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  • The Arrow is a Centaur comics character revived in Project Superpowers, a member of the Protectors in Malibu Comics, a hero in Legion Unleashed by Raven Entertainment, and the Arrowverse alias of Oliver Queen. Arrow is a Green Arrow inspired foe in The Legion.
  • Backlash is a former member of Team 7 and Stormwatch, a foe of The Ultraverse character Warstrike, and a foe of the Justice League Task Force and Freedom Fighters.
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  • Blue Marvel is the alias of Adam Brashear. In Quasar, the 1950's Marvel Boy and an impostor of Marvel Boy both appeared as Blue Marvel.
  • Black Cat is a Marvel Comics character and a Harvey Comics character.
  • Blackout is the name of an obscure Nova villain and an unrelated foe of Ghost Rider.
  • Marvel has both the Fixer, an Avengers villain who later became a founding member of the Thunderbolts, and Roscoe "The Fixer" Sweeney, the gangster who murdered Daredevil's dad.
  • Oracle is the identity former Batgirl Barbara Gordon took up after being crippled during The Killing Joke, as well as the name of the company started by Namor. Lampshaded in an issue of Heroes for Hire:
    And let's get something straight: Oracle is not the lady in the wheelchair who talks to a certain pointy-eared dude. That's a different universe.
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  • Decay is the name of a male Supergirl villain from 1982, an invulnerable monstrous Wonder Woman villainess, and an assassin who appeared in Comic Book/Quicksilver.
  • There are two popular comic strip characters known as Dennis the Menace: the American one created by Hank Ketcham, and the UK one featured in the anthology comic The Beano. Both are young grade-school boys who own dogs and get into mischief, but they're otherwise quite different. To make the coincidence even more astounding, the characters first appeared (in different publications, on opposite sides of the Atlantic) within three days of each other in March 1951.
    • To avoid confusion the American version is "Dennis" in the UK and the British comic is called "Dennis and Gnasher" outside the UK.
    • The UK version lampshades this in an issue when Dennis and Gnasher attend a comic convention, where two apparently-American cosplayers confuse him for the US one.
  • Bucky is either Bucky Barnes, a girl adopted by Jack Monroe, or Rebecca Barnes from Heroes Reborn.
  • Before Marvel created Doctor Doom as the Arch-Enemy of the Fantastic Four, there was a Batman villain by that name. If you haven't heard of him, it's likely because he was Killed Off for Real at the end of his debut issue. Not to be confused with Doctor Droom, the obscure Avenger better known as Doctor Druid. There was also in the pages of various Archie Comics a Mad Scientist dubbed Mad Doctor Doom.
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  • DC and Marvel each have a character named Atom Smasher (typically differentiated by the Marvel one being Atom-Smasher). In DC, he's the size-changing grandson of the energy-projecting villain Cyclotron. In Marvel, he's the energy-projecting enemy of the size-changing hero Black Goliath.
  • There's The Sentry, a superhero and former Avenger, and the Sentries, a group of giant robots who serve the Kree.
  • The many Captain Marvels.
    • Billy Batson, the Lieutenant Marvels (all three of whom happened to share the name "Billy Batson" with the original) Mary Batson, Freddy Freeman on one side, and Mar-Vell, Genis-Vell, Phyla-Vell, Monica Rambeau, Khn'nr and more on the other... Granted, most of them have alternate names.
    • To add to the confusion, Monica Rambeau and Genis-Vell have both used the name Captain Marvel and Photon. They at least consciously made the swaps together so you didn't have both using the name at the same time.
      • Monica Rambeau also eventually settled on the name Spectrum, not to be confused with Doctor Spectrum, a member of the Squadron Supreme.
      • The situation was lampshaded in an Avengers filler arc where some bad guys mistakenly captured Monica while trying to get Carol Danvers, confused by the fact that both women used codenames containing "Marvel."
    • Played for Laughs in the final battle of JLA/Avengers. While fighting alongside Monica Rambeau, Doctor Light shouts "Captain Marvel, look out!" which causes both Mar-Vell and Billy Batson to reply "Thanks!" in unison.
