Follow TV Tropes

Following

Names The Same / Real Life 0 to F

Go To

    open/close all folders 

    General 

    # 
  • Several numbers on the Interstate Highway System are duplicated. In three of the four cases, this is because one of the two formerly bore a different designation that was rendered obsolete in The '70s, and there was no way to fit the highway into the Interstate numbering grid system (even routes run east-west with higher numbers to the north; odd routes run north-south with higher numbers to the east; major routes are multiples of 5) without duplication:
    • Interstate 76. A freeway running from Denver to the Nebraska Panhandle, and a second unrelated one running from Cleveland to Philadelphia. The duplication is because the former route was originally designated as I-80S (indicating a southern spur of I-80).
    • Interstate 84. One runs from Portland, Oregon to Salt Lake City, Utah; the other, from Scranton, Pennsylvania to near Worcester, Massachusetts. The former was previously designated I-80N for similar reasons.
    • Interstate 86. The western one is a very short stub in Idaho running from rural Decla to Pocatello, connecting interstates 84 and 15 and originally bearing the designation I-15W. The eastern one is a designation begun in 1999 which, when complete, will run along the New York/Pennsylvania border from Erie, PA to Woodbury, NY. A third Interstate 86 designation previously existed from Hartford, CT to Worcester, MA, but it was renumbered as part of the eastern Interstate 84 when the latter's originally-planned routing into Rhode Island was scuttled.
    • Interstate 88. The western incarnation runs across the top of Illinois from the Quad Cities to Chicago, while the eastern one runs diagonally across eastern New York state from Johnson City to Schenectady. Unlike the other three examples, the duplicate numbers exist because of Loophole Abuse: the Illinois freeway was built to Interstate standards, but because it bore only a state route designation, it had to carry a maximum 55 MPH speed limit due to a wording in a speed limit law. As a result, the state petitioned to upgrade it to an Interstate to raise its speed limit, and chose 88 because it was the only number that fit in the grid.
  • Relatedly, many of the three-digit spur and loop routes occur more than once across the Interstate Highway System, but this is rarely an issue as they're limited to one per state. For instance, there are four different Interstate 275s, but each goes through a different state: one loops through Tampa, one connects to downtown Knoxville, one is a beltway around Cincinnati, and one is a western bypass of metro Detroit.
Advertisement:

    A 
  • Tony Abbott is the Prime Minister of Australia and the author of The Secrets of Droon series.
  • In 1969, Lew Alcindor became Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who is currently the NBA's all-time scoring leader. In 1995, Shannon Shah became Karim Abdul-Jabbar, who had a decent four-year NFL career with the Miami Dolphins. Both attended UCLA in college and wore the number 33 in the pros, and that, and the extreme similarities in their names led Kareem to sue Karim in 1998. As a result, the man born Shannon Shah has been going by the name Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar since 2000.
  • Robert Adam is either an 18th-century Scottish neoclassical architect or a currently active British neoclassical architect. Got that?
  • Amy Adams, as well as being an acclaimed American redheaded actress and singer, is also a successful New Zealand politician (the MP for Selwyn as of March 2016).C
  • There's Bryan Adams, the singer/musician, and Brian Adams, a late pro wrestler best known as Crush from Demolition.
  • It's a generic name, but John Adams has done it all. He was the second President of the United States, and also the sixth, an obscure contestant from American Gladiators, a revered minimalist composer, a participant in the Mutiny on the Bounty, the astronomer (John Couch Adams) who using mathematics predicted the existence of the planet Neptune, and has probably held many other interesting occupations.
  • Scott Adams is the name of either the cartoonist of Dilbert or a series of old text adventure games.
  • From 2001 to 2015, the American Hockey League had two teams named the Admirals – Norfolk and Milwaukee. They entered the AHL a year apart from each other (Norfolk was first, arriving in 2000). That's because the two teams were originally part of different leagues. Milwaukee came into the league from the International Hockey League when it folded, Norfolk moved up from the ECHL when its City Council threatened to revoke their lease if they didn't move to the highest level of minor pro hockey.
    • Now partially averted. Since the 2015–16 season, there have been Milwaukee and Norfolk Admirals, but they're in different leagues. The AHL went through a major reorganization that saw a total of seven teams move. Five of these were moves to California by teams affiliated with NHL Pacific Division teams, with one of them being the AHL version of the Norfolk Admirals (now the San Diego Gulls). The ECHL's Bakersfield Condors moved east to become the "new" version of the Norfolk Admirals. Milwaukee remains in the AHL.
  • Is Jason Alexander a comic actor or the guy whose marriage to Britney Spears got annulled in 55 hours?
  • The Boxing tournament in the 2016 Summer Olympics sees the return of Muhammad Ali - although he's representing Great Britain instead of the United States.
    • A contestant on Total Wipeout was also named Muhammad Ali, which Richard Hammond had great fun with.
  • Rick Allen is the drummer for Def Leppard famous for continuing to play even after losing an arm. Rick Allan was a DJ for Toronto's CHUM-FM. He left before the band made it big. However, he did become rather famous around the same time as the band as a comedic actor using his real name: Rick Moranis.
  • Derek Anderson is a black NBA wingman who was once one of the few solid citizens on the Portland "Jail Blazers" of the early 2000s, and a white NFL quarterback better-known for snapping at reporters than anything he did on the field.
  • Ian Anderson the lead singer/flautist in Jethro Tull, folk guitarist and editor of Roots magazine Ian A. Anderson, soccer player Ian Anderson, or Scottish extreme right-wing politician and National Front member Ian Anderson? (There was a small controversy when quotes from the fourth example were attributed to the first example)
  • Jamal Anderson was a 7th-round draft pick of the Atlanta Falcons; he was a running back whose solid career was cut short by knee injuries. Jamaal Anderson was a 1st-round draft pick of those same Falcons; he is a defensive lineman whose career never took off.
  • Another common name, but John Anderson has been a U.S. Presidential candidate, a country singer, a baseball player, an ESPN anchor, and a character actor.
    • And none of these should be confused with Yes lead singer Jon Anderson (whose name was originally spelled with an "h").
  • Ken Anderson could be a former NFL quarterback, a former NBA point guard (actually Kenny), or a wrestler known under his real name in TNA/Impact Wrestling, and previously in WWE as MISTER...KENNEDY! KENNEDY!
  • Paul Thomas Anderson is an American film director who mostly directs drama films, such as Magnolia and There Will Be Blood. Do not confuse him with Paul W.S. Anderson, a British film director who directs science fiction and action movies, such as the Resident Evil series. Nor with science fiction writer Poul Anderson.
  • Ant and Dec are a pair of creators, but do they have a TV show or a Youtube channel (2 out of 3 members)note  together?
  • There's Mark Antony the Roman statesman and general, and then there's Marc Anthony the American singer and songwriter.
    • And wrestling writer Marc "Fozzie Bear" Anthony of TJRWrestling.com
  • Apple Corps (pronounced apple core) versus Apple Inc. Since they were originally in totally different lines of business, this recycling of a trademark wasn't a problem — until Apple Inc. decided to move into computer music, whereupon the older Apple objected.
  • Neil Armstrong was the first human to walk on the Moon. Neill Armstrong was a player and coach in the NFL and Canadian Football League.
  • There are two association football teams named Arsenal F.C. The Argentine team is usually referred to as Arsenal de Sarandí to avoid confusion with the English team.
  • David Axelrod is the name of an an avant-garde jazz musician, the senior advisor to Barack Obama, and a poet from Massachusetts.

    B 
  • Nicklas Bäckström is a Swedish forward currently playing for the Washington Capitals. Niklas Bäckström is a Finnish goaltender currently playing for the Minnesota Wild.
  • Bach, the classical composer. You will almost always refer to Johann Sebastian. But good luck if you mean any of his family, who a) bred like rabbits and b) almost all were musicians. Somewhen first names were out and they had to resort to ordinals. (And what Bach is for music, Bernoulli is for science.)
