the final boss, making it almost useless, especially since you are past the Point of No Return.
    • Ness receives a big stat boost after defeating Ness's Nightmare after the eighth sanctuary location... unless he's already level 99. Which can happen while you're hunting in the Stonehenge base if you're unlucky enough.
  • Eternal Sonata has an old lady that can be spoken to in Chapter 4. Doing so will allow you to access a Score Piece later on. However, if you don't speak to her in Chapter 4, she will be sleeping for the rest of the game, making that particular Score Piece lost forever.
  • Eye of the Beholder: In the first game, on the Drow levels (Floor 7), there are three small rooms behind doors close to each other, each with a rare magic item inside: "Slicer", a short sword +3; a set of +3 bracers; and a ring of wizardry. Opening one door seals the two other shut; there is no way to get two or all three magic items.note 
  • In Fable I, there's a very special weapon in a key chest in the Heroes Guild. However, if you do not obtain all the necessary keys or just procrastinate in opening the chest before Jack of Blades attacks the Heroes Guild, the weapon is, you guessed it...
    • This gets fixed in the expansion pack, as you can revisit the (rebuilt) Guild after the attack. Later in the game, you may encounter a demon door that demands all your keys to open, which would make all the contents of the chests you haven't opened yet lost forever... but you're given ample warning, and it's optional.
    • Another demon door requires you to find three suits of armor, the first one being bright plate mail. Unfortunately, it's only sold in the Arena; and you can only visit the Arena once, at a specific point of the main quest. So if you didn't buy all its parts, at the one and only possible time, you can never open the demon door. (This is also fixed in the expansion, where you can buy the armor in one of the added locations.)
    • Yet another door can only be opened if you had married the villainous Lady Grey. If you choose to expose her evil deeds instead (only possible in the expansion), you're out of luck. Or if you become Mayor in the Fable: The Lost Chapters, by turning her in. Ideally though, one should court her, fight Thunder (it is an area off limits and only accessible if you fight Thunder for Lady Grey's favour), then turn her in (find her dead sister).
  • Fable II only has one (potentially avertable) instance of this. If you don't choose the Love/The Needs of the Few ending, you can't resurrect your dog, who dies during the end of the main quest. Because of this, any dig spots you missed can't be dug up. However, if you have the Knothole Island DLC, then you can get your dog back by sacrificing a villager at Cheet-Ur's Crypt.
  • Fallout 3:
    • The game has collectible bobbleheads that increase your stats. Four of them can be lost forever: Strength is in Lucas Simms's house in Megaton, which you can nuke; Energy Weapons is in Col. Autumn's quarters in Raven Rock, which you can't go back to after you leave; Medicine is in Dad's office in Vault 101, which you lose forever if you don't get it before completing Escape! or Trouble on the Homefront; finally, there's Repair, which is in Evan King's house in Arefu, behind a locked door. Force the lock and break it and it's inaccessable unless you took the Infiltrator perk.
    • Non-storyline quests and special items can also be lost forever if you murder someone crucial to a quest or choose the wrong option. Of course, if you kill random civilians for fun, you probably deserve it. One exception is the Wasteland Survival Guide quest; if you nuke Megaton, Moira Brown will survive, though she's now a Ghoul.
    • Potential party members can be killed before you have the chance to let them join you. You can murder Butch within five minutes of getting a pistol, for instance. You'll also have to kill Clover if you attack Paradise Falls before recruiting her.
    • If you kill Greta for Azhrukal and he gets killed by the subsequently hostile Underworld residents, you won't be able to recruit Charon.
    • If you choose to let the ghouls into Tenpenny Tower during the sidequest of the same name, you may be permanently locked out of your penthouse suite, along with any items you left in there.
    • Mothership Zeta has two points of no return, which will cause any items in the affected areas, including the Alien Captive Recording Logs, to be lost forever. Certain door controls can also be rigged to explode; doing this will permanently lock you out of the room that they open.
    • In Point Lookout, all items left in Calvert Mansion will be destroyed along with the mansion when it blows up at the end of the "Thought Control" story quest.
    • One locked room in The Pitt contains several steel ingots necessary for the Mill Worker quest and achievement, which will be lost forever if you break the lock when forcing it. Worse, there's a game breaking bug where if you give the last few ingots to Everett in a quantity less than 10, you won't get your reward or the achievement.
  • Fallout: New Vegas:
    • When it comes to the 4 major DLC (Dead Money, Honest Hearts, Old World Blues, Lonesome Road), you can return to any of their areas as often as you like upon their completion, with the exception of Dead Money's Sierra Madre. Once you leave, you can't return, unless you use console commands in the PC version.
    • As in Fallout 3, potential companions can be killed in New Vegas if Hardcore mode is enabled. Unlike Fallout 3, though, some companions are found outside, where they're at the mercy of whatever may wander in. A particulary bad spot is Jacobstown, where you meet Lily, which happens to have a Cazador spawn point near the front gate. Another bad spot is the 188 Trading Post where Veronica is found, which is near a Legionary Assassin spawn point. Also, choosing the wrong dialogue or quest options will turn certain groups hostile and prevent you from doing their quests.
    • Some of the companion quests can be lost forever by triggering too many non-repeatable "trust point" events before recruiting the character, or picking them up too late in the storyline, for example, a bug may cause Loyal to disappear after the completion of "Volare!", breaking Raul's "Old School Ghoul" quest. Though Loyal can be brought back using the console commands on the PC to relocate him to the player, cosole players will have to revert to an old save or start a new game file. The reason he dissappears is because he's stuck in an old cell in the Nellis Base Hanger. After the quest "Volare!" is completed the hanger becomes a whole new cell after a few game days to add the B29 bomber in it.
    • Raul's quest will also be lost forever if you have been declared a terrorist by the NCR, as you will no longer be able to talk to two of the required people, even if you have a disguise.
  • In Fallout 4:
    • If you're quick to make enemies with the Railroad, Brotherhood of Steel or the Institute, this will prevent you ever getting Deacon, Paladin Danse or X6-88 as companions. Although, you'll be forced to eventually kill two of those companions depending on what faction you side with anyway. Furthermore, if a companion ever leaves you due to low approval, it is impossible to get them back.
    • Most merchants sell at least one unique weapon or armor piece. If they die for whatever reason (e.g. hostility to the player or monster attack), then you'll be unable to obtain it.