    • And then there's the Space Pirate Captain Marvelous. In a twist, that's supposedly his real name; his superhero title is GokaiRed.
      • Aaannd we have the name Marvel Boy which has been used by a member of the New Warriors (who had an Alternate Timeline double to make things weirder), a teen Marvel superhero from the 50's, and a current Kree hero who is part of the Young Avengers. Marvel Boys have nothing to do with Captain Marvels, though. Neither does Jean Grey who once went by the name Marvel Girl.
      • That said, the 1950's Marvel Boy had powerful Quantum Bands which eventually went to S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Wendell Vaughn, who very briefly took the name Marvel Boy (later Marvel Man) before settling on being called Quasar. The Phyla-Vell Captain Marvel adopted the name Quasar for a while, and Wendell currently shares the title with a young woman named Avril Kincaid.
      • Speaking of Marvel Girl, this name was also used by Reed and Sue Richards' future daughter Valeria before she was reverted into fetus inside her mom, and Jean's Alternate Universe future daughter Rachel Summers.
    • Now that we have the whole Captain Marvel/Photon/Marvel Boy/Quasar thing sorted out, let's turn to Ms. Marvel. Ms. Marvel, Carol Danvers, was the Distaff Counterpart to Captain Mar-Vell. The name was also taken up by another woman, Sharon Ventura, who briefly joined the Fantastic Four during the period where the original Ms. Marvel was operating with the Starjammers under the name Binary. Ventura would later abandon her claim to the name and fully adopt the moniker She-Thing, while after returning to Earth and rejoining the Avengers, Danvers operated for a time under the name Warbird before returning to Ms. Marvel. During Dark Reign, Moonstone (Karla Sofen), a member of the Thunderbolts and herself a Distaff Counterpart Legacy Character (Karla stole the identity from the original Moonstone, Lloyd Bloch), took the name Ms. Marvel as her identity in the Dark Avengers.
      • And more recently, the former Ms. Marvel has taken up the Captain Marvel mantle herself. Which has in turn caused Marvel to recycle the Ms. Marvel identity for a new character named Kamala Khan. She was inspired to be a hero by the original, but other than that there's absolutely no connection between the two.
    • Also worth noting that one should not confuse Carol Danvers with Linda Danvers.
  • Diablo is a Marvel Comics villain and a Chilean anti-hero.
  • Faith, the dark-haired teenage heroine who foils a vampire coven's plot to Take Over the World, appears in the Chick Tracts Christian comics franchise. There is also another, nowadays far better known teenage girl named Faith who fights vampires in the Buffy the Vampire Slayer universe.
  • Freedom Fighters are a team of heroes in Sonic the Hedgehog (Archie Comics) and DC Comics.
  • Prior to the introduction of the X-Men's Dazzler, a villain with that same name showed up as the antagonist of the short-lived Angel back-up feature that ran in the 70s Ka-Zar series.
  • Gladiator is a Daredevil foe, and a member of the Shi'ar Imperial Guard.
  • Drax is a Guardians of the Galaxy member, the brother of Darkseid, and a Kryptonian.
  • Glory is an Amazonian, a waitress, or an alien in Image Comics, and a member of the Warriors of Plasm in Defiant Comics.
  • Miss America is the Timely/Marvel Comics Golden Age alias of Madeline Joyce, and the modern day alias of America Chavez. There was another Golden Age Miss America, originally from Quality Comics, later incorporated to DC, whose civilian name was Joan Dale.
  • Marvel and DC both have characters named Chthon. Marvel's is an evil Elder God who has menaced The Avengers (Scarlet Witch in particular) and Doctor Strange, while DC's is an obscure Rock Monster who battled the Justice League Europe.
  • Multi-Man of DC Comics (debuted 1960) and Multi Man of The Impossibles (debuted 1966) have surprisingly different powers.
  • Before the introduction of Titania (best known as an enemy of She-Hulk and the lover of Absorbing Man) in Secret Wars, there was another character by that name who battled The Thing and Dazzler as a member of a female supervillain team called the Grapplers. The original Titania has since been renamed Lascivious to avoid confusion with her better known successor.