  • Richard Bachman was a Pen Name for Stephen King and years later, an ice hockey goalie - who decided to just enjoy the connection wearing The Shining-inspired masks (helps this Bachman, like the Overlook, is from Colorado).
    • There's also Richard "Dickie" Bachmann, a former Philippine Basketball Association player.
  • Does the name Francis Bacon make you think of Empiricism or creepy, but awesome, post WWII, British paintings?
    • They were in fact related.
  • Bill Bailey is an English comedian who shares his name with a singer better known as W. Axl Rose.
  • Similar sports team naming kerfuffles erupted when, for instance, the Canadian Football League tried to name an expansion team the Baltimore Colts a decade after the NFL team by that name had fled to Indianapolis. The ensuing lawsuit caused the expansion team to literally play without a name for its inaugural season before gaining the Stallions moniker the next year, though they would move to Montreal and become the Alouettes the year after that.
  • James Baldwin was an early 20th century philosopher, a Vietnam War era general, a novelist, and a baseball player.
  • The Peter Banks of Eighties One-Hit Wonder After the Fire (most famous for its English-language version of the Falco hit "Der Kommissar") is not to be confused with the late founding Yes guitarist Peter Banks.
  • Tony Banks: Genesis keyboardist, former NFL quarterback, or a (late) British member of Parliament?
  • Which Trevor Bannister: The one from Are You Being Served? Or the one from Bad Boys Blue?
  • Professional poker player David Baker has one World Series of Poker bracelet and career tournament winnings of more than $3.1 million. Professional poker player David Baker has two WSOP bracelets and career tournament winnings of almost $2.8 million. The first Baker has given himself the nickname "ODB", for "Original David Baker" — because he's older. The younger Baker goes by the nickname "Bakes" to differentiate himself.
  • Tom Baker is the name of the British actor best known as the fourth Doctor, the American actor who starred in Andy Warhol's "I, a Man", and also the name of a mastering engineer who has worked on material by Nine Inch Nails amongst other bands. There are quite a few others as well, perhaps unsurprisingly, since both "Tom" and "Baker" are pretty common names.
  • Ashleigh Ball, the singer of Hey Ocean! and the voice of Applejack and Rainbow Dash, shares her name with a British field hockey player.
  • In a non-person-related example, Baptist Health is the name of no fewer than five hospital networks in the U.S.:
  • Dean Barker: a sailor from New Zealand, a racecar driver from the UK, or a political journalist from the US?
  • Hank Bauer was the name of a right fielder for baseball's New York Yankees in the '50s, and a running back for football's San Diego Chargers in the '70s.
  • Dave Bautista: American wrestler and actor of Filipino descent, or Filipino basketball player from the late '90s? It's too bad the latter's basketball career was cut short due to injuries, because back in the day, he could rebound like an Animal.
  • In another non-person-related example, there are two different off-price retail chains in the south both called Bealls (pronounced "bells"): one based in Texas and one based in Florida. The latter goes by Burke's in areas where their markets overlap.
  • Billy Beane is the former utility outfielder who became the general manager of the Oakland Athletics famous for the analytical, statistics-driven approach he used to find talent in order to compensate for his small-market team's limited resources. Billy Bean is also a former journeyman outfielder who is one of two former Major League Baseball players to come out as gay (the late Glenn Burke is the other). And another Billy Bean had a career that had little to do with baseball (he was a jazz guitarist).
  • Paul Bearer & the Hearsemen, a 1960s band, and Paul Bearer, The Undertaker's manager. Both are obviously puns on "pallbearer".
  • There are two different British musicians named Andy Bell. The first is the frontman for the shoegazing band Ride and he was also the bassist for Oasis for several years. The other is the singer from the band Erasure.
  • Kenny Bell somehow played wide receiver for both Nebraska's and Alabama's college football teams in 2013.
  • In Brazil, Belém can be both a big city, capital of one state, or the historical Middle-Eastern Bethlehem. Ever since a clueless footballer said he was "proud to be on the city Jesus was born" it's a Running Gag towards the Brazilian city.
  • Joan Bennett: Glamorous movie star from the 1930's and 1940's (and aunt to Morton Downey, Jr.), or glamorous Playboy Playmate of the Month for January 1985?
  • Tony Bennett not only has a successful singing career, he's also a successful college basketball coach, among other things.
  • William Bennett is an American conservative political commentator who landed in a heap of controversy when his gambling addiction became public knowledge, or a British musician noted as the chief driving force behind power electronics act Whitehouse (which, in turn, is named in "honour" of Moral Guardian Mary, as well as a British pornographic magazine of the same name, and not after the seat of the American presidency).
  • In another non-person example, Italy has multiple companies named Beretta, of which the most famous and largest are a weapon manufacturer and a manufacturer of salami, sausages, ham and similar foods.
  • Brazilian Football team Botafogo from Rio de Janeiro shares its name with a good amount of imitators, one of the biggest is Botafogo of Paraíba (Or just Botafogo-PB), which plays in lower divisions note , it even has the same crest but with a red star instead of a white one, however, the team was founded by fans of Botafogo from Rio and grew enough in size to be the local state's big team.note . While Botafogo-PB is explicitly named after Rio's team, there's another regular team in the lower divisions called "Botafogo" (Or Botafogo-SP). According to the team's lore, the name has nothing to do with Rio's Botafogo note  but actually named because one of the founding members of the club, irriated in the founding meeting that nobody could decide a new name for the team said "Either you choose a new name or "Put Fire" (Bota fogo) in everything and end this story..." and the others in the meeting decide to adopt the name as a joke. There's a lot of discussion if the story really happened or if it is made up to not admit that the team also copied Botafogo-RJ.
  • Latvia's President from 2011 to 2015 was one Andris Bērziņš. The Latvian Prime Minister in 2000-02 was also Andris Bērziņš. You might think former PM Bērziņš was Kicked Upstairs to the Presidency in recognition of his political service... but the two Bērziņšes are totally different people.
  • Justin Bieber is a famous singer. Behold, Justin Bieber the 35 year old tech support specialist from Jacksonville, Florida.
  • Big Boi / Big Boy is:
  • Rebecca Black, when she's not lookin' forward to the weekend, is a bikini model.
  • Robert Blake (original name Mickey Gubitosi) was an actor who (allegedly) murdered his wife. Bob Blake was a 5-time Jeopardy! champion who was not only the first player to earn over $75,000 in regular competition (which was the then-winnings cap), but also won the 1990 Tournament of Champions. Neither seems to be related to Robert M. Blake, creator of the World of Fizz. Also bearing mention is retired NHL defenseman Rob Blake.
    • He was also the name H.P. Lovecraft gave to a character (based on his friend Robert Bloch) in "Shadow From The Steeple."
  • Bleach are a Japanese thrashcore female trio, an American Christian rock group, and a British indie rock group. Just to add to the fun, the first two both released eponymous albums.
  • Steve Blum is a voice actor known for roles in (among others) Cowboy Bebop and Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann. Steven Blum is an associate director of Whose Line Is It Anyway?. Neither seems to be related to Steve Bloom, a South African photographer and published author.
  • Veteran college basketball coach Ken Bone never wore a red sweater on the sidelines, unlike the guy with the same name who became a human meme during the second 2016 presidential debate.
  • Bono: U2 Frontman or Melbourne-based noise trio?
    • Double-whammy in the case from the latter: While one of the members is named Kyle, makes Harsh Noise, and lives in Melbourne, he is not Kyle Dennis. And no, none of them are Sonny Bono.
  • Daniel Boone has been the name of an American Pioneer, a baseball pitcher, a British singer, and a British Member of Parliament.
  • Cameron Boyce is both an Australian cricket player and the child actor who plays Luke Ross on Jessie, Carlos in Descendants, and Conor on Gamer's Guide to Pretty Much Everything.
