Follow TV Tropes

Following

Anti-Hero Team

Go To

"So here we are. A thief, two thugs, an assassin, and a maniac."
Peter Quill, Guardians of the Galaxy (trailer)

An Anti Hero Team is Exactly What It Says on the Tin, a group of people consisting of Anti Heroes. Sometimes, there will be an Anti-Villain on the team or even an Ideal Hero or The Cape. In that case, it will be a mixed team. Both Token Good Teammates and Token Evil Teammates can show up on these teams. The mix of exact moral alignments makes these types ripe for internal conflict, but when push comes to shove, they stick by each other more often than not.

Advertisement:

Often leads to Black-and-Gray Morality, Grey-and-Gray Morality, or Orange And Blue Morality Overlaps often with Rag Tag Bunch Of Misfits.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • Marvel Comics also has Daimon Hellstrom: The Son of Satan. The Badass Crew he joins in Marvel Zombies 3 is a team of antiheroes, including Morbius the Living Vampire and Werewolf by Night.
  • The late 1980s and early 1990s had the Teen Titans' sister team, the "Team Titans," who were this to the point that one of them took to calling himself Deathwing.
  • The Outsiders, Batman created them to be superhero black-ops team to take on missions the Justice League wouldn't normally do out in the open.
  • While the Thunderbolts are more of a villain team, the Marvel NOW! team is an anti-hero team, consisting of killers led by General Ross, the Red Hulk. It consists of the Punisher, Elektra, Deadpool, the Leader and Agent Venom. Of everyone on the team, Agent Venom is the only straight-up hero.
  • The Guardians of the Galaxy, like their film counterparts below, feature the half Spartax Starlord, the deadliest woman in the galaxy Gamora, Rocket Raccoon, Groot, and Drax the Destroyer. They also feature members such as Angela, Iron Man, Mantis, and Kitty Pryde.
    • Ironically, the original Guardians, back in the 1970s (and from the 31st century—why yes, they were Marvel's answer to the Legion Of Superheroes) were a straight up heroic team, right up to a former Avenger, Vance Astro, wielding Captain America's shield.
  • Suicide Squad, verging very close to a straight up Villain Team, they're still forced to carry out heroics by their boss, Amanda Waller.

    Fan Works 
  • In Brave New World, we have Team Quantum's Aeon. The rest of Team Quantum still count, but Aeon takes it further when he sucks Team Ebony in his stomach-mouth and puts them through Training from Hell. As a reward, they are now fearless and can use time-themed attacks, but are severely traumatized as a result. Even the rest of Team Quantum didn't like what he did.
  • Child of the Storm has the Avengers, based on their MCU counterparts who are also this, with the addition of a Reformed, but Not Tamed Loki to the roster. On the one hand, they're arguably more prone to doing questionable things than their canon counterparts in some respects, but individually, Thor and Tony are more classically heroic (if in a Knight In Sour Armor sort of way).
  • The Outlaws in The Virtue of Revenge are a team of superheroes who have no issues with killing their enemies as well as torturing them. This puts them at odds with the Justice League, who adhere heavily to a Thou Shalt Not Kill policy.
Advertisement:

    Films — Live-Action 

    Literature 

    Live-Action TV 

    Tabletop Games 
  • In Mage: The Ascension, the protagonist faction is usually the Traditions as they fight against the "evil, soulless" Technocracy, making the protagonists of Panopticon Quest an Anti Hero Team. The Technocracy obviously has a different view as to who the heroes really are, but given the nature of the setting, most experienced mages or Enlightened Scientists would count as anti heroes.