  • During his first battle with the Fantastic Four, Galactus employed a robotic henchman known as the Punisher. No relation to the other guy.
  • John Dee is a villain in Night Raven, a mutant in the Stridex X-Men Marvel Collector's Edition comic, and an unrelated mutant first appearing in Son of M. John Dee is the alter ego of DC Comics villain Doctor Destiny.
  • Lobo is a Czarnian in DC Comics and a cowboy in Dell Comics.
  • Nick Fury is often called Fury, not to be confused with the Captain Britain foe The Fury or the Infinity, Inc. member Fury.
  • Master Mold is the leader of the Sentinels in X-Men and the device used for creating Life Model Decoys in the Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. series.
  • There have been multiple identities of Spider-Man's somewhat "Distaff Counterpart" Spider-Woman: Jessica Drew (black haired, wears red, can float, super power reels more about spider venom), Julia Carpenter (blonde, wears black, can float, her super power is more similar with Spidey although she shoots psionic energy webs), Mattie Franklin (seems to be very-directly inspired on Spidey himself, uses spider-legs), and Charlotte Witter (Villainess, white haired, wears green-yellow (a bit like Rogue)). And the Marvel Mangaverse turns Mary Jane Watson into this. There was a Golden Age Spider-Woman in Major Victory #1 by Dynamic Comics.
  • Marvel has Spider-Girl (May Parker & Anya Corazón), part of Spider-Man's related stable of characters, who debuted in 1998, while DC has Spider Girl (Sussa Paka) of the Legion of Super-Heroes who debuted in 1964. They're very different characters, with DC's version having Prehensile Hair.
  • There's an obscure Black Panther villain named Venomm who predates the far better known ''Spider-Man'' villain of the same name by quite a few years. In DC Comics, Venom is a super steroid used by Bane.
  • Carter Slade, the original Ghost Rider and the modern Ghost Riders. There's also a supporting character in Blaze of Glory named Ghost Wind Rider, who happens to be the daughter of Flaming Star, keeper of the Ghost Rider costume. Maybe's that's where he got the name from?
  • From Marvel's western comics, the heroic gunfighter duo the Gunhawks and the Bounty Hunter Gunhawk, singular. Also the rather exorbitant amount of Trope Kids.
  • DC Comics has a Batman villain named The Scarecrow and Marvel Comics has a villain named Scarecrow (who bounces around Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Ghost Rider's rogues galleries). They even teamed up in Marvel Vs. DC. There is in fact another Marvel villain known as Scarecrow, but now referred to as Straw Man.
  • For whatever reason, Green Lantern Hal Jordan happens to share a name with his own cousin, Harold "Hal" Jordan, alias Airwave. Yeah, what?
    • There's also a Hal Jordens who appeared in a Golden Age Timely's Submariner Comics issue, ten years before his more famous namesake's debut. Curiously enough, he's also an aircraft pilot and looks similar to Green Lantern.
  • American Eagle is the superhero identity of Jason Strongbow in Marvel comics; a Public Domain Character formerly of Nedor comics who has appeared since in Tom Strong and Project Superpowers; and a female students in PS238.
  • Changeling is either: a minor X-Men adversary from the 1960's who underwent an off-panel Heel–Face Turn and died while covering for Professor X; or another name for Teen Titans member Gar Logan. Both have shapeshifting abilities, but they function differently from each other (the former can change into other people, while the latter can transform into animals).
    • Morph from X-Men: The Animated Series was supposed to be a modernized version of Changeling, since he technically was an X-Men member in the comics, even if it was only established through a retcon. He even had the same civilian identity of "Kevin Sidney", but the codename "Changeling" couldn't be used at the time since it now belonged to the DC Comics character. Ironically, when the Teen Titans got their own animated series, Gar Logan went back to using his old Beast Boy handle. By that time, the Morph name had pretty much stuck for the Marvel character, with his Alternate Universe versions from Age of Apocalypse and Exiles using that name.
    • Savage Dragon also has a character named Beast Boy.