  • Some episodes of Inspector Morse were written by a guy named Daniel Boyle. This is different from the Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle... who did direct some Morse episodes.
  • Michael Bradley, according to The Other Wiki there are more than 10 different Michael Bradleys. The most prominent ones being Michael Joseph Bradley (1897-1979), American congressman of Pennsylvania, Michael John Bradley (1933-2010), British governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands, and American soccer player Michael Sheehan Bradley (born 1987).
  • Tom Brady is the name of a star NFL quarterback for the New England Patriots note , a winger for English rugby union Leicester Tigers, and a movie director note  whose credits include The Comebacks, The Hot Chick and Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star.
  • There are two prominent places in California named Brentwood: a neighborhood of Los Angeles, and an incorporated city in Contra Costa County, east of San Francisco.
  • Former child actress Abigail Breslin, didn't branch out into fashion. That would be the other Abigail Breslin, a native of Wayland, Massachusetts, who founded Wanderlust Fashion LLC alongside long-time friend Emily Bache, and is also a blogger.
  • Pete Brock is an American automotive engineer who's worked on many of the country's best known sports cars while Peter Brock was a race car driver well renowned in his native Australia. In an eerie coincidence, Peter was killed in a racing crash behind the wheel of a replica of the Shelby Cobra Daytona, a car Pete designed.
  • Did you know? Alton Brown pitched seven games for the Washington Senators in 1951, eleven years before he was born.
  • Chris Brown, controversial African-American singer; Dr. Chris Brown, Australian veterinarian/television star or Chris Brown, NHL player? Or maybe Chris (Taylor) Brown, not-really-controversial lead vocalist from one-hit wonder rock band Trapt? Or perhaps even Chris Browne, son of Hägar the Horrible cartoonist Dik Browne who took over the comic strip after his father died?
  • Dan Brown: Best-selling novelist or YouTube personality?
  • Dee Brown played Major League Baseball, in the NFL, in the NBA (twice), and wrote Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
  • James Brown is: a.) the Godfather of Soul, b.) a legendary American football player, better known as "Jim", c.) an American sports announcer, formerly with Fox and now with CBS, d.) a music video director who frequently works with Tori Amos, e.) a journalist and former editor of loaded and f.) a former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (although he goes by his middle name, Gordon), g.) a soccer striker for Hartlepool, h.) a former quarterback for the University of Texas and professional teams in several leagues and now an assistant coach at Lamar University, h.) drummer for UB40.
  • VJ "Downtown" Julie Brown might have shown the video for singer/comedienne Julie Brown's The Homecoming Queen's Got A Gun. The latter eventually starred in an MTV show called Just Say Julie and billed herself as Miss Julie Brown to eliminate the confusion.
    • There's also an athlete named Julie Brown who was a long-distance runner, as well as a completely different actress named Julie Caitlin Brown who appeared in Babylon 5.
  • Larry Brown could be one of so many people, as seen in The Other Wiki's entry for that name, but he's most recognizable in the world of sports. Mainly, he could be one of the NBA's greatest coaches of all time, a journeyman baseball infielder from the '60s and '70s, a top NFL running back in the 1970s, or the cornerback who won MVP honors at Super Bowl XXX.
  • Les Brown was a big band leader known for his "Band of Renown". Les Brown is also a famous motivational speaker. And Less Browne was a star defensive back in the Canadian Football League.
  • Marc Brown, the writer of the Arthur books. Not to be confused with Marc Brown, former anchorman for ABC 7 News.
  • Former Spice Girl Melanie Brown should not be confused with Canadian voice actress Melleny Brown.
  • Zac Brown, country singer; meet Zach Brown, Tennessee Titans linebacker.
  • James Buchanan: 15th President of the United States, or Nobel Prize-winning economist?
  • Is Tim Buckley a webcomic artist or a jazz and folk musician who fathered Jeff?
  • In Carl Sagan's The Demon-Haunted World, he tells a story of being picked up at an airport by a driver named William Buckley. The driver thought Carl had the same problem as he did, since Carl had the same name as "that science guy." (His response: "I am that science guy.")
  • Buffalo, Texas changed its name twice because of sports, due to a league championship game between a team from Dallas (the closest major city to Buffalo) and one from a certain city lying on Lake Erie: first to Blue Star, Texas when the Dallas Cowboys played the Buffalo Bills in the Super Bowl (twice), and later to Green Star, Texas when the Dallas Stars played the Buffalo Sabres for the Stanley Cup.
  • James Bulger, the Liverpool infant who was murdered in 1993, is clearly not the same person as James Joseph "Whitey" Bulger the Boston mobster, who amongst other things was convicted of 11 murders and was himself murdered in prison in 2018.
  • Ronnie Bull: American football running back active in the 1960s, or English football (soccer) left back active in the 2000s??
  • Humorously Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Madison Bumgarner claims to have dated a girl named Madison Bumgarner when both were in high school in North Carolina.
    • And, at the time of the pitcher's heroics in the 2014 postseason with the San Francisco Giants, there was another girl named Madison Bumgarner enrolled at their old high school.
  • Burger King:
    • Home of the Whopper and The Burger King, or an older restaurant in Mattoon, Illinois? This actually became the case of a lawsuit, which resulted in the nationwide chain being unable to open a Burger King within 20 miles of Mattoon.
    • Burger King was also the name of a takeaway in Adelaide, South Australia, which is why the Burger King franchise is called Hungry Jack's in Australia. (Basically; it's actually much more complicated than that.)
  • Exploited by Philip José Farmer. "The Jungle Rot Kid on the Nod" deliberately "confuses" Edgar Rice Burroughs with William S. Burroughs. Just for completeness, the latter author's grandpa with the same name (up to the middle "Seward") was a computer pioneer.
  • Does Richard Burton mean the actor who married Elizabeth Taylor twice or the translator, spy/explorer who translated The 1001 Nights, went to Mecca, and tried to find the source of the Nile? They even made a movie (Mountains of the Moon) about the explorer; it did not star the actor (he would have been too old).
    • Good thing that Richard Burton changed his real name. Or else the current Richard Jenkins would have been confused with him and leading people into thinking that Burton was still alive.
  • Does Robert Burton refer to the author of The Anatomy of Melancholy or the British track star?
  • Kate Bush is a beautiful and amazingly talented but notoriously reclusive British singer with her own unique style. "Kate" is short for her birth name "Catherine". Which she shares with Catherine Bush, a successful novelist.
  • Brett Butler is the name of a former MLB center fielder (obviously male), a stand-up comedian and former star of the ABC sitcom Grace Under Fire (female), and a stage and voice actor known for playing Dr. Quinn on Sealab 2021 (male).
  • Adam Buxton has a show where he explores music videos via YouTube comments. When he's not doing that, he plays in defence for English football team Portsmouth.
  • Laura Buxton meets Laura Buxton. Both each had a brown and orange guinea pig, a gray rabbit, and a black Labrador. Synchronicity, anyone?
  • There are three different writers called John Byrne, two of whom also illustrate their work. The best-known works in comic books and was responsible, amongst many other things, for the 1986 Superman reboot. The second wrote the TV series Tutti Frutti, while the third (who sometimes calls himself Johnny Byrne) wrote scripts for Gerry Anderson.

    C 
  • Cajus Julius Caesar, a politician in The Berlin Republic, and Gaius Julius Caesar, a politician in The Roman Republic. You want the latter for the controversies.
  • Tim Cahill is either a soccer player from Australia who competed in World Cups in the 2010s or the co-creator of My Gym Partner's a Monkey and Littlest Pet Shop (2012).
  • Michael Caine the actor, and Michael Caines the celebrity chef.
  • Jim Caldwell is either the name of a game show host from the second half of The '80s or a former college and National Football League head coach.
  • In northern Germany, there is a small town named California. (Explanation: This town was founded near a shipwreck and the only thing which could be salvaged from the wreck was a plate with the word "California". Because of this, people decided to name the town California.)
