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"Look into those flames, supplicant! Raise your head, look! Is that what you wish to hold, supplicant? Is the shaping of flames what stirs your heart? Know that flames can burn, and if you would learn their power, you must suffer their touch."
Ignus's teacher, Planescape: Torment
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Fire is one of the basic classical elements and usually the starter element from the Fire, Ice, Lightning trinity that console role-playing games love so much. It's a very popular power to use, mainly because it comes from the prettiest of explosions. This seems to work best when used on the undead, arrows, swords, and, against all common sense, even people. It even works when rolled up into a tangible ball and thrown!

People who are literally packing heat also tend to be fireproof and have a very high heat tolerance, as Required Secondary Powers. But sometimes, they aren't and are, in fact, just as vulnerable to their own flames as everybody else. Similarly, such characters may be Glass Cannons physically or emotionally owing to their element's reputation for extreme destruction and fragility.

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A person with fire power often possesses — get this — a fiery personality. You could say that they are Hot-Blooded, choleric, or that the flame of passion burns within them. And who knows, maybe their burning anger powers their burning hands; it's certainly possible for it to make them literally burn from anger. They also tend to be redheads (or dye their hair). They may even give you due warning by being Fiery Redheads. If they're also a Pyromaniac, heaven help you. In jRPGs, this person is likely to be a Black Magician Girl.

Contrast with the natural foil, An Ice Person, Making a Splash (with which it combines for boiling or steam), and Shock and Awe (which can be perceived as this trope plus Blow You Away). When it appears alongside Making a Splash and Blow You Away, that's Fire, Water, Wind. Compare Kill It with Fire, and Having a Blast. May overlap with Magma Man (which could be perceived as a combination of this trope and Dishing Out Dirt). If you're caught in a literal firefight with these people, you should probably Kill It with Water. Frequently shown (off) via Finger Snap Lighter and Blasting Time. Expect them to sneer at anyone using a Faux Flame. See Fiery Stoic for a Power Stereotype Flip.

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    Fan Works 
  • Child of the Storm has most magical people capable of doing this, but few are particularly good at it - the jack of all trades thing being in play. Loki is very skilled, Harry Dresden is a prodigy and Harry Thorson is likewise, if not more so, which only makes sense since his protection came from the Phoenix Force, which his mother merged with. However, all three have varying levels of skill in manipulating other elemental magics, even if it takes the latter a while to get into it.
  • In Keepers of the Elements, Izzy gains this as her Element.
  • Gerland in The Tainted Grimoire is a master of fire-based spells.
  • Nathaniel Augustine' psychic powers manifest this way in The Legacy of the Blood Ravens.
  • The wizard Emeth from Warriors of the World specialises in fire spells.
  • Aurora Borealis has this as her special talent in Whispers.
  • Celestia gets some aspects of this ability in the Triptych Continuum, which seems to be a unique side effect stemming from her link to Sun. However, she hasn't been shown to generate direct flame. Instead, she seems to create pure heat, apparently from nowhere. (This is in contrast to pegasi who know the heat-shifting technique: hot spots can be created—by lowering the temperature somewhere else.) She can channel this on a very small and subtle scale: in particular, she can literally burn out infections. However, when she gets upset, the temperature in her vicinity tends to spike… A Mark Of Appeal shows her having a nightmare in which the ability goes out of control, sending Equestria into literal meltdown.
  • Haeten from Hard Being Pure is a pyrokinetic. Astrex also uses a weak flame spell to good effect.
  • In The Big Four Cjupsher Series, various people are shown possessing pyrokinetic abilities
    • Anna Callagh/Firestar
    • Frollo
  • In The Witch of the Everfree, while Sunset has a wide variety of spells at her disposal, she has a particular affinity for fire magic, and has a set of enchantments on her to make herself fireproof.
  • In Children of an Elder God, Asuka possesses fire powers.
    She sat upright, face contorted into an angry scowl, her fists suddenly ablaze with flame.
  • In Thousand Shinji, a blink-and-you-will-miss-it moment hints that Asuka has pyrokinesis. During a scene where she's pissed, a small leaf spontaneously combusted near from her, and Shinji attributed it to Asuka.
  • The New Adventures of Invader Zim:
    • Norlock's favorite magical attack is to launch blasts of black fire.
    • In Episode 11, Viera gains an amulet called the Eye of Fire, which shoots fire on command.
  • At the end of A Warm Blizzard, a Frozen fanfic, Prince Hans is revealed to be a pyrokinetic as a counterbalance to Elsa's frost. A binding was put in place so he won't be able to use his magic, but a magical scissor unlocks his powers.
  • The Pieces Lie Where They Fell: One of the Nightmare's powers; it is shown throwing a fireball during the final battle. Xvital also gains this when she gains magic; in the days after, it's noted that she has trouble with accidentally creating fire in her sleep.
  • A Prize For Three Empires has Jean Grey and Carol Danvers, both of which are able to produce and manipulate cosmic fire.
    Jean turned into Phoenix, and still stood between her and the car.
    Carol set her suitcase down, and, in a burst of flame, became Binary.
  • Ruby Stars: As she's part Ruby, Sadie has the ability to summon fire, which she unfortunately finds out by accidentally setting a wooden support beam on fire and causing the warehouse they were in to go up in flames.
  • DNMC features D'Arg Forrest who, after getting Dust infused into his blood, can shoot fire and set his swords on fire. However, while he's immune to external fire (Ex.: Clu held a lighter to his face to no avail), he's not immune to his own fire (Ex.: A fireball he shot from a nick on his cheek cauterized it shut afterwards.)