  • Speaking of the Exiles, the team shares its name with a group of obscure Silver Age Captain America villains.
  • The Mankiller is a HYDRA android that once battled Captain America, while Man-Killer is a Straw Feminist supervillain and former member of the Thunderbolts.
  • Magneto is both an incredibly popular villain/Anti-Hero from Marvel and an extremely obscure Aquaman villain from DC.
  • In the 1976, Teen Titans introduced a young black heroine (in fact, DC's first black female superhero) named Bumblebee, who could fly and fire energy "stingers." Years later in 1984, Marvel began publishing Transformers comics, and had been instrumental in developing the characters, including an Autobot named Bumblebee who could turn into a Volkswagen. This eventually led to a lawsuit, with Hasbro arguing that the Bumblebee dolls from the DC Super Hero Girls line infringed on their trademark.
  • Nightwing used to be known as Robin, but Nite-wing is a mentally ill man who got his name from a sign advertising chicken wings all "nite". The latter was a supporting character in the former's series. Nightwing is also the alias of Van-Zee the Kandorian.
  • Nomad is a hero name that's been used by Marvel Comics' Captain America (Steve Rogers), Jack Monroe, Rebecca Barnes from Heroes Reborn, and DC Comics' Valor (Lar Gand/Mon-El).
  • Dr. Hugo Strange is both a Golden Age hero and a Batman villain, but neither is to be confused with Marvel's Doctor Strange, who himself should not be confused with one-off Silver Age Iron Man villain Dr Strange. When the GA hero Strange was used in Tom Strong, his name was changed to Tom Strange, probably in part to avoid confusion and otherwise because he was in that story the alternate universe counterpart to Tom Strong.
  • For whatever reason, Malice is very popular villain name. We have:
  • In Avengers Annual #10 (1981) where future X-Men mainstay Rogue first appeared, a little girl, apropos of nothing, introduces herself as "Maddy Pryor," adding, "I been sick, but I'm better now." A little while later, X-Men leader Cyclops begins dating - and soon marries - a woman named Madelyne (Maddie) Pryor. Readers assumed there had to be a connection between the two. Actually there wasn't. In real life, Madelaine (Maddy) Prior is the name of a singer with Steeleye Span, a British folk rock group. Chris Claremont - the writer of the stories in question - liked the band and used the name as an homage twice, for two otherwise unrelated characters.
    • Similarly, before the Jubilee we know debuted, there was an unrelated one-shot character with the same name and power (and introduced herself with a similar line.) Evidently, it was a "wanted to reuse that character, but it wouldn't work with the way the older story ended" case.
  • Fleetway Comics published stories about a kid who played practical jokes on people called...wait for it...The Joker. No comment...
  • There's the DC/Milestone hero Static, and a far lesser known X-Men character of the same name.
  • When most comic fans hear the name Starfire, they think of a hot alien babe with orange skin, who wears a stripperiffic outfit and who is usually stacked enough to rival Power Girl. The name also belonged to the Russian hero, Red Star at a time, a short-lived Supergirl villain and also a sword-wielding female warrior.
  • Marvel has two separate heroines named Golden Girl: The original Golden Age version was a Badass Normal and Captain America's love interest/occasional partner. The Bronze Age version was a Japanese-American member of The Invaders (Marvel) who could fire Hand Blasts.
    • Speaking of Golden Girl, the original's civilian identity is Elizabeth Ross, who went by "Betty" for some time, no relation to Bruce Banner's frequent love interest Betty Ross.
  • Same goes for the Angel. The first was a Badass Normal costumed detective during the Golden Age, while the much more popular one is Warren Worthington III, the Winged Humanoid member of the X-Men.
  • An early issue of The Incredible Hulk had one-time villain, Mongu, a hulking "space barbarian" who turned out to be a Russian agent operating a Mini-Mecha designed to look like a space barbarian. Hulk trashed the armor and sent the agent, Boris Monguski, packing. Years later, Man-Thing encountered an actual barbarian named Mongu in a gladiatorial contest in Mongu's home dimension. The Maha Yogi would later bring Mongu to Earth to fight the Hulk and Doctor Druid.
