Follow TV Tropes

Following

Anti-Frustration Features
aka: Anti Frustration Feature

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/anti_frustration_arrow_cut_8.png
"After getting stuck and swimming across boiling hot lava back to the beginning of the maze several times, it occurs to you that you could shortcut this whole stupid sonofabitch by simply swimming to the goal."

"There is one feature I will happily abase myself before: mid-boss checkpoints. This is a game where a boss can be the size of the moon and have eleven health bars. Chipping the first ten away only to be killed by a casual elbow to the face is frustrating enough without having to take it from the top."
Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw, Zero Punctuation, on Bayonetta
Advertisement:

Anti-Frustration Features (sometimes called "Quality of Life" features for obvious reasons) are instances in a game designed to alleviate frustration, either in normal gameplay or from previous series iterations.

There are three variants to them. The first is where the established rules of the game are suspended/modified under certain circumstances, or a particular effect that happens when the game deliberately helps you out during a specific situation. Usually an example of an Obvious Rule Patch to prevent unwinnable situations from developing, such as if a given Boss Battle mandates the use of one specific weapon with limited uses (be it Breakable Weapons, Cast From Hit Points, or a simple lack of Bottomless Magazines). It can also occur in other situations, but those are less common.

The second is where they come in the form of very minor changes to the game or interface that provide great conveniences to the player, which alleviates frustrating features found in the prequels or similar games of their genre. For instance, the ability to quickly return to any branching point in a Dialogue Tree within a visual novel, or the addition of little icons on a minimap to allow the player to know where to go to advance the plot.

Advertisement:

The third variant, accessibilitynote  is a variant that has been around for many years but hadn't become an established thing until the mid-2010s. This includes features like text size and contrast options, colour-blindness filters/design, replacing button-mashes with holds, skipping puzzles with extreme dexterity, and more. Many of these can be convenient for able-bodied players too, such as aim lock-on. Perhaps the oldest example is subtitles, but it's best to not list these as games with this feature are too numerous to count, unless it's a special circumstance like being added in a patch.

While Anti-Frustration Features can be found in practically any video game these days, they're particularly notable in Remakes and Remasters, which often add new features to help make it less frustrating and more intuitive for modern players. For example, a remake of game that used a Password Save will use Autosave instead, or a 3D Platformer's remake adds camera inversion options. And as noted above, sequels will often improve the gameplay with these so that the player can better focus on the core mechanics.

Advertisement:

While being a game trope, this isn't exclusive to video games - game shows may contain these as well. Such as acknowledging a challenge is unfair and giving them an out.

See also Acceptable Breaks from Reality for when it is the rules of reality that are changed, and Player Nudge for when the game helps you out only in times where the solution isn't obvious. Can sometimes lead to some slight backlash, and take the form of Suspicious Video-Game Generosity. Not to be confused with Mercy Mode. Direct opposite of Classic Video Game "Screw You"s. Mercy Invincibility is the subtrope where the player is immune to damage for a few seconds after getting injured. Related to Anti-Rage Quitting, where the developers try to keep players from being frustrated at other players as opposed to the game itself.


Examples for specific titles:

Other examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Action Adventure 
  • Assassin's Creed Series:
    • In Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood one of the Lairs of Romulus requires you to cut down counterweights with a projectile. The counterweight you find at the end of a long platforming sequence has a few chests nearby which infinitely replenishes your throwing knives, crossbow bolts and bullets in case you got all the way up there with no ammo left, or have really atrocious aim — they're the only such chests in the entire game!
    • In Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag, if you have several hostile ships around you, they'll stop firing at you when you board one to take it as a prize. Same goes for forts if you initiate a ship boarding mini-event near a hostile fort.
    • A series-wide example is that the final bit of health is valued more than the rest, allowing you to take more hits than you think you can when near-death.
  • Aladdin (Virgin Games): The last two bosses can be killed only if you throw apples at them, and more apples appear every time you run out. In addition, if you fail the Rug Ride level enough times, the game will automatically skip you, giving you a "Nice try" message.
  • The Batman: Arkham Series has a few.
    • Several times in predator encounters, enemies that should notice Batman don't, either because he's too far away, or in the middle of a special takedown.
    • In Batman: Arkham City and Batman: Arkham Origins, after using a gadget to create a platform in the water, Batman will automatically aim straight for it if you glide at it.
    • City featured Riddler informants that could tell Batman where Riddler trophies were hidden, as long as the informant was the last enemy taken out in any encounter. This made battles with the informants frustrating, since the player would have to avoid targeting them until they were done. Origins fixed this problem by making the informants surrender when beaten as opposed to being knocked out, so the player no longer has to beat them last. Also, informants in City would respawn later if you screwed up and didn't interrogate them.
      • And since it's easy to lose track while battling a bunch of Mooks, the informant glows green to make him stand out.
    • Typically, if Batman falls into any pool of water, he'll just grapple gun right back to a safe platform. In Batman: Arkham Knight, even if Batman is too far away for the grapple gun to work, he'll instantly reappear back on a platform anyway.
    • There's a sequence in Knight where you have to analyze security footage for the correct number sequence to open a door. Fail enough times, and Batman will just punch the number pad, causing the door to open anyways.
    • Batman: Arkham Origins (and likely others) will have the AI take pity on you if you're being beaten too badly in a fistfight. Jump into a huge crowd of enemies and quickly lose all your health by playing extremely poorly. When you're down to one hit left, the enemies will basically turn into punching bags, offering no threat whatsoever until you're down to about five enemies, at which point normal AI resumes. You might still lose, but at least you still beat a bunch of guys, right?
  • Bayonetta Series:
    • As mentioned in the page quote, Bayonetta features mid-boss checkpoints so that the player doesn't have to fight the boss all over again if they die towards the end of the fight. It also puts a checkpoint right before every Press X to Not Die moment so that, even if you fail the quicktime event, you don't lose more than a few seconds of progress.
    • Bayonetta 2 removes damage from falling in to pits, which is useful since it generally involves more platforming than its predecessor. Quicktime events that punish the player with death have also been removed, due to the complaints about how sudden they were in the first game and how penalizing failing one was.
  • When you die in Beyond Good & Evil, you're usually sent back to a checkpoint near the start of the room or the area you're in. You'll have half your regular health, and any items you may have used in the interim will be gone. There are two exceptions, however: The Looter's Caverns and the Final Boss. When you lose a Looter's Cavern, you're sent back to the start with whatever health you had when you entered (full, if you're smart) and any items you used during the challenge are returned to your inventory. Since the Looter's Caverns are... annoying, this is quite a boon. The Final Boss has a checkpoint halfway that's the same way.
  • The first Boktai game had a "Loser Button" in a room with a particularly difficult ice block puzzle. Pushing it instantly solved the puzzle for you, at the cost of changing the button to a hint panel that read "Here forever engraved is the name of the LOSER Django (Or whatever name you inputted)."
  • Normally in Brave Fencer Musashi when you die you're given the option to either reload your last save or, if you used a Memory Box, pay half of your Drans to continue from there. During any of the mini-games like the rafting sequence or the gondola ride however, you get to continue from the beginning of it for free. The gondola ride even adds checkpoints of its own along the way.
  • If you die to a boss in Cave Story, retrying that same boss will have the pre-fight cutscene's dialogue boxes scroll by instantly so you can get back to the fight faster. Also, the the exposition dialogue of the Brutal Bonus Level occurs only once when you pass it for the first time, so you don't have to hear the same thing every time you die.
  • Clash at Demonhead
    • If you need to buy some items but use up your stock of Shop Calls, you can go to the "WELCOME" sign on Route 5 to have the shop appear for free.
    • The shop's stock rotates depending on how many times you visit it, but the Password Save-granting Microrecorder items are always in stock.
  • Cuphead has the Marathon Battle against King Dice, where you're forced to battle at least three out of nine mini-bosses in the King's Court, and then the King himself, all on one life. It's notably the only time in the game where you can replenish health mid-stage: certain boss battles grant a "Health Up" when you land on them and give you an extra hit, labelled as heart icons on the roulette board. A patch released for the game now ensures that if a player dies during each battle with one of the mini-bosses in co-op mode, they will automatically return to life at the King Dice board with 1 HP once their surviving partner has defeated the mini-boss. Oh, and the "Start Over" square will now trigger only once per attempt.
  • Darksiders II has an item that resets your skill trees, allowing you to reassign skill points if you want to try out different abilities, or if you are having difficulty with certain enemies that are strong against whatever abilities you currently have.
  • In The Emperor's New Groove video game, the Catacombs levels have stages where you ride Yzma and Kronk's rollercoaster into their lab. The developers seemed to have anticipated that the levels would be difficult due to the high speed, frequently reversing your controls, and lack of checkpoints, so the level doesn't have a health bar or count any falls into the Bottomless Pit as deaths and take you from the top.
  • Freedom Planet
    • In Final Dreadnought 2, Milla will occasionally pop in and give Lilac or Carol a bubble shield to prevent them from suffocating after Brevon shuts down the oxygen supply. When playing as Milla herself, Brevon won't even shut the oxygen down. As of the later updates, there have also been bubbles as seen in underwater areas.
    • Milla also doesn't have to fight the end boss of Final Dreadnought 2, though there is a very good reason for that.
    • The boss of Pangu Lagoon requires you to destroy a very large number of orbs scattered across its back, at which point its eye becomes vulnerable and you can finish it off. Due to the sheer size and speed of the boss, destroying every last orb would be a nightmare, but thankfully the game lets you off if there's just a few left.
    • The game compensates for Milla's lack of any kind of quick or multi-hit attacks by toning down the number of hits certain bosses take. For example, Serpentine's second phase in Jade Creek starts with its windshield already partially cracked, and the "defeat 99 ninjas" challenge in Trap Hideout is cut down to 15 ninjas instead.
    • If for any reason pushing the gem at the end of the mid-boss for Relic Maze doesn't progress the game by braking the truck's engine, it can easily be destroyed with an attack.
    • In the final boss with Lord Brevon, if you die after a phase of the three-phase boss, the game puts you back at the beginning of the current phase, recognizing just how hard this guy is. Also after defeating each form, a full bar's worth of health will drop, letting you refill your HP before moving on to the next.
    • In the second game, if you die at any point, you can mash the jump button to regain a sliver of health that brings you back. You'll die in one hit and this only applies if there's actually an intact body to revive, but it can be tremendously helpful if you're close to finishing a boss and get killed at the last second.
  • In Goof Troop, if you get a Game Over, the Password Save system will remember the last password you obtained, allowing for a quick continue.
  • Harry Potter: The game based on Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone can be very frustrating due to its large amounts of Permanently Missable Content in the form of Famous Wizard Cards. Its sequel, based on Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets heavily improves on this aspect, as many areas can now be revisited allowing you to find potentially missed Wizard Cards and cards you may have missed in areas you can't revisit are purchasable at certain ingame vendors. Another nice feature is that the second game tracks how many secrets you've found.
  • Horizon Zero Dawn will have Aloy muse that she could use her Focus, if the player doesn't catch on right away to do this in order to accomplish a mission objective.
  • Iji gives you a pre-made Resonance Reflector for your tennis date with the final boss, just in case you didn't have one yet. More acceptable than usual, since otherwise it would be impossible to win on the hardest difficulty level.
  • The Last of Us
    • During sneaking sections, enemies will only notice the player character, not any AI escorts or party members. Appropriately, the AI sneaks around corners as well as a player can, but if you're careful, you may notice a few times when the bad guys ought to be noticing the escorts but don't.
    • Whenever you've killed the last enemy in a combat section, Joel will say something along the lines of "Alright, that's all of them," preventing players from wandering around an empty level looking for enemies that aren't there.
    • Similarly, when you're navigating through large areas, the characters will occasionally say things like, "Let's go through here," or "Can't go this way," to let the player know when they're on the right track or when they should turn around.
    • Despite the emphasis on survival and limited provisions, specific scenes where you're required to use a specific gun, the game will quietly give you unlimited ammunition for it to ensure the segment isn't Unwinnable by Mistake.
  • Metroid:
    • Most games in general tend to bias Random Drops items in favor of items that you need. If you're low on health, you'll see more health pickups. In some of them (such as Super Metroid), if you are full on a certain item such as missiles, it will no longer appear at all, allowing other items to fill its place.
    • Metroid 1:
      • Both Kraid and Ridley give you 75 missiles upon killing them, which cuts down on the time spent searching for missile tanks, and both of their rooms have a hidden energy tank, which will refill your health even if you have six already.
      • Any Zebetite barriers destroyed by the player will remain destroyed, even if the player dies or has to reload the game with a password. Since the act of destroying Zebetite consumes a lot of missiles and leaves the player vulnerable to a constant onslaught of turrets and Rinkas, it is very merciful of the game developers to not force players to repeat the process every time they die to Mother Brain.
      • If you're playing the game on the original hardware and have two controllers, you can press start on Controller one, then press Up and A on Controller two at the same time to end your game and go to the password screen without dying.note 
    • Metroid Prime 2: Echoes has the Light, Dark, and Annihilator beams that require ammo to use. Some enemies are only vulnerable to certain beam weapons, and some doors only open with those weapons, too. Thus, you gain Dark ammo from enemies killed with the Light Beam, Light ammo from enemies killed with the Dark Beam, and both types from Annihilator. Even if you run out of ammo, you can still fire the beams by charging them up, but they shoot normal shots instead. And if you happen to run out of ammo while fighting the third form of the final boss Emperor Ing, he'll gracefully summon a bunch of cannon fodder mooks that drop health and ammo when killed.
    • In Metroid Fusion, missiles are required to kill a Core-X (everything else will go down to the Charge Beam eventually). Fortunately, just shooting a Core-X with a beam weapon will cause both health and missile X's to fly out of it like candy. This is near-essential in a 1% Run, as you only get one missile expansion. Making this even better is it is actually justified In-Universe. The X's are actually deadly fatal and infectious to anything except for Metroids and Samus (who has Metroid DNA) and throwing them out at an attacking enemy is actually a defense tactic of the Core-X.
  • Mickey Mania:
    • Similarly to the Rug Ride level in Aladdin, losing all your lives to the inexplicable buzz-saws and acid pits (and the floor itself, if you fall off the trolley) in the level based on The Mad Doctor will not earn you a Game Over, as the game will Hand Wave you to the next area with a message to the effect of "Mickey has broken all the trolleys so he walked instead". Why didn't he just walk to begin with? It had the apple thing too, but with marbles.
    • The same level also has another one of these, though it can actually happen anywhere in the game; the trolley level is the easiest to perform it in. Throw a marble at a certain row of buzz saws causes a "Level Warp" screen to pop up, letting you go one level forward or backwards, whichever you choose. So why does this example fit this trope? The "Level Warp" is a very cleverly disguised Crash Handler. Whenever a Game-Breaking Bug is triggered, the game boots up a level warp as the crash screen, which is much more attractive to the players than the game simply freezing, or getting a screen about the game crashing. The trolley level is only an example of how to crash the game consistently: it can be done by accident elsewhereanother . Sonic 3D Blast by the same developer also disguised its crash handler as a secret level warp.
  • Fail enough times at any of the Oni Island races in Ōkami and the game will start going easier on you. This can include changing the timing of the obstacles, slowing your opponent, or putting platforms over spikes. There is a reduction in the reward for winning each time, but it does help those that are less proficient at this sort of thing.

