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Many video games seem to undergo a wide variety of titles across the globe.


Systems:

  • Many early Japanese game consoles had their names changed for the overseas market:
    • The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was originally released as the Family Computer (FC) or Famicom for short, with the hardware itself being completely redesigned from the more toy-like top-loading design used by the Famicom with the permantly-wired controllers to the more VRC-looking front-loading design used by the NES with its detachable controllers. The differences are not just cosmetic. The different pin size of the cartridges themselves meant that certain Famicom games, most notably Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse, would employ additional sound channels that cannot be heard on an actual NES console, even when played with a converter, without some modding. Moreover, the Famicom has a dedicated expansion port for additional peripherals, whereas the NES uses controller port#2 for the same purposes, rendering peripherals for both consoles mutually incompatible with each other as well (although, the Famicom AV would switch to using NES-style controller ports while still keeping dedicated ports for peripherals).
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    • Likewise Super Famicom, is known as the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (or Super NES for short) outside Japan, but only the North American model went with a different design for the console and controllers.
    • In South Korea, Hyundai Electronics (now Hynix) officially distributed Nintendo consoles under the Comboy line. The NES became the Comboy, the SNES became the Super Comboy, the Game Boy became the Mini Comboy, and the N64 became the Comboy 64. Starting with the Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo's consoles kept their original name in Korea, although the GameCube was distributed by Daewon, with Nintendo finally distributing its consoles themselves starting with the Wii and DS.
    • Sega:
      • The company's Mark III was released as the Sega Master System overseas (a name later used in Japan for a revised version of the Mark III). In Korea, it was called the Gam*Boy. Yes, really.
      • The Mark III's successor, the Mega Drive, was released as the Sega Genesis in North America and the Super Gam*Boy in Korea (but was still called the Mega Drive everywhere else). The rename for the North American market was usually attributed to a trademark dispute, but it was actually because Sega co-founder David Rosen did not like the term "Mega Drive" and wanted the name to reflect that it was a "new beginning" for Sega. Either way, as a result, the Mega CD add-on became known as the Sega CD in America, and the Super 32X in Japan was exported to Europe as the Mega 32X and to America as the Genesis 32X.
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    • The PC Engine became the TurboGrafx-16. In Britain it had a limited release just as the TurboGrafx with no number.

By Company:

  • A few of Compile's Casual Video Games were also subjected to this trope, with Lunar Ball becoming Lunar Pool and Party Games for the Sega Master System becoming Parlour Games.
  • Electronic Arts produced the Sega Genesis versions of several British Amiga games from Psygnosis, retitling two of the conversions: The Killing Game Show became Fatal Rewind, and Leander became Galahad. EA also published Galahad as The Legend of Galahad in Europe; the Genesis/Mega Drive version of The Killing Game Show was published under its original title in Japan, but not Europe. (Shadow of the Beast, a Psygnosis game with better recognition and wider distribution to begin with, was not retitled by EA for the Genesis.)
  • When Mattel Electronics began porting their Intellivision games to the Atari 2600, they marketed them under the "M Network" label, with different packaging and mostly different names (non-sports Licensed Games and arcade ports were exempt):
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    • Armor Battle became Armor Ambush.
    • Astrosmash became Astroblast.
    • Frog Bog became Frogs And Flies.
    • Major League Baseball became Super Challenge Baseball.
    • NASL Soccer became International Soccer.
    • NFL Football became Super Challenge Football.
    • Night Stalker became Dark Cavern.
    • Space Battle became Space Attack.
    • Averted with Star Strike, which had the same name on both systems.
  • Epyx changed the titles of many of the European computer games it imported to the United States:
    • Alternative World Games became Sports-a-Roni.
    • Barbarian: The Ultimate Warrior and its sequel Barbarian II: The Dungeon of Drax became Death Sword and Axe of Rage.
    • Driller became Space Station Oblivion.
    • Inside Outing became Devon Aire in the Hidden Diamond Caper.
    • International Karate became World Karate Championship; the sequel IK+ was released by a different U.S. publisher as Chop n' Drop.
    • Quedex became Mindroll.
    • The Sacred Armour of Antiriad became Rad Warrior.
    • StarRay became Revenge of Defender.
  • Sinclair Research changed the titles of several early Hudson Soft games when publishing them for the ZX Spectrum: Bomber Man became Eric and the Floaters, Cannon Ball became Bubble Buster, and Itasundorious became Driller Tanks.
  • SNK
    • Art of Fighting is called "Ryuuko no Ken" ("Fist of the Dragon and Tiger") in Japan, which refers to the motifs that represent the Kyokugenryu styles of protagonists Robert Garcia and Ryo Sakazaki, respectively.
    • Fatal Fury's name in Japan is "Garou Densetsu" ("The Legend of the Hungry Wolf"), referring to series face Terry Bogard's nickname. The Japanese title is alluded to in the most recent (and currently final) installment, Garou: Mark of the Wolves, in all regions (although "Garou" was made into "Fatal Fury" for the Dreamcast release but kept the subtitle intact).
    • The Last Blade is called Bakamatsu Roman in Japan, referencing the time period in which it takes place (the end of the shogun age in Japanese history). Unlike the other SNK examples, this English title does reference the same age, albeit more abstractly than the Japanese name.
    • The oddly spelled Samurai Shodown series is called Samurai Spirits in Japan. The Japanese titles also do not use numbers to distinguish installments, instead opting for subtitles, while the English titles stick with Roman numerals.
  • Tec Toy, Sega's Brazilian distributor, curiously retitled a number of games for Sega consoles:
    • Bubble Bobble became Dragon Maze.
    • Columns became Shapes and Columns.
    • Enduro Racer became Super Cross.
    • Factory Panic became Crazy Company.
    • Halley Wars became Space Battle.
    • My Hero became Gang's Fighter.
    • SpellCaster became Warrior Quest.
    • TransBot became Nuclear Creature.

By Game:

  • The three PS2 Ace Combat games all had their titles changed in Europe.
  • Akumajō Dracula (Demon Castle Dracula), officially known as Castlevania, enjoys this trope a lot:
  • Of the Aleste series, various installments were distributed internationally by four different companies, who obscured the relations between them with different titles:
    • All Aleste games distributed by Sega became Power Strike outside Japan (including one game that was only released in Europe).
    • Musha Aleste dropped "Aleste" and became MUSHA: Metallic Uniframe Super Hybrid Armor (a backronym which already existed in the Japanese documentation).
    • Dennin Aleste became Robo Aleste, keeping the series title for once. This might qualify as a Completely Different Title, except that "Dennin" was otherwise left untranslated.
    • Super Aleste became Space Megaforce in North America, but the European release used the original title.
  • Alundra is known in Europe as The Adventures of Alundra.
  • Animal Crossing:
    • In native Japan, Animal Crossing is called Animal Forest (dobutsu no mori).
    • Let's Go to the City was released in North America with the subtitle City Folk, because "Let's Go to the City" is a bit too wordy in English and "City Folk" is a familiar American term with the same connotation. The European release notably uses the original title.
  • The Nintendo DS game titled Another Code: Two Memories in Japan and Europe was renamed Trace Memory in America. It even went so far as to rename the in-game device resembling a DS from Dual Another System (DAS) to Dual Trace System (DTS).
  • Another World was released in the U.S. as Out of This World, and in Japan as Outer World. It has been renamed back to Another World for its 20th anniversary rerelease in the U.S.
  • Aqutallion was released outside Japan as Secret of the Stars.
  • The Area 88 games are known as U.N. Squadron outside of Japan. Whatever the reason for the name change, it was certainly not due to licensing issues, as Shin, Mickey, and Greg all retain their likenesses.
  • The Sega Master System game TransBot was titled Astro Flash in Japan. Sega also created as an Arcade Game which had the same title in Japan but was titled Transformer internationally.
  • Atomic Runner Chelnov, as an Arcade Game, had the same title in all regions. The Sega Genesis port was released as just Chelnov in Japan and as Atomic Runner in the U.S. and Europe, even though the altered Excuse Plot of this version made Atomic Runner an Artifact Title.
  • Aztec Wars was released in Europe as The Aztec: True History Of Empire, as Aztec Empire in Poland, and as Die Azteken in Germany.
  • Baraduke has a rare US version named Alien Sector, where the only thing that changed is the title screen, since all the text was in English even in the original Japanese version.
  • Bare Knuckle is known as Streets of Rage outside of Japan.
  • The NES version of Batman: Return of the Joker was called Dynamite Batman in Japan.
  • When Battle Kid: Fortress of Peril made its official debut in Japan eight years after its original release, it was known there as Battle Kid: Kikenna Wana.
  • Mobile Phone Game Beauties Battle is also distributed as League of Beauties.
  • Biohazard is known as Resident Evil outside Japan, because Biohazard was too generic to be properly trademarked in America; both a band and another video game used the name.
    • The subtitle for the third game was also changed from Last Escape to Nemesis (after the titular monster), even though Jill title drops her "last escape" during the opening monologue.