  • Speaking of the Hulk, he was predated by an alien monster from Tales to Astonish called Xemnu the Living Hulk. Subsequent reprints of his first appearance changed his name to Xemnu the Living Titan, which is what he's gone by ever since.
  • Similarly, there's the X-Men member Colossus and the old Jack Kirby monster It, the Living Colossus.
  • In the Knightfall series of Batman there is a Dr. Simpson Flanders. (No word on whether he greets himself every morning and then tells himself to shut up.)
  • Two unrelated heroes also share the name The Vision. There's Aarkus, an extradimensional alien with the power to teleport, and Victor Shade, a Ridiculously Human Robot with the power to become intangible. Though Word of God is that the robot Vision was created as an Expy when Roy Thomas was denied permission to use the original. The name and costume are meant to be a Shout-Out to the Golden Age version.
  • DC's Liberty Belle and Blossom's Wonder Woman Wannabe alter ego of the same name in The Powerpuff Girls episode "Super Zeroes." One fights crime, the other gets held up in traffic while trying to fight crime.
    • The Powerpuff Girls comic book shares the story title "The Trouble With Bubbles" with an episode of the cartoon series. The comic book had Bubbles running away from home while the cartoon had her creating a 3-D printed clone of her to help around the house.
  • There is the Cult Classic Madman comic and a Slasher Movie from The '80s called Mad Man. They are both very different.
  • Do not pick up the award winning graphic novel Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth expecting Jimmy to have any connection to the Gotham City Police Department or The Spectre.
  • There seems to be no relation between Cain Marko (aka the Juggernaut) and Flint Marko (aka The Sandman), apart from the fact that both have fought Spider-Man and were co-created by Stan Lee. Flint Marko's name has since been retconned to be an alias.
  • Speaking of which, Marvel's Sandman has nothing to do with the several DC characters who go by that name (such as Wesley Dodds or Morpheus).
  • Marvel's Nemesis is the son of Apocalypse and also known as Holocaust, while DC's Nemesis is a super spy Master of Disguise who dated Wonder Woman for a while. There's also Doctor Nemesis, a public domain Golden Age character who is probably best known now for his association with the X-Men, and Nemesis, an armored villain from the original 80s The Falcon limited series.
  • The Bucky O'Hare universe is called the Aniverse, not to be confused with a much lesser-known furries-in-space comic called Tales From The Aniverse.
  • The 1940s Timely Comics heroine Black Widow is definitely not the same character as the more familiar Marvel Comics Russian spy hero of the same name. And neither of them have any connection with the BattleTech character, the Black Widow who leads the eponymous mercenary sub-unit in Wolf's Dragoons. Although both Natasha Romanoff (Marvel) and Natasha Kerensky (FASA) are both extremely attractive Russian redheads who are dangerous to those who cross them...
  • We have Daredevil, a Marvel superhero from the sixties who is blind, but has supersenses, wears a red devil-like costume, and fights with a billy club . We also have Daredevil, a Lev Gleason Badass Normal superhero from the forties who wears a red-and-blue costume (split down the middle) and is very good with a boomerang.
  • In Marvel Comics, Hamilton Slade is the real identity of the third Phantom Rider, a modern day descendant of Carter Slade. Hamilton Slade is also an 18th century vampire in the Marvel miniseries Apocalypse vs Dracula.
  • There is a G.I. Joe character named Ghost Rider. When Marvel was publishing G.I. Joe comics, they didn't want the trademark getting confused, so his name was never used (there was a Running Gag that nobody could ever remember his name). Now that IDW is publishing it...the running gag is maintained, because Marvel still owns the trademark in comics.
  • Marvel has two completely unrelated heroes named Prodigy. The first was a member of the Slingers and Avengers Initiative named Richie Gilmore, and the second is David Alleyne, a member of the Young Avengers and former member of the New X-Men.
  • This is going to be a plot point for the Sonic the Hedgehog (Archie Comics)/Mega Man (Archie Comics) crossover Worlds Collide when Shadow Man meets the Roboticized Master Shadow Man, who resembles Shadow the Hedgehog.