  • The Time Travel powers in the Prince of Persia Sands trilogy include Rewind, which allows the player to rewind time just enough to reverse a fatal mistake. It's also designed to prevent abuse, though, with the use of sand tanks and a timer that needs to recharged in-between time power usage.
  • Starlink: Battle for Atlas is a "toys to life" game in a similar vein to Skylanders, but had the misfortune of being released around the time such games were falling out of popularity. To that end, the developers made additional ships and pilots available as DLC, so players don't need to buy the toys to get additional content.
  • In the original Dreamcast release of Sonic Adventure, the Egg Carrier chao garden had a very deep pool of water that chao liked to drown in. The water was so deep that it completely submerged all player characters, making it impossible to reach the flailing chao when they swam out too far. The Updated Re-release rectified this by lowering the water level so it was shallow enough to rescue them.
  • If you repeatedly die in ToeJam & Earl, the game will eventually give you a random beneficial present upon respawning.
  • In Tomb Raider, if you save at a crystal, then find a secret, and then die and continue from the save crystal, the secret will remain marked as "found". You'll have to refind the secret if you want to keep the ammo or items you found within, but finding it once is all you need for the end-level tally. This can be handy for some of the trickier late-game secrets, since if the items weren't worth the effort you can simply move on and still get 100% Completion. Note that if you actually shut off the machine or quit to the main menu you'll have to refind the secret; this only applies if you choose the "restart the level" option upon death.
  • Trover Saves the Universe: Whenever Trover jumps, a marker will appear beneath him, showing where he'll land.
  • If the player bounces the ball too many times off the paddle in DX-Ball 2 without hitting a destructible block, all indestructible blocks on the field are changed into destructible blocks (since this is usually caused by indestructible blocks being a huge pain in the ass and keeping you from making the shot.)
    • If the player still can't hit the last few blocks in a level, a lightning will strike them and destroy the blocks instantly.
  • Likewise, WizOrb gives the player free MP if they bounce the ball off the paddle too many times without hitting a destructible block or enemy, so they can use a spell to progress further.
  • Another breakout clone, Hyperballoid, allows the player to skip the last three destructable blocks in a level by dropping a "level skip" bonus once that point is reached. Ending the level the good old-fashioned way is rewarded with extra points, but if you just can't get the ball in that accursed corner with the tiny little block, then you have an easy way out.
  • The Wonderful 101: If the player seemingly ends up stuck at some point, P-Star will generate a hologram of either an arrow indicating where to go or the shape of the Unite Morph needed to progress. For instance, in Operation 004-A, it might not be immediately obvious that forming Unite Hammer will make you sink under water. P-Star will make an image of a yellow hammer should the player spend too much time on the surface, not knowing what to do.
  • Yoku's Island Express: The Slug Vacuum and Sootling On A Leash tools, which are often required to be used while flying through the air at high speed, both cause time to slow down when an airborne Yoku passes within range of a target, giving the player a better chance of completing the action successfully.

    Adventure Games 
  • A game based on the Connections TV show featured a hint book that told you how to solve certain puzzles. Said hint book also included a few "magic buttons" that, if you clicked on them, would instantly solve a puzzle or put you right at the screen you needed to be at. The game also included a small inventory system, with the objects used for certain puzzles or doors. You could only use these objects on the screen they were designed to be used on, though; attempting to use them at any other time netted you a "not yet!" message, so you didn't spend a lot of time pointlessly trying every object on every pixel of every screen.
  • The Dame Was Loaded had a tuxedo needed at one point to get into the Blue Angel nightclub. If you miss it the first time, there’s an alternative route planned to save you from having to reload.
  • On the Armor Games version of Don't Escape 3, the AG quests corresponding to the in-game achievements were only added after the game had been up for a while and, as a result, a lot of players had gotten them already. To prevent players from having to do the same things twice, the quests were coded so that going to the achievements page in-game would trigger the completion of any quest whose corresponding achievement was already completed.
  • In the Farnham Fables games, pressing the X button or the middle mouse button will highlight every interactive item on the screen, eliminating the need for Pixel Hunting.
  • Ghost in the Sheet has two arcade sequences; you can use a command to skip them if they're too difficult for you (the rat one you should probably be able to get on your own; good luck with the fireflies though).
  • Modern-day interactive fiction not uncommonly comes with an 'undo' command, allowing the player to simply take back moves if desired. (This is for example the default in games written with Inform 7 unless explicitly disabled by the designer.)
  • In Lost Chronicles of Zerzura the tip of the cursor turns red if something can be interacted with or used on something else.
  • In Lost Horizon the cursor resembles a mouse when you hover over things. The right button is highlighted if you can look at something and the left button is highlighted if you can interact with it or use it on something else.

    Card Games 
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links has an auto-duel option for standard opponents, which can be turned off mid-fight, and an automatic deck creator, which automatically uses your strongest cards.
  • Magic: The Gathering:
    • Usually, mechanics that prove too annoying or too complex to explain or track are simply not reprinted or printed on new cards, removing them from most formats.
    • In both Online and Arena there are hotkeys and options to allow you to automatically pass pioriety to reduce the amount of of time used up when you have nothing to play. Online also lets you set up automatic passes on indiviual ablities that trigger often multiple times. You can also set up skipping whole phases by clicking on the phase buttons.
    • If a card in Arena lets you cast it from a place outside of your hand it'll appear in a seperate "hand" beside your normal one.
    • +1/+1 and -1/-1 counters nullify each other entirely, so a creature that has had 3 +1/+1 counters and 1 -1/-1 counter placed on it has 2 +1/+1 counters on it rather than 4 counters total. While there are a handful of cards that would care about such things, keeping track of multiple types of counters on a single creature is enough of a hassle that it's not worth doing so for the two most common counter types that simply negate each other's effects, just for such cases.
    • Some old cards care about the order, not simply the contents, of a player's graveyard. Figuring out what order things that should enter can be irritating, and players might like to be able to e.g. put a card with flashback on top to remind themselves they could play it. Consequently players are given the ability to rearrange their graveyards at will in any format these cards aren't legal, since there's no way the order can be relevant (and in casual play the rule is normally ignored anyway, because the cards that make it matter are rare, unpopular, and not even very good).
    • Playing lands and producing mana are both defined as "Special Actions" which operate outside of the normal timing rules, so that they are impossible to interact with. This prevents players from disrupting them and slowing down the game. Additionally, the ability to destroy lands has been slowly but heavily nerfed, to the point where the only formats where land destruction cards are made also include other ways to obtain mana. Land destruction is still a viable strategy with a deck, it's just not as much of a Game-Breaker as it used to be.
  • Ensemble Stars! guarantees that if you make it to 5.5 million event points, you will receive a copy of the ranking event card, regardless of what the actual border ends up being. This was devised to deal with the extremely varying borders events could reach up to - at the lower end, some events barely get over 2 million, which for a good team making full use of regenerated LP might take less dia than a gacha pull, but as the game's audience grows the more popular units and characters were starting to achieve extremely high borders above 5 million, which would require hundreds of dia. Even where the border ends up around 5.5 million anyway, the knowledge that a card is guaranteed then is more than enough to soothe a lot of anxiety (especially since the last-minute rush at such high levels tends to be extremely brutal), and since many players are satisfied to simply reach that point and then stop, events which might have spiraled into ludicrously high borders are softened (for example, it was projected that the current record-holder Knights Repayfes would reached 8 million event points if the card were not available; as it is, it still got to over 6 million.)
  • A3 has an auto feature during lessons which stop the player from tapping too many times to proceed, and also saves time.
  • Hearthstone:
    • Minions with conditional effects have a yellow border instead of green when their condition is fulfilled. This can be really important for cards like Reno Jackson which check whether your deck has any duplicate cards or not - which would otherwise require keeping track of every card you've drawn that game.
    • The Mage Quest card Open the Waygate requires the player to play spells that didn't start in their deck. Cards that you get through generation effects are normally unmarked in your hand, but hovering over the quest will highlight any spells that fill the requirement.
    • Whenever a card is nerfed, you can disenchant it for full dust value for a short period afterwards. This lets you craft something of equal value, or save up for a rarer card more easily. On a similar note, sometimes the Arena gamemode will go through a rules change that requires all active decks to be retired. When this happens to you, you're given a free Arena ticket.

    Edutainment Games 
  • Super Solvers Series:
    • In Treasure Cove!, you use bubbles to attack things and move around the level. To obtain bubbles, you have to shine your flashlight at the bubble station a few times to pay for them, and bubbles could in turn be used to capture starfish, who reward correct answers to questions with more flashlight energy. Since you could, if you tried very hard, waste all of your bubbles and light, the game would place electric eels on the next screen you swam to to give you a free energy boost, rather than leave you to swim around a now-Unwinnable game.
    • This also applies to all Super Solver games. Treasure Mountain! and Treasure Math Storm! have the same thing, if you swap flashlight for coins, and electric eels with coins laying on the ground.