    • Played with in Resident Evil 7: Biohazard, which combines the English and Japanese titles together, where they take top billing in their specific regions, making the Japanese title "Biohazard 7: resident evil".
  • Blackthorne was renamed Blackhawk in certain European countries. One possible explanation was due to sharing a name similar to a brand of British cider, Blackthorn; though this is unlikely for want of an 'E'. The GBA rerelease retained the original Blackthorne title.
  • The Data East run-and-gun shoot-em-up Bloody Wolf is known as Battle Rangers in Europe since "Bloody" is considered a profane word in England.
  • Bomber King was localized as Robo Warrior on the NES. Bomber King: Scenario 2 on the Game Boy was localized as Blaster Master Boy in America, and Blaster Master Jr. in Europe.
  • For a while, Bomberman was known as Dynablaster in Europe. There were a few Bomberman games from this era (Bomber Boy for the Game Boy and the Irem arcade games) that were retitled Atomic Punk for the U.S. market and retitled Dynablaster in Europe. The Nintendo Entertainment System game Bomberman II also used the Dynablaster name in Europe, but it used the original name in North America. This ended in 1993 with Super Bomberman using the same title worldwide.
  • For a while, the Bonk games were known as B.C. Kid in Europe. In Japan, Bonk is known as PC Genjin, being a Pun on the franchise's console of origin (the PC Engine), with "genjin" being Japanese for "caveman".
  • Breath of Fire. Outside Japan, Breath of Fire V: Dragon Quarter became Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter.
  • Bully became known as Canis Canem Edit (the Pretentious Latin Motto of the fictional Bullworth School) in the UK due to controversy over the title. It has since died down and the Updated Re-release was released under the title Bully.
  • Enix had a Rhythm Game in Japan known as Bust A Move. Unfortunately, Taito's Puzzle Bobble had already been released under that title outside of Japan, so Enix's game had to be released as Bust a Groove in the West. Since Square Enix succeeded both companies, European releases and some online versions use the Puzzle Bobble title instead of Bust-A-Move.
  • Masters of Combat, a Fighting Game for the Sega Master System, was released for the Game Gear in Japan as Buster Fight.
  • Cannon Dancer was changed into Osman for its English release.
  • Captain Tsubasa on the Famicom was given a Cultural Translation on the NES and renamed Tecmo Cup Soccer Game.
  • Castlequest for the NES was originally released as Castle Excellent in Japan. This raises the question of what the international title of Castle Quest, an unrelated Strategy RPG for the Famicom, would have been. Answer: a translated version of Castle Quest for the NES was previewed under the title Triumph, but only the Game Boy version was released overseas in Europe, under the Castle Quest title.
  • Castle of Shikigami came to the US "localized" as Mobile Light Force 2, and to PAL regions as MLF2.
  • Castleween was released in the U.S. under the title Spirits & Spells.
  • Kid Chameleon was released as Chameleon Kid in Japan.
  • The Chaos Engine was released in the U.S. on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and Sega Genesis as Soldiers of Fortune (not to be confused with Soldier of Fortune).
  • Chiki Chiki Boys was retitled Mega Twins outside Japan in all versions except the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive version which used the original title in all territories.
  • In Europe, the original Contra was released Gryzor on the arcades and home micros, and as Probotector on the NES. The latter version is notable for redesigning the protagonists and some of the enemy characters into robots due to a law in Germany that forbade the depiction of human characters killing each other in games sold to minors. This ban would be in effect until Contra: Legacy of War on the PlayStation, which was when the European versions of the console games started keeping the Contra name and characters.
    • Super Contra is known as Super C in North America and Probotector II: Return of the Evil Forces in Europe, but only the NES version. The arcade version used Super Contra in every region, even in Europe.
    • Operation C, the Game Boy-exclusive entry in the series, is simply known as Contra in Japan and Probotector in Europe. However, the Japanese version spells the title in katakana to distinguish itself from the arcade and Famicom versions, which used kanji.
    • Operation C was also included in the Game Boy Color Compilation Re-release Konami GB Collection: Vol. 1, a compilation that never reached North America. Weirdly, the European version used the Probotector name, but featured human characters.
    • Contra III: The Alien Wars is known as Contra Spirits in Japan and Super Probotector: Alien Rebels in Europe at least for the Super NES version. The Game Boy port was simply titled Contra: The Alien Wars (without a numeral) in North America and Probotector 2 in Europe (it was still called Contra Spirits in Japan).
    • Contra: Hard Corps is known as Contra: The Hard Corps in Japan and once again shortened to Probotector in Europe.
    • Contra Force would had been titled Arc Hound in Japan had the Famicom version been released.
    • Contra: Shattered Soldier is known as Shin Contra in Japan.
    • Contra Advance: The Alien Wars EX is known as Contra: Hard Spirits in Japan.
    • Contra 4 is known as Contra: Dual Spirits in Japan.
  • Crackdown for reasons unknown is called Riot Act in Japan.
  • The Crazy Castle series:
    • The Famicom game Roger Rabbit was brought to the Game Boy as Mickey Mouse, becoming the first game in the Mickey Mouse series in Japan.
    • The Bugs Bunny Crazy Castle on the NES is based on Roger Rabbit. The Game Boy version is based on Mickey Mouse.
    • Mickey Mouse II was released as The Bugs Bunny Crazy Castle 2 in the US. In Europe, the game was released as Mickey Mouse, and also as Hugo, to tie into the Hugo series, followed by the sequel Hugo 2, based on another Hugo 2 game on the PlayStation.
    • Mickey Mouse III: Balloon Dreams was released in the US as Kid Klown in Night Mayor World, becoming the first game in the Kid Klown series.
    • Mickey Mouse IV: The Magical Labyrinth was released as The Real Ghostbusters in the US and Garfield Labyrinth in Europe.
    • In Japan, Bugs Bunny: Crazy Castle 3 was also released as Let's Go!! Kid: Go! Go! Kid.
  • Data East USA retitled Crude Buster to Two Crude in arcades; the Sega Genesis port was retitled Two Crude Dudes in the US and Europe.
  • Early versions of Dance Dance Revolution are called Dancing Stage in Europe. Dance Dance Revolution X onwards drops this, instead being called DDR as well over there.
  • Each main game in the Danganronpa series has had its Japanese title changed for its western release:
  • Darius II was released as Sagaia outside Japan, and Darius Force was released in America as Super Nova.
  • The sequel to Level-5's Playstation 2 action-RPG Dark Cloud is known as Dark Cloud 2 in North America...and Dark Chronicle everywhere else.
  • Crusader of Centy is Dawn of the Era: Ragnacenty in Japan and Soleil in Europe.
  • The survival horror game Demento was released as Haunting Ground in North America.
  • For some strange reason, the game known as Dewprism in Japan was turned into Threads of Fate in the US.
  • The Puzzle Game Diablo (not to be confused with Diablo) had some Japanese-made ports retitled Blodia, and the TurboGrafx-16 version of Blodia was retitled Timeball in the U.S.
  • Digimon:
  • Donald Duck: Goin' Quackers is Donald Duck: Quack Attack in Europe. With at signs: Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers is Donald Duck: Qu@ck Att@ck in Europe.
  • Double Dragon
    • Double Dragon III: The Rosetta Stone became Double Dragon III: The Sacred Stones outside Japan. This was likely due to the fact that the Rosetta Stones that the Lee brothers collect throughout the game are nothing like the actual Rosetta Stone the game draws its title from. However, the arcade game, which spells its title with an Arabic numeral, was unaffected by this change and the title Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone, was used in every region.
    • Super Double Dragon is known as Return of Double Dragon in Japan.
  • PS2-era Dragon Ball Z fighting games provide an odd example:
    • In Japan, Dragon Ball Z: Budokai is Dragon Ball Z, Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2 is Dragon Ball Z 2, Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 3 is Dragon Ball Z 3, Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai is unchanged, while Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai - Another Road is Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai 2.
    • Japan's Dragon Ball Z: Sparking! is localized as Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi in America — essentially trading in Gratuitous English for Gratuitous Japanese.
  • Dragon Knight III became Knights of Xentar in the US.
  • The game DragonNinja was released in the US as Bad Dudes, and was released in Europe as Bad Dudes Vs. DragonNinja.
  • Dragon Quest:
    • Enix found that there was already an old RPG released in North America had used the title Dragon Quest and SPI (the publisher of said game) still held the trademark to the name. Thus, when bringing Dragon Quest I over, they were forced to use the name Dragon Warrior. Technically it was the camelcase DragonQuest, which, while not exactly the same, was still close enough to prevent Enix from calling its video games series Dragon Quest. Disuse of the DragonQuest trademark prevented any problems Square Enix would have had with obtaining the Dragon Quest trademark for the eighth entry on the PS2.
    • The Japanese titles were changed overseas instead of translated as Dragon Quest II: Gods of the Evil Spirits, or Dragon Quest II: Pantheon of Evil Spirits, Dragon Quest III: And thus into Legend..., Dragon Quest IV: The Guided Ones, Dragon Quest V: The Heavenly Bride, Dragon Quest VI: Land of Illusion, Dragon Quest VII: Warriors of Eden, and Dragon Quest VIII: The Sky, the Ocean, the Earth, and the Cursed Princess.