  • Victor Zsasz is the name of a serial killer that Batman deals with occasionally. Charles Victor Szazs is the real name of Vic Sage, The Question. Not quite the same thing, but very close. (Both were named after the psychologist Thomas S. Szasz.)
  • There are two Superman Substitutes called Omniman, and Supreme fought both of them. The first, during Alan Moore's Awesome Comics run, was a fictional character come to life, and the second is the father of Invincible, who fought Supreme in Erik Larsen's Image Comics run.
  • Phoenix was the short-lived identity used by Helmut Zemo before he settled on becoming the new Baron Zemo, years before Jean Grey began calling herself "The Phoenix". The aforementioned Rachel Summers, the Alternate Timeline daughter of Jean Grey, is also known as The Phoenix.
  • In the Marvel universe, Gorgon is both the name of the Inhuman Gorgon Petragon, and the codename of criminal Tomi Shishido. (and that's not counting how the mythological Gorgons existed and had a descendant of theirs, Delphyne Gorgon, in the present day)
  • In a bizarre coincidence, Luke Cage and Captain America both have two separate villains named Diamondback and Cottonmouth. Luke's Diamondback and Cottonmouth are street level villains (and both male), while Cap's Diamondback and Cottonmouth are superpowered members of the Serpent Society (and Diamondback is a woman).
    • Luke himself has a case of this, as once he was hunted by villain (later reformed) Erik Josten on the grounds he was known as Power Man before him - Luke won the fight.
  • Bug is the name of two different Spider-Man Captain Ersatz from DC Comics. One's a blue and red multi-armed superhero who was a member of The Maximums from Jeph Loeb's run on Superman/Batman. The other is a brown-costumed version who is a member of The Retaliators from Earth-8 who appeared in Grant Morrison's The Multiversity. Bug is also a character from the Marvel Comics Micronauts series who has appeared in Earth-616 continuity.
  • Deadeye. The name of an Evil Counterpart of Green Arrow from planet Qward in the Anti-Matter universe, who appeared in Justice League International. And the name of the Hawkeye Captain Ersatz of Earth-8 from The Multiversity. There's also the Amalgam Universe character who's the merge of DC's Deadshot and Marvel's Bullseye.
  • Speaking of Bullseye, a few years before he first appeared, an unrelated costumed assassin named Bull's Eye was featured in Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. #15.
  • This is the reason why Spider-Gwen is titled the way it is. While canonically her hero name is "Spider-Woman," we already have an active Spider-Woman - Jessica Drew. It's also a Fan Nickname that went canon. Eventually, Marvel changed Gwen's hero name in-universe to Ghost-Spider as a way to further differentiate the two.
  • Many years before Spider-Man's debut in Amazing Fantasy, Harvey Comics' Chamber of Chills had a one-shot Mad Scientist villain called "The Spider Man."
  • An aquatic superhero debuted in World War II. He was the last survivor of an underwater civilization (and royalty to boot), had superior strength, and fought the Axis. If you're thinking it's Namor, you're wrong. It's Iron Man.
  • Spirit of '76 is a Marvel Comics character and a Harvey Comics character.
  • Supervillain Thanos shares his name with a villain in the French comicbook Lanfeust and they're both ruthless conquerors.
  • The Red Hood's full name is Jason Peter Todd. The Golden Age Flash, whose identity was public and who lived as a hero long before Jason was born, is named Jason "Jay" Peter Garrick.
  • Pantha is a Cat Girl. But one is an ally of Vampirella and the other is a member of the Teen Titans. Add the somewhat obscure Princess Pantha. Luckily, at least the NSFW Panthea by Trina Robbins has a slightly different name...
  • In a 1966 story by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee, a hallucinating Captain America sees several old enemies of his and identifies one of them as Agent Axis. Kirby had indeed created a Nazi villain with that name back in the 40s, but it was during his time at DC. Roy Thomas later addressed this apparent mistake by creating a distinct Agent Axis for Marvel, using him in The Invaders (Marvel). And shortly afterwards, DC reused the name for another apparently unrelated Nazi.