    Fighting Games 
  • The otherwise insanely-powerful-even-for-an-SNK Boss of Arcana Heart 3 score attack, Parace, starts with less life each time you continue. After losing to her a dozen times or so, she'll start with about a quarter of full health and can be taken out with a single blaze - if you can hit her.
  • In Battle Fantasia's story mode, continuing after defeat will start you with a full level on your MP bar. This continues up to level 3, after which you are given infinite MP.
  • Dragon Ball Fighter Z
    • The Dynamic Entry that accompanies a character being KO'd is done to avoid the Cycle of Hurting that can happen in the Marvel vs. Capcom games, where the next fighter in queue simply jumps into the fray after their partner goes down. Arc System Works felt that this punished a player for losing since a waiting opponent could pounce on them as they came in. In FighterZ, the clash resets both characters to a standing neutral start, so there is no immediate advantage gained by knocking an opponent's character out. This also helps with a bit of Gameplay and Story Integration as these characters will either go in as fast as possible to save their fallen comrade or blindside them to take advantage.
    • The Eternal Dragon mechanic will not activate automatically when a player fills up the meter. Instead, it must be activated intentionally by completing an auto-combo while your super meter is at the maximum 7 bars. This way a player cannot stumble into getting a wish by accident, despite their opponent trying to strategize around securing it.
    • Z-Coins, contrary to initial fears of being a premium currency, are this when it comes to the unlocks. You can't buy Z-Coins with real-world money; instead, you can randomly get a Z-Coin when popping open a capsule, and you also get one if you got something from a capsule that you already have. Trading in ten Z-Coins will always unlock something you didn't already have as a way to mitigate the frustration of getting the same things over and over.
    • Losing a match in Story Mode will still give your fighters a small amount of experience points. And although you're sent back to the beginning of the map, you'll retain all the experience you gained. Also, challenging the Final Boss of Story Mode doesn't make you restart the map, instead just letting you start the boss battle over.
    • Every cutscene you've triggered will be permanently unlocked in the Story Gallery, even if you didn't save. Equipment is also permanently acquired without needing to save the game. This makes farming items and collecting optional cutscenes much easier, since you can simply return to the story title screen whenever you need without losing any data. Unfortunately, if you lose a match and already arrive at the victory/loss screen, the loss will still count even if you shut down the game without saving.
  • The King of Fighters:
    • Starting with KOF '98, you were allowed to continue with a slight advantage upon losing (such as reducing the enemy's health to 1/3 of its normal length or starting you off with a full Super Meter)... though that's little help against the final boss.
    • In the remakes of '98 and 2002, failing any combination of the challenge games 100 times unlocks everything in the game automatically.
  • Mortal Kombat 4 introduced a Maximum Damage cap regarding combos. In previous games some characters (like with Kitana and Scorpion in Mortal Kombat II or with Sub Zero or Noob Saibot in Ultimate Mortal Kombat 3) were capable of 100% combos, which would effectively guarantee a victory if pulled off, and some of them (especially Noob Saibot's) were rather easy to perform with practice. Mortal Kombat 4 instead forcibly makes both players back-flip away from each other if 20% of an opponent's health is drained in a single combo.
  • In Mortal Kombat 9, the A.I. gets progressively easier as the player dies, even with final boss Shao Kahn (to the point where he'll mostly just taunt over and over).
  • Skullgirls has the Infinite Prevention System, a feature that detects when a player is trapped in an infinite combo loop and lets them burst out of it in an instant. Although, the one doing the infinite can bait out said burst...
  • The Chronicles of the Sword mode in Soulcalibur III, like the Ratchet & Clank example below, allows you to keep accumulated experience even if you fail a map, so you won't have to restart the campaign from scratch when you realize in the final level that your party is underleveled or that your class composition doesn't allow for enough anti-A.I. moves to beat the SNK Boss.
  • Street Fighter:
    • The series in general has this feature called Negative Edge. Normally, to perform special moves or super moves, you do the motion then press the attack button. Negative Edge allows one to hold the attack button, perform the motion, then, by releasing the depressed button, the special is performed. This allows chaining particularly hard combos and allows easier performance on special moves. This has since been used by other fighting games.
    • Street Fighter III has the A.I. in a particular fight become gradually easier with each loss, until it's practically handing you the win on a silver platter out of pity. This is perhaps easiest to notice in 3rd Strike during the Final Boss: if Gill ever uses his taunt mid-battle, something he'd never do in normal circumstances, that's an indicator the difficulty's been lowered at least a peg or two. (But considering Gill's taunt involves him openly laughing at his opponent, some players might instead interpret the gesture as Easy-Mode Mockery.)

    First-Person Shooters 
  • Don't tell the other splicers, but BioShock gives you the Dungeon Masters Girlfriend treatment:
    • Enemies deliberately miss their first few shots at the player, alerting you to their presence so you aren't instantly killed. Their first shot is guaranteed to miss and the next few have very poor accuracy.
    • Big Daddies move much slower when you are not looking at them to not only spare you getting drilled from behind by surprise, but also to allow you to easily run away from the buggers if you need to.
    • And most notably, you can't truly die in the game. Dying just kicks you back to the nearest Vita Chamber and any damage or kills you've gotten on enemies are retained.
  • BioShock Infinite and its Burial at Sea DLC always play a short violin Stinger when you've cleared an area of enemies. Given the sheer size and scope of some of the areas the fighting takes place in, this is very helpful. Also, Infinite doesn't count falling off of its floating city setting as a death; you're simply instantly teleported to someplace close to where you fell with a tiny decrease in health.
  • Borderlands:
    • Ammo chests are weighted slightly to what you're low on.
    • Running out of health puts you into a "Fight for your Life" mode that lets you get back on your feet if you manage to kill an enemy within a short time, undoubtedly a useful feature given the amounts of damage a lot of the enemies can dish out. However, this can arguably make the frustration worse in a few instances, for example if you managed to kill the only nearby enemy a nanosecond before you went down due to afterburn or something. Fortunately, Death Is a Slap on the Wrist thanks to the New-U stations, which only consume your Money for Nothing, scattered about.
    • In a mid-game mandatory Escort Mission where you have to protect a beacon from Hyperion robots for a certain time the beacon cannot be permanently destroyed; its health depleting only halts the timer until you repair it. If you fail to do it and have to repair it enough times, the Big Bad himself will remark on how much you're sucking at the job. Afterwards, the beacon becomes completely invulnerable. The Difficulty Spike said mission presents in single-player means that, to a first-timer, it makes completing the mission possible.
    • Some quests give you specific weapons or items that you must take to complete them, or as a quest reward. Should you get a quest item or reward when your inventory is full, you'll still get the item anyway, with your inventory going over its maximum limit.
    • Accidentally sell an item you didn't want to? Buy it back for the exact price you sold it for!
    • At one point in the Tiny Tina's Assault on Dragon Keep DLC, the player has to complete a jumping puzzle designed by Tina over a lava pit. If you die, the game simply plunks you back next to the puzzle rather than booting you to the last New-U station, and it doesn't charge you any money for the respawn.
  • If the player loses enough times in a Brothers in Arms game, the player is given the option to replay last checkpoint with full health, instead of whatever health the player left off with. In the Road To Hill 30 game, it even tells you "War isn't fair, but a game should be."
  • During the boss fight against the Giant Venus Maneater in Bulletstorm, you never run out of PMC ammo. If you happen to run out, you instantly spawn another full clip.
  • In Dino D-Day, The Dilophosaurus can pick up a downed enemy and throw them at another player to instantly kill both. However, knocking down someone can prove to be a difficult task (especially if you're out in the open, since you become a sitting duck for gunfire), so there are harmless goats scattered around every map for you to freely pick up and throw.
  • In DOOM (2016), killing enemies when you're low on health will cause them to drop health containers. Performing a Glory Kill when you're at low health will make enemies drop even more. Also, enemies will occasionally drop free ammo on death if one of your ammo types is empty.
    • The healthbar consumption under damage is treated as non-linear, with the last ticks containing more "hit points" than the first ones. According to the developers, it has been made with an intention to invoke Last Chance Hit Point experience when playing on Ultra-Violence and Nightmare difficulty levels.
  • Doom Eternal ramps up the diificulty from it's predecessor, but also adds a number of helpful features:
    • The game adds Extra Lives scattered around the levels, items that are automatically activated when Doomguy's health reaches zero, and allow for him to seamlessly continue in action instead of dying and having to go back to the last checkpoint.
    • Unlike in the previous game, falling to a bottomless pit due to failing a platforming segment will bring the player back to the nearest platform instead of killing them. It does take away some health every time you do this, however, so falling into enough pits will kill you eventually.
    • When you're near the end of a level, you gain the ability to fast travel to previous areas in order to backtrack and hunt down secrets you might have missed.
    • When your chainsaw runs out of fuel, it'll automatically replenish its fuel to 1 pip after a short cooldown, meaning that it's usually possible for you to find a fodder demon somewhere and saw it for some emergency ammo. Given how strapped for ammunition you'll be in Eternal compared to its predecessor, you'll be taking advantage of this a lot. In fact, to facilitate this, the game will constantly respawn fodder zombies in arena zones (including all boss fights), so that one will always have something to chainsaw or Glory Kill in case they need health or ammunition.
    • If you're struggling with a Boss, the game will offer you Sentinel Armor, a temporary Rune that massively boosts your damage resistance, for no penalty.
    • The campaign provides more Praetor Tokens and Sentinel Batteries than a player actually needs, so one doesn't need to obsessively accomplish every challenge or find every secret to max out Praetor suit perks and unlock all rooms in the Fortress of Doom.
  • Half-Life 2:
    • If you find an infinite ammo crate, expect to use it liberally.
    • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon upgrades your suit to allow it to heal much faster and more energy (as well as HP) from the wall-mounted recharge stations.
    • In the one battle that doesn't have an infinite crate for the one type of ammo you need, infinitely-respawning allies will provide you with the ammo you need.
    • A more minor example is the supplies dropped by crates. They're dependent on the player's current status, so someone low on ammo might get a few more rounds, while someone with low health could find a medkit. It's done subtly enough that it's not really noticeable in-game — you just know that you managed to find that crate at just the right time!
  • Halo series:
    • When fighting the Anticlimax Boss of Halo 3, Sgt. Johnson gives you a Spartan Laser, which at the time is the only weapon capable of doing damage to said boss. It doesn't matter if you brought in a fully-loaded rocket launcher or fuel rod cannon, they're useless here. Luckily, the laser has infinite ammo, so you don't have to jump off the edge when you run out of charge.
      • There's even a small nod to this as well. The Spartan Laser you're given is at an ammo capacity of 77 out of a possible 100. Given that the laser normally fires in increments of 20, such an ammo count should be impossible, cluing the player into its' significance.
    • Games from Halo 2 onward do this if you get caught into death loops at any point (i.e., if you die too fast after reloading your auto save point many times, particularly because of a plasma grenade getting stuck to you just before a checkpoint). Normally, such cases require reloading the entire level from the start, but Bungie decided that the game should throw a merciful bone to players who're stuck in impossible situations by reloading from two checkpoints back.
    • In Halo: Reach, the space combat section can get disorientating because one might easily end up flying "upside down". Thus, the game automatically makes your Sabre right itself if you stop turning for a few seconds. Also, so that enemies don't become too difficult to shoot at such long range, the reticle for hitting them automatically adjusts based on distance and waypoints appear showing where the enemy fighters are when there's only five left.
  • Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast and Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy make any enemies who are carrying key cards somewhat immune to certain Force powers (i.e. Push and Pull will still knock them over, but they won't actually change position) to prevent players from accidentally throwing that key card down the nearest bottomless shaft and promptly locking themselves out from an item crate or the path out of the level.
  • Left 4 Dead:
    • Developers' commentary states that it's a major feature of the Director AI: It will try to estimate the survivors' stress levels and give them breathers if they seem to be fatigued by constant combat. Conversely, it'll also spawn hordes of the Infected if they try to Take Their Time.
    • When you go down, your survivor pulls out a Pistol to defend themselves until someone helps them up. In Left 4 Dead 2, you can discard your Pistol or Magnum for a melee weapon. If you happen to go down while having a melee weapon, your character will pull out another pistol from nowhere, allowing you to defend yourself until you get help. This lets players have less worry about incapacitation, knowing that they will have something to fight with even if they hold a melee weapon. This rule also applies to Chainsaws, which will be tossed away and traded for a Pistol once the Chainsaw runs out of gas.
      • The rule also applies for players in Left 4 Dead 2 who have died, but are revived from a Magical Defibrillator. Upon death, the player will drop all weapons and items they were carrying except for their secondary weapon (Pistols, Magnums, or a melee weapon) so that when they get revived on the spot, they will have a weapon to defend themselves with should their fellow survivors loot their body beforehand.
    • Left 4 Dead 2 has two finales that require the survivors to fill something with gasoline. Normally, you have to collect all the cans in the map, but if you are playing in single player mode, you need fewer cans to escape instead of having to collect all the cans. This is to compensate for the limitations of the survivor AI where they can't pick up or use gas cans at all. The gas cans are also otherwise entirely identical in function to the regular gas cans and can be set alight by gunfire - since the game only spawns as many cans as is necessary to complete the finale, destroyed cans will simply respawn where they were initially grabbed from.
  • In Medal of Honor (2010) and Medal of Honor: Warfighter's single-player portions, the player gets infinite secondary weapon magazines, and also has the option of holding the reload button near an allied NPC to get more primary weapon ammo from them. However, this feature in the former game has some limitations:
    • Your allies will only carry spare ammo for weapons that you start the mission with and/or weapons that they're already using. So while your M4A1-wielding squadmates can give you ammo for that Mk 14 EBR or M1014 shotgun you started with, they can't give you ammo for an AKM or Dragunov that you picked up somwehere.
  • Overwatch:
    • When players use their Ultimate Abilities, each team hears something different. This allows each team to know instantly if they should run for cover, or take advantage of the moment to push forward. For example, when Pharah uses her Barrage ability, the opposing team hears her shout "Justice rains from above!" Her allies hear "Rocket barrage incoming!" Likewise, when Mercy uses her Resurrection ability, her team hears, "Heroes never die!" Her opponents hear "Helden sterben nicht," which is just the German translation of that phrase (in general, enemy characters who speak another language primarily will announce their ult in their non-English tongue, to make them even more discernable).
    • Supportive abilities including ultimates will not fire if the condition for them to work aren't present, helping prevent accidental use of ultimates. For example, Ana cannot use her Nano-Boost ultimate unless there is one other teammate in her sight, and the same applies for Brigitte's armor packs.
  • Syndicate (2012) has checkpoints during the Agent Tatsuo boss fight. Also, in the fight with Agent Tatsuo, there will be drones flying about that dispense guns when you Breach them, just in case you run out of ammo. On La Ballena, there's a part where you have to shoot down drones with the Swarm missile launcher, which has many ammo stock-up points for when you run out.
  • Team Fortress 2:
    • Official servers scramble the teams if one team keeps losing very badly. If the teams are skewed in one side's favour (usually from multiple members leaving), autobalance kicks in to shift players into the smaller team.
    • Each class is very easy to identify. Their voice lines, color palette, silhouette, weapon noises, etc. are all distinct from one another, even after adding cosmetic items into play.
    • During the Tough Break update, there was a Contract system that would reward players for playing the game while using a specific weapon. If the player didn't own the weapon, there was an option to temporarily rent one for the duration of the contract.
  • In Quake I, every time you exit a map with less than 50 health, your health will restore back to 50 on the next map.