    Films — Animation 
  • Lumiere, the ever-burning candlestick from Beauty and the Beast frequently lights and expands his flames, typically for emphasis. He also burns Cogsworth’s hand and sets a pie “en flambé” with them.
  • La Muerte from The Book of Life, gives little sparks that are red like fire. And she literally, blew her top when she found out that Xibalba cheated again. At the end, when she and Xibalba have The Big Damn Kiss, the candles on her hat become fireworks.
  • Sunset Shimmer of My Little Pony: Equestria Girls is hot-headed (although not quite hot-blooded), very good-looking, very short on patience, and distinctly associated with fire. Her demonic, phoenix, and angelic forms all have fire motifs, and her demonic form (or demonic persona; Sunset wasn't exactly in control) throws fireballs. And in her normal human form, her long, complex red-and-gold hair looks almost fire-like, especially when billowing up above her.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Chi is the least stoic and solemn of the Warriors of Virtue. Though he also represents Wisdom, he's still eager and impulsive: "Patience is not my virtue."
  • Wilder and Wallace in Wilder Napalm are two brothers with pyrokinetic abilities. Things start heating up between them when they start querreling over a woman.
  • X-Men Film Series:
    • Pyro can't generate fire, but is immune to it and can direct and grow any nearby fire. As such, he uses a lighter to create it when he needs to in the first two movies, and he gets a wrist-mounted flamethrower in the third.
    • X-Men: Days of Future Past: Sunspot's mutant ability consists of converting the sun's energy into bursts of flame that he can aim at his enemies.
    • X-Men: Apocalypse: The Ancient Egyptian Famine's mutant power is pyrokinesis. It's very much like Pyro's in that she only seems capable of manipulating already existent fire instead of being able to create it.
  • Liz Sherman in the first and second Hellboy movies has pyrokinesis, but is unhappy with it and has difficulty controlling it (she burned down an entire city block and killed her family as an eight-year-old). Ultimately, she is able to embrace it and, in the second film, has greater control and is in a relationship with the luckily fireproof Hellboy. Oddly, Hellboy has the fiery, impulsive, and chaotic personality, while Liz is comparatively stable and reserved.
  • In the film The Last Airbender, Firebending is handled differently than in the show; no firebender can create their element, so they all have to carry around tiny lanterns. Only the most powerful can generate flames from nothing.
  • In the film Firestarter, little Charlie McGee slowly comes into her powers until her pyrokinesis lets her take down an entire hardsite full of armed agents.
  • Legend (1985)
    • The alicorn (unicorn horn) allows its holder to start fires and throw fire.
    • In the climactic fight with Jack, Darkness repeatedly fires fire out of his hands and weapons he's holding and causes fire to blaze up at a distance.
  • Due to a failed anti-radiation vaccine, the main character of Spontaneous Combustion is born with an ability to set people on fire when he's pissed off enough.
  • In Yamato Takeru, the ability to conjure fire is the signature power of the priestesses of Amaterasu. Oto Tachibana in particular has fireball-throwing as her signature spell and combines it with martial prowess to be a Kung-Fu Wizard.
  • The ghost that is haunting Sid in The Gravedancers is a child Pyromaniac who now possesses pyrokinetic powers.
  • Supersonic Saucer: Meba is capable of starting fires thanks to his alien powers.
  • The Czech fairytale "Die Prinzessin und der fliegende Schuster" features the Sun herself note . She's ruined her shoes and now calls for a fireproof cobbler to repair them. Our hero gets out the blacksmith gear and even lends a hand during the try-on. (Don't Try This at Home, it's a fairytale.)