  • In Faria, the towers all crumble after you clear them, making it impossible to collect items you missed. However, only one easily missed item is unique: the Hyperspeed 3 in the Phantom Tower.
  • Fortune Summoners: This can happen, but not to anything good or important:
    • You can miss an accessory for Arche in the bonus quest if the player continues with the main story from a Prologue Clear save without playing through it. The bonus quest can only be accessed from a Prologue Clear save.
    • Also, the two accessories which can be won from Rock-Paper-Scissors, as well as the few items to be found in Minasa-Ratis Magic School after fixing Mr. Towarin's magic pot, as the normal school area becomes permanently inaccessible.
  • Near the beginning of Infinite Undiscovery, Sigmund gives you his sword. It's nothing special and the Sorting Algorithm of Weapon Effectiveness makes it useless fast. As a further temptation, it does sell for a pretty high price for such an early item. If you sold it, say goodbye to the Infinity +1 Sword.
  • Golden Sun: Dark Dawn has this with permanently missable djinn and summons, the former having an incredible 24 potential missable Djinn and 6 summons spread over three different points of no return, out of 72 total djinn and 13 summons. Particularly irritating in that some of these djinn and summons have very small windows of opportunity to get them, and there wasn't anything like this in the first two games. The Ninja Sandals equipment is also lost forever if you don't talk to a certain NPC the first time you're in Kaocho. Additionally, some Encyclopedia terms can be lost forever if you don't talk to random NPCs in the Morgal region, frustrating those who consider filling it out as part of 100% Completion. Even more irritating, oftentimes those terms WILL appear in other characters' dialogue, but they're not highlighted in red, so it doesn't count.
  • Kingdom Hearts:
    • In the first game, finding and using multicolored marks called Trinities is one of the requirements for 100% Completion. In Halloween Town, a Red Trinity can be found in the base of Oogie's Manor, and you must use that Trinity before fighting Oogie Boogie for the first time. After you beat Oogie, he merges with his manor, and beating him makes him collapse to the ground, thus rendering the Trinity lost forever. Another catch is that to use the Trinities, you have to have Donald and Goofy in your party for them to work. Many players who couldn't be bothered to switch Jack Skellington out of their party at the Save Point at the top of the manor and backtrack to the Trinity with Donald and Goofy ended up tearing their hair out in frustration. The Final Mix version moves the location of that trinity, preventing it from being lost forever.
    • Kingdom Hearts II has a few harmless missables during the tutorial, but they aren't even counted in Jiminy's Journal (the main tracker for completion). Considering it was made by Square Enix (see the opening entries in this trope), it's surprising that otherwise, the series has mostly avoided this problem since then.
    • Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep, which requires 100% to get the bonus ending:
      • The game can lock you out of a few otherwise boring chests during the final chapter. If you miss them, you'll have to pick up on your old Aqua save (hope you still have it!), open the silly boxes, beat the game again and then redo the final chapter. And you just know it was for a Potion or something. And optimally you'll want to get them before an even earlier plot event, because after that, the area will be guarded by an unavoidable Bonus Boss. (namely, Young Xehanort)
      • The post-game battle levels: both Terra and Ventus can have the battle levels of their worlds raised significantly after completing the Final Episode, making grinding to Level 99 a much faster process. Due to a bug, however, the player must not touch either of their Terra or Ven saves between beating their final bosses and beating the Final Episode, or else the battle levels will stay where they are, and they'll have to make new files to set their completion flags and try again. (Graciously, Aqua's battle levels can never be raised and are exempt from this status, but that just makes for a completely different problem.)
  • In King's Field II, a certain merchant (Lyn), sells a number of dead useful items, but at the time, they seem rather expensive. It's only until later one realized that a) many of her wares are otherwise unattainable, and b) her prices are actually quite low. Of course, by then she's been killed.
  • A recurring case in the whole Kiseki Series: there’s a mind-boggling amount of side-quests and items that can be missed. The games expect the player to really take their time talking to everyone again and again as much as possible in order to trigger hidden events, and these are all situational, meaning that if you didn't talk to X character before to trigger an event with character Y later, then you can kiss that side-quest goodbye.
  • Knights of the Old Republic:
    • The game contains a fairly egregious example: as you progress through the game, two visitable planets/cities are destroyed by the Sith with little to no forewarning, and all items and sidequests therein are rendered lost forever.
    • There are also smaller and more numerous examples such as a runaway girl found on your ship, that will eventually run away again and be left to her own fate if you don't finish the 'side-quest' within the time limit.
  • Several weapons and items in The Last Story can be missed if they're not gotten before certain key events. The Fast Bow, a revamped version of the regular bow, can only be obtained by defeating the boss Lesser Shadow in less than four minutes, which can be very difficult to do if the player doesn't know the best strategy to prevent the boss from recovering HP. There's also a rare katana, obtainable through a Chain of Deals, that cannot be complete if the player completes Chapter 31 beforehand. A wine bottle can also be missed from a drunken man if the player gets past all the moments of nightime in the game. And there are even optional chapters that are missable at key points, namely 20, 21, 25 (these three after 31), 24 (if 20 isn't done), 42 and 43 (if the player skips directly to 44, which will trigger the game's finale and take the player to New Game+).
  • Several examples of this appear in Legend of Legaia
    • There are four paths that each lead to the first Mist generator, and attempting to go to the valley before you have revived three Genesis Trees in Drake Kingdom will cause a cutscene to play in a hidden area in the canyon. Each canyon contains a treasure chest, but once you have revived three Genesis Trees, these valley crossings will become inaccessible and the treasure chests therein are also forever outside your grasp.
    • Any item in any of the four Mist Generator dungeons note  and any item in either Rogue's Tower or Noaru Valley, both in the Seru-kai, is permanently lost once you complete the dungeon, as the area becomes inaccessible.
    • There are not one, but two items that become such in the first hour of the game. When the Mist attacks Rim Elm at the beginning of the game, you can talk to the shopkeeper to get three Healing Leaves, and talking with Mei and offering to have her stay with your family during the Mist attack will cause her to give you her Pendant when you leave for Drake Castle.