    Hack 'n Slash 
  • Dante's Inferno gives you health back slowly if failing repeatedly.
  • In the Devil May Cry series:
    • In the third game, dying a few times on Normal Mode unlocks Easy Mode. The fact that the game notifies you that "Easy mode is now selectable" is seen as Easy-Mode Mockery in some circles and, thanks to an infamous Super Best Friends Play moment, has been subject to Memetic Mutation.
    • In the fourth, dying to a boss three times in a row automatically gives it a handicap in future fights. Which can actually feel pretty insulting, especially since it doesn't tell you it's handicapping the boss until after you beat it and doesn't allow you to refuse.
  • Diablo series:
    • In Diablo II, when you die, you respawn in the nearest town with no equipped items or gold. To get your items back, you need to go back to where you were killed and recover your own corpse. This is often unfeasible, especially on higher difficulties, because the enemies that killed you are still hanging around your corpse and now you have no weapons to defeat them or armor to survive them. Thankfully, you can restart your game and your corpse will appear in town with all the items intact and only the gold gone.
    • In Diablo III, some bosses spawn weak monsters whose sole purpose seems to be to drop health orbs when killed. This is so the game is not by definition over should you be unable to use your bottomless potion during the fight. The respawn rule is even more lenient; you just go back to the previous checkpoint, which is almost always right outside the boss room. The higher levels of the Torment difficulty seems to be tuned with endless respawns in mind. The game also picks up gold when you walk over it, and you can now remove gems from their sockets, so they aren't permanently missable as soon as you use them.
    • Diablo II had optional dungeons, which could be multiple levels deep. Once you cleared them out you had a long walk back through empty rooms ahead of you. Diablo III puts a teleporter in the last room, which will take you back to the entrance.
    • In Set Dungeons, losing all of your life doesn't kill you, but just sends you back to the beginning of the dungeon, even if you're playing on Hardcore Mode. Also, a town portal can't be interrupted in a Set Dungeon, in contrast to the usual rules where a player can't move or defend themselves while casting the spell. So if a player wants to leave and come right back in to try again, there's nothing stopping them.
  • Any time you die in Drakengard 2, you're allowed to keep whatever experience points and gold you acquired before dying — the Game Over screen outright tells you "Select 'Yes' to retain your experience points."
  • The God of War series:
    • Traditionally, each game will offer you a chance to drop down in difficulty if you're consistently dying in the same area again and again... which falls apart when the difficulty levels only change combat difficulty, and you're far more likely to die repeatedly on the platforming sections. If you continue from the same checkpoint enough times in a row with low health, it also begins respawning you with slightly more health each time.
    • In God of War (PS4), if you accidentally forget to pick up a unique item after an encounter (like a Frozen Flame upgrade for the Leviathan Axe), the blacksmiths will put the item in the "Lost Items" section of their shops, where you can claim it at no cost.
  • Magicka 2, in contrast to its predecessor, allows the player to skip learning complicated Magicks and assign them to Quickslots, which are effectively macro buttons with a cooldown mechanic. Also, unlike the predecessor again, all checkpoints are automatic and persistent across reboots.
  • Warriors: Legends Of Troy gives your health back after three failures, or rather gives health back to the guy you have to protect in a mission when he acts as a suicidal coward.
  • Hack and Slash Castlevania games:
  • Enemies in Red Steel 2 will stop whatever attack they might be winding up whenever the player executes a finisher. In fact, the player is entirely invincible during a finisher animation.

    Idle Games 
  • In Alchademy, when you put two ingredients in the cauldron, the water will change color to show if you've already tried that combination or not.
  • Patch 4.8 of Trimps added a new Heirloom tier which didn't allow to reroll bonuses, making hunting for the perfect ones a weeks' long quest. Sixteen days later, Patch 4.81 brought up the odds somewhat by giving each Heirloom of that tier a bonus empty slot.

    Maze Games 
  • In Bomberman 64, before the big boss fights, Sirius provides you with Remote Control bombs to make the fight easier.
    • That's until you get all 100 Gold Cards from the first five worlds, and Sirius reveals himself as the real villain. From that point on, in the earlier big boss fights you'll have to bomb open a little container to grab the Remote Bombs.
    • In the first three Bomberman Land games if you lose in a minigame too many times the employee will eventually ask you if you want to skip the minigame and get your price instead.
  • In the often maddeningly difficult Atari Lynx/computer game Chip's Challenge, it's actually stated in the Windows version's Help file (not sure if it's stated anywhere else) that Melinda, the one giving Chip the titular challenge, likes persistence and will let him go to the next level if he fails enough times. Given that many of the game's levels require just the right combination of speed, skill, intelligence, and plain dumb luck, it's nice to have something to keep you from pulling out that last clump of hair. However, this feature is smart enough to know when a player is killing himself repeatedly to move to the next level. In order to get the offer to skip, Chip must die 10 times in a row, yet he must have played for at least 30 seconds each time. Persistence indeed.
    • There is also a level where you must build a bridge over a river by using blocks, which you need to navigate all through the level to get them to the water. However if you start with the blocks farthest from the water, you'll discover a pair of swimming fins underneath one of them; alleviating the need to build the bridge!
  • In Carrie's Order Up!, to unlock everything, one has to complete four challenges in all 20 rounds of Service Mode. These include never spinning (which lets you dodge customers), never missing a dropped coin, always getting the food to the customers before they even start to lose their patience, and completing the round in a limited time. Thankfully, you don't have to do all four in the same playthrough of a round, and can simply focus on one challenge at a time. Similarly, the Secret Character, Calcia, normally requires completing all 20 rounds on a single playthrough, but can also be unlocked simply by accumulating a high overall score across all playthroughs.

    Metroidvania 
  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night
    • Shard abilities that are required to move through the castle (such as Craftwork's hand) consume very little mana on use, so a player won't find themselves stuck. Other abilities, such as inverting or traveling underwater, don't require mana at all.
    • The Aqua Stream ability doesn't use any mana if it's used while underwater. The reason is because it's the only way to traverse past a few obstacles in the watery caverns. The alternative of waiting for mana to recharge just to move across the room would have been insufferable.
    • If a dropped item bag gets stuck in a wall, its contents will automatically be collected after a few seconds.
    • To keep players from getting frustrated by grinding for valuable loot, any item that is crafted is automatically added to the shop in the next room. So after forging an item, you can later buy more of it and break it down to get those hard-to-find loot drops.
    • Shards that are in finite supply (such as boss attacks and the Silver Knight familiar) cannot be sold.
    • There are certain rooms on the train that can only be accessed on your first visit with Zangetsu (the opening section and where the Glutton Train is fought), and the time limit will probably prevent you from exploring the entire area. If you get back on the train afterwards, the game will count the entire map as being explored regardless of how much you actually uncovered, allowing you to achieve 100% map completion.
  • The Castlevania series will fully restore your HP, MP, and status every time you reach a save point, allowing you to save the often uncommon restorative items for the heat of battle. There is almost always a save room right before a boss, and boss rooms have a unique door to warn you that you're in for a battle and you should probably look for said room to save and recover before going on in.
  • Shantae:
    • Starting with Risky's Revenge, the games distinguish between Bottomless Pits and pits that lead somewhere else by giving the bottomless pits skull-and-crossbones marks that float up as a visual cue not to fall.
    • In Shantae and the Pirate's Curse, "Run, Run, Rottytops!" makes Shantae and Rottytops, whom Shantae is carrying to safety, both a One-Hit Point Wonder. To make up for this, failure only sends them back to the beginning of the current screen, each room serving as a checkpoint. Also, dying doesn't subtract any health or use any Auto-Potions.
      • From the same game, the No-Gear Level where Shantae is mistaken for a princess requires her to sneak past some palace guards, and getting caught sends her all the way back to her room. Eventually, the player can hit a switch that opens the room's front door, significantly reducing the penalty for getting caught.
    • Shantae: Half-Genie Hero features a magic carpet race level where the player flies over the clouds. Falling during the race will not send Shantae back to a checkpoint, instead subtracting a small amount of health and sending her right back up (while holding her butt with a shocked expression on her face).