    • Europe drops numbers from most Dragon Quest releases, probably to avoid the "some titles were never released there" problem. In Europe, the DS title Dragon Quest IV: Chapters of the Chosen is Dragon Quest: The Chapters of the Chosen, Dragon Quest V: Hand of the Heavenly Bride is Dragon Quest: The Hand of the Heavenly Bride, Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation is Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Reverie, and Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King is Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King. The UK seems to be exempt from this practice; Dragon Quest IX on the DS was released about a year before VI, and both retain their numbering.
    • Dragon Quest Monsters: Dragon Quest Monsters: Terry's Wonderland became Dragon Warrior Monsters. Dragon Quest Monsters 2: The Mysterious Key to Malta - Iru's Adventure and Dragon Quest Monsters 2: The Mysterious Key to Malta - Ruka's Journey became Dragon Warrior Monsters 2: Tara's Adventure and Dragon Warrior Monsters 2: Cobi's Journey.
  • Dragon Slayer:
    • Legacy of the Wizard was Dragon Slayer IV: Drasle Family in Japan. "Dragon Slayer" remained the name of the Sword of Plot Advancement, and Brøderbund Software left somewhat confusing references to "the Draslefamily" in the manual.
    • The Legend of Heroes sub-series. Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes is known on the TG-16 as Dragon Slayer. Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes II was unreleased in English. The Legend of Heroes III: Shiroki Majo became The Legend of Heroes II: Prophecy of the Moonlight Witch. The Legend of Heroes IV: Akai Shizuku became The Legend of Heroes: A Tear of Vermillion. The Legend of Heroes V: Umi no Oriuta became The Legend of Heroes III: Song of the Ocean.
    • The Legend of Heroes: Zero no Kiseki and The Legend of Heroes: Ao no Kiseki were unreleased in English. The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki, The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki II and The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki III became The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel, The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel II and The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel III.
  • Elebits is called Eledees in Europe. It's a pun on LEDs, small electronic components which produce light for indicating the circuitry conveys the electricity properly.
  • Elnard became The 7th Saga. Mystic Ark was planned to be localized as 7th Saga II.
  • Emergency! 4 was released by Atari in the United States as 911: First Responders. The first three Emergency games were released in North America with their original names intact.
  • Epica Stella was published in North America as Vanguard Bandits.
  • Resonance of Fate is known as End of Eternity in Japan.
  • The Estepolis Denki series of JRPGs was renamed Lufia when the first installment, Lufia & The Fortress of Doom, was released in America. This ended up being an Artifact Title from the sequel onwards, as "Lufia" was the name of one of the major characters in the first game, who didn't appear in any of the others. Particularly confusing for people in the PAL regions, who never got the original at all and who had the name of the second game shortened to simply Lufia, a title that basically meant nothing to them.
  • Sega's Eternal Arcadia became Skies of Arcadia overseas.
  • The EXA_PICO series has had its rather lengthy titles shortened for each installment. The first game, Ar tonelico: Sekai no Owari de Utaitsudzukeru Shoujo (The Girl who Continues to Sing at the End of the World) became Ar tonelico: Melody of Elemia. Similarly, Ar tonelico II: Sekai ni Hibiku Shoujo-tachi no Metafalica (The Girls' Metafalica that Resounds through the World) became Ar tonelico II: Melody of Metafalica. Lastly, Ar tonelico III: Sekai Shuuen no Hikigane wa Shoujo no Uta ga Hiku (The Girl's Song that Pulls the Trigger of the World's Demise) broke the pattern with Ar tonelico Qoga: Knell of Ar Ciel.
  • Fahrenheit was marketed as Indigo Prophecy in the US, in order to avoid confusion with the film Fahrenheit 9/11.
    • However, the uncut version (a sex scene was removed to get an M rating in the US) was released as Fahrenheit.
  • Fatal Frame is known as Project Zero in Europe and just Zero in its native Japan.
  • The Sega Genesis version of Taito's Arcade Game Final Blow was released outside Japan as James "Buster" Douglas Knockout Boxing, a title also used for an altogether different Sega Master System game.
  • Final Fantasy
    • In North America, Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy VI were renumbered II and III respectively on the Super NES due to Squaresoft not localizing the three installments that were released in between those two and the original Final Fantasy. From Final Fantasy VII and onward, Squaresoft now had better resources that allowed them to localize the series without skipping entries, resulting in the newer games keeping their actual numbering. Thus, when Square started re-releasing and localizing the older games on newer consoles such as the PlayStation and Game Boy Advance, there was no longer any need to renumber them.
    • Before Square properly introduced Final Fantasy to Europe, Final Fantasy Adventure and Final Fantasy Mystic Quest were released there as Mystic Quest and Mystic Quest Legend, respectively. Mystic Quest was released in Japan as Final Fantasy USA: Mystic Quest.
  • The Natsume-developed Famicom shoot-'em-up Final Mission received a slightly enhanced NES localization for the American market with the unfortunate title of S.C.A.T.: Special Cybernetic Attack Team. The PAL version was given the more sensible (if generic) name Action in New York.
  • Fire Emblem Gaiden: Internationally, the 3DS remake is subtitled Shadows of Valentia. In Japan, it is subtitled Another Hero-King, playing up how Alm is Valentia's counterpart to Archanea's Marth, who is also known as the Hero-King.
  • Groove Coaster is marketed as Rhythmvaders in some Asia Pacific countries.
  • The Jaleco game The Ignition Factor was titled Fire Fighting in Japan.
  • Flipull was known as Plotting outside Japan, until Taito America released the Game Boy version under the original title.
  • Flying Shark was released in the U.S. as Sky Shark.
  • Most of the games in the Game & Watch Gallery series go by the Game Boy Gallery name in Australia due to what is technically the first game in the series, Game Boy Gallery, never being released outside of Europe and Australia. The first Game & Watch Gallery game is known as Game Boy Gallery 2 in Australia, and Game & Watch Gallery 2 and 3 are known as Game Boy Gallery 3 and 4 respectively. Game & Watch Gallery 4 breaks this pattern by instead being named Game & Watch Gallery Advance, and is the only game in the series to use the Game & Watch Gallery name in Australia.
  • Game Boy Wars Advance was retitled Advance Wars for its western release since it was first Wars game to get an international release and most western players would've not been familiar with the earlier Game Boy Wars games that were released only in Japan. When the DS sequels were made, the English versions kept the Advance Wars name, while the Japanese versions changed it to the Famicom Wars moniker of the series' home console installments.
    • The second DS game in the series is known as Advance Wars: Days of Ruin in North America and Advance Wars: Dark Conflict in Europe and Australia.
  • Pocket Arcade Story's original title in Japanese is Game Center Club. It was changed to Pocket Arcade Story due to the rest of the world being more familiar with Kairosoft's <x> <y> Story naming scheme and due to Game Center being the Japanese Gratuitous English term for arcade.
  • Ganbare Goemon is known as Mystical Ninja or Legend of the Mystical Ninja outside of Japan.
  • Intra-region example: Gaplus was rereleased under the name Galaga 3 to make it more clear that it was a sequel to the original Galaga. Somehow, they skipped making a "Galaga 2."
  • Garfield: Caught in the Act is titled Garfield in TV Land on PC, which was also the title of a cancelled 32X port.
  • The Girls Mode series of fashion boutique simulators is known as Style Savvy in North America, and New Style Boutique in Europe.
  • Mobile Phone Game Girls X Battle, Ninja Girls: Moe Moe Moe or Ninja Girls: Revolution is titled Kawaii Academy in Thailand and Sexy Academy in Indonesia.
  • God Slayer: Haruka Tenkū no Sonata (God Slayer: Sonata of the Far-Away Sky) became known as Crystalis, presumably to avoid offending religious people.
  • The arcade version of the original Gradius, as well as the three MSX games in the series, were released under the Nemesis title outside Japan. In a form of Recursive Import, the Nemesis name was used in Japan and Europe for the two Game Boy games (the first of which used the Nemesis title in North America, and the second of which came out as Gradius: The Interstellar Assault in North America) and Nemesis '90 Kai for the Sharp X68000 (an enhanced remake of the MSX version of Gradius 2). The arcade version of Gradius II was also released as Vulcan Venture in Europe. And Salamander became Life Force in the U.S., though the arcade versions differed a bit more than in name. On the NES, Life Force was called Life Force Salamander in Europe, Salamander being the name of the arcade version outside of North America.
  • Graffiti Kingdom was renamed to Magic Pengel for its English release. Confusingly, Graffiti Kingdom 2: Battle of Devil Castle was later released as... Graffiti Kingdom.
  • Gravity Rush, a Killer App for the PlayStation Vita, is called Gravity Daze in Japan.
  • Green Beret was released in North America as Rush'n Attack, exploiting the Cold War hysteria at the time (if it isn't so obvious, "Rush'n Attack" is a play on "Russian Attack").
  • Gunbird came to the US and Europe localized as Mobile Light Force.
