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  • None of the character names in 12 Angry Men are revealed until right at the end - even then, only 2 of the 12 main characters are named (and then only surnames are given). In the play the film is based on, no names are ever revealed for any of them. Justified by the fact that the nature of jury duty requires that jurors remain anonymous throughout a trial.
  • In 44 Inch Chest, the kidnapped French lover is referred to only as "Loverboy" by his kidnappers. The main character tells the story of how he beat the man's name out of his cheating wife, but it's never revealed.
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  • 6 Underground: One and Six's real names aren't revealed. All the rest eventually reveal their real (first) names.
  • In Accident, the female member of the gang is never addressed by name (or nickname). In the credits, she is referred to as 'the Woman'.
  • In Almost Famous, the female lead goes by the name of "Penny Lane". At the end of the movie, she reveals that her name is Lady Goodman.
  • In Amusement, the villain is only credited as 'The Laugh'.
  • In Lars Von Trier's Antichrist, the protagonists are only known as He and She. They torture each other in their woodland cabin, "Eden".
  • The Assistant: Jane's Bad Boss, obviously inspired by Harvey Weinstein, is never named and only referred to as "the President." Combines with the fact that he never appears on camera and has only a few fleeting lines of audible dialogue to convey that he's not so much a character as a commentary on sexual predation.
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  • If you recognize (and at one time or another you'll know her by name due to online sites and show biz articles) Lauren Graham (quite recognizable by then by name to many by 2003 when it came out), if you watch through the credits, you'll see that her anonymous Bad Santa bartender has a name, Sue. Credits are roughtly in order, and a bonus, some versions even have clips with the name (the unrated version, titled Badder Santa has the clips with the actors billed on it, anyhow).
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs: Most characters receive no name and are credited with broad descriptions like the Kid, the Cowboy, the Impresario, the Prospector, the Frenchman, etc.
  • In Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Diana Prince is never actually referred to as either Diana or Wonder Woman. The closest anyone comes is when she's called "Ms Prince".
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  • In Big Game, most characters - Oskari's entire family save his father, most of people in National Security Vault, Hazar's mooks - don't get any name, although Chief of Staff is called General Underwood in closing credits.
  • In The Big Lebowski Sam Elliot's cowboy narrator character is never given a name and is simply titled 'The Stranger' in the opening tumbleweed sequence. To be honest, nothing is revealed about him, leading fans to come up with some very interesting ideas.
  • In the novel and film Birdy, Birdy's real name is never given.
  • The main characters from Blonde in Black Leather.
  • In John Woo's Broken Arrow, despite the trials and tribulations they faced together and the strong bond that grew between them, the two protagonists don't learn each other's names until the very last scene.
  • The protagonist in Bunraku is simply known as "The Drifter".
  • The man who owns the Death Factory in The Butchers is not addressed by name and is only identified as 'the Collector' in the credits.
  • Two of the girls in the college with Ashton Kutcher (Evan) and Ethan Suplee (Thumper) in The Butterfly Effect are not named in the film, the first being one in the pool and right after it, in Evan and best buddy Thumper's (NOT to be confused with Bambi's character). First one (Jaqueline Stewart) is named Gwen and the second (Tara Wilson) is named Heidi.
  • In Canadian Bacon, the president of America, despite being a pretty important character, is never named.
  • The love interest(s?) in Cemetery Man (all three of her), only called "She" in the credits.
  • The father in A Christmas Story is referred to as The Old Man, even in the credits.
  • Clara: Clara's last name is never revealed. She's only called by her first name.
  • In Closet Land, Alan Rickman and Madeleine Stowe are credited simply as "Interrogator" and "Victim".
  • The Crow: Top Dollar (played by Michael Wincott), Myca (played by Bai Ling) and Grange (played by Tony Todd) are never named in the film. Similarly, the gang members who kill Eric and Shelly are known only by their nicknames (Tin-Tin, T-Bird, Funboy and Skank).
  • The Dark Crystal: Thra is never actually named in the film, and is simply referred to as "the world" or "our world" by the characters.
  • In The Dark Knight Rises, Selina Kyle's friend Jen is never referred to by first name on-screen.
  • Every single character in Day Night Day Night. The protagonist is referred to in the credits as "She", although she rehearses a fake name in one scene.
  • Deadgirl: The titular zombie's name and back story remain a mystery throughout the film.
  • The serial killer in the first Dirty Harry movie is only ever referred to as the Scorpio Killer, with no real name. In the credits he is called "Killer". In the novelization, however, he's named Charles Davis.
  • The Driver from Drive, played by Ryan Gosling. Likewise in the original, The Driver, in which no one is named, not even in the credits.