    MMORPGs 
  • In City of Heroes, the XP Debt that you accrue from dying is temporarily suspended during zone invasion events when an area of the gameworld is overrun by hordes of aliens, zombies, etc. Also deaths that occur inside the Rikti Warzone only give half as much debt as in any other zone.
    • The addition of the Patrol feature, where you gain a double XP bonus based on how long you are logged out, helps even more. Now, when you die are defeated, some of that bonus is taken away instead. If the bonus runs out it's business as usual.
    • There's also the streakbreaker feature, which prevents missing too many attacks in a row (if your tohit is high enough, it will kick in after one miss).
    • The phone feature meant you could call in a quest when it was done, and get the new quest, rather than traveling back to the quest-giver and then back to the quest location for the next step.
  • In the Korean-made MMO driving game Drift City, if you fail a mission, trying it again slightly lowers the requirements. Failing again lowers them even more, and so on. Useful for those who aren't yet able to afford enhancements to their car to pass the time-limited missions.
  • In Dynasty Warriors Online, each time you enter a new scenario, you go back to guard rank which allows you to do the rank up quests again. On the chance you don't have a weapon that's level 2 or below (which you need the higher rank to be able to use), you get a spear the second you start up again, allowing you to use it until you can use the higher level weapons. Also, it will always provide you with a generic partner if you haven't requited one. (Although, some plays may see that as a problem)
  • The Gaia Online minigame Gaia Cards has you playing blackjack against different dealers. Each of them have their own cheat: one dealer can pull out an ace out of nowhere, one can redraw her hand, etc. Fortunately you, as the player, have a frustration meter that, when full, allows you to cheat by looking at the dealer's hand.
  • Granblue Fantasy:
    • If you retreat from a quest that you've never finished, then you're refunded the AP that you've spent. Additionally, if it's a story quest, you get a stat bonus if you retry the quest in the next hour that stacks up to five times.
    • If a character is on their 5★ uncap, then they'll be able to gain Extended Mastery Points even if they aren't at their level cap. Levels past 80 can be very grindy, so it helps that the uncap doesn't have to be delayed just to grind Extended Mastery.
    • Some specific weapon types obtained through a lengthy process of grinding and forging (i.e. Awakened Revenant Weapons, Seraphic Weapons) cannot be sold, reduced, or used as fodder.
    • A weapon cannot be used as an EXP fodder for its duplicate (i.e. Celeste Claws cannot be used as EXP fodders of other Celeste Claws), since the ideal use of a duplicate, especially SSR weapons, is to uncap another copy and not upgrade it.
    • The ability to tag weapons and summons as your "Favorites". Not only it acts as a filter for your inventory, it will (by default) prevent your weapon or summon from being accidentally sold, reduced, or fed to other weapons or summons when using the Auto-Select button of the upgrade menu.
    • For the game's 4th anniversary 10-draw special event, you'd get a roulette once a day where you could get 10 (highest chance), 20 (almost as high of a chance), 30 (decent chance) or 100 (very low chance) draws, completely free of charge. If, on the last day, you hadn't gotten the 100-draw prize over the course of the event, the roulette would just guarantee you 100 draws.
    • The puzzles featured in the "Detective Barawa: The Jewel Resort Incident" can be solved by clicking on the "Show Solution" button, as it gives the direct answer instead of providing clues or hints to the puzzles.
  • In Grand Chase, even if you lose all of your lives and don't continue, you still get to keep your GP, EXP, and quest items (and complete quests).
  • An extension of the Me and My Nemesis Quest in Kingdom of Loathing has a fiendishly difficult volcano puzzle that requires a lot of patience and careful mapping to work out. Fortunately, there's an option to skip it for a loss of 10 adventures if you don't want to go through all that trouble, though you miss out on two of the quest rewards if you do that.
    • The Twin Peak area, released with the revamped level 9 quest, has three (actually four) puzzles that are atrociously hard to solve, and that may be impossible depending on what items and buffs you have available. Once you've spent fifty turns in there, however, an adventure will appear that finishes the entire area, though you miss out on the reward for clearing it the hard way.
    • In the original version the naughty sorceress would be less likely to use her ability blocking talents each time she defeated you. Since she also scaled to your stats this could be the only way to defeat her, short of praying for help from the Random Number God for some players who didn't know how her scaling worked and relied heavily on abilities.
  • Especially in the newer quests, RuneScape has a tendency to have quest givers give you small items that you need to complete the quest. This is especially nice when you've trekked out ten minutes to the dungeon and only then realized that you forgot to grab a hammer or a chisel. Also, if they ask you to go to a location some distance away, they'll frequently offer to teleport you there, saving some teleport runes or the need to walk that whole distance.
    • This was later expanded with the tool belt allowing your character to permanently carry most basic tools at all time without using up any inventory space.
    • In the mid-to-high level quest Monkey Madness, the player has to solve an infuriating sliding puzzle early on - however, if sliding puzzles aren't your speed, you can bribe the former gnome glider commander to unlock the hangar remotely and save you the trouble.
    • Following a rework, players can acquire skip tickets from treasure chests which skip different parts of a Treasure Trail. Don't like completing sliding puzzles? Use a Puzzle Skip! Can't get a certain piece of gear for an emote clue? Use a Costume Skip. These tickets are tradeable, which naturally means for merchants these are prime cash builders. Even better, the Treasure Trail shop sells untradeable versions of these tickets for points.
  • Star Wars: The Old Republic implemented a whole list of these in patch 1.2, including being able to access vehicles in certain areas, being able to jump right past orbital stations when returning to your ship, and in general cutting down on the Fake Longevity.
  • MapleStory has a few in its new Black Heaven content. If you fail enough times at flying the airplane or escaping from a killer robot, you're given the option of outright skipping the segments.
  • Aura Kingdom
    • Failure to enhance a weapon does not drop the enhancement level at all nor will it break. Instead, you gain potential. Get enough and you'll be guaranteed to successfully enhance the weapon/armor by one level. Enchancement goes up to +20, with +10 being the limit for regular scrolls.
      • Although you can buy advanced scrolls to get past +10, they can be collected through some achievement quests and main quests. They are also shared through your character accounts. Though the success rate, as you might guess, is a bit on the low side...
    • Additionally, if you buy 35 Eidolon packs of a certain eidolon and fail to get a fragment/key, then you will be guaranteed to get a fragment on the 36th pack opened. Still costs a lot of money, but at least there is a guarantee that you can get one.
    • Instead of limiting dungeon runs per day like x-legend's other game Eden Eternal, they are limited to up to one-three times per specific hour (1, 2, 6, 12, 24).
    • You no longer have to buy a cash shop item to reset your character's stats or envoy's path. You can freely reset your character's stats, while resetting envoy's path will cost gold to do so. Still, it is a lot better than paying real money.
  • Guild Wars did not feature a durability mechanic, and instead punished you for dying with a "Weakness" debuff that would slowly go away with every enemy you killed - not every enemy group, every enemy. This meant that while you still were punished for dying, the punishment was far less annoying than losing your entire inventory.
  • In Guild Wars 2, the Desperation Attack in the form of downed skills is this, as it gives players a chance to recover after getting their HP depleted and avoid death.
    • All classes also share a common Downed Skill, Bandage, which slowly puts them back on their feet. Very handy if you have run out of enemies to kill for a Rally, have no allies to help revive you, or the fight has moved somewhere else leaving both sides too busy to finish or help you.
      • Additionally, when you are downed underwater, you either go to the surface to slowly recover or can use Bandage - with Bandage now letting you also move around as you are not immobile unlike when you are downed on land. This lets you swim away and recover if swimming to the surface is unavailable.
    • Also one of the personal story missions for those who chose to join the Durmand Priory involves a mandatory jumping puzzle, which can be frustrating for those who don't enjoy that sort of thing, as normally jumping puzzles are entirely optional. Thankfully, your mentor highlights the path you need to jump, and if you take too long, she just opens a portal for you instead. Frustratingly, while the earlier and more challenging puzzle — crossing a chasm via a narrow path with a side wind blowing — can also be skipped, the way to do it is not obvious. (When you fall, you are teleported to the entrance in a downed state. To skip the puzzle, instead of healing yourself from the downed state, you need to let yourself die and choose "Retry from a checkpoint", which will teleport you beyond the chasm.)
      • In the case of many Jumping Puzzles, having a Mesmer (Or Scourge) there (or being one yourself) might be considered this due to their portal ability, allowing people to completely skip everything as long as the Mesmer is able to complete it...AND IT STILL COUNTS!
    • Several classes use some summoned allies that can't be fully controlled, and losing them generally means greatly losing impact on battles until they can be summoned again (Rangers and Mesmers are dependent on their pet/illusions to function, Necromancers, Guardians and Engineers need to fill a skill slot with each extra minion/spirit weapon/turret they use which means less skills available). Against bosses with strong AOE attacks that players can dodge but AI-controlled units can't, most of the time these units take greatly reduced damage or are sometimes immune to them (notable in Fractals where only players are subject to agony). Speaking of Fractals, Subject 6 is a special case : it periodically takes a defensive stance that blocks all incoming attacks and after taking 20 hits, every subsequent hit causes an explosion that damages everyone and can cause team wipes. Uncontrollable AIs will always attack the boss until their destruction, but their attacks aren't counted when the boss enters its blocking stance.
  • Billy vs. SNAKEMAN has Megamissions, which becomes available once you reach a certain rank: do a mission at 10x cost, but with 11x rewards. R00t has Megaactions, which work the same (10x/11x, as well as 50x/55x). Also, Pizzawitch deliveries are done in part to find the rare ryo coins you need for upgrading your gear, but there's very low chance of getting one on higher difficulties. However, once you've done 20 deliveries of a certain difficulty, you have the option to "work in the back" on another person's delivery, giving you a one-click option to earn tips and possibly coins (with the added option of bribing them to increase the chance of getting a coin). A few quest also become easier and/or less costly if you've done it a previous season (although a few others become harder instead).
    • Once you've won eleven consecutive Glowslinging duels, you get the "Autosmash" function, which grants an automatic victory (though you forfeit the "perfect"/"nailbiter" bonuses) since you're obviously good enough to win anyway. Also, any turf you've conquered can be "multidueled", where you expend several duels at once and get an equal reward multiplier. You can also play multiple Retail shifts at once, and play multiple Mahjong and Hanafuda games. Saves time when you're grinding.
  • In Kingdom of Loathing, the Level 12 quest (Island of Mystery war) involves fighting enemies on the Battlefield while wearing one of two specific outfits. If the player doesn't have either outfit, a noncombat adventure in the Arid, Extra-Dry Desert will provide a full set for one of them.
  • Normally in Perfect World, each character death from Level 10 onwards results in loss of EXP, with the amount of lost EXP going up with character level, unless the slain player has only just leveled up and doesn't have any loose EXP to penalize. Since this can be VERY painful for players of Level 100 and up, especially for anyone not carrying Guardian Scrolls to prevent it, there exist numerous mechanics to soften the blow:
    • The Cleric's resurrection spell and the Mystic's revive-on-death buff both result in lessened EXP penalties for the target on higher skill levels.
    • Players who Reawaken at less than Level 105 on either their first or second "cycle" may store all EXP gained from Level 100 up on a subsequent cycle in their Ancient Tome in order to retroactively gain levels on the previous cycle, resulting in greater gain of attribute points. EXP stored in the Ancient Tome is protected from being lost upon character death.
    • Certain instanced dungeons, particularly those that feature obscenely high numbers of things that can One-Hit Kill players and bosses who love Total Party Kill moves, do not assess EXP penalties against players who are killed. Chief among these are Warsong City, Flowsilver Palace, Uncharted Paradise, Dawnlight Halls, Icebound Underworld, and Ten-Dimensional Domain.
    • Events where players are expected to kill each other, whether they're purely PvP (Arigora Colosseum, Nation Wars, Territory Wars, Theater of Blood) or also feature PVE activity (Territory Resource Wars, Mayhem in Morai) suspend the "random PK" PvP rules that turn player-killers' names red and cause slain players to lose EXP, drop items, or have their gear shattered (or consume Guardian Scrolls in lieu of the above).

    Multiplayer Online Battle Arenas 
  • League of Legends
    • The gold an enemy gets for killing you is reduced when you're on a death streak, so he stops getting even stronger and stomping you even harder.
    • Season 4 brought a host of these features for support classes. The support job was to help protect and build up an initially-vulnerable Carry, into a late game powerhouse Unfortunately this was done at the expense of the support, leaving them weak and under performing at end-game without the money to buy any interesting tools. Numerous changes were made to increase the fun level of supports. The biggest changes were the adding of items that significantly increased money income for supports, while being worthless to non-supports, and limiting the number of wards a support could carry, while giving limited use free wards to everyone, to encourage spreading out the responsibility of warding to the entire team rather than making the support do it entirely.
    • If two or more players disconnect from a co-Op vs AI game, some AI players will 'go afk' as well and just sit in their base to even the teams back up a bit.
    • The "/remake" feature was added for when a team has a player go idle for too long. With "/remake", the idle player's team can vote to end the match prematurely, ending in a draw for everyone except the idle player, who gets it counted as a loss.
  • Heroes of the Storm:
    • If an ally disconnects from a game, their role will be picked up by the computer so that you still have a full active team instead of having one or more players parked in your base. AI players will even attempt to respond to player pings.
    • Most skills or talents that require you to kill heroes or minions to gain stacks have some leniency. Either you only need to be in the vicinity of the kill to get quest credit, or hitting an enemy with your ability will "mark" them for a very brief period, giving you credit even if your attack wasn't quite the killing blow. This is especially big for Malthael, who gains a stacking cooldown reduction on his Last Rites heroic which mercifully isn't lost to a Kill Steal.
  • In Awesomenauts, you play a drop-pod minigame when you respawn. Not only does it kill some time that would be spent twiddling, you can recover most of the money you lost on death if you're skilled enough.