    Video Games 
  • The playable characters of Tales of Berseria are a demon who eats other demons, a slave who has broken free of his binds, a traitor to the holy faction of the world, a Blood Knight samurai who only cares about beating one opponent, the first mate of the world's most infamous pirate crew, and a cynical witch who loves to push people's buttons, and that's not counting the people they kidnapped and forced to join them. They're outright called "a group of villains" at one point.
    • Though to be fair to the traitor, she basically had no choice but to join at the point she did because she had at that point realized going with the more heroic looking faction would actually screw over the entire world. In fact, at first, she fully intends to be The Mole, but circumstances completely change when she is given proof of the Abbey's corruption, and even worse, its dogmatic extremism in just how it tries to go about saving the world. In terms of moral fiber, Eleanor never changes her ideals, she just matures them to fit a more Gray-and-Grey Morality world. Tellingly, by the end of the game, she joins back up with the once-villainous faction as their Christ-figure and leader, and uses what she learned traveling with Velvet's party to make the Abbey actually heroic, and starts the Shepard system that would protect the world all the way up to the sequel. Which, by the way, is a period of many thousands of years.
  • The Star Wolf team in Star Fox started as a generic "evil Star Fox" group, but in sequels, the team becomes more anti-heroic. The removal of the two "scum" characters Pigma (a traitor) and Andrew (nephew of the main villain in Star Fox 64) and the addition of a ladies' man named Panther (who falls in love with a character on the heroes team) gave them an opportunity to work with Star Fox.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • Team Chaotix. They'll do good, but they expect to be paid-handsomely. Vector at least has his better moments, such as finding a kid's lost toy for free.
    • Team Dark, consisting of Shadow, Rouge, and E-123 Omega, have been this ever since Sonic Heroes. They may help save the world, but mainly for their different reasons. Shadow only fights whoever gets in the way of his goals, Rouge is only interested in jewels, and Omega attacks whatever the former two point him at.
  • King of Fighters XI introduces the Anti-Kyokugen Team, consisting of Kasumi Todo, Eiji Kisaragi, and Malin; each of whom has a personal grudge against Ryo Sakazaki, Robert Garcia, and Yuri Sakazaki respectively. Sadly for them, they end up as a comedic group of punch clock villains.
  • Shepard and his/her squadmates from the Mass Effect series, especially if Shepard is being played as a Renegade. The squad from Mass Effect 2 is the most clear cut example, as Shepard is joined by two members of a paramilitary terrorist organization, a vigilante, a Deadly Doctor, a master assassin, an Ax-Crazy biotic convict, a genetically "perfect" member of a Proud Warrior Race, a Knight Templar who can be replaced by her Sex Demon daughter, a Geth Platform, a master thief, and an Only in It for the Money mercenary. Tali is the only member who doesn't qualify as an Anti-Hero, and she makes it clear she is only there as a favor to Shepard.
  • The Phantom Thieves of Hearts from Persona 5 are made up of delinquents and social outcasts who feel repressed in their daily lives and use their powers to correct the injustices of the world around them, regardless of the legality of their actions.
  • The Homura Crimson Squad of Senran Kagura fame become this after the events of the first game, when they abandon Hebijo Clandestine Girls' Academy and become renegades. While they're technically no longer evil shinobi (though that moniker really didn't mean much even then), they're not as morally upright as the Hanzo elites and are more dedicated to their own personal business than being heroes. That said, they have a strong habit of getting involved against the forces of evil and fighting alongside their rivals regardless.
Advertisement:

    Visual Novels 
  • The playable cast of Spirit Hunter: NG are all societal outcasts in one way or another. Main character Akira is an anti-social underground fighter, his best friend Seiji is the heir to a Yakuza family, Kaoru is an occult Idol Singer with hidden Guile Hero tendencies, Ban is an unethical journalist, Rosé is a stage magician with criminal tendencies, and Ooe is a Cowboy Cop who doesn't play by the rules. Their collective lack of morals does come in useful when they need to break into forbidden areas to investigate spirits.

    Web Original 
  • Critical Role: Vox Machina is this, which is pretty standard for a D&D adventuring party, best emphasized in Episode 26. Keyleth means well, but is a Classical Antihero with her self-doubt and awkwardness; Tiberius is a classist loner without remorse for buzz-sawing an old woman to death; Vax and Vex are prideful (nearly to the point of self-destruction in Episodes 24/25) and money-obsessed, respectively; Percy seemed level-headed, but is hiding a survivor complex among other psychological issues that are only getting worse with time; Grog doesn't even bother with a pretense of Good, being a Blood Knight hedonist with a Chaotic Neutral alignment and only his alignment sets him apart from Scanlan. Even Pike slit an unconscious guard's throat once (and paid for it). The Whitestone arc also has a lot of the team getting darker and darker, with enemies who are running away being executed, being tortured, and instigating a violent, bloody revolution.

    Western Animation 

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report