  • Duel: In the original story by Richard Matheson, the truck driver is named "Keller", but in the film he is nameless as well as faceless.
  • The eponymous antagonist of Dust Devil has no real name to speak of, though Wendy calls him "Texas" at one point.
  • Nearly everyone in Eagles Gathered, with the exception of Bob the (maybe) angel.
  • Lampshaded in The Earrings of Madame de.... Andre and Louise's last name is never mentioned. Once someone forgets it, once Louise is cut off by some noise when saying it, and two times their name on a card is obscured by a bit of scenery.
  • Max's foreman at the factory in Elysium.
  • Lampshaded in the credits to Eraserhead.
  • Escape from New York: The president is referred to by characters and in the credits as "the President."
  • In EuroTrip, Fred Armisen's character is listed in the credits as the "Creepy Italian Guy".
  • The Everlasting Secret Family doesn't name anybody in the film except for the chauffeur (Eric).
  • Three of the four major characters in Faster (Driver, Killer and Cop) are never referred to by name. Cop's real name shows up briefly on a report Cicero (the fourth major character) prints out, but no one on-screen uses it.
  • In Feast, characters are given titles ("Hero", "Loser", etc) by caption, and never otherwise named.
  • Edward Norton's character in Fight Club is never given a name. Only his alternate personality gets one, and the narrator explicitly states at one point that it's not his name. The DVD chapters call him "Jack" based off a scene involving Reader's Digest, which fans sometimes use as well, and the HBO closed captions use "Rupert," one of the alias he puts on his nametag when surfing support groups.
  • In Sergio Leone's spaghetti Westerns, Clint Eastwood's character's name is never given — rather, the other characters in the films refer to him by nicknames such as Joe or Blondie. Eastwood's character may be regarded as one of the archetypical examples of unnamed heroes, to the extent that his character is widely known as "The Man With No Name." In fact, his character is so ambiguous that people continue to debate whether he was portraying the same character in all three films to this day. This is a reference to Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo, which A Fistful of Dollars is a remake of. In Yojimbo, the main character is asked for his name and responds with what he sees out of the nearest window and his age: "Mulberry Field Thirtysomething".
  • In Forrest Gump, the first name of Forrest's mother is never mentioned. She's identified as "Mrs. Gump" in the credits. Her first name is not mentioned in the original novel either.
  • Bill Paxton's character in Frailty is only ever referred to as "Dad" or "Mr. Meiks", even in the credits.
  • The President from G.I. Joe: Retaliation. Even in the credits, he's simply listed as "President".
  • In A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, the vampire protagonist is never named, and is credited only as "The Girl".
  • The Girl From Monday: The female alien simply answers that she's "Nobody" when people ask her name, and that remains the only thing they ever call her in the film.
  • The Mutos from Godzilla (2014) aren't given specific names, but are just referred to as "the male" and "the female" of their species.
  • In the indie romcom Good Dick the two main characters are never named, and are credited as "The Man" and "The Woman."
  • Hannie Caulder: Whatever name the Preacher has is not known.
  • Hellraiser: None of the cenobites have official names in any of the movies, including the lead cenobite who has been dubbed Pinhead as a Fan Nickname. Creator Clive Barker did not like the name, saying that it was undignified. It wasn’t until the third film (when a backstory for the character was given) that it was revealed that the name he had when he was human was Elliott Spenser. Barker has stated that his actual name as a Cenobite will be revealed in the upcoming novel The Scarlet Gospels.
  • The viewpoint character of Hero, played by Jet Li, goes by "Nameless".
  • The Hidden: Neither the evil or good alien parasites in the story reveal their true names. The good one only adopts a human cover identity to make it easier to conduct its work.
  • The Kurgan in Highlander is mainly known to the other Immortals by his ethnicity, although he does use aliases. Similar is true of the Egyptian, although fans remember him by the alias "Ramirez."
  • In another Clint Eastwood movie, High Plains Drifter, you also don't know his name. Sometimes referred to as the Stranger, you do figure out who it is at the end, though what you figure might not be the same as the person next to you figures.
  • Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks) as she appears in the entire "The Hunger Games" franchise isn't named, at least in the first one (2012).
  • In I Bought a Vampire Motorcycle, the priest who joins the main characters to destroy the titular beast is never named, despite being a major character.
  • In In the Line of Fire, the President of the United States is only referred to as "the President" or by his Secret Service-given codename "Traveler." The First Lady is also unnamed.