  • Bill Callahan is a singer/songwriter, a TV producer best known for Scrubs and the offensive line coach for the Dallas Cowboys.
  • Reddit once had the British visitors trolled by r/hockey, who decided to upvote "Dave Cameron has been fired" so people could think it was British Prime Minister "David Cameron resigning instead of the Ottawa Senators GM Dave Cameron leaving his job.
  • Bruce Campbell is an actor, right? Or is he an American football offensive tackle who was selected by the Oakland Raiders in the 4th round of the 2010 NFL Draft? Or the 70s Glam Rock cult figure better known by his Stage Name, Jobriath.
  • When you mention you're a fan of Erica Campbell, make sure you specify if you mean the gospel singer or the clothes-unfriendly model (picture SFW, don't worry). The latter gave it all up in 2008 and converted to Christianity, which might make it even more confusing.
  • Glen Campbell is a now-deceased American singer/guitarist known for safe country-pop music as a solo artist. Glenn Campbell is a living American guitarist who gained cult popularity in the U.K. as part of freakbeat band The Misunderstood, and later played alongside the likes of Joe Cocker and Sammy Hagar in their backing bands. (He's often credited as "Glenn Ross Campbell" to prevent confusion with the "Rhinestone Cowboy" hitmaker.)
  • Harry Carey was a popular silent-film actor, and his son, Harry Jr., was a popular character actor of the 1940s and 1950s. Harry Caray was a legendary baseball announcer with the Cardinals, White Sox, and Cubs.
  • Two Brazilian players share their names with singers: Roberto Carlos (FIFA World Cup champion who played in Spain for a long time) and Fábio Júnior.
  • John Carpenter: One is a film director famed for such works as Halloween (1978), Escape from New York, and The Thing (1982); the other is the first American winner on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?.
    • It was also the name of Elvis's character in Change of Habit, which became Hilarious in Hindsight when the first Carpenter directed the TV Bio Pic Elvis.
    • It was also the name of a Sony sales manager who was tried for, but acquitted of, the murder of actor Bob Crane (Colonel Hogan on Hogan's Heroes).

  • Madeleine Carroll: 1930s English actress or modern-day American actress?
  • Chris Carter, a creator of The X-Files known for his effect on audiences. Or the Throbbing Gristle musician. Or the wrestler who starred in Midwest indy circuits in the 80's. Or Cris Carter, the Hall of Fame wide receiver. Another Chris Carter is a producer and disc jockey who hosts the radio show Breakfast With The Beatles, and who used to play bass with alternative band Dramarama in The '80s. Meanwhile, two Chris Carters played outfield in Major League Baseball in 2010, one in his final season, one in his first.
  • Dixie Carter (of Designing Women fame) has the same name as the president of the TNA wrestling promotion.
  • Nancy Cartwright is the name of the voice actress behind Bart Simpson and a philosopher.
  • Former Pennsylvania Governor Robert P. "Bob" Casey Sr. had a decade where he would end up losing Democratic primaries in the state to two other candidates also named Bob Casey that spent little money or time campaigning and benefited from the name similarity. First in 1976; Robert P. Casey (term-limited from his role as Auditor General) ran for the Democratic state treasurer nomination only to be defeated by a county official named Robert Caseynote . Two years later, Casey ran for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor, only to face another candidate named Robert P. Casey (this one was a teacher and ice-cream parlor owner). The other Robert P. Casey won the nomination for lieutenant governor only for the Democratic ticket of gubernatorial nominee Pete Flaherty and the teacher Robert P. Casey to lose to the Republican ticket of Dick Thornburgh and William Scranton III. By the time of Bob Casey Sr.'s successful run for Governor in 1986; he took to referring to himself as "the real Bob Casey". Nowadays, you can find the ex-governor's son Bob Casey Jr. in the Senate.
  • The Houston Astros chose catcher Jason Castro with the tenth overall pick in the 2008 MLB draft, not even a month after a different Jason Castro was eliminated from season 7 of American Idol in fourth place.
    • Those two are not to be confused with Filipino basketball player (and, according to FIBA, Asia's Best Point Guard) Jayson Castro, who's full name is....Jayson Castro William (See "Jayson Williams" in Folder "W")
  • Nick Cave, rock star/writer. Nick Cave, American artist/dancer.
  • Celebrity Productions was the imprint of the Ub Iwerks Studio back in the 30s, where he created Flip The Frog. In the 1970s, Celebrity Productions was the imprint under Goodson-Todman Productions for the revival of Match Game.
  • Jackie Chan, the well-known Chinese martial artist and film actor, is not to be confused with Jacqui Chan, a Chinese-descended actress from Trinidad & Tobago.
  • Tom Chapin is a child actor who played Jack in Lord of the Flies. Not to be confused with the late Harry Chapin's brother Tom who like Harry is also a singer/songwriter.
  • Mark David Chapman is the man who shot and killed John Lennon. This was rather unfortunate for British actor Mark Lindsey Chapman when he auditioned for the role of Lennon in a biopic. (Needless to say, he didn't get the part. But he has gotten many others.)
    • There's also Mark Chapman of the Pirate Party UK. He deliberately plays on this trope by tweeting as "@Pirate_Lennon".
    • And there's also the British presenter Mark Chapman, who presents Match of the Day and the BBC's coverage of the NFL.
  • Steve Chapman is a contemporary Christian musician who had his greatest popularity in the 1970s and 1980s. Another Steve Chapman entered the same industry in the late 1980s—but presumably in deference to the first Steve Chapman, he records under his full name of Steven Curtis Chapman (and has gone on to become the genre's biggest-selling artist in history).
  • In the state of Texas, judges are elected, but few voters care enough to become informed about or actually vote in judicial elections. Worse, the few that do have to go through candidates for an absurd number of seats on the bench. As a result, the "name game" plays a huge role in who gets elected. Ron Chapman got elected despite being a Democrat in a Republican-dominated year because he shares the name of a popular Texas radio DJ. And that's not just a theory; on a survey regarding politician name recognition, most people who claimed to be familiar with Chapman listed his public office as "DJ". Conversely, judicial candidates with difficult-to-spell (or pronounce) names, like Cathy Herasimchuk, find it difficult to get elected no matter how much partisan or financial support they get.
  • Dave Chappelle was the star of Chappelle's Show. David LaChapelle is a prominent photographer.
  • Ray Charles, the black soul singer, and Ray Charles the white television music consultant and arranger. The Muppets: A Celebration of 30 Years, which also featured archive footage of the singer dueting with Kermit, credited the consultant as "the other Ray Charles".
    • Do not confuse the Ray Charles Singers, who had a few Billboard hits as an easy-listening group led by the latter Ray Charles, with the former's group of backing singers, who were called the Raelettes.
    • It also bears mentioning that Ray Charles the singer was born Ray Charles Robinson. Had he been billed as Ray Robinson, he would have shared a name with the famous boxer Sugar Ray Robinson, who, ironically, was born under a different name — Walker Smith Jr.
    • The "other" Ray Charles, born Charles Raymond Offenberg, took the pseudonym first in 1944, before Ray Charles Robinson dropped the Robinson in 1950.
    • Some recordings of the standard "Frenesi" have a songwriting credit to "Ray Charles". It's neither of them — in fact, it's a pseudonym for Charles Carpenter, who co-wrote the English lyrics. Due to a dispute with ASCAP, who he was affiliated with, he took up a new name with BMI. Made even more confusing because Ray Charles #1 did a Cover Version of the song.
  • Cheryl Chase: One is an activist and founder of the Intersex Society of North America. The other is a voice actress best known as the voice of Angelica Pickles.
  • Ray Chase, a voice actor who's known for playing Noctis Lucis Caelum, should not be confused with Ray P. Chase, a US representative from Minnesota in the 1930s.