  • Taito tweaked the title of Gun Frontier to Gun & Frontier outside of Japan to avoid confusion with the anime of the same name. They did the opposite to Dungeon & Magic, which lost the ampersand outside of Japan.
  • Gwent: The Witcher Card Game: The game is known as Gwint in the original Polish, presumably changed during the English localization of The Witcher 3 for ease of pronunciation.
  • Rad Racer was called Highway Star in Japan. Averted with the sequel, which was never released outside of North America.
  • The platformer Human Weapon: Dead Fox was released outside Japan as Code Name: Viper.
  • Astyanax was originally titled The Lord of King in Japan.
  • Forgotten Worlds was originally titled Lost Worlds in Japan. Later Japanese ports of the game used the English title as well.
  • Glory of Heracles: Proof of the Soul was released in North America as Glory of Heracles.
  • The Guardian Legend was originally Guardic Gaiden, a spin-off of the MSX game Guardic.
  • Mobile Phone Game Gundam Breaker Mobile was released as Gundam Battle: Gunpla Warfare outside of Japan.
  • Cannon Spike was released in Japan as Gunspike.
  • The first Hebereke game received a Cultural Translation as Ufouria. It never left Europe until nearly 18 years later, though.
  • The Hoshi no Kirby (Kirby of the Stars) series is shortened to just Kirby internationally. Even ignoring that (as we'll be doing in the following examples), most games get new subtitles between Japan, America, and Europe. This can get weird when newer titles reference prior subtitles from other regions.
    • The original game, simply titled Hoshi no Kirby, became Kirby's Dream Land in America. The next two games followed the same pattern (Kirby's Dream Land 2 and Kirby's Dream Land 3), while Kirby 64's American title exchanged "Dream Land" for the subtitle The Crystal Shards.
    • Kirby: Yume no Izumi no Monogatari ("Kirby's Dream Spring Story") became Kirby's Adventure. Its remake, Yume no Izumi Deluxe ("Dream Spring Deluxe") was instead renamed Kirby: Nightmare in Dream Land.
    • Kirby Super Deluxe made it to the US as Kirby Super Star and Europe as Kirby's Fun Pak.
    • Kirby: Sanjō! Dorocche Dan ("Arrive! Dorocche Gang") became Kirby: Squeak Squad in America and Kirby: Mouse Attack in Europe.
    • Atsumete! Kirby ("Gather! Kirby") was released internationally as Kirby Mass Attack; a play on the prior "Mouse Attack", even in America where that game was "Squeak Squad" instead.
    • Touch! Kirby has the title of Kirby: Canvas Curse in America and Kirby: Power Paintbrush in Europe. Its sequel Touch! Kirby Super Rainbow is known as Kirby and the Rainbow Curse in America and Kirby and the Rainbow Paintbrush in Europe.
    • Kirby Wii was rechristened Kirby's Return to Dream Land in America and Kirby's Adventure Wii in Europe; the latter of which includes the Super Title 64 Advance element from the Japanese title but has the unfortunate side effect of making it sound like a remake of the aforementioned Kirby's Adventure.
    • Averted by Kirby: Triple Deluxe, which stayed the same in all regions (barring the usual removal of Japan's "Hoshi no") - which is odd since "Triple Deluxe" was a Call-Back to "Super Deluxe", a title only used in Japan.
  • Intelligent Qube was released in Europe as Kurushi.
  • It's A Wonderful World became The World Ends with You because every variant of the original title that Square Enix could come up with was already trademarked.
  • The first Jet Set Radio is known as Jet Grind Radio in North America, allegedly to avoid confusion with the band Jet Set Satellite. The radio station is still referred to as "Jet Set Radio" in-game though. Apparently they weren't as worried about this confusion for the release of the game's sequel/remake/Alternate Continuity, Jet Set Radio Future, and the conflict was long gone by the time that the HD re-release of the first came out. However, the GBA port still retains the "Grind" title.
  • The Backyard Sports games are known by their original name, Junior Sports, in Europe.
  • JumpStart is known as Jump Ahead in the United Kingdom.
  • Deception: Kokumeikan was released as Tecmo's Deception: Invitation to Darkness, Kagero: Kokumeikan Shinsho was released as Kagero: Deception II, Soumatou was released as Deception III: Dark Delusion, Kagero II: Dark Illusion was released as Trapt, Kagero: Dark Side Princess was released as Deception IV: Blood Ties, and Kagero: Another Princess was released as Deception IV: The Nightmare Princess.
  • Kiki Kai Kai is known as Pocky & Rocky outside of Japan.
  • Kileak The Blood was released in the US as Kileak: The DNA Imperative, while the sequel's American title became simply Epidemic.
  • Kult: Heretic Kingdoms is called that in Europe (where it was made), but turned into Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition for its American release.
  • The Kunio-kun games released outside Japan were released as Super Dodge Ball, River City Ransom, and Crash 'n' the Boys: Street Challenge. River City Ransom was released as Street Gangs in the PAL regions. Later Kunio-kun games keep the River City title, despite taking place in Japan and focusing on the original characters.
  • The first Langrisser game was released on the Sega Genesis as Warsong.
  • Legend of the Cryptids is Legend of Monsters in Japan.
  • Mobile Phone Game Lies of Astaroth is also distributed as Elves Realm.
  • Lilo & Stitch
    • The PlayStation release of Lilo & Stitch: Trouble in Paradise has its subtitle dropped by Sony Computer Entertainment America in the United States, even though the game's Windows version was also released in the U.S. with the original title intact. Complicating matters is that there is also another Lilo & Stitch video game for the Game Boy Advance by a different developer that also goes without a subtitle, which caused a few online databases to mistakenly define that game as a version of Trouble in Paradise for a while.
    • The GBA game's standalone sequel Lilo & Stitch 2: Hämsterviel Havoc loses the subtitle in Europe, while Japan also removes the number and swaps out the ampersand for the word "and". (Japan never received the first Lilo & Stitch GBA game.) Additionally, the title screen of the Japanese version adds The Series as a subtitle, since it's the tie-in game to that show.
    • The first tie-in game to the Stitch! anime, Stitch! DS: Ohana to Rhythm de Daibouken (literally Stitch! DS: A Great Adventure of Ohana and Rhythm), had its name pared down in English to Disney Stitch Jam for the North American and European releases.
  • Some level names in LittleBigPlanet PSP change depending on the localization: "High on Rugs" vs. "Rugs and Kisses" or "Brazilian Whacks" vs. "Golissmo!".
  • The Adventures of Bayou Billy was called Mad City in Japan.
  • The original Magical Drop Arcade Game was released outside Japan as Chain Reaction, a title used in no subsequent release.
  • Magic and Mayhem was released in the US as Duel: The Mage Wars.
  • Magician's Quest: Mysterious Times was titled Enchanted Folk and the School of Wizardry in Europe. The US version was originally announced under the title Little Magician's Magical Adventure.
  • The game Magic John was released in the US and Europe as Totally Rad.
  • Marvel Land was released as Talmit's Adventure in Europe.
  • Matrix: Gridrunner 2, a Centipede-like game, was released in the U.S. under the title Attack of the Mutant Camels, which belonged to a different game by Jeff Minter, simply because the publisher liked the title. When the real Attack of the Mutant Camels was released in the U.S., it was renamed Advance Of The Mega Camels to preserve the initialism.
  • Mega-Lo-Mania was released in the U.S. as Tyrants: Fight Through Time.
  • Metafight, or Super Planetary War Records: Metafight, was localized as Blaster Master. Metafight EX on the Game Boy Color was localized as Blaster Master: Enemy Below.
  • Metal Gear
    • Metal Gear: Ghost Babel is known Metal Gear Solid in North America and Europe, suggesting that it was reworked port of the PlayStation game of the same name for the Game Boy Color. At the time, it was not uncommon for most console and PC games to be released alongside cheaper Game Boy Color version of the same (such as Daikatana, Tomb Raider and Perfect Dark).
    • The extra missions disc that came with Metal Gear Solid: Integral (the Updated Re-release of Metal Gear Solid in Japan) was released as a stand-alone game under the title of Metal Gear Solid: VR Missions in North America and Metal Gear Solid: Special Missions in Europe.
    • Metal Gear Solid: Digital Graphic Novel for the PSP is known in Japan as Metal Gear Solid: Bande Dessinée, after the French term for graphic novels. Strangely enough, the French version does not use this title.
    • The Metal Gear Solid: HD Collection is known as Metal Gear Solid: HD Edition in Japan, a somewhat misleading title, as it implies that it's a stand-alone remaster of the first Metal Gear Solid when it's actually a compilation of Metal Gear Solid 2 and 3 with a voucher code to download the first game ifyou bought the PS3 version (which is ironically the only title in the collection not remastered in HD, being instead a straightforward emulation of the PS1 version). Unlike the North American and European versions, the Japanese compilations did not come with the Peace Walker remaster, which was instead given a separate stand-alone disc release.
  • Metal Marines was released as Militia in Japan.
  • The Puzzle Game Mindbender, which went by the title Brainbender on the Game Boy, was released by Acclaim's Japanese division under the title Migrain.