  • James Bond
    • The name of Bond's boss M is never revealed (he has been called "Miles"). M is the character's codename. James Bond teases the audience with The Unreveal in Casino Royale (2006), being cut off by M just as he's about to speak her name. At the end of Skyfall, in a Freeze-Frame Bonus, her name is given as Olivia Mansfield, a pun on 'I live in a man's field', very fitting for this M. In the novels, the first M's name is given as Admiral Sir Miles Messervy and the second M (the current one) as Barbara Mawdsley.
    • Miss Moneypenny's first name has not been revealed in the old continuity, but in the Craig reboot, at the end of Skyfall her full name is revealed as Eve Moneypenny.
    • You Only Live Twice: The Bond Girl is not even given a name during the film's duration. It's not until the credits that's she's listed as Kissy Suzuki.
    • Blofeld's Persian cat, who appears in multiple Bond films, has never been named. The cat's usually just referred to as "the pussy".
  • Julia X, Kevin Sorbo's character's name is never given. The credits list him as 'The Stranger', and a press report during the opening credits calls him 'The Brand Killer'. Ving Rhames character is only identified as 'The Man'.
  • Kill Bill - Part I included a ridiculous amount of obfuscation around the Bride's name, to the point of bleeping it when it was spoken (however, her name is still visible on her driver's license at one point on her airplane ticket). In Part II we find out that Bill calls her "Kiddo" because that actually is her surname, and that her first name is "Beatrix"...which makes the "silly rabbit" bit in Part I make slightly more sense.
  • The Fat and Skinny pair of frat boys in Killer Party who act as Those Two Guys are never named. In the credits they are identified as 'Fat Bee-Boy' and 'Skinny Bee-Boy'.
  • In Kingsman: The Secret Service, we never find out Merlin's real name.
  • The young man in Knife in the Water is never named.
  • In Labyrinth, Sarah's stepmother is never given a first name. Fans eventually dubbed her Karen until the spin-off Manga series Return to Labyrinth revealed her name to be Irene. Some people still use Karen though.
  • The Tall Thug in Last Train to Freo, who is only referred to as such once. Everyone else gets a first name only.
  • Daniel Craig's character in Layer Cake is never referred to by name, and he is identified only as "XXXX" in the credits. He hangs a bit of a lampshade on this at the end when, after listing the names of everyone whose death is either seen or referred to, looks at the camera and states, "My name? If you knew that you'd be as clever as me."
  • In the 1965 film version of Lord Jim, the bandit leader is only known as "The General".
  • In Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, Dr. Dealgood introduces Max into The Thunderdome arena as "The Man with No Name" given that he's arrived in Bartertown out of the wasteland, and so no-one knows who he is. This is a lampshading how Max (while having a name) has a similar role as the Man With No Name (at least in the second and third movies).
  • In The Matrix films, many of the programs are referred to by title rather than name. These include the Oracle, the Keymaker, the Trainman, the Merovingian, the Architect and the Twins. As they are programs rather than people, those probably are actually their names. The names that all of the human protagonists had while plugged in the Matrix aren't fully revealed. Only their hacker nickname/unplugged name (Morpheus, Trinity, etc...). Neo used to be Thomas A. Anderson, Cypher's surname is Reagan. Even the "freeborn" humans of Zion only go by their first (nick?) names (Tank, Dozer, and Zee). That's because those are their real names. The names they have in the Matrix could be considered to be no more real to them then anything else in the Matrix.
  • A Matter of Faith: Both Kamen and Portland are only addressed by their last names.
  • The Mayor of the City of Frank in Osmosis Jones is only ever referred to as 'Mayor Phleghmming'; a first name is never given. He does have a Fan Nickname, though: Charles.
  • The Captain in Meet Dave is only ever known by his rank and is never given any other name. However, in the track listing for the movie's soundtrack, he is referred to as "Mini Dave" due to his appearance being near-identical to his humanoid starship's.
  • For most of the three films of the Mexico Trilogy, the main character is referred to as "El Mariachi". Even in Desperado, where he faces off against his brother, we only hear him called "Manito", which more-or-less translates as "little brother".
  • In The Mummy Trilogy, Ardeth Bey's name isn't revealed until the sequel (it is sort of All There in the Manual though, because various articles as well as the director's commentary use his name).
  • In the Spaghetti Western My Name Is Nobody, the main character's name is never revealed. He is in fact referred to as "Nobody" throughout the whole film.
  • In The Naked Gun (and its first sequel), several characters are referred to in the credits not even by name or nickname, but by their only spoken line in the picture (e.g., "Here, you can use my radio mike," and "Ya dumb broad!"; maybe the best-known of them would be "It's Enrico Palazzo!", played by Mark Holton of Pee-wee's Big Adventure fame).
  • Several of the major characters in The Naked Witch are not named, including the protagonist (The Student) and the antagonist (The Witch).