  • John Cheese is a writer for Cracked and possibly the "John" in John Dies at the End by David Wong (wait — Dave and John fight monsters and save the world in an internet story that became a physical book? I've heard that before...); "John Cheese" would've been John Cleese's name if his dad hadn't changed it, to John's annoyance ("Everyone knows what a 'cheese' is but what on earth is a 'cleese'?").
  • Jason Chen is both a Taiwanese-American pop singer and the founder of Kirin Entertainment, a video game developer best known for Plumbers Don't Wear Ties.
  • Don Cherry is the name of an American jazz musician (father to Eagle-Eye and stepfather to Neneh), an American singer who had a few pop hits in the 1950s, and a Canadian NHL coach turned Hockey Night in Canada commentator known for his colorful jackets and hats.
  • The Chinese Basketball Association is the English-language name of two separate basketball entities in China—the sport's overall governing body, and the country's top-tier men's professional league. However, the names are different in Chinese (pinyin transliterations provided here): the governing body is Zhōngguó Lánqiú Xiéhuì (literally "Chinese Basketball Association"), while the league is Zhōngguó Nánzǐ Lánqiú Zhíyè Liánsài ("Chinese Men's Professional Basketball League", though the English initialism of CBA is regularly used to refer to the league even in Chinese).
  • Deepak Chopra the New Age guru and favourite of Oprah Winfrey? Or Deepak Chopra, president of Canada Post?
  • Winston Churchill was not happy to learn about Winston Churchill the American novelist. The British Churchill wrote only one novel, being better known for his popular histories and journalism. Both Churchills had political careers, and were both noted amateur painters. The British Churchill, upon becoming aware of the American Churchill's books, wrote to him suggesting that he would sign his own works "Winston S. Churchill", using his middle name (actually part of his surname), "Spencer", to differentiate them. This suggestion was accepted, with the comment that the American Churchill would have done the same, had he any middle names. Supposedly (it might just be a joke), the British one had first suggested the American change his name and was informed that since the American was born three years earlier, the American said the British one should be the one changing it.
  • City Connection was an arcade game published and developed by Jaleco in the mid-1980s. More than a decade after the company shut down, the rights to most of Jaleco's game IPs, including City Connection, were acquired for distribution by a holding company called...City Connection.
  • Cinemax is one of the major American premium cable channels. Don't confuse it with CineMAX, a chain of movie theaters in India, or the Czech Republic-based video game developer known for games like Daemonica and Inquisitor.
  • There's Bob Clampett, the Looney Tunes animator and director and creator of Beany and Cecil. And then there's Bobby Clampett, a former PGA golfer.
  • Tom Clark(e), a member of the band Area 11 who prefers his stage name Sparkles*, a member of the Yogscast nicknamed "Angor", a reporter for the British Channel Four News, or a US Supreme Court justice from mid 20th century?
  • John Clay, a news anchor for WTAJ of Altoona, Pennsylvania, a sportswriter for the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky, or a running back for the Pittsburgh Steelers? Yet another football player was a disappointing offensive lineman for the Raiders/Chargers.
  • There are two famous musicians named Les Claypool. One is the singer and bassist for Primus. The other works in anime and video game sound recording, and has collaborated with director Steve Wang on a few of his projects.
  • George Clinton is either a funk musician, or Thomas Jefferson's second and James Madison's first vice-president. There's also a soundtrack composer named George S. Clinton The musician is black, while the politician and soundtrack composer are white. None of them are known to be related to President Bill Clinton.
    • The musician's memoir tells of negotiations with Casablanca Records in the late 70s during which a Casablanca employee said "how can you complain? We just signed a deal for your boy's soundtrack work!" Neither Clinton had claimed the two were related, and this was the first time the former had heard of the latter, who is only six years his junior.
  • Clinton, Michigan can be either Clinton Charter Township, which is northeast of Detroit, or the village southwest of Ann Arbor. (Most people drop the "Township" from Michigan's charter townships. The same is true of Harrison, Michigan, which can be either Harrison Charter Township (also northeast of Detroit), or Harrison, the city a few miles north of Mount Pleasant in the middle of the state.
  • Ty Cobb: Hall of Fame baseball player from the early 20th century, or attorney who served as part of President Donald Trump's legal team in 2017–18?
  • Joel Coen is a director, one of The Coen Brothers whose films range from Film Noir to Black Comedy. Joel Cohen is a movie screenwriter who worked mainly on lighthearted family films like Cheaper by the Dozen and Toy Story, and Joel H. Cohen is a writer for The Simpsons. Bill Murray signed up for the Garfield movie because he thought it was written by Joel Coen instead of Joel Cohen, a decision he would later regret.
  • Mike Cofer: White NFL kicker (b. James Michael Cofer) who won two Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers, or black NFL linebacker (b. Michael Lynn Cofer) who played for some awful Detroit Lions teams? Both, incidentally, were mainly active from the mid-'80s to the early-'90s. (See Ron Heller for another example that happened around the same time.)
  • When he's not playing football/soccer for the Tampa Bay Rowdies, Joe Cole can be seen in programmes such as Skins or Peaky Blinders.
  • Do not confuse Eve 6's male lead singer Max Collins with the Filipino actress of the same name.
  • Michael Collins led the 1916 Easter Rebellion in Ireland and flew to the moon.
  • Phil Collins enjoyed great success as a member of Genesis and as a solo artist. Another Phil Collins enjoyed little success as a pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1930's.
    • Neither of which should be be confused with the similarly-named Phil Collen, lead guitarist for Def Leppard.
  • Jerry Colonna is either a comedian/singer or a venture capitalist.
  • Director/producer Chris Columbus did not discover America. Christopher Columbusnote  really didn't, either, although he's traditionally credited with doing so. This was lampshaded when Chris Columbus named his production company 1492 Pictures.
  • In London in the 8-bit computer era, there were two exhibitions called the Computer Fair; the London Computer Fair was run by the Association of London Computer Clubs from 1979, originally at what was then North London Polytechnic but later at the Central Hall Westminster, and the Computer Fair (a series of exhibitions across Britain) run by a commercial company from 1981, the London one being at the Earl's Court Exhibition Centre. To avoid confusion, those in the know refer to the latter one as the "Earl's Court Computer Fair". However, confusion still arises; the ZX Spectrum is often wrongly claimed to have been launched at the London Computer Fair, when in fact the launch was at the Earl's Court Computer Fair. (Although the launch was preceded by a private preview to invited ALCC members at North London Poly.)
  • Coney Island: Either the famous beachfront amusement mecca on Long Island, NYC, or an equally venerable amusement park in Ohio (the latter originally called 'Ohio Grove' but nicknamed "Coney Island of the West" and eventually the name was borrowed entirely).
    • It's also a generic term for a casual diner-type restaurant in Michigan.
  • Angel Concepcion: A lightweight boxer, as well as an ex-gang member working with Chicago's "Cease Fire" violence-prevention gang.
  • Even countries can fall victim to this- the Democratic Republic of the Congo (a large, underdeveloped, rainforest nation in Africa) and the Republic of the Congo (another nation in Africa which is smaller, more developed, and just as rainforest-y) are Not the same place. Averted for a few decades when the former country was named Zaire.
  • There's the Dominican republic known as Dominica, then there's the Dominican Republic. There's Guyana and Dutch Guyana, now known as Suriname, along with French Guiana and Venezuelan Guayana. There's Macedonia, along with the long-nameless former Yugoslav republic now known as North Macedonia. There are Indians from India and Native American Indians. And worst of all, there's Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Equatorial Guinea, Papua New Guinea, along with the former Dutch New Guinea, Danish Guinea, Dutch Guinea, German Guinea (next to all the other guineas, as opposed to the German Guinea in modern Papua New Guinea), the Guinea region of Virginia, and as a cherry on top, the British Guinea, a coin in the old Imperial British monetary system (which in turn was borrowed for the Arabic name of the Egyptian currency—Gineh in Cairo dialect—because it was originally the same value, but which was then translated into English as "pound").
