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Nightmare Fuel / Lilo & Stitch

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https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/stitch.JPG
He does not come in peace!
Lilo & Stitch: The Series has its own Nightmare Fuel page (with examples involving experiments found throughout the franchise).
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  • Stitch's original sentence: life in exile on a desert asteroid. Why he was punished with that rather than capital punishment is ambiguous (the United Galactic Federation doesn't have the death penalty, he's too tough and durable to execute, such a sentence is considered a Fate Worse than Death, etc.), but the idea of spending the rest of your life confined to a barren rock in the darkness of space is goddamn scary, and comes off as pretty cruel even for somebody as destructive as Stitch.
  • After it's confirmed that Stitch will crash on land rather than in water, the Grand Councilwoman says that Earth has to be gassed. Granted, her tone indicates that she's not happy about it (implying a Godzilla Threshold or something along those lines), but she still very nearly condemned a planet to death just to get rid of one (admittedly very dangerous) criminal. And the only thing that stays her hand is the fact that Earth is a protected wildlife reserve.
    • Think on the implications of that line. The council apparently has the means to destroy all life on an entire planet, and is willing to use it if they believe things to be desperate enough. If a planet's population is sapient, but not advanced enough for long-distance space travel, then a possible gassing would be utterly terrifying for them to go through.
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  • Jumba gets a surprisingly creepy moment at the end of the scene where he's recruited to recapture Stitch. After the Grand Councilwoman leaves, Jumba, clearly relishing the thought of his creation causing mass destruction like he was programmed to, says the following line:
    Jumba: So tell me, my little one-eyed one; on what poor, pitiful, defenseless planet has my monstrosity been unleashed?
  • The scene where Stitch crash lands is pretty frightening, at least at first. It starts with him shrouded in darkness, giving an Evil Laugh while he stands in front of a crater containing the burning remains of the police cruiser he stole.
  • Stitch's near-drowning experience after he gets attacked by Jumba and Pleakley while surfing.
  • It may not seem to have this, at first glance, but during the movie Lilo is taken away by Cobra Bubbles, and then abducted by Captain Gantu. Huge Mood Whiplash in the finalized theatrical version.
  • And there is the deleted scene of Jumba's attack that is NF in itself.
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    • To put the entry into better context, the original version of the sequence where Jumba attacks the Pelekai household is still relatively the same in terms of structure and what happens; what pushes it into Nightmare Fuel territory is the differences between what's seen in the above link and the final version of the scene.
      • The tone of the scene is a lot less comedic than in the final cut, almost entirely devoid of the insults that Stitch and Jumba fire off at each other and the goofier elements of the fight, putting Jumba's attack in a far more sinister light.
      • Jumba is way more trigger-happy with his plasma gun and seems almost poised to outright kill Stitch than capture him, and when Stitch tackles him moments later, he almost accidentally hits Lilo. The final cut changes this, making Jumba lose the plasma gun for most of the scene; this also means the scene where he shoots out the ceiling to bring Stitch back down to his level is changed to him using plates as an improvised weapon to achieve the same purpose.
      • While Jumba continually goes Off-Model throughout the entire movie, in this scene, he's shown to stay consistently on model the whole time, making him a lot more imposing and threatening; by extension, Jumba also comes off as a lot more deranged and willing to get his hands dirty, even if it means Lilo may become a potential casualty.
      • Jumba throws a Swiss Army Weapon...that features things like a tube of toothpaste, a comb and tweezers in the final cut of the movie. In the original cut, however, it was a full-bore Swiss Army Weapon with several deadly tools installed on it clearly meant to maim and torture someone (and comparing the two versions side-by-side, there's actually more tools than in the final version) and Jumba nearly kills Pleakley with it by accident.
      • Stitch's stunt with the chainsaw ended the moment Jumba hits him with a plunger, which continues to stay stuck on his head for the remainder of the scene, with the chainsaw simply disappearing afterward. The original cut features said chainsaw continuing to run and very nearly killing or severely injuring Lilo. She's only saved by Pleakley running in to rescue her and get her out of the house before she unlucky enough to get caught in the crossfire; if not for that, it's very possible Lilo could've gotten killed.
      • The ending to the scene is also completely different; the final cut features Stitch finally getting a hold of the plasma gun, only for Jumba to jam it with a carrot and force it to overload and explode following a game of hot potato. The original version instead ends with Stitch ripping the stove free of its gas line and eggs Jumba on with it...who, figuring he's got Stitch cornered and the gas is simply an empty threat, he pulls the trigger, which causes the gas to detonate and completely destroy the house, with the scene ending on a lingering shot of the burning remains of Lilo's house.
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