  • There's no end to this for the Monster Hunter series. Just to name some more popular examples: Monster Hunter Portable became Monster Hunter Freedom in the West, Monster Hunter Portable 2G became Monster Hunter Freedom Unite, Monster Hunter 3G and 4G became Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate and 4 Ultimate, respectively, and Monster Hunter X (Cross) became Monster Hunter Generations.
  • The NES game Monster Party would have been known as Parody World: Monster Party in Japan had it not been cancelled.
  • Mortal Kombat games are usually published with an untranslated title in France. But Mortal Kombat: Deception was translated to "Mortal Kombat: Mystification" because "déception" is the French word for "disappointment".
  • The leaked English prototype and early promotional materials of MOTHER indicated that, in the original plans to internationally release it (which obviously never happened), it was also going to be renamed EarthBound. The polished-up ROM was renamed EarthBound Zero by fans to differentiate it from the more-well-known sequel, with its eventual official release on the Virtual Console giving it the title EarthBound Beginnings.
  • MOTHER 2: Gyiyg Strikes Back, better known outside Japan as EarthBound. For decades, it was the only Mother game to actually have been released outside of Japan. Earthbound's opening, "The War Against Giygas", tagline does refer back to the Japanese title, though. The reason for it not being "strikes back" is obvious: since the original MOTHER wasn't released outside Japan until twenty years after its sequel, Giygas had no reason to "strike back" as far as American players knew.
  • Irem's Arcade Game Mr. Heli no Daibouken was released outside Japan as Battle Chopper, but the Western computer ports dropped only the Japanese words and were titled Mr. Heli.
  • The Slam Masters series of Wrestling Games are known as Muscle Bomber in Japan, although the second arcade game (Muscle Bomber Duo) kept its original title outside Japan for some reason.
  • Nebulus was released in the U.S. as Tower Toppler. However, the NES and Game Boy versions were Castelian in both territories.
    • In Japan, both versions were a Licensed Game based off of the Japanese snacks Choco Ball. The game was renamed to Kyoro-chan Land and the player character was changed to Kyoro-chan, the Choco Ball mascot.
  • Necro-Nesia was released as Escape From Bug Island.
  • Hudson Soft released Nectaris for the TurboGrafx-16 as Military Madness in America. Later remakes of the game were released internationally with both titles combined.
  • Need for Speed:
    • The first four games were sold under the Over Drivin' name in Japan for some reason.
    • High Stakes is Road Challenge in Europe and Brazil.
    • Porsche Unleashed is Porsche in Germany and Latin America, and Porsche 2000 in the rest of Europe.
    • V-Rally for the PlayStation was originally released by Infogrames. However, when Electronic Arts purchased the publishing rights to the Play Station version, they retconned it into a Need for Speed game, marking one of few times when a game has actually jumped across franchises for marketing purposes. The N64 version was released under it's original name.
      • The sequel was also retconned as a Need for Speed title on the Play Station in North America as EA purchased the publishing rights to that one too, but the Dreamcast version was instead published by Infogrames themselves, who released it as a Test Drive title, as Infogrames had obtained the franchise when they acquired Accolade earlier in 1999.
  • The Nintendo Entertainment System version of The New Zealand Story was for some reason released in the U.S. as Kiwi Kraze: A Bird-Brained Adventure!.
  • N.I.C.E. 2, a German-developed Racing Game, was released internationally by THQ and SouthPeak Games as Breakneck. Its predecessor, Have a N.I.C.E. Day, was apparently distributed by 21st Century Entertainment in some countries under the title Axelerator.
  • The original Nier was released in two separate versions in Japan: Nier: Gestalt on the Xbox 360, where the protagonist is a middle-aged man, and Nier: Replicant on the PS3=, where he is a younger man. Only the Gestalt version was released outside of Japan, where it was simply titled Nier.
  • Ninja Gaiden:
    • The series was originally called Ninja Ryukenden in Japan. An odd case, as Tecmo simply switched one Japanese word for another instead of actually translating the title into English. Ninja Gaiden was actually the Working Title in Japan before they eventually settled with Ninja Ryukenden. Tecmo thought that the title Ninja Ryukenden would've been too hard to pronounce for English speakers, so they kept the name Ninja Gaiden for the American version.
    • The PAL versions of the Ninja Gaiden games (particularly the arcade version and the first two NES games) were released Shadow Warriors as using the word 'ninja' was forbidden for children's toys under some European laws, as with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
  • Rocky Rodent was released in Japan under the title Nitro Punks: Might Heads.
  • Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee became Abe a Go Go in Japan.
  • In the Onechanbara series, The OneeChanbara was released as Zombie Zone, The OneeChanpurū ~ The Onechan Special Chapter ~ was released as Zombie Hunters or Zombie Zone: Other Side, The OneeChampon ~ The Onechan 2 Special Chapter ~ was released as Zombie Hunters 2, OneeChanbara VorteX ~ Imichi o tsugu mono tachi ~ was released as Onechanbara: Bikini Samurai Squad, OneeChanbara Revolution was released as OneChanbara: Bikini Zombie Slayers, and OneeChanbara Z2 was released as Onechanbara Z2: Chaos.
  • Onmyōji is known by this title in all localizations except Japanese, where it's titled Onmyōji Honkaku Gensō RPG because of trademark issues.
  • The French computer game Opération Jupiter was released in other European countries as Hostages and in the US as Hostage: Rescue Mission (note the singularization). The Nintendo Entertainment System port, however, was released as Hostages: The Embassy Mission in Japan and as Rescue: The Embassy Mission in the US and Europe.
  • Pac-Man was originally titled Puck-Man, until someone figured out what would happen if a vandal changed the P to an F. Only the Japanese and German releases used this name.
  • Pandemonium! and its sequel were imported to Japan by Bandai under the titles Magical Hoppers and Miracle Jumpers, the former also receiving something of a Cut-and-Paste Translation.
  • Panel de Pon was released as Tetris Attack overseas, presumably to cash in on the popularity of the Tetris label despite both games playing very differently. Later games drop the Tetris branding and are known under the Puzzle League brand; Nintendo seems to look for any excuse to not call it Panel de Pon in the West.
  • Pang and its sequels were titled Buster Bros. in the U.S. (with the third game becoming Buster Buddies, except for Mighty! Pang, which used the Pang title even in North America); the first game (and only the first) was titled Pomping World in Japan.
  • Phantasmagoria was renamed Phantasm in the Japan-only Sega Saturn release.
  • The original versions of Pipe Mania were renamed Pipe Dream in the US.
  • Pokémon Trozei! was named Pokémon Link in Europe.
  • Mobile Phone Game Pocket Three Kingdoms is Three Kingdoms Legend in Thailand and Three Kingdoms Hero in Indonesia.
  • The Fighting Game Power Athlete was released in the U.S. under two different titles: Deadly Moves on the Sega Genesis, and Power Moves on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System.
  • Police 911 is known as Police 24/7 in Europe, and The Keisatsukan in its native Japan.
  • Power Blazer was released outside Japan as Power Blade.
    • The game's sequel, Captain Saver was released in North America as Power Blade 2.
  • Prehistorik Man was shortened to just P-Man in Japan.
  • With the exception of the first one, all the games in the Professor Layton series have different titles in the US and UK markets.
  • Puyo Puyo has been distributed internationally under the name Puyo Pop since the Neo Geo Pocket Color version. The only previous releases outside Japan had been some quite strangely Dolled Up Installments of the first game. Strangely enough, Sega also completed a straight translation of the original game, and American or European players who imported Puyo Puyo for the Game Gear would be greeted with Puzlow Kids on the title screen. While the main series went back to the Puyo Puyo name after Puyo Puyo Tetris, the game known as Puyo Puyo eSports in Japan was released as Puyo Puyo Champions internationally.
  • Puzzle Bobble, a puzzle game spinoff of Bubble Bobble, was renamed Bust-a-Move internationally, except in Europe where it inconsistently uses both names.
  • Taito America shortened the title of Rastan Saga to Rastan, but then released its sequel under the title of Nastar Warrior. The Sega Genesis port averted this, being titled Rastan Saga II in both U.S. and Japan.
  • All of the sequels to Ratchet & Clank have had their subtitles changed in Europe - Going Commando became Locked And Loaded and Up Your Arsenal was just called Ratchet & Clank 3. Presumably by then changing the title was simply a tradition, as Deadlocked became Gladiator and all Ratchet and Clank Future titles had the "Future" part removed.
    • In Norway, Going Commando and Up Your Arsenal apparently kept their original titles while Deadlocked was changed. There's hardly any consistency.
    • In Australia and New Zealand, the third game got both titles, being called "Ratchet & Clank 3: Up Your Arsenal" (the official name in the US lacks the 3).
    • It's worth noting that the reason the Future was removed was because "Ratchet & Clank Future: Tools of Destruction" proved to be rather complex in other European languages (and in addition to the Future removal, the subtitle was often changed as well). This was kept for the follow-ups Quest for Booty and A Crack in Time for consistency, although one wonders why the UK title also lost Future when it uses the same dominant language as the US.