  • John Connolly is the name of a best-selling author of a number of horror, supernatural and mystery novels. It is also the name of a crooked former FBI agent who infamously collaborated with Boston gang leader James "Whitey" Bulger, as depicted in the film Black Mass (in which he was portrayed by Joel Edgerton). Spelling it slightly different are former Texas governor John Connally and Country Music singer John Conlee.
  • Darwin Cook is an American basketball player who spent the '80s as a journeyman NBA point guard. Darwyn Cooke was a Canadian cartoonist who worked for DC and Marvel, among others.
  • Quentin L. Cook: Mormon apostle, or the real name of Fatboy Slim?
  • Robin Cook is the name of both a (late) British MP and an American medical-thriller novelist.
  • Sam Cooke is a soul music legend. Be careful with the NSFW image searches since Sam(antha) Cooke is a British glamour model. And there's also Sam Koch (same pronunciation), a punter for the Baltimore Ravens.
  • English soccer team AFC Bournemouth currently has a defender called Steve Cook. A few seasons earlier, they had a midfielder called "Stephen Cooke".
  • Alice Cooper is also a scriptwriter, journalist and women's rugby correspondent in England. Although she prefers to be known as Alice D. Cooper and her Web presence stipulates "Alice D. Cooper (United Kingdom)".
  • Harry Corbett created the much-loved British puppet character Sooty. Harry H. Corbett starred in Steptoe and Son, and used his middle initial to avoid confusion. Rumour has it the Prime Minister Harold Wilson was still confused, so that both Harry Corbetts received MBEs after he initially offered the award to the wrong one.
  • Chris Cornell is both the late, great lead singer of Soundgarden and a megafan of Mystery Science Theater 3000 nicknamed "Sampo".
  • Bill Cosby is a famous black comedian turned disgraced sexual criminal. William Cosby was Royal Governor of New Jersey in the 1730s and the antagonist of the Zenger case, which allowed freedom of the press.
  • Is Brian Cox a Scottish actor known for his roles in Manhunter, X2: X-Men United and The Long Kiss Goodnight, or a former keyboard player from the band D:Ream and current particle physicist working on the Large Hadron Collider?
  • Courtney Cox is not the Friends actress—that would be Courteney Cox—but rather a member of the all female Iron Maiden tribute band The Iron Maidens.
  • San Francisco had two major sports figures near the end of the 1980s in San Francisco Giants manager Roger Craig (white), who shared a name with the San Francisco 49ers star running back of the period (African American).
  • Bob Crane: Hogan's Heroes star, and founder of the C. Crane radio company.
  • David Crane. Is he a video game designer who co-founded Activision and created the Pitfall and A Boy and His Blob series, or is he a television producer who with Marta Kaufman co-created Friends?
  • Cindy Crawford is an American supermodel who many want to have sex with, and an American (now retired) porn star who many have had sex with.
  • Coco Crisp is an American baseball player. Cocoa Krispies is an American breakfast food.
  • Veteran NFL defensive back Chris Crocker couldn't care less whether or not you leave Britney alone.
  • Davy Crockett was the King of the Wild Frontier and a prominent American politician in the 19th century. David Crockett is best known as an announcer and executive for the NWA — the National Wrestling Alliance, not THAT NWA.
    • The latter David Crockett briefly used his first and middle names as a wrestler, competing as Dave Finley. Unlike his near-namesake Dave 'Fit' Finlay, he's not Irish, and he apparently didn't love to fight, as The Other Wiki describes his wrestling career as "very brief."
  • David Cross: the violinist for King Crimson, or the comedian?
  • Tom Cruise is the owner of the HoverRound company that helps elderly people with the need — the need for speed.
  • Colgate once tried to launch a toothpaste in France called "Cue". It was also the name of a French pornographic magazine. The toothpaste probably didn't sell very well.
    • "Cul" is French for "arse/ass", which sounds similar to the English word "cue".
  • Ramon Cruz: Could be a former point guard for either one of two collegiate teams in the Philippines: the Ateneo De Manila Blue Eagles or the University of the East (UE) Red Warriors. Both played college ball in the late '70s, with the latter having far more success than the former, eventually making it to the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA).
    • Neither are to be confused with Ramon "Onchie" Dela Cruz, who was also a point guard, albeit slightly younger, who played in the PBA from 1985 to 1993.
  • Larry Csonka: Is he the Hall of Fame NFL running back for the Miami Dolphins, or the well-known wrestling dirtsheet writer?
  • Jim Cummings. The prolific voice actor shares his name with James Harvey "Mister Jim" Cummings (1890-1979), a long-serving member of the Tennessee House of Representatives. Mister Jim held his position from 1928 to 1972.
  • Stephen Curry is best known to Americans as a guard for the Golden State Warriors and breakout basketball star of 2015 and to Australians as an actor/comedian. The former pronounces his name "Steffen".
    • Averted by the basketball player and his father, himself a former NBA player. Both were born Wardell Stephen Curry, with the younger being designated as II instead of the more common Jr. However, his father is commonly known as Dell Curry.
  • The technical artist for Way Forward games is named Tim Curry. The serenades of "Sweet Transvestite" probably get old fast.
  • Meet Ben Curtis, professional golfer. That dude is certainly not getting a Dell.
  • Rui Costa was a great Portugese footballer who in 2013 became world champion in cycling.

    D 
  • Court TV once was showing a trial in which an FBI agent was testifying, and when he began his testimony he stated his name: Jeffrey Dahmer. He is not related to the Milwaukee man of the same name who died in prison after being convicted of killing and eating his victims.
  • If you visit the campus of the University of Southern California (USC), you might meet Elizabeth Daley. No, not Elizabeth Daily, who played Dottie in Pee-wee's Big Adventure and voiced Tommy Pickles in Rugrats; I'm talking about the current Dean of the School of Academic Arts. And if you'd been on the campus about 10 years ago, you might have bumped into Kristy Swanson. No, not the originator of the role of Buffy Summers before Sarah Michelle Gellar popularized it; she was the receptionist for the USC Alumni Association office.
  • Richard Daley: Former Chicago mayor; his son, namesake, and another former Chicago mayor; or the bassist for the Reggae band Third World?
  • The Charlie Daniels that plays for AFC Bournemouth is not the Charlie Daniels that records country and bluegrass music.
  • The BBC's season of programmes on Charles Darwin has featured programmes named What Darwin Didn't Know and Darwin's Dangerous Idea, which share their names with books of the same name. However, the former is a book that promotes Intelligent Design, the programme exactly the opposite. The latter chronicles nearly the same subject matter as the former (namely, the implications of Darwin's Theory of Evolution).
  • Keith David is a black US actor most recently known for voicing the cat in Coraline. Keith David is also the name of a black British rapper.
    • Let's not forget another noted character actor (and Patrick Swayze-lookalike), David Keith.
  • Sylvie Davidson: A black French singer, or a white American theatre actress and folk/country singer?
  • When you mention a pro athlete named Anthony Davis, are you talking about the power forward/center now playing alongside LeBron James with the Los Angeles Lakers, who was the Number 1 Pick of the 2012 NBA draft and has made a name for himself as one of the most athletic and talented big men (with 6 NBA All-Star selections and 3 first-team All-NBA selections) in the NBA... while also being known for his very noticeable unibrow? Or are you referring to a relatively solid Offensive Tackle drafted 11th overall in the 2010 NFL Draft, who has been a mainstay on the San Francisco 49ers Offensive Line but has never been named to a Pro Bowl or an All-Pro Team... and, for the matter, has no unibrow?
  • Devin Davis is a male basketball player who played for Miami (of Ohio) in the NCAA and as an "import" for the Alaska Aces in the Philippines.note  Deven Davis is a female ex-adult film star who's married to Korn vocalist Jonathan Davis.