  • Tatooine was not named in A New Hope.
  • The mysterious "student" in The Ninth Gate is only called The Girl in the credits. She's (probably) Satan.
  • In No Country for Old Men, the man who hires Wells and who is implied to be the mastermind behind the drug deal that drives the plot is never named and is credited simply as "The Man who hires Wells."
  • The two main characters of Once are never named; they are listed in the cast as "the Guy" and "the Girl."
  • Also, in Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West, Charles Bronson's character is only referred to as "The Man with the Harmonica" (or just simply "Harmonica" in the end credits).
  • In Osama, no character in the movie is named, except the main character's male friend, who is probably-not-coincidentally the one who gives "Osama" her famous alias.
  • In Paint Your Wagon, Eastwood's character (which wasn't in the original show) is known only as "Pardner"...until the final scene, wherein he identifies himself as Sylvester Newel. ("Just one 'l'.")
  • And in Pale Rider he is simply known as Preacher. Seeing a pattern yet?
  • In Michelangelo Antonioni's The Passenger, co-star Maria Schneider is credited simply as "The Girl".
  • The antagonists of The People Under the Stairs are never named. In the credits they are listed simply as "Man" and "woman".
  • Although the main character is called by dozens of nicknames throughout The Perfect Sleep, the Narrator's name is never given. At the end, Porphyria barely audibly whispers "Lyovshka", which is the diminutive for Lyov, the Russian form of Leon.
  • In The Pillow Book, only Nagiko, Jerome and Hoki have names. All other characters have "functional" titles: The Publisher, The Father etc.
  • The Spaniard in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.
  • The Postman: Most of the characters (including the titular Postman) are not referred to with anything except just one name (first, last or nicknames).
  • The Lady in The Quick and the Dead is a gender-flipped Man With No Name. A flashback to when she was a child reveals her first name is Ellen.
  • In Raiders of the Lost Ark, Toht is named in the ending credits, but his name is never mentioned within the actual film.
  • In The Film of the Book Rebecca: the main character is never called anything but "Mrs. DeWinter" on screen.
  • Despite being one of the most popular characters and occasionally playing the Mr. Exposition role in Repo! The Genetic Opera is never actually given a name. He's called Graverobber by fans because he digs up graves to extract black-market Zydrate from corpses. Amber refers to him as "Graverobber" during "Zydrate Anatomy"
  • In Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, all of the thieves are given colors as aliases: Mr. White, Mr. Orange, Mr. Brown, Mr. Blue, Mr. Blonde and Mr. Pink. We only learn the real names of Mr. White, Mr. Blonde, and Mr. Orange.
  • In Rogue Assassin (titled War in the U.S.), Jet Li plays a hitman known only as Rogue. It's not even his own alias, but that of the hitman that killed his family - he killed the real Rogue, faked his own death and assumed that identity to track down those responsible.
  • The tire is never named in Rubber but the actors call it a "him." The American trailer named him Robert.
  • The colonel from Run Wild, Run Free is credited as "The Moorsman."
  • In The Seven Year Itch, the name of Marilyn Monroe's character is never revealed. In the credits, she is called The Girl. Strangely, the protagonist never even asks her for her name, and refers to her as "Miss Whoever-You-Are" the one time he directly addresses her.
  • Several characters in Shandra: The Jungle Girl are never identified. The woman Karen is sleeping with is only listed as 'Gorgeous blonde' in the credits, and the stripper is listed as 'Stripper'.
  • Shoot 'em Up. 'Smith' is obviously not the protagonists' real name; the Big Bad even lampshades him as The Man With No Name who rides into town on a pale horse. The Dragon thinks he's worked out who Smith is, but isn't completely sure right up to the end.
  • Siren (2010): The dead sailor (who, despite his designation, does play a major role in events) is only identified in the credits as 'Dead Sailor'.
  • In Six Degrees of Separation, we never find out the real name of "Paul" the Con Artist who claimed to be Sidney Poitier's son.
  • The Mysterious Woman in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004). Although since she's a robot, she may not even have a name.
  • Sleeping Dogs main character is referred to with his last name Smith, or "Smithy" for a nickname, while major characters Bullen and Jesperson are never referred to by first names either. Though in a Freeze-Frame Bonus when Smith's police file appears, it shows that his first name is Martin.
  • In the wuxia film Soul of the Sword, the protagonist refers to himself as a "Swordsman With No Name." He later abandons the plan to triumphantly reveal his name to the world after his girlfriend points out he has a very common, plebian name.