  • Obscure Game Boy Color RPG Li'l Monster has the Dowser and Dragonscale ability gems, and their associated monsters, Gyro and Argon. These two monsters are fought as bosses. However, the bosses will only appear once, and if you lose to them, they'll vanish. You'll never be able to get their ability gems. Frustratingly, missing Gyro/Dowser also means you miss the Disc-One Nuke, Minhand, which doubles your attack power, as the monster that holds that particular gem only appears when you use the Dowser gem to summon a monster to fight.
  • Lisa: The Painful features lots of it. The most notable example, though, is in the Area 2 after you get TNT in the construction site. Two guys will appear in the far right of the area and, if you interect with them, they will offer a fair amount of mags in exchange of some of your TNT. If you aceppt the offer, they will blow up a whole village, killing almost everyone in it. It will make you permanently miss the chance to recruit 3 party members and buy some items that are unique to that village, if you haven't done yet.
  • In the Game Boy Advance version of Lord of The Rings: Fellowship of The Ring, there were a series of Runes the player needed to obtain to unlock doors in the Mines of Moria. However, there is nothing that indicates the need for these runes taking up space in the limited inventory. And since there is no way to go back to previous areas, these items can be lost forever, making the game Unwinnable by Design, or Unwinnable by Mistake, depending on perspective.
  • Lost Odyssey:
    • Items from areas that cannot be returned to become available in an auction house that exists for that sole purpose. Even if the player loses the auction for an item, it will reappear until the player wins it; winning items this way is sufficient for 100% Completion. Given that to get the 'all items' achievement requires nearly 700 items, literally hundreds of which are in items almost indistinguishable from mundane items and are usually overlooked, dozens hidden in inexplicable places or that require incredibly hard puzzles to get to, about 50 from sidequests ranging from easy to merciless, 24 from following vague clues to hidden items and 11 that are literally invisible with no indication that they're there, and something like 70 of these items can be missed, being able to buy what you miss is only fair.
    • There are two spells which can only be purchased from two different vendors. One is in an area at the end of the second disc, the other is in an area near the beginning of the third disc. Each of these vendors are in areas that once you progress far enough, can NEVER be visited ever again. Granted, you get more powerful versions of these spells later (and they aren't missable) but you could still miss out on an achievement this way.
  • Lufia II: Rise of the Sinistrals averts a situation like this when it comes to sold items by including a shop late in the game where you can buy back any item you've ever sold.
  • In Lufia: The Legend Returns, once Seena reveals herself as Erim, you can no longer recruit the Egg Dragon.
  • Lunarosse has very little of this, mostly one or two inconsequential items not needed for the best ending. Early versions made it possible to lose a party member permanently, locking you out of the best ending, but the revised final version allowed you to get her back via a sidequest.
  • Luxaren Allure: Crystallized Hope, if you miss more than two, you can't craft the Infinity +1 Sword. Although, you get a good bit of armor instead. Also, Aggressive Edges. There's just enough to craft one of everything to craft with them. So if you miss one after the last Point of No Return, and you crafted everything you could, you can't craft with Aggressive Edges anymore, and an Aggressive Edge is needed for the Infinity +1 Sword.
  • Machina of the Planet Tree -Planet Ruler-: The Heads I Win, Tails You Lose version of Gertheim will drop Unlimiter II if the player wins and is the only opportunity to obtain this accessory.
  • The MARDEK Flash RPG series has several examples of this — unless you save certain items in your storage at the very end of each chapter, they are permanently lost in future titles:
    • The cosmetic "tunics" that Mardek and Deugan wear in Chapter 1 are unique, and cannot be obtained again (due to the Time Skip) unless placed in storage.
    • The Lapis Lily item that Elwyen gives in Chapter 2 for completing her sidequest (a useful accessory that partially protects against three different elements) is unique. Failing to finish the sidequest in 2 means you lose out on it for the rest of the series (and unlike other examples, this accessory retains its usefulness for a long time after its acquisition).
    • Killing Gope (the sympathetic bandit) in the Gem Mine in Chapter 2 not only locks you out of part of the Trilobite Cave/Cambria for the balance of the chapter (and when you do access it in Chapter 3, several chests are permanently blocked off), but you miss out on additional character development and a travelling merchant who sells some powerful items. By default, Gope is considered dead in Chapter 3.
    • Mardek's Infinity +1 Sword in Chapter 2, the Champion Sword, is only awarded if the Arena mode is completed. It's a unique item, to boot — fail to complete the 20 waves, and you lose out on it for the following chapter. Additionally, the "Keyblade" sword is a unique item only dropped by a specific enemy in the Catacombs, and doesn't carry over unless placed in storage.
    • Once you enter Moric's battle-saucer in chapter 2, you've permanently sealed off from the Catacombs, lose your chance to unlock Cambria, and boosted the hire price of Zach by 1000%. Also, when you go into the throne room in chapter 3, everything is closed off (it's possible some areas could be revisited in subsequent chapters, but since the series was rebooted, that's something of a moot point).
  • In Mario & Luigi: Dream Team, the boss Mammoshka has a 50% chance of dropping the 1-Up Gloves (auto-revive a Bro if he gets KOed). You're gonna have to reset if you don't get it when you kill him, since there's NO other way to get them.
  • Marvel: Avengers Alliance:
    • The Special Operations used to do this until later when Playdom released the first few heroes for an outrageous 200 CP.
    • There's also the case with Moon Knight. It had tasks similar to Spec Ops without being as Guide Dang It! as Spec Ops are. However, if you didn't finish the tasks before the time expired, you lost your chance.
    • They later started slowly retiring lockboxes one by one. If you didn't manage to luck out on getting enough non-duplicate covers from the boxes before the boxes expire, sucks to be you.* Marvel Ultimate Alliance allows you to return to almost any area you've already completed, but there are a few exceptions, such as the SHIELD base in Atlantis or the fake Dr. Doom's castle in Murderworld. Any items missed there are gone until your next playthrough.
  • Mass Effect:
    • Once the four primary planets in Mass Effect have been finished, you automatically return to the Citadel, where several new sidequests become available....and then you hightail it out of Dodge and cannot return to the Citadel in its current, un-invaded by the geth state for the rest of the game. Fortunately, there's only the final planet left to complete after this point anyway.