  • Hannah Davis is a gorgeous model from the U.S. Virgin Islands. Hannah Davis is also an Australian kayaker and Olympic medallist. The one who has never gone walking with talking horses. The one who has never been a competitive paddler.
  • General Jefferson Davis (1828-1879) of the Union should not be confused with President Jefferson Davis (1808-1889) of the Confederacy. Both were active in The American Civil War. Jefferson Davis (1862-1913), Governor of Arkansas, was not related to either man. Though some of his voters reportedly mistook him for a son or nephew of the President. "A belief that Davis did nothing to discourage".
  • All three seem to have no relation to Jeff Davis.
    • Jeff Davis also shares the name of Teen Wolf's showrunner. The comedian gets threatened a lot on Twitter because of it.
  • Jim Davis, the creator of Garfield, was not an animator on Fritz the Cat and The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat. The animator, who also went by James Davis, had a long career in animation, originally working for Warner Bros. and MGM animation. The book Forbidden Animation confused the two, as did IMDb for a time.
    • Another Jim Davis was famous for playing Jock Ewing on Dallas.
  • Mackenzie Davis, a Canadian-born actress, shares a name with Musical.ly sensation Mackenzie Davis.
  • English actress Sammi Davis-Voss often joked about being confused with Sammy Davis Jr., before adding her husband's name. Was cast in as his Swedish wife in a biopic that was never made.
  • Virginia Davis was a child actress of the 1920s, notably known for her work with Walt Disney. Geena Davis, the star of The Fly, Beetlejuice and Thelma & Louise, was born Virginia Elizabeth Davis.
  • One group called the DCI adjudicates drum corps competitions. Another group called the DCI adjudicates Magic: The Gathering competitions.
  • James Dean the actor has been dead since 1955. Jimmy Dean the country singer and sausage seller stayed around until 2010.
    • It doesn't help that the play/film Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean is about James Dean.
    • Adult film star Bryan Sevilla uses the stage name James Deen.
  • After association football referee Mike Dean made more than a few controversial decisions in some matches from late December 2016 to early January 2017, many on Twitter directed insults to Kanye West's record producer Mike Dean, who was not amused.
  • There are at least two musicians with the stage name Ricky Dee; the first wrote "Devil in His Heart" (which was covered by The Beatles as "Devil in Her Heart") and the second, a country singer, was born about four years after "Devil in His/Her Heart" was released. Neither is the artist who recorded "Disco Duck"; that would be Rick Dees.note 
  • John Deere was a blacksmith who invented the steel plow and founded the Deere & Company agricultural equipment corporation. John Dear is a Catholic priest who participated in the Plowshares disarmament movement, named for the "swords into plowshares" passage in the Book of Isaiah.
  • Mousa Dembélé is a Belgian midfielder for Tottenham Hotspur. Moussa Dembélé is a French forward for Celtic.
  • Philippine basketball has had two fairly prominent players named Bong Dela Cruz. One of them, a power forward whose complete first name is Virgilio, played for the PBA's Crispa Redmanizers from 1975 to 1983. The other (full first name Segundo), was a point guard for the University of Santo Tomas (UST) in the late '80s, and had stints in the minor leagues. He is now the head coach of UST's men's basketball team.
  • Jack Dempsey (birth name William Harrison Dempsey) was a heavyweight boxing champion during The Roaring '20s. Another Jack Dempsey, nicknamed "The Nonpareil" (real name John Edward Kelly), fought in the lightweight and middleweight classes in the 1880s. Several other boxers in the first decades of the 20th century fought as "Jack Dempsey" in homage to Nonpareil—among them Bernie Dempsey, older brother of the future heavyweight champion. In fact, the heavyweight champion later recalled that he first fought as "Jack Dempsey" as a substitute for his brother.
  • Reginald Denny was the name of an old Hollywood character actor, as well as that of a truck driver who was attacked and beaten during the Rodney King riots in 1992.
  • Bruce Dickinson, the lead singer from metal band Iron Maiden? Or Bruce Dickinson the lead guitarist from rock band Little Angels? The latter Bruce went by his full name of Bruce John Dickinson during Little Angels' tenure to avoid any confusion.
  • Matt Dillon is known for writing many computer programs and for developing DragonFly BSD. There's also an actor with that name.
  • Diva Destruction is either an American darkwave band, or a New Zealand roller derby team.
  • There are two hip hop artists named Doctor Dre. One is a DJ who worked with Ed Lover and the Beastie Boys; the other, who spells his name Dr. Dre, is a rapper who's worked with Snoop Dogg and Eminem. In addition, they both have the same real first name. The former's real name Andre Brown, while the latter's is Andre Young.note 
  • Joe Dolce: former editor-in-chief of Details and Star magazines, or the guy who sang "Shaddap You Face"?
  • Gemma Donati is both the wife of Dante Alighieri, and an Italian actress, who, among other things, is the Italian voice of Ashley Tisdale.
  • There are two celebrities known as Drake: People either think we're talking about teen star Drake Bell of Drake & Josh or there's the rapper Aubrey Drake Graham. Incidentally, both names are actually their middle names. Although the former was the first to gain recognition, the latter is by far the more famous of the two nowadays.
  • Michael Keaton's real name? Michael Douglas.
  • Brian Drummond is best known for voicing Vegeta in the Ocean Dub Dragon Ball Z (and delivered the famous "Over 9000" line). Ryan Drummond is best known as the voice of Sonic the Hedgehog from 1998 to 2005.
  • Dublin and Blackpool are at the same latitude on opposite shores of the Irish Sea. Dubh linn is Gaelic for black pool. Also of note is that Dublin has a suburb named Blackpool. As does Cork, Ireland's second city.
  • In the last round of 2017–18 EFL League Two matches, two players with the same name were sent off together in Swindon Town's 3-0 win over Accrington Stanley. Swindon's James Dunne was given a straight red card for a foul on Accrington's James "Jimmy" Dunne, who received a second yellow card for his reaction to the foul.
  • You should not confuse high-scoring black forward Kevin Durant with high-scoring white forward Devin Durrant. The former is a bona fide NBA superstar, while the latter played just one season in the NBA in the mid-'80s.

    E 
  • We have Amelia Earhart, the pilot who went missing, and Amelia Earhart, traffic reporter for NBC's Denver affiliate KUSA (she left for Los Angeles briefly in 2009). A promo from 2005 actually played off of this. The traffic reporter Earhart thought they were related, but turned out they are not. It still inspired her to learn flying, quit her job, raise money via crowd sourcing, and embark on an around-the-world flight of her own following footsteps of the famed aviator.
  • How big is the probability that there are two unrelated computer pioneers named Eckert (namely Wallace John Eckert and J Presper Eckert) ? (The German name is not that common.)
  • It's a good thing that Portugal and Italy didn't meet during Euro 2016 - both had strikers called Éder.
  • On the London Underground, the Bakerloo Line has a station called Edgware Road, and is not connected to the one on the Circle, District and Hammersmith & City Lines.
    • There are two LU stations each called Hammersmith and Paddington, which are shown as unified on the famous tube map. Until 2008, there were also two unconnected Shepherd's Bush stations: one on the Central Line and the other on the Hammersmith & City Line. The latter was renamed Shepherd's Bush Market to remove the confusion.
  • A quip for hardcore soccer fans: "Actually I wanted Eto'o, but seems the president heard Edu." (Mike Büskens, trainer of German club Fürth)
  • Gareth Edwards: Either the British film and TV director, the BBC radio and TV producer, or the Welsh all-time rugby great.
  • John Edwards is an American politician of the Democratic Party, who unsuccessfully sought the presidential nomination in 2004 and 2008 and was the vice-presidential nominee the first time around. John Edward (no s) is a professional psychic medium who has starred in two television shows. The latter's use of Cold Reading techniques lead to detractors calling him a Phony Psychic, but he obviously still has fans.
