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Arthur Stewart "Art" Farmer was an American jazz trumpeter and flugelhorn player. Noted for his playing style, he created trumpet solos that relied heavily on lyricism and form. He became one of the most versatile improvisers of his generation. While elements of Farmer’s work were likened to the bebop of masters Dizzy Gillespie and Fats Navarro, Farmer abandoned bebop’s dramatic high notes and complexity to concentrate on pure melody. Giving his playing a warm timbre and a melodic approach to phrasing.

He also played a major part in creating a trumpet–flugelhorn hybrid, the flumpet, which was constructed for him by theinstrument maker David Monette. This instrument allowed him to play with more expression in a range of settings, from small groups to big bands.

He would die in 1999 of a heart attack. However, not without influencing countless modern trumpeters such as Roy Hargrove and Arturo Sandoval.

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Tropes associated with Art Farmer

  • Always Identical Twins: Had a twin brother named Addison Farmer, with whom they would acknowledge their uniform appearance with humour, such as in this image
  • Dedication: The original flumpet he used had several symbols dedicated to his close friends (Harry Edison, Clifford Brown) and influences (Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Armstrong).
  • Game-Breaking Injury: Art initially left school to tour with a group led by Johnny Otis, but this would lasted for only four months, as his lip gave out while on tour. Performing for long periods for this job put great pressure on his technique, which was insufficiently developed to cope with such physical demands. His lip eventually became lacerated, and he could no longer play. Fortunately, he would get better and later play for Dizzy Gillespie.
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  • Jazz: Art was a reputable trumpeter in the genre and even helped invent a new instrument in the process.
  • Reclusive Artist: He was described as mellow, gentle and introverted, in the same vein of his horn playing. He had even built a soundproof room in one of his homes in order to practice for at least four to five hours a day by himself.
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