    • The exceptions are the PSP games (which were developed by a different team who have links with the original team), which are named Size Matters and Secret Agent Clank in both regions.
  • RayForce is a huge offender. The original Japanese and American arcade releases are called RayForce, and the European verison GunLock. The Japanese console release? Due to trademark issues with the name of another Japanese video game company, it was renamed Layer Section. And when Acclaim got the rights to publish the Saturn port in North America and Europe, they renamed it Galactic Attack. Its sequel, RayStorm has a lesser example of this; the Japanese Saturn port is called Layer Section II, but all other versions retained the original title. RayCrisis mostly escapes this trope, although Working Designs appended "Series Termination" as the game's subtitle.
  • In North America, Rayman M was known as Rayman Arena because it was thought that people would think that the 'M' stood for 'mature'.
  • Deadly Premonition is titled Red Seeds Profile in Japan.
  • Rhapsodia is known outside Japan as Suikoden Tactics.
  • The Rhythm Heaven series is known as "Rhythm Paradise" in Europe.
  • Road Blaster by Data East was published as Road Prosecutor on the Pioneer LaserActive, Road Avenger on the Sega CD, and Road Blaster FX in Japan, probably to avoid confusion with RoadBlasters by Atari.
  • Mega Man is better known as Rockman in Japan and parts of Asia. The name change from "Rockman" to "Mega Man" was originally thought to be done to avoid trademark issues with a brand of guitar amplifiers, but it was later revealed that a Capcom USA executive simply didn't like the name.
    • All mainline Mega Man (Classic) games, save for the original and Mega Man & Bass, have subtitles that were removed when they were localized:
      • Mega Man 2's is Dr. Wily no Nazo (The Mystery of Dr. Wily),
      • Mega Man 3's is Dr. Wily no Saigo?! (The End of Dr. Wily?!),
      • Mega Man 4's is Aratanaru Yabou!! (A New Evil Ambition!!),
      • Mega Man 5's is Blues no Wana?! (Proto Man's Trap?!),
      • Mega Man 6's is Shinji Sadai no Tatakai!! (The Greatest Battle of All Time!!),
      • Mega Man 7's is Shukumei no Taiketsu! (Showdown of Destiny!),
      • Mega Man 8's is Metal Heroes,
      • Mega Man 9's is Yabou no Fukkatsu!! (The Ambition's Resurgence!!),
      • Mega Man 10's is Uchu Kara no Kyoui!! (The Threat from Outer Space!!),
      • and Mega Man 11's is Unmei no Haguruma!! (The Gears of Fate!!).
    • Rockman DASH was changed to Mega Man Legends.
    • And the Battle Network Rockman.EXE games were brought over, not as Battle Network Mega Man.EXE, but as Mega Man Battle Network. The Battle Network pretitle was dropped after the third game in Japan.
      • Similarly, the sequel Series Ryuusei no Rockman/Shooting Star Rockman had its name changed to Mega Man Star Force; the Star Force is an important plot element...in the first game in the series. In the sequels, it's never heard from again.
      • In the third game, the localization actually shoehorns it into the plot as the name of the team designated to stop Meteor G from crashing into earth since the Star Force was the power the Satellite Admins first gave him to save the Earth from the FMians.
  • The original Runabout was released outside Japan as Felony 11-79. The sequels averted this.
  • Rune Factory:
    • As soon as the series became its own series the Japanese games dropped the "a fantasy Harvest Moon" subtitle. It was mostly present in the first game so people would know it was a Harvest Moon spin-off, and since the games were gathering their own fans the director wanted them to be more divorced from the original series. The English copies of the game continue to carry the subtitle for any Harvest Moon fans who might not have heard of the series.
    • Due to a copyright spat with Natsume over the use of the Harvest Moon name, the series was retitled Story of Seasons internationally while Natsume took the "Harvest Moon" name in its own direction.
  • Rushing Beat and its two sequels all made it out of Japan, but under three different names: Rival Turf!, Brawl Brothers and The Peace Keepers. Brawl Brothers was titled Rival Turf 2 in Europe.
  • Mobile Phone Game Age of Ishtaria is Saga of Ishtaria in Japan.
  • Samurai Spirits is known as Samurai Shodown outside Japan: an odd case considering the international title actually misspells the replacement word ("Showdown").
    • It was supposed to be called "Shogun Shodown", a punny if not so clever title. However, for some reason, the misspelt word stayed that way.
  • Dynasty Warriors is originally titled Sangoku Musou in Japan, which literally translates to "Three Kingdoms Unrivalled". The English title became Dynasty Warriors. The first installment of the series was a traditional fighting game, and the series didn't start having the famous horde hack'n'slash gameplay until the second installment, with which they started giving it a new title: Shin Sangoku Musou. Shin roughly means new/true, implying that the series was reborn into its true form.
    • The English titles are always one number higher than the Japanese titles for this reason. Due to the large gameplay transition from Sangoku Musou to Shin Sangoku Musou, the Japanese branch decided to reset the numbering of the titles, while the English branch did not. Dynasty Warriors 1 still refers to the original Sangoku Musou fighting game, while Dynasty Warriors 2 refers to the first installment of Shin Sangoku Musou. This carries over to the sequels, so Shin Sangoku Musou 2 was brought to the West as Dynasty Warriors 3, and so on.
    • The English versions of Warriors Orochi are also chronically a number higher than the Japanese titles, albeit for the opposite reason. Warriors Orochi 2 is not considered a full sequel in Japan, because as a Mission-Pack Sequel, it adds nothing to the gameplay. It is known in Japan as Musou Orochi: Maou Sairin; the subtitle roughly means "Rebirth of the Demon King". Musou Orochi 2 actually refers to Warriors Orochi 3, a next-generation title that shakes up the status quo quite a bit.
  • Seiken Densetsu (Legend of the Holy Sword) is known as World of Mana outside of Japan, though the Japanese titles have been adopting the "of mana" title as well.
  • Sengoku Ace was retitled Samurai Aces for the international market. Its sequel, Sengoku Blade, was released outside Japan as Tengai.
  • Senran Kagura Burst: Crimson Girls was released outside Japan as Senran Kagura: Burst.
  • The Sentinel was released in the U.S. as The Sentry.
  • Shadow Hearts: Shadow Hearts II became Shadow Hearts: Covenant outside Japan.
  • Shadow of the Ninja, like other Ninja examples in this article, was retitled Blue Shadow in the PAL region. The Japanese version was simply titled Kage.
  • Shien's Revenge was originally titled Shien: The Blade Chaser in Japan. No, it's not a sequel to anything.
  • Shin Megami Tensei:
    • The more kid friendly spin-off Devil Children has been given several names to circumvent the rather unfortunate connotations "Devil Children" has in Western countries. When Atlus translated the GBA games, they were named Demi Kids and TMS Entertainment is adamant in referring to the anime tie-in as DeviChil: Goddess Rebirth (as a side, this series did get some airtime in Italy).
    • Revelations was the early US name for the Shin Megami Tensei franchise, which was discarded with the US release of Nocturne. Last Bible was released in the US under the name Revelations: The Demon Slayer.
    • The Persona sub-series: The first game, Megami Ibunroku Persona, became Revelations: Persona in the West. The rest of the Persona series in Japan is simply Persona without the subtitle Shin Megami Tensei. Elsewhere, however...:
      • The PSP remake of the first Persona came to the US as Shin Megami Tensei: Persona.
      • Persona 2: TsumiTranslation 's PSP remake added the Shin Megami Tensei subtitle, released as Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 2: Innocent Sin. The original version of the second part, Persona 2: BatsuTranslation , was previously brought to the US as Persona 2: Eternal Punishment on the PlayStation.
      • Shin Megami Tensei was added to Persona 3 and Persona 4, becoming Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3 and Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 4. Later Persona games stopped the practice as the sub-series became more popular than mainline Shin Megami Tensei.
      • The PS Vita re-release of Persona 4 is called Persona 4 Golden in the US and Persona 4: The Golden in Japan. There are still some parts with the Japanese name however.
      • Persona 4: The Ultimate in Mayonaka Arena became Persona 4: Arena for the overseas market. Atlus could have gone with a literal translation and called it The Ultimate in Midnight Channel Arena but the Gratuitous English would sound very weird to English speakers. The sequel, Persona 4: The Ultimax Ultra Suplex Hold, became Persona 4: Arena Ultimax overseas.
      • The Rhythm Game spin-offs Persona 5: Dancing Star Night and Persona 3: Dancing Moon Night had their subtitles changed to Dancing in Starlight and Dancing in Moonlight respectively in the English localization to cut down on the Gratuitous English.
      • The official Chinese title of the series is "女神異聞錄"note , which is a direct transliteration of the first game's subtitle Megami Ibunroku. This was most likely because of the fact that it is the only part of the title that is conveniently in kanji.
    • The Avatar Tuner series outside Japan was released as Shin Megami Tensei: Digital Devil Saga to associate it more with the main series, with Digital Devil Saga: Avatar Tuner and Digital Devil Saga: Avatar Tuner 2 becoming Shin Megami Tensei: Digital Devil Saga and Shin Megami Tensei: Digital Devil Saga 2.