    • Also in the first game, there are Achievements you gain from having certain party members in your party for a certain percentage of the game. However, since you only get Liara once you leave the Citadel for the first time, and the planet she's on is only one of many you can visit, it's possible for there to not be enough game left to complete once you get her, locking you out of the achievement until the next playthrough.
    • Liara's Achivement is nearly a Guide Dang It! in the way you're better off beelining to recruit her, avoiding any optional quests until she's part of your team. The precise amount of main and side quests completions required for the achievement is different for each party member, depending on which point of the game you can recruit them, but the margin of error is less for later characters.
    • Most characters take 45 assignments to reach. Liara along with Garrus take 50 for no clear reason. Garrus is only acquired a couple story missions before Liara, so he's almost as difficult. The only thing that makes Liara notably difficult is that most of the assignments are available as soon as you leave the Citadel, so if you are the type of player that does every side quest possible before the main mission, you are out of luck. Alternatively, it is possible to do almost all the main missions before getting Liara, although why anyone would do this, whether they want the achievement or not, is hard to guess. It is the shortest, easiest mission and provides access to your final squad member.
    • The Feros colony offers several sidequests which can never be completed if the hero ends up killing the characters associated with them - nice job, Shepard. Even better, failing to save the Colony locks you out of a War Asset in the third game.
    • Did you tell Admiral Kohaku about his dead men before you started the Cerberus side arc? Welp. So much for that, then. Bear in mind that Admiral Kohaku's men are on a planet in the same cluster where you get Liara, and about the only thing to make them even a little hard to get at is the thresher maw.
    • Several side quests and subplots are potentially continued on in the next two games. Permanently Missable Content times three. Oh, and the skip dialogue button can also choose dialogue, so it's possible to accidentally choose something you didn't want by accident.
    • In Mass Effect 2, most weapon and armor upgrades can only be found during missions. Thanks to the game's rigid mission structure, there's no way to revisit the locations of missions you've already completed. Complete the mission without getting the upgrade, and you're outta luck. New Game+ mitigates this somewhat. Additionally, there are three separate mini fetch quests you can perform on Illium where you can find an item or information significant to a separate NPC. These can only be found during Miranda's loyalty mission, Samara's recruitment mission, and Thane's recruitment mission. if you don't find these items during their respective missions, you can't complete the fetch quests.
    • Mass Effect 3:
      • You regularly find new weapons during missions. Most of them can be purchased at the Citadel if you miss them, but two weapons, the M-358 Talon and the M-99 Saber, have to be found during missions or else they become unobtainable. While none of them are mandatory to complete the game, it's always nice to add a new gun to your arsenal. (Made even more noticeable in the Expanded Galaxy Mod, which adds a Wall of Weapons to the shuttle bay and lets you see exactly what guns you're still missing.)
      • Once you complete Priority: Tuchanka, several side quests on the Citadel will become locked out if uncompleted. Additionally, if you wait too long to complete two side missions ( evacuating Grissom Academy and disarming the bomb on Tuchanka) after they become available, they will be considered failed, locking you out of the relevant upgrades and war assets.
      • There's a glitch on one sidequest in 3, the one with the salarian Spectre and Kasumi Goto. If you leave the Citadel while it's going, if you activate the Spectre terminal, if you trigger any other sidequests - and this is a game where sidequests are triggered by walking past people - or if, by some accounts, you hit pause before completing it, even though it's a quest that requires meandering across several areas - you can't complete it and those War Assets are lost forever.
      • The game tries to mitigate the frustration factor by letting you buy any any quest item on the Citadel if you don't find it during the mission where it's normally found.
  • Mega Man Battle Network:
  • In Mega Man Network Transmission, if you didn't get the golden Mystery Data from the data graveyard before defeating Zero, the Zero chip is lost permanently.
    • While the main series normally averts it, there is one instance in Mega Man Battle Network 2. If you don't buy gifts for your friends while you are overseas (easy to miss) you can't return and buy them (even though you can return to the location) but none of the thanks yous are unreplacable if you look enough.
    • Other than the above, the main series itself goes out of its way to avert this. Every boss has a stronger version which you can rematch an unlimited number of times and can drop any Battle Chips its weaker versions can. From the 4th game onwards, weaker enemies in earlier areas are replaced with their stronger counterparts once you get far enough, but a few select areas will retain the weaker enemies so that all variants of all enemies can still be found.
    • In Mega Man Battle Network 4: Red Sun and Blue Moon, the mystery data contain different items depending on what playthrough the player is on. Moving on to the next playthrough without picking up all the blue and purple mystery data can cause the player to miss a HP memory or Navi Customizer part forever. This also applied to green mystery data, which made certain chips such as Wideblade S and Longblade S more easily gettable on certain playthroughs, but virtually impossible on others.
  • Mega Man Legends has the Bomb and Plastique, which are hidden in the city as part of a sidequest. If they explode, you lose them forever - although the Buster parts made out of them are easily outclassed.
  • Thanks to a glitch, the Mock species in Monster Rancher 2 can become lost forever. You get the Mock by randomly receiving some seeds from the item store after getting a monster to Rank B. There's no guarantee of when you'll get the seeds; you have to keep visiting the store. However, if you get a monster to Rank A without getting the seeds, you'll never be able to get the Mock.
  • In MS Saga: A New Dawn, there's an optional opponent fight early on that can only be accessed if your characters head to a certain spot before that area can be actively entered. If you completely miss this fight, then you miss out on also 100% Completion with the MS guide.
  • Neverwinter Nights has a summoning pool where any unique or quest-specific item can be found for a small fee. Which only makes the trope's presence in the sequel all the more unforgivable... Neverwinter Nights also had companions who would tell you their life stories as they adventured with you (read: once you reached a certain level), and eventually would give you a special item in exchange for something related to their backstories. However, you could only find these special items in the first chapter, and they vanished once you moved to the second chapter. If you didn't adventure with every single companion in the first chapter enough to make the trade, their items were lost forever. Chapter two has them reveal a second part of their backstory and give an upgrade to their item, but only if you received it in chapter 1. You can get another upgrade in chapter 3 - but you can be below the level required by the end of the chapter. Of course, in practice "adventuring with them enough" amounts to practically only hiring and dropping them again every so often to keep hearing their life stories and eventually helping them finish their own quests. The game only tracks how many levels you've advanced since the last chat, not how much time you actually spent with each companion, and since all but one of them hang out at the same place right at the start of chapter 1, making the required rounds once you've figured this out is easy.