  • There were two cartoon characters named Dilbert: one created by Robert Osborn during World War II, and another created by Scott Adams.
  • Warlock's nemesis is Magus, and Warlock's nemesis is Magus.
  • Weapon X is the code name of three individuals and four clandestine projects.
  • DC Comics has two stories titled "World War III": the first being the finale to Grant Morrison's JLA, where the Justice League had to deal with a runaway weapon of the Old Gods that was driving several people (including world leaders) into homicidal or even genodical rage, and an issue and tie-in miniseries for 52, where Black Adam lashed out at the planet.
  • X is a Dark Horse Comics vigilante. In Marvel Comics, X is the founder of The Brotherhood, and the new moniker of Professor X.
  • There are at least four different individuals known as Goliath affiliated with the Batman title, though they exist in different realities and are all completely different. There was the Earth-One Batman villain and the Joker infected Albert King from the Arkhamverse, in addition to the non-human six-armed assassin Red Robin fought who was wiped from reality to be replaced with the heroic "dragon bat" Damian keeps as a pet.
  • In Detective Comics, Lorna Dane is a murder victim. In X-Men, Lorna Dane is capable of fighting back.
  • Nightshade is a very beloved name for shady ladies. We have at least a DC version (a shadow-manipulating heroine associated with the Suicide Squad), a Marvel version (a beautiful Mad Scientist known for fighting Captain America, Black Panther and Luke Cage), and the C.O.P.S. version. Mercilessly nightshaded...eh, lampshaded in a (NSFW) fanfic where Tara goes superheroine...and is the first one bearing the name justifiably...she's a tomato and thus belongs to the nightshade plants.
  • Winged Victory is the name of both Shining Knight's horse and Astro City's resident Wonder Woman Expy.
  • The Wrecker is best known as a Thor / Avengers villain and the leader of the Wrecking Crew, but an unrelated saboteur known by that same name appeared as the antagonist of the first crossover between the Fantastic Four and The Incredible Hulk back in the early 60s.
  • Spider-Man has a recurring villain called Shocker, but there's also a very obscure member of Magneto's Brotherhood of Evil Mutants with the same name. He was later renamed Paralyzer to avoid confusion.
  • Danger Girl's Sonya Savage shares her name and red hair color with Red Sonja. Sonya's last name "Savage" could even be a reference to Red Sonja being a Barbarian Hero.
  • Amadeus Cho and Nicholas "Nicco" Cho are both Asian and Nerdy comic book characters with the last name Cho. Amadeus is a supporting character to The Incredible Hercules and The Incredible Hulk while Nicco is a supporting character to Power Girl.
  • Both Marvel and DC have a Lady of Black Magic named The Enchantress who wears green and fluctuates between being a hero and a villain. DC's Enchantress is an artist named June Moone who is known for being a member of the Suicide Squad and Shadowpact. Marvel's Enchantress is named Amora and is a love interest/enemy of Thor.
  • Jade Nguyen aka Cheshire of Teen Titans fame shares her first name with Jade, a vampire sorceress from Chaos! Comics. Like Cheshire, Chaos! Jade is also an Asian woman who wears green.
  • Both Marvel and DC have a villain named Arclight. The one from Marvel is an X-Men villain who can generate shock waves and geo tremors. The DC one is a Superman villain who is an Energy Being.
  • A DC Comics superhero formerly known as the Gay Ghost was later renamed the Grim Ghost due to the modern usage of the word "gay". Coincidently, an Atlas/Seaboards comics superhero is also called the Grim Ghost.
  • Lanolin can refer to two different sheep: an ill-tempered one or a Freedom Fighter.
  • Dennis the Menace: The US and UK series not only share names, but the title character of both is a mischievous kid with a slingshot, and a dog.
  • In a rare case both DC and Marvel intentionally created a superhero team called "The Crusaders". The DC version was based on Marvel's Invaders and battles DC's Freedom Fighters. The Marvel version features the roles reversed.
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