  • The Super Shinobi, the first Shinobi game for the Mega Drive, is known as The Revenge of Shinobi outside Japan, while its sequel, The Super Shinobi II, was retitled Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master for its overseas release. Meanwhile, Shin Shinobi Den is known as Shinobi Legions in America and Shinobi X in Europe.
  • Two of the expansion packs for The Sims for PC were re-titled: The Sims: Livin' Large became The Sims: Livin' It Up (or a translation thereof) in all European releases, while The Sims: Vacation was renamed The Sims: On Holiday in the UK, Ireland, China and Scandinavia. The first The Sims was also renamed Sim People in Japan, however the subsequent games in the series use The Sims. The ExpansionPacks were also renamed in Japan:
    • Livin' Large was changed to the more cheerful-sounding Happy Life
    • House Party was changed to Party Fever
    • Hot Date was changed to Love Date
    • Unleashed was changed to the more descriptive Pets & Gardening
    • Superstar was changed to Star Paradise
    • Makin' Magic was changed to Magical Dream
    • Averted with Vacation, which used the same title even in Japan.
  • Siren is Siren, Siren 2 and Siren: New Translation in Japan, Siren in the US, and Forbidden Siren, Forbidden Siren 2 and Siren: Blood Curse in Europe.
  • The Game Gear version of Skweek was retitled Slider for Europe and the U.S., even though it was originally a European game and all previous versions had been released as Skweek.
  • Slap Fight was retitled A.L.C.O.N. for the American market.
  • Robotrek was originally Slapstick in Japan.
  • The Puzzle Platformer known in Europe as Solomon's Key 2 (which is a literal translation of the Japanese title) was renamed Fire 'n Ice in the U.S.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • The European boxart and cartridge art for Sonic the Hedgehog 3 renders the title as simply Sonic 3, as did some contemporary media.
    • Many of the Game Gear and Master System games have different titles across regions: Sonic Chaos is known in Japan as Sonic & Tails, Sonic Triple Trouble is Sonic & Tails 2, and Sonic Blast is G Sonic.
    • Sonic 3D: Flickies' Island was known as Sonic 3D Blast in America.
    • The Sonic Compilation cartridge for the Mega Drive was retitled Sonic Classics for its later US release.
    • The Xbox 360/Playstation 3 compilation Sonic's Ultimate Genesis Collection was renamed to simply Sega Mega Drive Ultimate Collection in Europe.
    • In some regions, Sonic the Fighters was renamed Sonic Championship.
    • Sonic Unleashed was known as Sonic World Adventure in Japan. During development, it was going to be part of the Adventure series, but it eventually became too different from those games.
    • Sonic Boom is known as Sonic Toon in Japan. Sonic Boom: Rise of Lyric is Sonic Toon: Ancient Treasure, Sonic Boom: Shattered Crystal is Sonic Toon: Island Adventure, and Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice is Sonic Toon: Fire & Ice.
    • In international releases, Sonic Generations retained the same name on both consoles and 3DS but in Japan they were suffixed with the subtitles “Shiro no Jikou” (“White Time and Space”) and “Ao no Bouken” (“Blue Adventures”), respectively.
  • Sonic Wings was renamed Aero Fighters in North America. The same goes for its sequels.
  • Soul Blader was released outside of Japan as SoulBlazer. Gaia Gensōki (The Gaia Fantasy Chronicles) was released as Illusion of Gaia in North America, and is known as Illusion of Time in Europe. The European localization of Tenchi Sōzō (The Creation of Heaven and Earth), known as Terranigma, references itself as Illusion of Gaia 2.
  • The PS version of Soul Edge was released as Soul Blade in North America and Europe due to trademark issues with the original title thanks to professional trademark troll Tim Langdell (the same guy who attempted to sue Electronic Arts over the title of Mirror's Edge). This is why subsequent installments were released as Soulcalibur.
  • The arcade Beat 'em Up Kung Fu Master (ported to the NES as Kung Fu) is called Spartan X in Japan, where it was a Licensed Game for a Jackie Chan movie of that title.
    • Amusingly enough, said film is also an example of this trope; It's known as ''Wheels on Meals" everywhere else in the world.
    • The game's MSX port was named Seiken Acho instead, because there was another Spartan X videogame already for the console.
  • Speed Freaks was known as Speed Punks in North America.
  • The PC-98 and Sharp X68000 versions of Spindizzy Worlds were released in Japan under the game's Working Title, Spindizzy II. This choice of numbering is a bit odd, considering that the original Spindizzy only appeared on Western 8-bit computers.
  • The 1981 Japanese computer game Star Blazer was released in the U.S. by Brøderbund Software under the title Sky Blazer.
  • Insomniac Games' second entry in the Spyro the Dragon series was named Ripto's Rage! in North America and Gateway to Glimmer in Europe. In Japan, it was released under the title Spyro x Sparx: Tondemo Tours.
  • The arcade version of Star Force was released again in North America as Mega Force(no relation to the Atari game or Space Megaforce).
  • To avoid legal trouble with a German company named StarVox, Star Fox was renamed Starwing in Europe, and Star Fox 64 was renamed Lylat Wars. This issue has since been resolved (or they just decided it wasn't an issue) and subsequent Star Fox games have kept the original titles.
  • Star Wars: Rebellion was marketed in the UK as Star Wars Supremacy.
  • Strider was shortened from its Japanese name Strider Hiryu. As revealed by Word of God, the game almost got its name changed to "The Falcon", as Capcom's overseas dept. initially thought the name was too confusing for a Western audience. Same thing with Strider 2.
  • The Story of Thor: Heir of the Light is The Story of Thor: A Successor of the Light in Europe, The Story of Thor on the European Sega Mega Drive Ultimate Collection, and Beyond Oasis in North America. Thor: Chronicles of the Elemental King is The Story of Thor 2 in Europe, and The Legend of Oasis in North America.
  • Some of the Street Fighter games are titled differently between regional releases and console ports.
    • The very first Street Fighter was released for the Turbografx CD as Fighting Street.
    • In Japan, Street Fighter II: Champion Edition is known as Street Fighter II Dash, while Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting is known as Street Fighter II Dash Turbo. The word "dash" is not spelled out on the title of either game, but represented by a prime mark (′) as a sort of Stealth Pun (both games were derivatives of the original Street Fighter II). The SNES port of Hyper Fighting is simply titled Street Fighter II Turbo in all regions, while its Genesis counterpart is known as Street Fighter II Dash Plus in Japan and Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition everywhere else.
    • Super Street Fighter II Turbo was originally called Super Street Fighter II X: Grand Master Challenge in Japan.
    • The Street Fighter Alpha series is known as Street Fighter Zero in Japan and Asia. The second game, Street Fighter Zero 2, had an Updated Re-release for the arcade in Japan and Asia that was titled Street Fighter Zero 2 Alpha, which then got ported to the home consoles as Street Fighter Zero 2 Dash. The console version was released in America as Street Fighter Alpha 2 Gold and in Europe as Street Fighter Alpha 2 Dash.
    • The GBA version of Street Fighter Alpha 3 is known as Street Fighter Zero 3 Upper in Japan, taking its title from a Japan-only upgrade of the arcade version. Thus, the PSP version, Street Fighter Zero 3 Double Upper became Street Fighter Alpha 3 MAX.
    • The console version of Street Fighter: The Movie is known as Street Fighter: Real Battle on Film in Japan. The game was retitled in America to cash in on the arcade version, despite the fact that its a completely different game.
    • The PS versions of the Vs. games dropped the "EX Edition" subtitle for each game when they were released outside Japan (hiding the fact that they were watered down ports that removed the tag team feature).
  • Super Mario Bros.:
  • Super Smash Bros.: Outside Japan, Dairantō Smash Brothers became Super Smash Bros., Dairantō Smash Brothers DX became Super Smash Bros. Melee, Dairantō Smash Brothers X became Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Dairantō Smash Bros. Special became Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
  • Super Stardust HD was released under the title Star Strike HD in Asia and Japan. Perhaps the original title isn't hardcore enough for Japanese markets?
  • The 1990 strategy game Supremacy: Your Will Be Done was released in the U.S. as Overlord.
  • Mobile Phone Game Sword of Chaos is Art of Sword in some markets, including Thailand.
  • When Namco of America localized Tales of Eternia, they named it Tales of Destiny II in a bid to catch the people who had seen the only other Tales game they had published in America, and also to avoid lawsuits concerning Masters of the Universe. This proved to be a bit awkward for everyone when Namco released Tales of Destiny 2, a direct sequel to Tales of Destiny.
  • Because they were were preceded by an older platformer, the three following beat-em-ups based on Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles varied a little in name depending on region. In Europe, Ninja was excised from the title in favor of Hero.
  • In Tenchu, English localization tends to tackle very different subtitles to each game:
    • The first two games are named Rittai Ninja Katsugeki Tenchu (2) ("3-Dimensional Ninja Fighting Scene"), which was changed to Tenchu: Stealth Assassins and Tenchu 2: Birth of the Stealth Assassins in English, respectively.