  • In Neverwinter Nights 2, most locations and related sidequests become inaccessible in Act III; even the titular city of Neverwinter effectively shrinks from three districts to one. Some NPCs, however, are relocated to different areas, mostly plot-critical ones.
  • Everything before the timeskip in Nier becomes inaccessible afterwards, since the New Game+ starts off right afterwards. This becomes a problem if you forget weapons from before the timeskip since you need to get them all for access to Ending D.
    • The time attack trophies for the bosses after the timeskip can be missed, but with New Game+ can be redone if you're persistent.
  • Nocturne: Rebirth isn't too bad about this thanks to the New Game+ feature, but there are some items that can only be obtained within a limited window of opportunity per run.
    • There are some optional items that can be obtained in Algiz, but the party will be locked out of the village for the rest of the game after Hypnosis's raid exposes their vampirism.
    • The Brave Clear reward for beating Shylphiel is Luna's best non-sorcerous weapon, which doesn't drop from enemies. This means it's possible to miss it if the boss is beaten while the party is overleveled.
  • There aren't a lot of these in Opoona— the biggest ones are a pair of artwork in the Artiela Museum (if you don't view them right when they appear, you won't be able to add them to your Artbook), and the friendship of Ine. First, you've got to make sure you can play the ukelele by a certain point in the game, or else you'll miss friendship with her. Secondly, another character will give you an item that you can sell for lots of money, but you have to give it to her to both cement her as a friend and to get an item that's necessary later on for increasing the friendship of another one of your friends.
  • Paper Mario:
    • You can hit a creature called Whacka to obtain Whacka Bumps, but there's a finite number of them. Hit Whacka enough times, and he'll run away for good.
    • In Paper Mario 64, there are a few Badges found in Peach's Castle. You can either collect these with Mario at the very end of the game, or nab them with Peach during her mid-chapter segments and place them in a treasure chest so that Mario can obtain them at a different location. However, if Peach grabs these Badges, but doesn't place them in the chest by the time her Chapter 6 segment is over, they are, of course, lost for good.
    • Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door
      • The game records every time you "tattle" on an enemy (a turn-costing move that lets you see its HP and other characteristics). As some enemies (most notably bosses, but there are others) can't be fought after a certain point, their records would be lost forever if not for a particular trash can in the Hub Level / First Town.
      • If you defeat Gloomtail and then set off the next event without going behind him and blowing open the crack in the wall, the stuff in that secret chamber will be inaccessible due to the floor to his room dropping way too low to reach the door. Thankfully the only items that can be lost this way are an Ultra Shroom and Jammin' Jelly, which are generic, albeit powerful, healing items that are infinitely purchaseable from a store for an expensive price. Your inventory is also likely filled with many of both items or their superior combined form, anyway, so it isn't a huge loss even utilitarianly, in addition to completionary.
    • In Paper Mario: Sticker Star, there is no way to get the pages in the Book of Wiggler (Wiggler's Diary) after reuniting all of Wiggler's segments with his body near the end of World 3.
  • In Persona's SEBEC route, you have one free space in your party that you can fill with Elly, Brown, Yuka or Reiji. Pick one, and you miss out on the others. The worst offender is Reiji, whom you have to jump through some hoops to recruit in the first place. The game checks to see if you're on the right path to get him when you have the recruit conversation with Yuka, and if you've missed anything out, you get locked into having Yuka on the team instead of Reiji.
    • Additionally, should you choose the wrong dialogue options at certain points in the game (which are not telegraphed in any way), you can easily lock yourself out of the protagonist's ultimate Persona. This means that you've locked yourself out of the protagonist's ultimate skill, which turns the Final Boss into an absolute joke.
  • Persona 2: Innocent Sin: It's possible to miss out on all of the ultimate Personas in this way. The first instance is that if you let Yukino stay behind at Caracol to grieve over her now-dead Love Interest Shunsuke Fujii, then not only does she not get Durga, but she'll die not long after. The second instance is that if you don't bother to check out the four unmarked rooms in Mt. Iwato and leave their chests alone, you cannot get the items holding the Ultimate Personas for Tatsuya, Maya, Lisa, and Eikichi. Finally, if you don't have Jun's initial Persona Hermes equipped on him during the boss fight against the four Longinus Mechs at the Aquarius Temple, then you can't mutate it into his Ultimate Persona, Chronos.
  • The female protagonist's route in Persona 3 Portable has two Social Links that are only available for one month each. If you fail to complete the Moon link in September or the Fortune link in November, they (and the powerful Personas that they enable access to) are gone for good.
    • Even back in FES, it's easy to forget to confirm that you've taken Elizabeth (or Theodore in Portable) out on a date to obtain key items to fuse certain Personas before the quest's deadline.
    • Portable also introduces missions in which civilians wander into Tartarus and must be rescued before the next full moon, after which they will die. Two of the victims are involved with the Hierophant and Hanged Man Social Links — not rescuing them means their links can't be continued for the rest of the playthrough.note  Worse still, making progress on these two links also unlocks the Temperance and Sun links respectively, meaning those can also be permanently missed if their introduction scenes haven't happened yet. Maxing out the former two links and then letting them die has no gameplay drawbacks, but they won't appear during the optional conversations in the epilogue.
  • Persona 4:
    • Certain Social Links will not be accessible after a certain date. Failing to complete Justice or Hierophant before the last kidnapping locks you out of completing them, for instance. Golden changes this up a bit - you get a bit more time to complete Justice and Hierophant so long as you didn't get a bad ending, but there are two bonus Links that have the exact same issue. Aeon gets locked off in December, while Jester has the same cutoff point that Justice and Hierophant did. Failing to complete any of these locks out out of the ultimate Personae of that Arcana. Failing to complete Aeon before you defeat Ameno-Sagiri also prevents you from getting the Bonus Dungeon and the epilogue, while failing Jester prevents you from getting one particularly dark Bad Ending and a few extra scenes. And of course, if you don't know beforehand about these deadlines they will catch you completely off guard (though it's possible to guess that something's going to happen with Aeon because the game gives you extra opportunities to talk to her).
    • If you're looking for achievements, there are two books that you will only get if you hang out with Daisuke and Kou, your friends from the sports club you join. If you max out their link by then, they will be unavailable.