    Live-Action TV 

    Music 
  • Lindsey Stirling's "Elements" features a lot of fire that she dances around, based in a frame quickly constructed from Home Depot materials.
  • Rammstein. Shows include flamethrowers, fire-shooting masks, massive fireballs errupting from the stage, instruments shooting sparks or bursting into flames... One of their most famous gags involves singer Till Lindemann rising from stage engulfed in fire. And they would use that in their opening number.
  • DJ the S' "Disciple of the Fire" is a compilation remix of Fire-based themes from video games.

    Myths & Religion 
  • Hephaestus from Greek Mythology is the god of fire, as well as the god of the forge. Sometimes, the three solar dieties (Hyperion, Helios, and Apollo) also are associated with Fire, if not with Light. Also, a well-known myth tells of the Titan Prometheus, who stole fire from the gods to give to mankind.
  • Surtr, Lord of the Fire Giants from Norse Mythology. Also, sometimes, Loki.
  • Pele. No, not the soccer player. The fire/volcano goddess of Pacific Mythology.
  • The traditional dragon of myth and legend is a creature who can breathe fire.
  • Elijah from The Bible was notable to use a few fire-related thaumaturgy. Some of em also counts as Kill It with Fire.
  • Dietrich Von Bern, a legendary Germanic king based on the real-life Theodoric the Great, was said to have the ability to breathe fire when angry. He uses this ability against Sigfried in Du Rosengarten zu Worms.

    Pinballs 

    Podcasts 
  • Chell/Summer from Sequinox can control heat and has a flaming sword. The stars Antares and Scorpio also have fire powers.

    Pro Wrestling 
  • Throwing "fireballs" (actually just flash paper) at an opponent was an occasional heel trick in the 70s and 80s, perhaps most notably used by Jerry Lawler. Often there is no Kayfabe explanation for it. The first territory to use fire as a hazard during matches was Puerto Rico, specifically CSP.
  • The infamous 1992 FMW Atsushi Onita & Tarzan Goto vs Sabu & Original Sheik no rope barbed wire death match, often held up as an argument against Garbage Wrestling (or at least the horrific extremes of overdoing it), where the Sheik tried to burn his opponents with a flaming stick and ended up setting the ring on fire. The men then tried to wrestle but not a minute into the match the ring started to melt, causing them to all panic and dive out under the flames...except for the Sheik himself, who caught on fire and chastised Sabu for using water to reduce his burns because it prevented him from throwing fire balls at what he thought was the perfect time.
  • In his wilder and younger days, Mick Foley was known to do some fire-based stunts, including what he himself calls the incredibly stupid innovation of the Fire Chair—a metal folding chair wrapped in a flaming, gas-soaked rag, and used as a club. He swore off this gimmick after nearly killing Terry Funk with it, but has played with fire from time to time since, most notably in his WrestleMania match with Edge.
  • WWE's Kane has a great love of fire, though whether he's a pyrokinetic or just a pyromaniac tends to vary based on how realistic he's being played at the moment.
  • WWE/F tried to create a fire-based gimmick match, the Inferno. While this looked cool, it made the match a bore, since the wrestlers were effectively trapped in the ring, and were taking too-obvious care to avoid the open flames.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons: Fire is one of the most common elemental damage powers, with such favorites as the Wizard's Burning Hands, Fireball, Flaming Sword, and Fire Trap spells, the red dragon's breath weapon, and so on.
    • The pyrokineticist prestige class embodies this trope.
    • Strangely enough, the Druid class is prone to this trope, gaining spells like Produce Flame, Flame Sphere, and Flame Blade within their first few spell levels. If that's not enough, Wild Shape lets them take the forms of elementals, including, yes, FIRE.
    • Ironically, fire is also the most commonly resisted damage type, leading it to being shunned by dedicated powergamers in 3rd edition in favor of sonic damage.
  • Exalted: Fire is one of the five basic elements of creation, and beings associated with it — such as fire elementals, Anklok Dragon Kings and Fire Aspect Dragon-Blooded — can manipulate, create and extinguish fire and light. Fire is generally associated with purification and transformation, and beings tied to it sometimes possess powers related to this concept without necessarily manipulating fire directly.
  • Feng Shui: The Path of the Brilliant Flame fu path essentially gives you fiery kung fu powers. And fire is one of the most common Blast powers that a sorcerer can use.
  • Magic: The Gathering: Fire magic is one of the most common means of offensive magic available to a Red mage, along with Shock and Awe and more rarely Dishing Out Dirt. Classic Magic's most iconic fire mage is Jaya Ballard, Task Mage, best known for providing the flavor text for many fire-related cards. Chandra Nalaar, her disciple of sorts, took over her role in the post-Mending era.
  • Fantasy Strike: Jaina Stormborne sets herself on fire in addition to the usual flame attacks. In Yomi, she also sets the arena floor on fire.
  • BattleTech: The Firestarter Battlemech is dedicated to the role, mounting four fusion-powered flamethrowers.
  • Games Workshop:
    • In Warhammer, Warhammer: Age of Sigmar & Warhammer 40,000, the magic conjured by Tzeentch, his daemons and his followers commonly takes the form of dazzling, multi-coloured flames that can burn the very soul of the victim, mutate them beyond all recognition, or anything in between.
    • In Warhammer specifically, one of the basic forms of magic available to the majority of magic uses in the setting is the Lore of Fire that specialises in the use of pyromancy.
    • Warhammer 40,000 specific examples:
      • The 6th Edition of the game added Pyromancy as a universal psychic power pool, as an option for many races that use psychic powers.
      • The purity and psychic abilities of the elite Grey Knight Purifiers typically manifests as a cleansing blue flame capable of incinerating the body and soul of any evil creature caught in the conflagration. This ability is represented in the 8th Edition of the game by the 'Purifying Flame' Ability that increases the damage done by the Purifier's Smite psychic power but reduces its range.
    • Necromunda:
      • One of the four types of Wyrds that gangs could hire in the first two editions of the game was the Pyro Wyrd. Possessing powerful pyrokinetic abilities Pyros were capable of flinging fireballs at their enemies, creating walls of flame or unleashing a blast of heat equivalent to an anti-tank meltagun.
      • One of the powers available to the Witches who accompany Chaos Cult gangs in the 3rd Edition of the game is Scouring. This Psychic Power causes balefire to engulf his enemies, inflicting damage equal to auto or las weaponry.
  • In 7th Sea, there is the rare sorcery "El Fuego Adentro" of Castille, where a practitioner can create and wield fire. Just don't let the Inquisition find out...
  • In Heavy Gear, the Flammjager gear was not only a specialised incendiary mecha, but its pilots had a (justified) reputation as Pyromaniacs.
  • The Pyrokinetic mutant ability in Paranoia. Of course, this being Paranoia, if it's actually helping at any point, the GM will probably cause the pyrokinetic to cook off the grenades he's carrying or otherwise inflict hilarity on the hapless fellow.
  • Call of Cthulhu. The Great Old One Cthugha and his Fire Vampire servants can perform fire-based attacks.
  • Princess: The Hopeful: The Court of Swords has a strong affinity for the element of fire, tied to their embrace of love and other passions. Many of their Charms create, manipulate, or protect from fire, and their Invocation can be applied for free to affect either fire or anything that's on fire.