    • Tenchu San became Tenchu 3: Wrath of Heaven. Its Xbox update went from Tenchu San: Kaiki no Shō ("Chapter of Regression") to Tenchu: Return From Darkness.
    • Tenchu Kurenai ("Crimson") became Tenchu: Fatal Shadows.
    • Tenchu: Dark Shadow became Tenchu: Dark Secret.
    • Tenchu: Shinobi Taizen ("Shinobi Encyclopedia") became Tenchu: Time of the Assassins.
    • Tenchu Senran ("100 Revolts") became Tenchu Z, for some reason...
    • Inverted for the Wii game: Japanese Tenchu 4 became Tenchu: Shadow Assassins (dropping the number) for its English release.
  • The Test Drive series has been well-known for this. This was because at a time in Europe, the series' trademark couldn't be used as Cryo Interactive held the rights to it (due to the fact they purchased the European publishing rights to Test Drive 6 from Infogrames), leading to some games in the series changing their names over there.
    • Test Drive Off-Road 2 was released as Test Drive 4X4.
    • Test Drive Off-Road 3 was released as 4X4 World Trophy.
    • Test Drive Off-Road Wide Open was released simply as Off-Road Wide Open, but the rest of the game including title screen uses the original name.
    • Test Drive: Eve of Destruction was released as Driven to Destruction.
    • TD Overdrive: The Brotherhood of Speed, was released simply as Test Drive in North America.
    • Test Drive Off-Road was released in Japan by Coconuts Japan under the name of Gekitotsu! Yonku Battle.
    • In North America, Infogrames' Le Mans 24 Hours title was released as Test Drive Le Mans on the PS 1 and Dreamcast. The later PC release and the PS 2 versions retained the original name.
    • Also in North America, the Dreamcast version of V-Rally 2 was released as Test Drive V-Rally.
  • Two out of the three games forming part of Three Wonders had their names expanded: Roosters became Midnight Wanderers: Quest for the Chariot and Chariot was given the subtitle Adventure through the Sky.
  • Despite being named Thunder Force everywhere for the second and third games, Thunder Force IV was inexplicably renamed Lightening Force in North America. Yes, that's a force that lightens things, not a Lightning Force. They would later go back to using Thunder Force for number 5.
  • Thunderhawk was released in the U.S. as AH-3 Thunderstrike.
  • Tiny Toon Adventures:
    • Tiny Toon Adventures: The Great Beanstalk is Tiny Toon Adventures: Revenge of the Beanstalk in Europe, or possibly Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster and the Beanstalk in Europe, the name of a different game for PC.
    • Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster's Bad Dream by Treasure, published in Europe, had a very limited release in the US as Tiny Toon Adventures: Scary Dreams.
  • Tokushu Butai Jackal, Konami's overhead jeep shoot-em-up for the arcades, is known simply as Jackal worldwide and Top Gunner in the states. Strangely, the Famicom Disk System version was released under the completely different title of Final Command: Akai Yōsai ("The Red Fortress"), while its NES counterpart was titled Jackal in the states (yet, it never came out in Europe).
  • The first game in the Tomba series was known as Ore! Tomba (Me! Tomba) in its native Japan. In America, the title was shortened to simply Tomba!, while in the UK and Europe the game and its title character were known as Tombi!, the change being because "tomba" is Italian for "grave". The sequel was released in Japan with the Gratuitous English title Tomba! The Wild Adventure, but still ended up getting retitled to Tomba! 2: The Evil Swine Return in America and simply Tombi! 2 (with no subtitle) in the UK and Europe.
  • The original arcade version of Bionic Commando was released as Top Secret in Japan, while the Famicom version is known as Top Secret: Hitler no Fukkatsu ("The Resurrection of Hitler"). The series then changed to the international title of Bionic Commando in Japan, beginning with the Game Boy version.
  • Trusty Bell ~Chopin no Yume~ (Trusty Bell: Chopin's Dream) is better known outside Asia as Eternal Sonata, which is a much more sensible title to the original's Word Salad Title.
  • A Russian video game called Turgor (Тургор) was released as Tension in English-speaking countries, and then re-released as The Void.
  • When Capcom localized the first game in the Turnabout Trial series for western audiences, they titled it Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney, with the intention of calling the series as a whole Phoenix Wright. When it became clear that Phoenix wouldn't be the main protagonist of the fourth game, the series was rebranded as Ace Attorney.
  • Turok 2: Seeds of Evil was released in Japan under the title Violence Killer: Turok New Generation.
  • Various Compilation Rereleases of Konami games have renamed Tutankham to Horror Maze, Quarth to Block Game, and TwinBee to Rainbow Bell.
  • The classic British DOS game UFO: Enemy Unknown was retitled X-COM: UFO Defense in the United States, and all the sequels followed suit. The remake combined the two titles.
  • Uniracers is Unirally in Europe.
  • Vampire became Darkstalkers for its english release, while its sequel Vampire Hunter became Night Warriors.
  • Vampire: Master of Darkness was titled In the Wake of Vampire in Japan; the Europe-exclusive Sega Master System version was just Master of Darkness.
  • Vermilion was released outside Japan as Sword of Vermilion.
  • Virtua Cop is titled Virtua Squad on PC.
    • Same thing with Virtua Cop 2.
  • The Virtua Fighter spin-off Virtua Fighter Cyber Generation: Ambition of the Judgement Six was released in North America as Virtua Quest.
  • Viva! Las Vegas is Vegas Dream in the US. Vegas Stakes is Las Vegas Dream in Japan.
  • The fifth non-Updated Re-release installment of Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune, referred to as Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 5, is simply titled Maximum Tune 5 in the North American localization. Part of it is licensing costs to use the name, and part of it is because the playerbase doesn't care about the source material, which is Japan-only anyway. Conspiciously, the full title can still be pieced together from other titles shown in the game: the companion "terminal" cabinet is still called the Wangan Terminal, and the game gives Wangan Midnight R the Retronym of Midnight R.
  • While Wardner was the usual international title of Wardner no Mori, the Taito America arcade release went under the name Pyros, and the canceled NES localization was to have been released by American Sammy under the title Pyross.
  • Warzard was released in the US as Red Earth.
  • The Wild ARMs sequels all have subtitles in Japan (such as Wild ARMs: 2nd Ignition or Wild ARMs: The 4th Detonator. In North America, these were all dropped for plain old numbers.
  • Wings 2: Aces High was released as Sky Mission in Japan, and as Blazing Skies in Europe.
  • Wipeout 2097, released as Wipeout XL in North America.
  • Xenoblade gained the Stock Subtitle of "Chronicles" outside Japan, which expanded to its sequels, giving us Xenoblade Chronicles X and Xenoblade Chronicles 2.
  • The very rare US version of Konami's Arcade Game Xexex is titled Orius.
  • The arcade game Yakyū Kakutō League Man or Baseball Hand-to-Hand Fighting League Man was released in the US as Ninja Baseball Bat Man.
  • The Yakuza series is known in Japan as Ryu ga Gotoku (Like a Dragon). Starting with the fourth entry, the Japanese titled carried subtitles that were axed in Western releases (except for the sixth game, The Song of Life). The seventh game in the series is numbered as such in Japan, but in the West, the game is retitled Yakuza: Like a Dragon. In addition, the zombie spin-off Ryu ga Gotoku: OF THE END is known in the West as Yakuza: Dead Souls.
  • Zelda no Densetsu, known as The Legend of Zelda:
  • Zone of the Enders:
    • Zone of the Enders: The 2nd Runner is known as Anubis: Zone of the Enders in Japan, where it was treated more like a soft reboot than a sequel to the first game. The proposed third game would've been titled Anubis 2 had it been actually made.
    • Zone of the Enders: The First of Mars is known as Z.O.E. 2173 Testament in Japan.
    • Like the Metal Gear Solid HD Collection, the Zone of the Enders: HD Collection is known as Zone of the Enders: HD Edition in Japan. Because of this, the stand-alone digital editions of both games are each disambiguated with the kanji characters 単体版/Tantaiban (lit. "stand-alone version") on the Japanese PlayStation Store. The western PlayStation Stores has no such issue, since the collection containing both games is clearly labelled as an "HD Collection".
  • The fighting game Shiritsu Justice Gakuen: Legion of Heroes was released in English-speaking countries under the title Rival Schools: United by Fate.
  • Swedish puzzle platform game Kula World is known as KulaQuest in Japan and Roll Away in America.
  • The Crash Bandicoot games sometimes got different titles when released in Europe and Japan.
  • Kaze no Klonoa: Door to Phantomile (Klonoa of the Wind: Door to Phantomile) got its title simplified to just Klonoa: Door to Phantomile in English-speaking markets. The sequel had a bigger change to its title: Kaze no Klonoa 2: Sekai ga Nozonda Wasuremono (Klonoa of the Wind 2: The Thing That the World Wants to Forget) became Klonoa 2: Lunatea's Veil.
  • Star Ocean:
  • In Japan, Wario Land II is titled Wario Land 2: Nusumareta Zaihō (Wario Land 2: The Stolen Treasure).

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