    • The Bonus Boss has relatively strict requirements- complete her Social Link and defeat all six optional bosses by December 24- but there's also an extremely short window of opportunity to unlock it. After you unlock the True Ending and revisit the Velvet Room for the Orb of Sight, you must immediately go back inside, or you will be unable to fight the boss.
  • Persona 5:
    • Unlike previous games, you cannot return to a dungeon again after defeating the boss, as stealing someone's Treasure erases their Palace from existence. This means that any chests you didn't open are now inaccessible.
    • Certain Mementos sidequests can be missed if you forget to read Mishima's texts, preventing you from obtaining the related achievement and 100% completion.
    • The Sun Confidant will not be accessible after the election begins in late November. Justified as he's a politician who's running at the time, and mercifully, he will warn you about it.
    • It's also possible to miss out on the Temperance Confidant if you didn't get it up to a certain point prior to faking your death, as one rank requires you to be at school to get a quest from Kawakami, and since you can't go to school if you're faking your death, there's no way for you to grab this quest, so you can't rank Temperance up.
    • The Strength Confidant needs to be completed before reaching the end of Mementos on the last day, because doing so begins a sequence of plot events that culminate in Justine and Caroline being fused into their true form, Lavenza. Since the Strength Confidant was written around Justine and Caroline specifically, it's obviously not accessible anymore.
  • The Phantasy Star series has a few examples:
    • In Phantasy Star III, there are stores in Cille and Shushoran that sell Star Mist and Moon Dew. But the player can only access the stores in the first generation. These stores are destroyed at the start of the second generation. What makes it worse is that the Dews are ridiculously expensive, even so early in the game, so chances are you won't get them all all without doing hours of grinding to get enough money.
    • In Phantasy Star IV, there are plenty, usually because the dungeons are run by a Load-Bearing Boss:
      • One of the Laser Barriers, a pair of unique lightweight shields, is found in Zio's Fort, which crumbles after he's defeated.
      • The Swift-Helm, one of the only armor pieces that increases agility (and is extremely valuable if you can hang onto it for Gryz at the end), and the Genocyber Claw, the only one of Rika's weapons with a dark elemental instant-death effect, are lost with the Air Castle when it disintegrates.
      • The only way to get Kyra's other Moon Slasher is to defeat a particularly rare enemy in the Garuberk Tower, which crumbles after the second Dark Force is defeated.
      • The Vahal Fort can only be unlocked after you take the Silver Soldier mission from the Hunter's Guild, but that mission can only be taken before retrieving Elsydeon, otherwise someone else will take the job and it's gone for good, along with Wren's best weapon, the Photon Eraser, and his best attack Skill, the Positron Bolt, which is itself part of the game's most powerful Combination Attack, which means you also lose Destruct forever. This is to prevent Script Breaking for when Demi will disconnect herself from Nurvus in order to become able to join the party again.
    • The Bio-Plant is the only place to get a Graphite Crown for Alys (unless you give her Rika's). It's gone for good once you leave the dungeon because Seed self-destructs.
    • It's possible to visit Molcum before Zio burns the place to the ground. You don't actually get to go in, but you can still see some of the Non Player Characters that you'll later see in Tonoe walking around and talk to the guards. Since it requires you to skip going to Zema (which is home to the second major plot point, and the main objective after leaving the Academy at the start of the game), most players aren't going to see it unless they try to recruit Rune early.
    • If, for some reason, you don't take The Ranch Owner mission at the Hunters' Guild, you'll miss out on some fun NPC dialogue in Mile because they all drop dead when the Edge opens.
  • Planescape: Torment is mostly generous in this aspect, but certain examples are still present:
    • The entire post-Sigil portion of the game is surprisingly linear, so anything you missed in those areas becomes this by default. This includes one of the game's most powerful items for a high-level mage (good luck finding it, by the way) and an Infinity +1 Sword. There's also a companion you can recruit during that time that's not only near-impossible to find without consulting a walkthrough, but, if you happened to leave Sigil with a full party, you will have to permanently leave him or another companion behind.
    • Non-plot-critical items left in a ground pile vanish after you leave the area, which can potentially destroy some unique equipment. It doesn't help that your companions tend to drop their inventory items on death (in case you're not able to bring them back).
    • Removing a dead party member from the party renders them permanently unavailable. Normally this shouldn't be a problem since very early in the game you gain the Raise Dead ability... except it's easy to miss the NPC or the conversation branch that triggers it; you can spend a long time in the game before discovering that resurrecting party members is possible at all. Certain companions can, under specific circumstances, give you unique spells, which can thus be lost forever as well.
    • There is a Bonus Boss you can fight in a late-game area that drops an insanely powerful ring when killed. The item is technically not unique note , but the boss is. Triggering this enemy's appearance involves failing an extremely annoying sidequest that is only available during the early portion of the game. There's no explanation for the connection between the two, nor is there a hint that there is more to the outcome.
  • Invoked in Rakenzarn Tales. One of the game's themes is choice and consequences. As such, it's impossible to get everything, recruit all possible party members or fill out the Monster Compendium in a single run.
  • There are several friends, Chinpokomon, and equipment items in South Park: The Stick of Truth that are possible to miss and not be able to get back. Examples include anything in the alien UFO, the government base, several places in the school, Clyde's Fortress, and Mr. Slave's ass.
  • Shadow Hearts:
    • The game switches the entire map from China to Europe around the halfway point. Everything in China? Gone for good, because you never go back. Oh, and you can't go back to places you leave while you're in China, either. And you need to answer the first response all three times while Alice is being interrogated by Dehuai, with no indication the chosen response matters before, during, or after, to unlock an extra dungeon and sidequest that is otherwise — you guessed it — lost forever.
    • Amon fusion. This fusion is obtained from a boss and requires finding a certain item (in the same dungeon, but not located in a chest) before reaching him. If you kill the boss first, you lose access to it. Moreover, the Seraphic Radiance fusion requires Amon and an item from China that is also not located in a chest.
    • In Shadow Hearts: From the New World, no area ever vanishes, preventing you from losing access to the items within. However, there are Snaps - using Johnny's "Snap" ability on enemies to get their picture. For the most part, you can either trade for Snaps you miss or take their pictures in Lovecraft's Pit Fights. But if you fail to snap Malice Killer, Malice Gilbert, Tirawa, Mudopkan, or a Malice Soaker, you'll never have the chance again.
