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Government Procedural

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We have met the Government Conspiracy, and it is us! The main characters are The Government (or at least part of it) - in The White House, Whitehall, the Governor's mansion, a Covert Group, or bureaucrats elsewhere. Variations range from Sitcom to Prime Time Soap with political trappings to topical Ripped from the Headlines drama.

A Law Procedural with government attorneys as the main protagonists is a subgenre. See Spy Drama for espionage themed stuff. See also Police Procedural and Cop Show for law enforcement portrayals.

If the story is more of a character drama focusing on one leader in particular, see Ruler Protagonist.


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Examples

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    Comic Books 

    Fan Works 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Advise & Consent
  • The American President combines this with a Romantic Comedy.
  • Conspiracy is a really sinister version of this, about a meeting between a group of German government officials in 1942... planning the Holocaust.
  • Dave
  • Gabriel Over the White House: a very odd example of the genre in which the President becomes a fascist dictator...and that's supposed to be a good thing.
  • In the Loop concerns factions within the British and American governments colluding to start the War on Terror.
  • Lincoln: Abraham Lincoln's efforts to get the 13th Amendment passed and end slavery in the United States forever.
  • Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
  • Path To War
  • Thirteen Days: the Kennedy administration deals with the Cuban Missile Crisis.
  • Contagion: is basically a look at how the CDC, as a government agency, would operate in the face of a supervirus. Local and federal bureaucracy occasionally becomes a problem.
  • Shin Godzilla shows in great detail what would the most likely response of the Japanese government to the Gojira threat look like. And the U.S. response, too...
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    Literature 
  • EarthCent Ambassador is a foreign service version of this, Played for Laughs. One of the two leads is the ambassador for EarthCent on Union Station, operated by a race of Benevolent AIs called the Stryx.
  • To a degree, Going Postal, and even more so Making Money.
  • When the plot doesn't center on the military action, much of the plot of the Honor Harrington series busies itself with the intricate workings of the various governments involved, and occasionally gives the impression that the military commanders have a less stressful job than the politicians do (Some of the politicians certainly think so, at least).
  • Manticore Ascendant, a prequel series to Honor Harrington, continues the trend of Manticoran politics being at least as ruthless as interstellar warfare.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire: It's about politics in the Seven Kingdoms... with some focus outside it when necessary, battles, dragons, zombies and other magic that occasionally show up to just make the politics much, much more complicated. Mainly, though: the fascinatingly convoluted politics of the Seven Kingdoms.
  • Star Trek: Articles of the Federation takes its name from the United Federation of Planets' version of the Constitution, and deals heavily with Federation internal politics and foreign policy, beginning with the inauguration of Nanietta Bacco as President. The author compared it to Star Trek meets The West Wing.
  • The war-themed epic thriller Victoria includes heavy elements of this, with political planning and machinations (within both the civilian government and the General Staff) as important to the story as the military action itself.

    Live-Action TV 

    Theater 

    Video Games 

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