    Pinball 
  • A common feature in many computerized pinball games is the "ball saver", where the game will automatically load or launch another ball at no cost if your original one drains soon after launch. This feature can sometimes be abused by attempting to score as many points as you can before the ball saver timeout expires, but some programs will negate any score you might have received during a saved ball.
    • F-14 Tomcat was the first pinball game to have this feature, called "Flight Insurance".
  • A related mechanic is the "three-switch rule," which has been around at least since The '60s: If the ball drains before hitting the third switch, the game will immediately load another ball and pretend the previous one didn't happen. An industry standard, at least when score displays became digital, is that if the score is blinking, the three-switch rule is still active, but if the score is displayed solidly, it's no longer in effect. Because any scoring or progress made during these three switch hits carries over when the game loads another ball, however, the three-switch rule creates some Loophole Abuse on certain machines. For instance, in CSI, you can lock balls for multiball on the second switch, allowing you to start a multiball without any risks (provided you aim perfectly). Due to this abuse, modern games get the occasional software patch that adds exceptions to the three-switch rule if they can be exploited to progress without worrying about draining.
  • After multiball ends in Williams Electronics' Earthshaker!, the player can shoot the ball into the Shelter within 15 seconds to start Aftershock, giving another chance to score the jackpot. This would later become a regular feature on many modern games after a poor multiball.
  • In Elvira and the Party Monsters, if you score poorly on the first two balls, the Extra Ball light will be activated at the start of the third ball.
  • In No Good Gofers, the bumpers on the left side of the table will occasionally direct the ball(s) toward the left outlane. Thankfully, there's a kickback that will propel the ball back to the playing field, even when it's not lit.
  • Space Shuttle has the "Airlock", a gate on the right outlane that opens to redirect balls to the flippers, and the "Heat Shield", a pop-up post between the flippers to prevent drains.
  • The original release of Star Wars (Data East) didn't have a ball saver at all, but one was added in a 2012 software update.
  • In Sega's Star Wars Trilogy, if you start X-Wing Multiball but drain two balls without even one attempt at shooting for the Jackpot, the ramp and the X-Wing saucer will light for 15 seconds; hit either one, and the game will automatically launch a ball to resume multiball.
  • In general, Zen Studios' digital pinball games (Zen Pinball and Pinball FX) tend to have very generous ball save timers, sometimes up to a minute after a ball is launched.
  • Theatre of Magic not only has a ball saver, but hitting the "Hocus Pocus" target enables two magnetic ball savers near the outlanes, which automatically catch any wayward balls.
  • In addition to a ball saver, Gottlieb's Gladiators lets a player stop the pop bumpers by holding down both flipper buttons. This is useful if the ball is in the pop bumpers when a Timed Mission starts and he wants to quickly get the ball to the flippers.
    • Related to this, many pinball games freeze or add to mode timers when the ball is hitting bumpers.
  • Airborne Avenger has a ball save gate in the rightmost outlane to return potential drains to the launcher.
  • In 3-D Ultra Pinball, if you launch a ball and fail to score before it drains, the game gives you a "bozo ball" for another go.
  • In Kirby's Pinball Land, getting a Maxim Tomato will temporarily block the gap between the flippers.
  • Silverball Mania has the Disappearing Kicker, a device that is normally recessed between the flippers. Raising it will cause drained balls to get kicked back onto the playfield.
  • In Stern Pinball's Harley Davidson games, the player can press a button on the right side of the cabinet, causing a headlight between the flippers to pop up for a second and block any balls from draining down the middle.
  • Most pinball games have drains on either side of the flippers, which you have no way to escape from and which immediately ends the ball. Some games will actually give you points when this happens, as a sort of apology. For example, Creature from the Black Lagoon calls this the "FOCUS!" bonus.
    • Some of them have a solenoid on the left side (very rarely, on the right) known as a "kickback" or a "laser kick." There will always be an arrow-shaped light pointing downward there, and if that light is on, it means the solenoid will return the ball back in play should it fall down there. Games with kickbacks include Star Trek: The Next Generation, The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends, and The Hobbit. There's also the lower-budget "virtual kickback," where the drain functions as normal but the game will give you a penalty-free ball and a few points as if a kickback existed, found on machines like Junk Yard (where it's known as the Recycle), Game of Thrones (known as Lord of Light), and Star Trek (Stern) (known as Rescue).
    • A few games, such as The Wizard of Oz, Whodunnit?, and NBA Fastbreak, have a mode that starts when the ball drains down there: The game will load another ball and have you complete a goal in a short amount of time—if you can accomplish the goal during that time, the game will continue as if you haven't drained.
  • In Cirqus Voltaire, once the ball is caught on the Ringmaster's hat, the ball will fall off in a random direction. Because these directions can potentially include the drains or a series of ricochets that lead to a drain, a roughly five-second ball saver occurs after each time the hat lets go of the ball.
  • The Time Machine magnet in Austin Powers is pointed directly at the center drain. While it happens less often than it looks, should the ball wind up there immediately after the magnet lets go, the game will provide another ball with no consequences.
  • In KISS (Stern), a spinning disk inside the plastic model of Gene Simmons's head causes the ball to travel out of his mouth in unpredictable directions. In addition, the disk gives the ball a huge spin, curving its trajectory. The machine's initial release generated many complaints about the ball zooming straight down the middle with no chance to salvage it, so Stern later released a patch that provided a short ball saver when the ball leaves his head.
  • Pre-1.00 versions of Stern's Star Wars do not have the Lightsaber Duel mode, even though it's required to reach Jedi Multiball and finish the game. As this would render the game impossible to complete, the machine will simply credit the player with finishing Lightsaber Duel as soon as the player fulfills all of the conditions needed to start it.note 
  • Elvira's House of Horrors has the "Hand of Fate" wheel, which is activated by losing the ball to the left outlane (when it's lit, of course). The roulette has six potential rewards, one of which is a ball saver; thus, by timing it right, the player can instantly send their ball back into play.
  • Deadpool saves your progress on Battle and Quest modes if you fail them (including one of the mini-Wizard Modes).
  • Jurassic Park (Stern): Since it's possible to fail to achieve a fossil and thus lose the opportunity to ever get it again, there are six "wild card" fossils that will award one from the lowest available set.
  • The Munsters:
    • Collecting a SPOT letter causes the family pet to briefly emerge under the left ramp, where it can be hit again to get another letter. Given how small the window of opportunity is, shooting the ramp for a very short period after Spot retreats will still count.
    • Failing to light a Super Jackpot during Raven Multiball leads to a short period where the player can restart it by shooting the left ramp again.
  • Rick and Morty features a pop bumper where the left slingshot would normally go, which has a tendency to hurtle the ball extremely quickly in unexpected directions. The Slam Save mechanic helps mitigate this - by spelling "SLAM", the next time the ball drains as a direct result of the bumper, it's sent back into play and the player gets points.
  • Aerosmith:
    • The mechanics behind Toy Box Multiball (wherein a player can delay the mode in order to add more balls, up to 6) could potentially lead to a second player "stealing" excess balls by choosing to play it with the minimum of 3. The game combats this by refusing to send the excess balls back into play during the ball save period, meaning that the second player will end up with just 3 balls soon enough. By the same token, it will also send as many balls as needed for the first player's multiball, even if they're not physically in the toy box.
    • Medley Multiball provides another opportunity to complete any unfinished song modes in order to access the Wizard Mode.