  • Skies of Arcadia averts this for every collectible... except treasure chests. And finding all of them is part of getting Vyse's Infinity Plus One Title in Legends.
    • In the Dreamcast version, Aika's best weapon can only be obtained as a rare drop from a random encounter in the second to last dungeon which disappears once you beat the boss.
    • Two of the best items to equip the Delphinus with, the Sparkling Deck and the Moon Gun, can only be obtained by defeating Gadianos, a monster that is only encountered once in the game and will flee if not defeated quickly enough. The Sparkling Deck in particular boosts the Delphinus' defense by a ludicrous amount (500, compared to the second best deck's 70) and makes the final ship battle against Zelos a joke. Gadianos isn't hard to beat if the player knows what they're doing, but the game gives little indication he's going to flee before he does, or that he's carrying such valuable loot to begin with.
  • SoulBlazer wants you to find these 8 Emblems. If a Dolphin who would've cheerfully given you an Emblem when he was asleep had, regrettably, woken up, then good-bye, Magic Bell.
  • Star Ocean: The Second Story seems to have a lot when the player loses access to the world of the entire first half of the game... but thorough investigation will reveal it is possible to return at the very end. Indeed, there is a Bonus Dungeon there.
    • Both Star Ocean and Star Ocean: The Second Story do contain plenty of things that the player has only one chance to get, mostly in the form of optional characters. Both games only allow certain characters to join the party if other characters are not present - enforced either through specific scripted events, or through the party size limit of eight characters (opportunities to remove characters from the party are very limited). Additionally, Star Ocean has a specific point where you can permanently lose the chance to gain a specific party member by leaving the room - without any indication, before or after, that this has any significant side effects.
    • The Sharp Edge in Star Ocean: The Second Story is a rather weak weapon for Claude that you can only get if you take second place in the fighting tournament, then speak to a specific NPC. Oh, wait, after the tournament was over, you left town BEFORE you spoke to that NPC? Guess what, the sword's lost forever. And did you know that Claude can customize it a few times and end up creating his Infinity +1 Sword? Guess you shouldn't have forgotten to get it!
    • There is a particular hidden witch in Star Ocean: The Second Story you may talk to in an early town, which promptly becomes uninhabitable a few minutes of game play later, and then much later in another town. If spoken to in both locations, she unlocks Indalacio Limiter Off, an alternate form of the last boss. It's a variance due to the fact that most players don't want this to happen, as he will destroy you.
  • Suikoden doubles up on this.
    • Several characters have short windows of opportunity where you can recruit them, and it's not immediately obvious this is the case. The final blacksmith is probably the worst; while he's always there and gives the option to recruit him, you need to take 4 other blacksmiths along. Because the game forces mandatory party members on you most of the time, you actually have very few chances to get him. Save after a certain point and he'll just be there taunting you forever.
    • There's also Pahn's fight against General Teo. It's a very tough fight unless you know about it in advance, and have spent time levelling Pahn up in preparation. As Pahn leaves for a chunk of the game beforehand, and comes back under-levelled and under-equipped, you may well ignore him. Lose the fight? Pahn dies, unceremoniously.
    • The doubling up comes into play because one character dies during the game, and in order to bring them back and get the best ending, you need to have recruited everyone else, and for them to all be alive. And the army battles have perma-death. Make a bad choice and get some random character killed, they're gone. If this or any of the above happen, your chance to resurrect Gremio is gone for good, and so is your shot at the good ending.
  • Super Mario RPG:
    • It's fortunately only a small item that is perfectly fine to miss, but near the beginning there's a part where Toad is walking into the castle. In order to get a certain hidden block, you need to jump onto his head at just the right moment and use the additional height to jump and hit the hidden block. You only get one chance at this, and the only way to know it's there (other than using a guide) is to have an item that you get significantly later in the game.
    • Which in itself is kind of sadistic because the item only lets you know a hidden chest is in the room, it does nothing to help pinpoint the location. The room is rather large too so without using a guide, you'll be left jumping in every inch of that room looking for a hidden chest that is in a place you not only can't possibly reach any longer, but is in a place you have no idea you even CAN reach because you never do anything like that ever before or ever again.
    • Bad Mushrooms are only sold in Seaside Town before you receive the 5th Star Piece. Once that happens, these mushrooms can never be bought or found anywhere in the game again. Thankfully, they're not as useful as other methods to perform what they do (poisoning enemies), so it's not a huge loss.
  • In Sword of Mana, several cases of this include an item only acquired with certain skill sets, characters who when killed while holding your gear, or just leaving you to return later loseing your items (bad if the above skill item) and not going back after most sections of the game, remedied after Dark Lord's castle, but then getting a lost forever on all quests and new items after entering Dime Tower.
  • Tales of Symphonia:
    • The game has quite a few treasure chests that can only be accessed once. As there is a reward for getting them all, this is extremely frustrating. However, this game is basically designed to be played more than once, using the New Game+ feature to carry over your rewards from previous playthroughs; it's literally impossible to get everything in the game in one run, even if you know how.
    • Several sidequests become lost later in the game... That is, until you see the very last cutscene before the final boss, in which not only do the lost sidequests re-open, but at least two new sidequests will open.
    • Those looking to achieve 100% Completion also need to use a Magic Lens once on each and every type of enemy in the game to complete the Monster List and get a reward. This includes bosses, whose Monster List entries are lost if you don't use a Magic Lens on them before you beat them. And Raine has to be the one to scan them (with the exception of a handful of cases where this is impossible), or you don't get the full entry — mercifully, the formal Completion Meter doesn't care about that distinction, but you might.
    • Another ToS sidequest this trope applies to is one involving a set of three optional bosses, the "Sword Dancers." If you haven't beat one by a certain point in the story it disappears forever. Also they have to be beaten in order - if you miss one the ones after it won't ever appear... which screws you out of the prize for beating all three - the Kusanagi Blades, Lloyd's Penultimate Weapon.
    • If you're looking for 100% completion of your item list, Martel help you not miss items in Palmacosta or Ozette. These places become inaccessible after certain portions of the game.