  • In Space Jam the Nerdlucks/Monstars are never given names in the film, although their names are given in the closing credit; they are according to merchandise Pound (the orange one), Blanko (the purple one), Bang (the green one), Bupkis (the blue one), and Nawt (the red one).
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock:
    • Commander Kruge never has his name spoken; his troops only address him as "My Lord" or "Sir", and he flat-out refuses to tell Kirk his name. He is named in the book and record adaptation, though.
    • The hapless transporter lieutenant that Uhura refers to as "Mr. Adventure" is never given a proper name in the film, and is credited by that nickname. He does get named Lt. Heisenberg in the novelization, though.
  • The galaxy in the Star Wars franchise. Also Yoda's species was deliberately never named (unlike every other alien in the setting), even when other members show up in the EU.
  • Sucker Punch: Most of the characters only have nicknames to go upon, even the doctor.
  • In Sullivan's Travels, the heroine is never given a name and appears in the credits as "the girl".
  • In the classic silent film Sunrise the archetypal characters are known only as The Man, The Wife, and The Woman from the City.
  • To underline the fantasy object status of The Sure Thing, she's never once referred to by her real name (even in the credits her character's called "The Sure Thing").
  • Swashbuckler: The Lute Player and the Woman of Dark Visage are never addressed by name in the movie, and are only identified by those designations in the credits.
  • Tales of an Ancient Empire: The character played by Lee Hensley is only credited as "The Stranger". All of the other characters are only addressed by one name.
  • None of the cyborgs in the Terminator franchise have names. Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles subverted this by naming the lead T-888 "Cromartie" and the unknown-model female "Cameron."
  • In That Thing You Do!, the name of the Fake Band's bassist (played by Ethan Embry) is never spoken on screen; the end credits refer to him as "T.B. Player" and "the Bass Player."
  • In Top Gun, Goose's actual name is never mentioned onscreen. Everyone, even his wife, just calls him Goose. His real name, which is seen on a box, was Nick Bradshaw.
  • Roddy Piper's character in They Live is never referred to by name. According to the credits, his name is "Nada," which is Spanish for "nothing".
  • Twilight Zone: The Movie: In "It's a Good Life", Anthony's fake mother and father are not named.
  • Tommy Chong's character in Up in Smoke is referred to only as "Man" for most of the movie, in the credits, and in track titles from subsequent Cheech and Chong albums. (His parents do call him Anthony in the opening scene, though.)
  • In Valhalla Rising, Mads Mikkelsen's mute character is dubbed "One Eye" (because he has, you guessed it, one eye) by a young boy who becomes his companion. (It is never explained whether he cannot speak or chooses not to, but at any rate, he never refutes this title.)
  • V from V for Vendetta never reveals his name, even V he only claims as V is something one may call him. It turns out this comes from "V" for "5" per Roman numerals, the number of the cell he was kept in. Also it's implied that he doesn't even remember what his name was.
  • Violet & Daisy: James Gandolfini's character is never named, while Daisy mentions they didn't learn it. He's just "The Guy" in the credits. Violet and Daisy are never referred to with anything except these names. Neither's last name is revealed in the film.
  • The main character in Waterworld has no name, being credited as The Mariner. This is the subject of a Badass Boast by the small girl who informs us that "He has no name so death can't find him".
  • Two characters from The Wailing are never given real names. The woman who appears to Jong-goo is only named Moo-Myeong, which means "Lady with no name" in Korean, while the ermit she accuses of being responsible for all the recent deaths in Goksung is only referred to as "the stranger" or "the Japanese man". Appropriately, both turn out to be supernatural beings. Probably.
  • In Welp, while the Wild Child Kai is named, his master is never referred by any title either by Kai or the Scouts they are terrorizing.
  • In Martin Scorsese's feature debut Who's That Knocking At My Door, the love interest of Harvey Keitel is simply named "The Girl".
  • The 2007 horror film Wind Chill never reveals the two main characters' names; their actors are even credited as playing "Girl" and "Guy" at the end.
  • In Withnail & I, the 'I' of the title is never named onscreen, although the screenplay refers to him as 'Marwood'. In the credits, he appears right after "Withnail...", listed as "...And I"
  • Despite being the second most important character in the film, the titular woman in Woman in the Dunes is never given a name.
  • The narrator in The World of Kanako is never given any name.
  • X-Men: First Class:
    • The government agent sent to liase with Xavier's team is only ever known as the Man in Black and is never given a name, not even in the credits.
    • Riptide's real name and mutant name are never mentioned in the film.
  • Zombieland has no names (until the end). Before the Zombie Apocalypse hits, the main character and his neighbor refer to each other by their apartment numbers. Afterwards, the main characters use their hometowns as names to avoid emotional attachment.


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