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Quirky Household

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That's not even counting the robot, the rest of the frogs, and that Tyrannosaurus Rex they recently adopted.

"That was this family's speciality: strange conversations."
Tomoya, CLANNAD
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Now remember, as far as anyone knows, we're a perfectly normal family...

An ensemble of bizarre characters who are related, or might as well be. Unlike the Dysfunctional Family, we as the audience plainly see the family is extremely well adjusted, supportive and loving — more so than some "real" families. They are also easily able to absorb friends, acquaintances, and distant relatives into their structure.

This is coupled with a range of quirks easily labeled "bizarre" by any of their peers.

It's also very convenient for heroes to have these, as they're not bound by the Masquerade, weirdness is normal.

May overlap with Creepy Family. Likely part of the natural growth of a Pretty Freeloaders group. For a larger grouping, see Quirky Town.


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Examples

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Yuu and Miki's parents in Marmalade Boy met, liked each other so much that they divorced and remarried each others' spouses, and then all moved in together into one big house.
  • Both the household of the Takamachis and the Harlaowns of Lyrical Nanoha.
    • For that matter, the Yagami household. It consists of a crippled girl and her humanoid program Guardian Knights, the Wolkenritter.
    • The Nakajima clan ain't no slouch in this regard, either.
  • Yuan's family in Samurai Deeper Kyo. Also, the Shiseiten, if you look at them as a family and not True Companions.
  • The Hiiragizawa household in Cardcaptor Sakura. The "dad" looks like a ten-year-old kid, and his "children" are a genderless magical being posing as a teenage schoolgirl and a winged cat that looks like a toy most of the time.
    • Not only that, his girlfriend appears to be way too old for him and used to date the older brother of the girl he antagonized on a regular basis (and is now dating his maternal family's descendant), who went on to date his previous incarnation's angelic moon spirit. And their father is his half-reincarnation!

    Comic Books 

     Fan Works 
  • The Avengers household is very much one of these in Child of the Storm. They're a Ragtag Bunch of Misfits, each with quite a few psychological issues, and a Family of Choice, kept more or less in order by Team Mom Pepper Potts. It gets to the point where explosions, Tony running around screaming and half-naked, or the Warriors Three performing an impromptu rendition of Mambo Number Five is just another day in the life.
    • The Royal Household of Asgard, though it's less obviously quirky, is also this trope-Loki mentions that his parents didn't care what he and Thor kept in their rooms as long as nothing ate the servants, and all unusual smells and explosions were kept within the room. Algrim has developed a routine-in the same way that animals can predict upcoming thunderstorms, he can predict Royal Family arguments and explosions with incredible accuracy. When Harry is about to explode at Odin for not getting him out of the Dursleys, Algrim is noted to select a particularly heavy desk.
  • The Queen household in the Legacy Series is also this trope-everyone in the family is or used to be part of Team Arrow, it's full of usually-affectionate snark, and once Jon gets going as the second Arrow, they get sucked back into the wild world of vilgilantism.
  • The tenants of Hôtel Camélia from The Legend of Royal Blue and La Sylphide is a "found family" example of this trope. Alphonse Agreste is the landlord, his grandson Gabriel is a Scholarship Student by day and a superhero by night, Frau Tannenbaum is a doddering Granny Classic who treats her houseplants like pets, Christine and Quentin Pons balance work and raising their kindergarten-age daughter Paulette, Giselle Marion is a nursing intern made all but nocturnal by her shift schedule, Davy Blaise is an anxiety-ridden law student, and M. Lévêque lives in the Creepy Basement and does most of the mansion's upkeep despite Gabriel never actually seeing him.
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    Films — Animated 
  • In Meet the Robinsons, the Robinson family includes a patriarch with a smiley face drawn on the back of his head who always wears his clothes backwards (but claims his head is backwards) and his wife, a retired Ditzy Genius who loves dancing (called "baking cookies"). He has two brothers, one of whom is big and fat and needs to be fed lest disaster strike and married to a train enthusiast with very large model trains, the other of whom is a Henpecked Husband married to a ventriloquist dummy with two adult children who act like fighting kids, a sister who wears a giant skyscraper hat and a brother who flies around painting on everything. Their son invented almost everything anyone uses and his wife spent most of her life teaching frogs to dance, sing, and play instruments. She has two brothers, one of whom is a cannon enthusiast (both using and being shot out of, actually racing at one point with his train enthusiast in-law) and one of whom delivers pizza dressed as a superhero in a UFO. Their son is fairly ordinary in comparison but still managed to leave the garage door open so that one of the two family time machines got stolen. There's also a robot, a butler who is a giant squid, and two random twins (apparently unrelated to everyone else) who live in the flower pots on the stoop and compete for doorbell rings. They also apparently have food fights at the dinner table a lot, cheer and toast when people fail, and have a very difficult to navigate house. Still, they are one of the most functional loving families ever.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Unstrung Heroes: young Steven Lidz' home, to a lesser extent. Especially quirky, however: the labyrinthine apartment (filled with hoarded junk) in which he lives with his eccentric uncles for awhile, after his mother's illness exacerbates the awkwardness of Steven's relationship with his father. Franz—actually Steven, now rechristened by his uncles; It Makes Sense in Context—undergoes an disorienting yet often enjoyable identity crisis. Then, as it turns out, at least one of his uncles is a bit more than merely eccentric. Franz must navigate between his uncles' pride in their heritage (complicated by imagined anti-Semitism lurking everywhere), and his inventor father's 100% materialist (i.e. anti-spiritual) worldview.
  • Beetle Juice: The Maitland/Deitz family household is a quirky blend of a benevolent ghost couple mixed with a perky goth chick, her father and very artsy stepmother.

    Literature 
  • The Moomin family, from the children's book series by Tove Jansson.
  • Roleplay example — the cafe in Kokoro.
  • The Bagthorpe family in the Bagthorpe Saga.
  • The Cassons of Saffy's Angel and its sequels (the Casson Family Series).
  • Harry Potter:
    • The Weasleys fit this, due to their seven children (nearly all with extremely different personalities), Mama Bear mother, eccentric father, weird pets (hyperactive owl; ancient, enfeebled owl; and ghoul), all crammed into a small, ramshackle house and, oh yeah, they're all wizards.
    • If they qualify, then they're normal compared to the Lovegood household.
  • The Threepwood Household at Blandings Castle: The dithering Earl of Emsworth, his long-suffering sister Connie, the Hypercompetent Sidekick Beach, Emsworth's ditzy son Freddie (occasionally bordering on the Genius Ditz), and the Team Pet, the Empress Of Blandings.
  • Tana French's The Likeness has one consisting of intelligent yet socially backwards twenty-something Daniel March and his best friends, Rafe, Abby, Justin and Lexie. The five live in a large estate which Daniel inherited from his uncle.

    Live-Action TV 

    Roleplays 

    Theater 

    Webcomics 

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 


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