  • In Tales of Vesperia:
    • Most sidequests (and the items, outfits and cities unlocked by completing them) have a very specific time frame in which you can complete them. Once that time's up, it's lost for good. And it doesn't help that there's usually absolutely no indication that a sidequest is even there. So, there are two strategies: Talk to everyone in the town you're in before moving on and hope you'll stumble across something, or just buy the strategy guide. It wouldn't be so bad if every single sidequest in the game was missable. Along with this, an entire dungeon can be missed if you don't go to a certain random location before a key story event. At no other point can you go to this location and get the quest that opens the dungeon. What makes this especially bad is the fact that you have to go to this specific location, at a specific time, twice!
    • The Secret Missions: bonuses awarded for carrying out certain (unhinted) actions during certain (unhinted) boss battles. You have to complete them all for one of Yuri's Titles. In particular, Secret Mission 16 (which is achievable during the boss fight with Estellise) requires you to use an item during the fight that can only be obtained by completing a specific sub event by sleeping in the Mantiac inn BEFORE setting foot in Myorzo. The sub event that gives you the item is just as easy to miss as any other event.
    • Another fun example: the first two steps of a subquest that awards Judith's second-best weapon starts hours before you've even met her. Both steps involve immediately retracing your steps after you've been implictedly told to move forward, and must be done before entering Capua Nor. note 
    • Interestingly, there are a few quest that lampshade the fact that you fucked up and will be unable to finish it, like the "Dark Enforcer" sidequest.
  • Tales of the Abyss is prone to a great deal of Sequence Breaking that will render many skits, titles, costumes, items, weapons and sidequests utterly lost forever. Events need to be triggered during a very small window and chained with secondary and tertiary events that happen well into the game. Miss one step or take the wrong one and it's goodbye Infinity +1 Sword. This is particularly frustrating because 1) events are activated and deactivated seemingly at random, providing no heads-up whatsoever as to their importance, and 2) you're stuck for the most part in a linear quest that allows for very little roaming.
  • Undertale has an interesting variation: certain minor events change depending on what the player did in previous playthroughs. Some of them can only happen the "first" time, so, unless every game file is scrubbed away and replaced with a "clean" one, the player is going to miss them. A notable example is the True Pacifist ending. If the player has ever completed a Genocide run, then the "True Pacifist" will be forever tainted into what is dubbed the "Soulless Pacifist ending". "Forever", as in "even if you delete the game from your old computer and install the game in a different computer, you're still screwed."
  • Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines has several unique items, some useful only for trade and some granting Status Buffs, hidden in locations that can only be reached once as part of a quest. One Collector of the Strange will forewarn the player character to look out for certain items before the related quests; if the PC has already done the quest and gotten lucky, she is uncharacteristically nonplussed to learn that they're carrying around various prized Artifacts of Doom.
  • Valkyrie Profile 2 Silmeria has an interesting variation of this that also combines it with Level Grinding and Guest-Star Party Member: several characters leave the party as the game progresses, but you also get various items when they do depending on their level, with the best rewards if you grind them to level 40 or 45 depending on the character, while you'd normally be around level 20 or so at that point of the story. Most of these items are unique and generally very powerful, effectively making the transition from Level Grinding to Disc-One Nuke.
  • A Very Long Rope to the Top of the Sky:
    • Mint's Cloak can only be obtained by completing the Chain of Deals sidequest to get Mint the best present in Silver Spring. This one seems pretty minor at first, but it's used to craft a very useful item later in the game, so it pays to get it.
    • The Jr. Bandit's Badge and Amos' Book can only be obtained while infiltrating Avishun prison as kids. Fortunately, these are pretty minor accessories and are quickly outclassed.
    • Cupid's Bow, obtained by successfully completing the Match Maker Quest in Dragon's Mouth. If you mess up or continue with the plot before finishing, you don't get another chance until New Game+. Fortunately, this is also quickly outclassed.
    • Before the Major Update, all of the equipment you obtain in dungeons was unique. Each piece of equipment can be used in multiple different Item Crafting recipes, so it was possible to accidentally waste a crucial component for an Infinity +1 Sword, and most ultimate weapons were mutually exclusive.
  • In Wild ARMs 2, Marivel is needed to find the Fab Science Lab, while inside, you battle Bulkogidon and afterwards, you'll see an hourglass-esque object appear, it has Lucifer and Asgard 2 forces inside, you'll have to switch to Marivel and check it to get it, people are known to exit the dungeon without doing this and so the hourglass vanishs preventing you from a 100% game.
  • In Wild ARMs 3, a Bonus Boss needs to have every chest in the world open to fight him. Luckily, no chests were placed in any one-time dungeons. Unfortunately for Wild ARMs 4, which has the same boss, that's not the case.
  • In A Witch's Tale, one of the cards can only be obtained in a one-shot area available in the New Game+.
  • In Wizardry Tale of the Forsaken Land there is an NPC on level 1 of the dungeon who you can play various minigames with, most of which give you very rare and useful items upon completion. Each game is harder and more rewarding than the last and you can replay them as often as you want... until you beat the main quest, at which point the NPC, and for that matter any uncompleted quests in the game become completely inaccessible. However you can now access the secret bonus dungeon, which was right behind the minigame NPC all this time.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles is rather merciful about this; the mission list explicitly tells you quests which quests will expire if you don't complete them by a certain point in the story. That being said, you can still miss out on a bunch of Affinity Coins if you don't hunt down the unique monsters of the Mechonis before completing the core.
  • In Xenoblade Chronicles X, there is nothing in the game that can be missed out on. Even the character who ends up leaving the party for good has his affinity missions be mandatory, so you don't miss out on his skills. However, due to Miiverse shutting down, the two achievements related to the BLADE Reports that can no longer be obtained.
  • The Xenosaga series mostly avoided this in full; despite that you couldn't actually return to most areas after having visited them, there was an Environmental Simulator where you could pick up things. However, this only worked (for the most part) with combat areas; in the third game, for example, there's a small sidequest that can be missed. In addition, the first two games have extremely useful items that either have an extremely low drop rate or have to be stolen from bosses. Xenosaga Episode I also has the e-mails, some of which are very unlikely to be found by playing the game normally. Not only are many of them lost forever once you've gone past them, but missing one often makes it impossible to get later e-mails, as well.

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