    Theme Parks 

    Toys 
  • There's several subspecies with this power in BIONICLE, though some of the more notable characters are Tahu, Vakama, and Jaller. More often than not, they're The Leader of their group.
  • The Infernites from Mixels. They habitat the Magma Wastelands and are one of the headliner tribes. They include Flain, Vulk, and Zorch. Wave 4 later introduced a second group of more lava-based members: Burnard, Flamzer, and Meltus.

    Web Animation 
  • The Fire-Human, from Water-Human. He literally looks like he's made of fire and might, in fact, be just an Elemental Embodiment. His servants also have fire spells.
  • DSBT InsaniT:
    • Killer Monster can spit fireballs and breathe fire. He also has lava powers.
    • ???'s Tyrannomon, fitting with the source material, can also spit fireballs and breathe fire.
    • Screech can breathe fire and spit out fireballs.
    • Averted with Fire Guy. Despite being a fireball, he has no command over it whatsoever.
  • Dreamscape:
  • Lewis from Mystery Skulls Animated uses his ghostly abilities to light some candles, braziers and his own hair with with magenta flames before filling an entire haunted mansion with the stuff. He is also able wreath his hands in the purple flames in a fight.
  • RWBY: After usurping the powers and title of the Fall Maiden, Cinder Fall gains pyrokenetic abilities that allow her to cloak her body in fire, fly, create flames, and even create obsidian weapons from her embers.
  • Animator vs. Animation
    • The Choosen One from breath and shoot fire.
    • Firefox can also breath fire.