    • Also not to be confused with Jonathan Edwards, noted American Reformation theologian of the 1700s... who himself is not to be confused with Jonathan Edwards, an American musician who had his best days in the 1970s, or Jonathan Edwards, a British triple jumper who won gold at the 2000 Olympics and still holds the world record in the event.
    • There is also Jedward, a pair of annoying hyperactive Irish popstar twins, who were initially known by their first names John and Edward.
  • Actor/comedian Albert Brooks' real name is Albert Einstein
  • Grandson of the 34th President of the United States, Dwight Eisenhower and eponym of Camp David, David Eisenhower shares almost the exact the same name with David Eisenhaur, who bullied and murdered thirteen year-old Nicole Lovell.
  • Bob Elliott was the National League's Most Valuable Player in 1947, and Ray Goulding's partner in comedy.
  • Ellis Park — the rugby union stadium in Johannesburg (commercially known as Emirates Airline Park) or the horse racing track most notable for being Kentucky's only significant landmark north of the Ohio River.note 
  • There are two notables with the name Greg Ellis - one, the guy who voiced Cait Sith; the other, a linebacker in the National Football League.
  • Terry Ellis, male, white, English former manager of Jethro Tull and co-founder of Chrysalis Records, or Terry Ellis the female African-American En Vogue singer?
  • Warren Ellis is the name of both a comic book guy and Nick Cave's violinist. The former even addresses this in his Twitter bio.
  • Tony Esposito is an Italian musician and songwriter. Tony Esposito is also an NHL Hall of Fame goalie.
  • Chris Evans, Hollywood actor and Chris Evans, the bloke who was married to Billie Piper and took over from Terry Wogan.
    • The science fiction author is Christopher Evans on the book covers, but Ansible consistently calls him Chris...
  • Linda Evans: SF/F writer, star of The Big Valley, Mitchell and Dynasty, or 1980s political radical?
Advertisement:

    F 
  • "Falcão", Portuguese for "falcon", can lead to this. The first exponent was retired Brazilian striker Paulo Roberto Falcão, who inspired both the nickname of futsal player Alessandro Rosa Vieira and the name of Colombian striker Radamel Falcao García Zárate (notice the lack of accent). In Brazil there are also two singers with a Last-Name Basis, rock singer Marcelo Falcão and camp-fueled comedy singer Marcondes Falcão.
  • There are at least three email services called Fastmail (not counting those whose name includes Fastmail); the Australian one which was for a while a subsidiary of Opera, the Canadian one (whose rep showed briefly on EmailDiscussions because his service was mistaken for the Australian one), and the Greek one.
  • Jon Favreau? The Barack Obama speechwriter or the director for the first two Iron Man movies?
  • A Kurt Felix was a popular television presenter in Switzerland in The '70s, then in West Germany in The '80s. Another one is a Grenadian Olympic athlete in The New '10s.
  • Two famous women carry the nickname Fergie: the Duchess of York and the former leader of the The Black Eyed Peas.
  • After finishing second in the British version of The X Factor in 2010, Rebecca Ferguson would go on to appear opposite Tom Cruise in Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation.
  • Fernandinha Fernandez is a Brazilian porn star. In order to avoid confusion with the porn star, Brazilian voice actress Fernanda Fernandes had to change her surname to "Baronne".
  • Although many NFL players move on to professional wrestling once their football days are over, the Manny Fernandez who wrestled in the 1980s is not the same Manny Fernandez who played for the Miami Dolphins in the 1970s. Nor did he play goalie for the Minnesota Wild during the 2000s.
  • Rudy Fernandez: The late action star from the Philippines, or the current basketball player from Spain. You choose.
  • In the past, there were two open-source programs named Firebird; a database server and a Web browser. To avoid confusion, the Web browser's name was changed to the more familiar Firefox. The database server is still called Firebird.
    • What's more, the name of Mozilla's browser was changed to Firebird because its original name, Phoenix, is also the (trademarked) name of a company that develops BIOS software for PCs.
    • And then there's the Mozilla project's browser for Mac OS X, Camino. It was originally called Chimera, but changed because several other pieces of software are also called Chimera (including a very old web browser for UNIX).
    • And Firebird is also a type of flashy Pontiac muscle car.
    • Another "Firebird" is a kind of Gibson electric guitar.
  • When you hear the name Carrie Fisher you think of Princess Leia, well there is another Carrie Fisher, though she still uses her maiden name of Carrie Underwood professionally.
  • There were three men at the court of Henry VIII of England named William Fitzwilliam. All three were knighted, meaning they were all Sir William Fitzwilliam. They were only distantly related.
  • Flamenco is both the name of a Gypsy-originated dance and the Spanish translation of "Flemish", yet they have completely unrelated etymologies.
  • An actor named "Ian Fleming" once had a minor role on an episode of The Prisoner. He shared his name with the author of the James Bond series.
  • Brandon Flowers, the football player, is not the lead singer for The Killers.
  • FM: frequency modulation, a technique for broadcasting high-qualty audio; a misnomer for VHF Band 2 (because that's where the radio stations which use FM are); the Federal Republic of Micronesia; and Opera Software's former e-mail subsidiary (now once more independent), FastMail (who drew their self-chosen abbreviation, as well as their domain name, partly from Micronesia).
  • Frankfurt am Main or Frankfurt an der Oder? (This is so well-known in Germany that a nonsense song strophe lampshades it and suggests that they had to split up Frankfurt as it was too large.)
  • Harrison Ford shares a name with a silent film actor, who famously had a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame long before him.
  • A number of people named Robert Ford have attained fame and infamy. One was a mayor of Toronto involved in numerous personal and political scandals, one was a South Carolina state senator involved in a campaign finance scandal, one was a former US Ambassador who was photographed meeting with Islamic State supporters, and one killed Jesse James.
  • Marc Forster, German-Swiss filmmaker, and Mark Forster, German pop singer.
  • Coaching two different Atlantic Coast Conference teams (Clemson and Duke) simultaneously from 1975 to 1980 would've been one of the greatest feats in college basketball history, except it was actually two unrelated guys named Bill Foster.note  Neither should be confused with Bill Foster, the congressman who has represented part of the outer suburbs of Chicago since 2008.
  • Another case of Fosters, spelled differently but sounding the same: 19th-century American songwriter Stephen Foster and former anime dubbing director for ADV Films and Sentai Filmworks, Steven Foster.
  • Fox['s] of Hayes could be: the coach firm which provided the coach for Magical Mystery Tour; any of several other coach firms ("Fox" is a fairly common surname, and there are at least two places called "Hayes" in Greater London County alone); a music group; or a song by Dandelion. Presumably, the last two are named after the first.
  • Long before Michael J. Fox became an actor, there already was an actor called Michael Fox who starred on such TV series as Science Fiction Theater (name-dropped in Back to the Future, which the younger Fox starred in). Michael J. thought of using his middle initial A (for Andrew) to distinguish himself, but wanted to avoid headlines like "Michael, A Fox!" or "Michael 'Eh?' Fox", thus picking the middle initial J in homage to actor Michael J. Pollard.
  • Samantha Fox, the Page 3 model and pop singer, is not to be confused with adult film actress Samantha Fox.
  • Francis I was a 16th-century king of France from the Valois dynasty. In 2013, he was elected Pope before deciding to just go with Francis.
  • The guy who sings the German version of "Young Love Rock 'n Roll" is named Benjamin Franklin.
  • Brian Froud: Fantasy artist, or Canadian voice actor?
  • Tito Fuentes, note  the Cuban baseballer who became a San Francisco Giants cult hero, is not to be confused with the lead singer note  of controversial Mexican rap-rock band Molotov.
    • Neither of the two are to be confused with American (of Puerto Rican descent) Mambo and Jazz musician Tito Puente.
  • Robert Fuller: Pro wrestler who later became Col. Robert Parker, or Dr. Kelly Brackett on Emergency!?

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report