    Platformers 
  • A great many platformers such as Crash Bandicoot (1996), Spyro the Dragon and Celeste still allow you to jump a split second after your character has run off a ledge, to help with a slow button press or input lag. In fact, the developers of Celeste call this feature "Coyote Time".
  • A Hat in Time:
    • Time Rifts have to be found in the levels, with selecting them from the menu only showing you a picture of where they are. However, not only can you view this picture from the pause menu at any time but once you've beaten the rift you're free to just select it from the menu rather than re-finding it in the level again.
    • The game often plays with time in "timed" missions. Murder on the Owl Express isn't even timed at all, with the clock instead advancing when you do specific things. The final battle of Battle Of The Birds does have a timed event but the timer steadily moves slower and slower as it depletes, turning that "80 seconds" into a solid two minutes.
    • Like Super Mario 64, choosing one act but finding a different act's Time Piece will complete that other act instead. Even in Subcon Forest, if you manage to earn a Time Piece before being contracted into completing that job, the job will be counted as completed and you'll never even have to sign that contract.
    • The Snatcher is the first truly difficult boss in game, and the first one you're likely to struggle with defeating owing to his quick attacks that are difficult to dodge until you learn their patterns. After dying the first time against him, none of the in-fight cinematics are replayed and he also becomes vulnerable much sooner, rather than taunting you for quite a while beforehand like he does in the first battle.
    • Lose enough times at the brutal Death Wish challenges and you're given the option to pay to make the level much easier. Initially by paying yarn, but this has since been patched to cost mere Pons instead.
    • Alpine Skyline has a brief introductory area with no enemies or items that you have to navigate to reach the main level. Once you've passed it and reached the main level, you will always start there as you have no reason to ever play the introductory area ever again. Also, as this level isn't broken into separate acts, when you reach one of the other peaks and the name of the area appears it will also tell you if you've found the time piece or any treasures there.
  • In Donkey Kong games:
    • The first three games will often place the hardest part or the trickiest obstacle of a level after the G letter. Since getting the four KONG letters yields an extra life, you keep the letters you got before the checkpoint, and the letters after the checkpoint respawn upon death, this in effect gives you unlimited attempts at that one difficult part provided you keep finding the KONG letters.
    • Donkey Kong Country:
      • The game puts an exclamation mark next to a level whose bonus areas have all been found, so that the player won't waste time backtracking to make sure they got every secret.
      • On top of that, the game has an Instant-Win Condition when it comes to finding secrets; the player only has to find the rooms, not win their challenges or even finish the level for them to count for your percentage. This makes backtracking for the secret rooms much easier, since you can just find the missing secret and then kill yourself to exit the level to save time.
    • Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze: As the number of figurines to collect increases each time you clear a world, and getting unique figurines is a Luck-Based Mission as they're only available through the Capsule Toy Machine in Funky Kong's shop (with no real way to manipulate the chances of getting a unique one), Funky will stop the player from using the machine if all the unique figurines currently available had been collected, preventing them from wasting their hard-earned Banana Coins on the machine.
  • While Eversion has its challenging levels, it gives players a huge saving grace by keeping track of each gem they pick up even if they die or restart the level, meaning that once you get the trickier ones (such as in the levels with an Advancing Wall of Doom) you don't have to pick them up again if you die, and you can still achieve 100% Completion without clearing the levels in a perfect run.
  • IOS game Badland has liberal use of checkpoints and dying automatically reloads you back to the last checkpoint within a second. The death itself is also very relaxed: instead of showing gory splatter and playing "You Lose" tune, the game will simply Fade to Black with a quite rustle of the leaves.
  • Binary Boy for PC. It's short, but has to be completed in one sitting. As such, there are checkpoints after virtually every obstacle in your path and when you die, your character simply drifts down from the screen like a falling leaf until he lands right before the current obstacle.
  • Enemy bullets are ordinarily white in the classic NES version of Contra. For the almost entirely-white Snow Field stage, enemy bullets are changed to red so the player can still see where they're coming from.
  • In the first three Crash Bandicoot games, if you failed at a level a certain number of times, the game would give you a free Aku Aku mask (an extra hit point). Fail a few more times, and it would give you a golden one (two hit points). Fail a few more times after that and it would start you off with temporary invincibility. Continued failures also sometimes turned some of the '?' crates into checkpoints, or made new, steel checkpoint crates (so as to not mess with the 100%-boxes rewards).
  • Distorted Travesty allows you to change the difficulty level whenever you die... unless you're playing on Distorted difficulty, which locks you into it for the rest of the game.
  • If you run out of ammo in Earthworm Jim, the ammo will slowly refill, but only up to 100 shots, which translates to about a second or 2 of rapid fire, the only possible firing mode.
  • In Epic Mickey, Mickey's reserves of Paint or Thinner will slowly refill to one-third of their maximum if they ever fall below the amount.
  • The last level of FreezeME is a lot more linear than the other levels, so it uses the game's Teleporters as checkpoints to prevent the player from having to redo large sections of the level before they gain the ability to fly.
  • In I Wanna Be the Guy and its spinoffs, it is usually very easy to accidentally save in an Unwinnable situation. Unless you regularly backup your savefiles or use the savefile editor program a fan eventually created, you're out of luck. However, one fangame—Pickory—automatically backs up your old saves and lets you undo a bad save just by pressing backspace.
    • While not actually a game feature, the creator of the original I Wanna Be the Guy will fix any unwinnable saves for you.
    • I Wanna be the Boshy gives you an extra jump if you reload after saving in midair. This is actually needed to progress in some sections.
  • Kirby:
    • Kirby and the Rainbow Curse will let you skip ahead to the next stage if you die too many times in one level.
    • In Kirby's Return to Dream Land, if you die during the second phase of the Final Boss or the second phase of the Metal General EX battle, you'll completely skip the first phase upon re-entering the boss room.
      • One of Magolor's first attacks in Phase 2 is throwing a bunch of mooks at you. The first one spawned will always carry the copy ability you had to ditch in the previous phase of the fight (due to you having to use Super Copy Abilities) if you entered battle with one. This means you can get your Tornado ability back and not be stuck with having to inhale and spit stars at the boss.
      • This gets inverted while in the sub-stages marked by the star-shaped portals. Throughout this game (and the series in general) a door is usually a checkpoint, but not the ones that separate the obstacle course and mini-boss areas. If you lose to the mini-boss, you get kicked out of the sub-stage entirely.
      • If you lose your copy ability and re-inhale it at the same time as you inhale a regular enemy that also contains a copy ability, you'll always regain your original ability when you swallow them. Unless the enemy you inhaled was a defeated mini-boss—then the mini-boss' power takes precedence. That's because mini-boss abilities are almost always required to get an item in the next area, and it's common to ditch the power you used to fight the boss to grab them.
    • Kirby Star Allies
      • Objects which require an ability that you don't get from a miniboss usually have an ability pedestal you can use to either take the ability yourself or spawn a Friend with that ability to deal with the object.
      • Objects which require multiple characters have a plate which shows how many you require; should this be early in the area, respawning enemies will be present to help round out your ranks, even if they have to spawn in front of you.
      • The pedestal for the Star Allies Sparkler requires a full party of four. If you enter the area or defeat Hyness without a full team, Friend candidates will spawn in until you have enough. This allows you to use the pedestal without having to leave the stage.
    • In main series Kirby games starting with Kirby: Triple Deluxe, every time you lose against a boss, they will have less health and more cooldown in-between attacks the next time you fight them. In the 3DS games, losing three times in a row gives you an Assist Star item that automatically revives you on the spot should you run out of health in that battle.
  • Realizing that "Nintendo Hard Platformer" is a frustrating enough formula, the developers of Mirror's Edge added completely unnecessary and impractical (for the enemy) visible-to-naked-eye laser sights to all enemy-wielded sniper rifles, giving the player at least a vague idea where they should run without being one-hit-killed by an enemy they could neither reach, nor even see. The aesthetics of the game are also usually stark white with very noticeable splashes of color marking out the path the player should take through the level.
  • Mega Man starts with three items and Rush Search in Rockman 4 Minus Infinity. In addition, dying three times on the final Escape Sequence causes the spikes to turn green and only do one damage, in addition to giving you more time.
  • Mega Man Legends gives you the option to retreat and restock before facing the Balcon Gelede: odds are your ammo is drained and your ship beat to near hell after facing the rather long naval battle that proceeds it.
  • The Mega Man X series upgrades the Mega Man (Classic) E-Tanks into Sub Tanks. While you can only have four of them, Sub Tanks are refillable by collecting health pickups when you're already at full health, compared to the one-time use E-Tanks. The PS1 games limit you to two Sub Tanks, but allow collecting health pickups to refill your tanks even if you're not at full health, while Mega Man X8 allows the player to pay Metal to refill their Sub Tanks in-between stages. To make up with the fewer Sub Tanks, starting with Mega Man X4, you start the game with more energy than the first three games.
    • Beginning with the PS1 games, mid-stage checkpoints count as a continue point if the player ran out of lives during a level. X5 and X6 takes this a step further and the player can continue the game after a Game Over from any checkpoints that they passed mid-stage.
    • While Mega Man X5 attempted this with Alia as your new navigator, most players just saw her as an Annoying Video-Game Helper who killed the pacing of the levels with her constant Captain Obvious hints. While the system was never removed, Mega Man X6 made answering her calls completely optional, and Mega Man X8 added two more navigators to provide more specialized info while also giving the option to go into a stage without a navigator.
  • Monster Party is not an easy game, even in spite of the character's vastly huge health bar, as the bosses are very unforgiving and your bat is a weak short-range weapon unless you manage to use it to deflect enemy attacks back at them. To make up for this every level has at least one enemy who will guaranteed drop a health power-up and at least one who will drop a pill, and it is always the same enemy each time. Because enemies respawn, a patient player who has memorized which enemies drop what (such as the first fish in Level 2 who always drops health) can keep their health topped up by memorizing these locations which takes a massive bite out of the game's difficulty.
  • Fail a mission in Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus enough times, and you'll start it with a 'lucky horseshoe', moving you from a One HP Wonder to a Two HP Wonder. Later games used a Life Meter, making it unneeded, although at times if you died in a mission with a 'Do Something X Times' theme, it would let you keep the ones you did already. Sometimes.
    • Enemies can also occasionally drop lives and the game seems to show mercy by MASSIVELY increasing the chance of this happening if you're low on them and have been dying a lot. Notably it might throw you a bone and let 2-3 enemies in a row drop them if you're on your last.
    • One case in particular: in the second game, there's a mission where you must steal blueprints from Raja by feeding him drugged melons and then picking his pocket. He has a really annoying habit of waking up just after you pick his pocket and catching you, making you fail the mission. However, the game always counts your successful attempt when it starts the mission over, which is probably the only reason anyone's finished the game. (That, and Bentley automatically escapes when he gets the last one.)
    • The third and fourth games always give you a rather easy Fetch Quest as your first mission in a new world with your objectives clearly labelled and sprawled all across the area. This helps you get a lay of the land and see what kind of enemies and dangers are waiting for you so before throwing you into the more difficult missions.
  • When you complete a level in the Something series, the game automatically brings up the save prompt. In the original game, the game only saves after a Ghost House, Castle or Fortess completion.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • In the Game Gear/Sega Master System version of Sonic the Hedgehog, the labyrinth boss battle takes place completely underwater, but you cannot drown on the stage, because the drowning timer is turned off.
    • One of Sonic the Hedgehog's signature abilities, the Spin Dash, came about because of one of these. In the original game, the only way for Sonic to gain speed was to run forward, which made some stages frustrating, as the player would have to backtrack through the level if they didn't have enough speed to clear an obstacle. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 fixed this by giving Sonic the Spin Dash, which allowed him to accelerate to full speed from a standstill. The Spin Dash has been used by almost every Sonic game since then, and some ports of the original Sonic give you the option to turn on Spin Dash for it.
    • Sonic Heroes: During some boss fights, the characters will go up to Level 3 with only one orb container.
    • Sonic Mania
      • Most of the level layouts, enemies and obstacles taken from previous games have been toned down in difficulty, starting with the platforming sequence from Green Hill Act 2 that now has a bed of spikes instead of a bottomless pit. Mechanics that slowed the pace too much, such as the elevators from Flying Battery, have been left out as well.
      • The boss of Chemical Plant Zone removes the stage timer for the duration of the fight, mainly because of the Unexpected Gameplay Change and the RNG involved with it. Furthermore, Eggman's AI for it is also pretty bad, so as to give the player a good chance to win since it's an early-game boss and players may not be familiar with the source material and its strategies. Despite being based on original rules, the aforementioned boss includes Double Rotationnote , a function that was originally introduced in Tsu.
      • The Final Boss area is considered separate from the atrociously long Marathon Level that precedes it, and resets the timer upon entering the area, as well as setting a checkpoint right before the boss.
      • Though the Special Stages have a simulated low draw distance, the Chaos Emerald-carrying UFO always remains visible regardless of how far away it is, preventing the player from losing track of it.
      • Stage elements can no longer be used up by the AI-controlled character in a Sonic and Tails game, an "& Knuckles" game, or in Encore Mode. This means the AI can't deprive the player character of an oxygen bubble, platforms won't fall before the player character stands on them, etc.
      • In Oil Ocean Zone Act 2, entering a submarine and then exiting it will reset the ring-stealing toxic fumes. Additionally, the fumes mechanic is removed completely for the boss fight.
      • At the start of the True Final Boss fight that is only playable after getting all seven Chaos Emeralds, just before your character turns Super, they are silently given a Lightning Shield to help collect the rings that fly across the stage.
    • Sonic Unleashed and every Sonic game since then puts a sign over a Bottomless Pit, indicating which pits are bottomless and which aren't, avoiding players having to find out for themselves through trial and error.
    • For the first three Genesis games, the requirements for entering the Special Stages and getting the Chaos Emeralds became more lenient with each game. In the first, you had to make it to the end of the Act with 50 rings and then jump into the giant ring just after the goal post (which you could easily miss if you running at full speed, and if you do there's not enough time to run back and jump into it,) and you don't get a giant ring in Act 3 nor anywhere in Scrap Brain Zone, effectively giving you a maximum of 10 attempts to get 6 Emeralds. In Sonic the Hedgehog 2, touching a checkpoint with 50 rings activates a Special Stage warp, giving the player as many tries as there are checkpoints, and in Sonic 3 & Knuckles access to Special Stages is gained through finding giant rings hidden in each level, and the ring requirement is removed completely. Meanwhile, Sonic the Hedgehog CD, meanwhile, while backsliding in making you get to the end of an Act with 50 rings and play a minigame to get a Time Stone, also made getting the Time Stones completely optional for getting the Good Ending, as you could also do it by traveling to the past in each Act and hunting down and destroying a certain machine that's producing Badniks.
  • In Spyro: Year of the Dragon enemies won't react to you when they are off-camera, with the exception of Egg Thieves who don't attack but simply run away, ninjas since attacking from behind is kind of their thing, and any enemy that gets lucky enough to wander into frame from behind and immediately attack since it's now in frame. This saves you from a lot of cheap hits from enemies lurking around corners and also gives you a bit of breathing room when engaging an entire crowd. Abusing this makes the gun-toting dinosaurs a lot easier to contend with.
  • Super Meat Boy, being the Nintendo Hard twitch-platformer it is, has very quick, automatic respawns after death. No more "PRESS R TO TRY AGAIN", yay! The levels themselves are short, from 15 seconds to 90 seconds, so that after you die, you don't have to go through too much again.
    • Various little side-quests when you get too frustrated with the main game, like beating past levels in record time, collecting bandages to unlock new playable characters, or playing through retro-styled "warp zones".
    • When you finally do beat a level, the game then shows you a replay of all your past lives doing the level simultaneously, which is good for showing you where the hardest parts of the level were. It's also kinda hilarious to see a ton of Meat Boys get shredded to half their number by a giant saw.
  • In The Adventures of Lomax, the game is very generous in providing plenty of pots that pop out of the ground and contain either spare helmets (which work as a Single-Use Shield and enable you to use several of the abilities) or additional uses of an ability. It helps in situations where lacking a helmet or an ability would make the level Unwinnable, and in crucial moments, these pots will keep infinitely reappearing if you run out of either.
  • In TY the Tasmanian Tiger, if you already have 299 Opals in a level (leaving just one left) and grab an Opal Magnet, the last Opal will fly directly to you from wherever it is (unless it's in a crate).
  • Yoshi's Woolly World has "Mellow Mode", which gives Yoshi wings so he can constantly float in mid-air by holding the jump button (rather than his usual, temporary flutter), provides more hearts from health sources, starts over the boss battles at the beginning rather than the last checkpoint, and if you die a certain number of times, you're given an egg which makes you invulnerable. There are also optional badges you can equip before starting a level which can show hidden items, bounce you out of bottomless pits, and make you invulnerable to lava and fire, all usable in regular and mellow mode. In the 3DS re-release, Mellow Mode also gives you the Poochy pups, who serve as infinite homing boomerang eggs.
  • Rayman has what the developers call "Coyote Time", where you're given a grace period after leaving a ledge to perform the jump.
  • In King of Thieves, if you find yourself getting killed repeatedly by the same trap in an opposing player's dungeon, that trap will be removed for free until you either complete the dungeon or give up.
  • Rabi-Ribi's "Dodge Master" achievement series requires defeating bosses with no damage taken. However, several particularly-long late-game bosses will allow you to take one to three hits depending on the boss and still get the achievement.
  • Sonic Erazor has the Hard Part Skipper, a device that's placed before especially difficult parts that will skip them, though you lose all your rings and power-ups in the process.