    Web Comics 
  • Embers from IronGate has been this ever since the Fey enchanted/cursed her with fire powers as a child.
  • The titular character from Nosfera can throw fireballs.
  • Kyros from Irregular Webcomic!, though he usually winds up causing more harm than good with it due to extreme trigger-happiness.
  • Cliff and Duster from Slightly Damned have the 'Siara Special'. It's powerful enough to ruin even a high-ranking Angel's afternoon. To a lesser extent, J has a tendency to make anything he touches explode.
  • Butterfly from Collar 6 apparently picked up this ability from Trina. She is a somewhat rare case of a non-Pyromaniac villain to use this trope.
  • Wayward Sons: Hestya's powers are identical to Johnny Storm's, but almost nothing can withstand the heat she gives off while her powers are active. Like her clothes, for instance.
  • John Henry Hunter in Next Town Over. Aside from being able to produce flames from things like alcohol or matches, he is also able to mess with guns being fired, making it hard for people to shoot him.
  • In Gunnerkrigg Court, Antimony soon received a Blinker Stone and quickly learned to use it, mostly for various pyrotechnic effects. You may also count uses of the phrase "fiery Surma" or synonyms. Which is neither quite a metaphor nor a coincidence.
    • Later, it is revealed that she, like her mother, are actually descendants of a Fire Elemental/Human pairing, and thus have a bit of supernatural fire burning inside them. Coyote makes a bit of a point out of the fact that, while she can generally be mistaken for an Emotionless Girl, the right prompting can cause Annie's temper to 'flare' with REMARKABLE speed.

    Web Original 
  • In the Whateley Universe, Fireball. And Sparkler, after she gets her power gauntlets in the first Ayla story.
    • In "Christmas Elves", Fey quite literally plays with fire — and then turns it back on the mooks who thought using flamethrowers against the reincarnation of a Sidhe queen on excellent terms with fire elementals back in the day was a good idea.
  • In Dead West, the Porcelain Doctor has this, paired with Healing Hands and a couple of other Psychic Powers. At the time the story begins, this power starts to overflow, making him running a constant fever. This particular gift comes in handy for field operations after clashes with the shamblers.
  • The Slender Man is often associated with fire, whether causing it or just being attracted to it. There's also TheArsonist of Dreams in Darkness.
  • The Anti-Cliché and Mary-Sue Elimination Society's Tash uses very powerful fire magic, first with a staff, then with a sword.
  • Chronicles of Syntax has Shia, who can manipulate her own thermal energy to create and control fire. Unlike some other examples, she's neither a redhead not hotblooded. In fact, she can be quite the Cloudcuckoolander at times. Unless she's actually trying to kill you, in which case avoiding fireballs becomes a necessary skill.
  • Frollo has command over pyrokinetic magic, as well as a fireplace that doubles as a TV and computer, on The Frollo Show.
  • Worm has a few, most notably Burnscar, a member of the Slaughterhouse Nine, who can create intense fires and teleport between flames. The more fire she uses, however, the more damaged and weakened her emotions get—and she's already pretty unstable, having joined the Nine after escaping from a mental institution.
  • Marcus is the only mage seen using fire so far, wielding it when he rescued the group from a mob of feral ghosts.
  • Noob has fire elementalists that include Roxana and Pironess, the Phoenix of fire.
  • Agent Hu from Curveball can become a living pillar of flame (asbestos underwear not included).
  • SCP Foundation
    • SCP-2757 ("Dr. Wondertainment's Projector Fantastico™"). When the SCP-2757 projector is used with the film SCP-2757-1e The Valiant Crusaders, one of the powers gained by the experimental subjects is pyrokinesis.
    • SCP-2814 ("Heretic of the Torch"). When a human being wears the SCP-2814 mask they can (a) manipulate fire as if it were a liquid or solid (b) modify the temperature of fire under their control (c) touch or "hold" their fire without being harmed and (d) take no damage from heat or flame up to 5000 °C.
  • Oddly enough for a Mons setting, Mortasheen has only two of these: Smoldronand Thermalunk. Presumably because of the fact that most monsters can use these powers via Psychic Powers.
  • One of the first major villains in MovieBob's The Game Overthinker series is a Fire ninja known as Pyrothinker, who burns down classic game stores and arcades. A few episodes later he is revealed to have an Ice counterpart in the Cryothinker.
  • In How to Hero's list of reasons to change your codename, the hero formerly known as The Flaming Dick is mentioned under the reason "The evolution of language has resulted in your codename now having unfortunate implications" he now goes by "The Combustible Detective."
  • Deviant: Alpha and Flare both represent this trope - Alpha is a calokinetic who heats things up enough to set them aflame and is crazy to boot; Flare, meanwhile, can absorb and unleash solar energy as blasts of flame.


Alternative Title(s): Pyrokinesis, Play With Fire

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The X-Files S01 E12

Cecil Lively decides to lighten up Mulder's mood... by bringing the house down with flames.

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