    Puzzle Games 
  • The 7th Guest has a hint book in the manor's library that can be used for any puzzle. The first time you use it, you're given a cryptic hint on how to beat the puzzle you last encountered. Using the book a second time tells you what you need to do, and using it a third time simply solves the puzzle for you. All three times, the book will also transport you right back to the puzzle. You can even use the hint book without penalty on every puzzle except the last one, despite what the manual tells you. These days, this hint book is the only way to beat the Microscope puzzle, which is based on AI intelligence - not a problem in the Windows 3.1 days, but nigh-impossible now.
  • Bendy and the Ink Machine has a few: when killed, Henry re-spawns at the nearest Bendy statue; and progress-critical items shine to make them more discernible in the sepia-tone environment.
  • There have been countless versions of Breakout, a game in which you attempt to destroy a brick wall by bouncing a ball off your side-scrolling paddle against said wall, taking out a brick with each hit. One version will let a player try to get the very last brick on each level, but will eventually destroy the thing automatically and move on to the next level.
    • One variant of Breakout is called Baku Baku Block. There are many different versions of it, but the basic idea is, instead of having blocks, it has a picture, which you "destroy" to reveal a different picture behind it. (Naturally, this lends itself to H-Games.) Almost all versions automatically detect when a part of the scene is unchanged and consider those parts to be pre-destroyed, to prevent it from being impossible to see where certain blocks are.
    • Hyperballoid makes a special bonus float repeatedly down if three or less blocks are left in the level; catching it instantly teleports you to the next one, so you don't have to repeatedly try to send the ball exactly right to hit the one remaining brick. There is a small points bonus if you avoid the teleport drops and break all the blocks anyway.
    • Magic Orbz eventually zaps the last few blocks in a level with lightning if the player is unable to hit anything with the ball within one minute.
    • Alpha Bounce has the Javelin, a weapon that is normally accessible via a power-up that destroys an entire column of blocks. When you get down to the last few blocks, however, it becomes freely accessible after a charging period, which gets shorter as you get closer to zero blocks remaining.
  • One Looney Tunes Game Boy Color game had a slider puzzle (the kind where you have to slide a bunch of tiles around to make a picture). After enough tries, you could ask another character to do it for you.
  • Portal:
    • The game will tweak the position and/or orientation of portals to help align things up.
    • If you fall towards an open floor portal that you'd otherwise slightly miss, the game will nudge you towards it.
    • You can move out of an infinite fall in a way that would not be possible in real life.
    • You can't take fall damage. Chell is wearing leg springs specifically to prevent fall damage.
    • You can't slice yourself in half by placing a new portal when you're halfway through one.
    • The game will bend thermal discouragement beams to account for portals that are just a little bit off, either between the source and the in-portal, or the out-portal and the target.
    • You can't take damage from thermal discouragement beams while you're in mid-air, which makes jumping over them easier.
    • The second game has two specific instances near the end of the game where you only have one shot to place a portal. For these particular instances, if you accidentally fire the wrong colored portal, the other one will silently take its place.
    • Also in Portal 2, the final boss fight resets its Exact Time to Failure countdown each time you complete a phase. Each phase is shorter than the one before it to ramp up difficulty, but you won't be trapped in an Unwinnable situation if you finish a phase with seconds to spare.
    • Portal 2 has moments of scripted velocity. It will force you to make certain jumps correctly.
  • Tetris:
    • Tetris Blast's Contest mode will give you a break if you managed to destroy almost the entire stack of blocks. If only a few blocks remain, the next several pieces you get will be made entirely of bomb blocks, enabling you to quickly make a big bomb and finish the level.
    • Later games tinker with the randomizer so as to prevent issues like the same piece spawning again and again, or a crucial piece not dropping:
      • Tetris: The Grand Master series The first piece of each game will never be an S, Z, or O, because an S or Z on the first piece forces an overhang, as well as an O followed by an S or Z. The games also heavily bias the randomizer against dealing a piece that has occurred in the last four pieces, so droughts of a single piece (such as the ever-crucial I) are rare. The second and third games also initialize the history to ZSZS, so that an S or Z in the first three pieces is also exceedingly rare.
      • Newer Tetris games use a "bag" randomizer, which repeats random permutations of the seven tetrominoes, making it far easier to predict what the next pieces will be. (i.e. after 7 pieces, all seven tetrominos will have been dealt exactly once, after 14 pieces all of them will have been dealt exactly twice, etc.)
    • Some Tetris games feature what are known as "wall kicks". For a simple example, take the wallkicks from Tetris: The Grand Master: If you try to rotate a piece, but that rotation is blocked by a wall or a block, the game will attempt to shift the piece one cell to the right and see if it will fit. If that fails, the game will do the same to the left instead. Only if that check fails will the piece fail to rotate. This feature is very, very handy for rotating pieces in tight spaces. It helps, because TGM in particular is still very, very Nintendo Hard.
    • In Tetris: The Grand Master 3, normally in Master mode the game stops at level 500 out of 999 if you took more than 7 minutes to get there. In a Promotional Exam, in which you need to meet or exceed a target grade to establish it as your qualified grade, this time limit is removed, allowing you to get to level 500 and beyond at your own pace.
  • Antichamber:
    • Stuck on a puzzle? Stuck by a puzzle? Not sure what to do? Whack the Esc key and go back to the main map. One room you might run into near the "beginning" of the game traps you in a tiny, inescapable box, with only the advice "Sometimes, we make choices that don't lead anywhere at all." and a picture of a person's finger pressing the Escape key.
    • In rooms with multiple paths, arrows will materialize on the walls to point you in the directions you haven't taken yet.
    • Rooms on the map with enlarged squares indicate there's still paths from that room you haven't found yet, even if (like with The Butterfly Effect) there aren't any other path indicators leading from it.
  • The Talos Principle:
    • If you get to a point where you cannot reasonably complete a puzzle, some text will pop up on screen saying "hold X to reset", which puts the whole puzzle back to how it was.
    • If you take too long on a puzzle, Elohim will tell you to "save this mystery for another day".note 
    • Lastly, you can use the services of a very limited number of messengers (you can get up to three in a game of 120+ puzzles), who provide vague clues on how to get through the puzzle.
    • A post-launch patch added two more: a special autosave that's never overwritten after getting all the sigils needed for the main story, so you can watch all the endings easily, and a button to make the game go at double speed to cut down on travel time.
    • Standing in the path of laser beams for about one second disrupts themnote , but merely passing through them doesn't, which saves a lot of time once the beam puzzles start getting complicated. Also, contrary to the ones in Portal, lasers in this game don't hurt the Player Character.
  • Elemental Story:
    • The loading screen converts the normally appearing as JST times for trials, souls collecting stages and battle arena to that of the phone's system time, eliminating the need to manually calculate local time. This does not appear elsewhere, though.
    • The heart costs of battling trial monsters is reduced to 0 when players battling them for the first time.
    • Players whose internet connection drops during a battle arena match are treated as lost the match, which still gives rewards as opposed to quitting which does not give any rewards at all.
    • Players who draw less than 5 effective element pieces in their first turn of battle arena will have the pieces redrawn to level the playing field.
    • Life costs for failed regular stages which are accessed first time will be returned to the player until the player cleared it.
  • Pony Island:
    • If there is a Hacking portal around the cursor will spit between red and blue and will point towards it.
    • A patch added an Act Select to the main menu to make accessing Ticket hotspots easier.
    • On the final level, your pony's laser will have infinite power, allowing you to fire at will without having to worry about running out.
  • The Witness:
    • The player is entirely incapable of falling off of anything. Then again, they can't jump, either.
    • There are two sets of puzzles in the Castle, though only one of them needs to be completed in order to open its beacon.
    • Many puzzles require you to stand at the exact right spot to solve them. On some of them, if you stand close enough to the right spot, the game will pull your character to the right spot when you start the puzzle. In some cases, it's to give you a hint to how to solve the puzzle. In one case, it's to save you from wasting an hour waiting for an object to move to the right spot in case you happen to be off alignment even slightly.
  • The Turing Test: You can reset a puzzle that you managed to get stuck on by selecting it from the menu.
  • Puyo Puyo
    • The arcade games reduce the Puyo's drop speed whenever the player uses a continue. It will only do so twice per enemy, though, so Puyo will still drop ridiculously fast against late-game opponents. This seemingly does not carry over to the home ports.
    • Games from Tsu onwards introduce Double Rotation: If your current Puyo pair is in a shaft one column wide, you can still rotate it to flip the order of Puyo by pressing either rotation button twice.
    • Nazo Puyo: Arle no Roux lets the player take a (larger-than-normal) health penalty to give up on the current puzzle and receive a new one. Rulue no Roux, on the other hand, cruelly subverts this by making the puzzles that you passed on earlier in the game reappear near the end.
    • All the Puyo Puyo games in the SEGA era have a cheat code which unlocks everything EXCEPT the in-game shop's content note  removing the need to play through the entire game.
  • In Word Stacks if you make a mistake which renders the level unwinnable, the letters rearrange themselves so you can still find the remaining words.

    Racing Games 
  • The rewind feature in Forza Motorsport 3 takes this trope and runs with it. Are you getting to the end of a long endurance race, only to take a turn wide and crash into a wall? No problem! Just hit the back button, rewind, and take the turn again instead of restarting from scratch. It returns in later Forza games as an assist that can be turned off (before the race) for a larger credit bonus
  • In Gran Turismo 2 and 3, if you fail a License Test requirement enough times in a row (and then get a result close to the Bronze time) they'll give you an unlisted prize called "Kiddie Prize" lower than Bronze that would let you technically pass that portion of the test, albeit with a horrendous score.
  • Mario Kart:
    • In general, better items are given to those at the back of the pack. First-place characters mostly receive red/green shells and bananas, whereas 8th place characters mostly receive Stars, Boos, and the dreaded Blue Shells. However, this usually applies to human players much more strongly in order to help them catch up. A human in 8th place will likely receive a game-breaking item each time, but a CPU player probably will not.
    • The franchise did away with screwing up a jump that crosses over a previous section. Straight from 1st to 8th because you got hit with a red shell? No, thank you! This only happens in the first game; in the later ones, Lakitu will save your sorry ass.
  • Crash Team Racing also made a point of giving better power-ups to racers doing poorly. You're not going to see an Aku Aku mask or Lightning Orb anywhere ahead of 3rd place, and don't expect to see an N. Tropy Clock unless you're pushing last. The AI also becomes less aggressive in the final lap and will use less items, allowing for a reasonable chance of victory after a much more hectic first couple of laps.
  • Carmageddon games let you Recover at the push of a button (and a small deduction of credits), which puts you back on your wheels at the last place you were "safe". This allows you to instantly recover from a missed jump, being stuck on your roof, or from falling off a ledge - it even kicks in automatically if you drop off the map. Especially useful in the N64 and PlayStation versions, which have notoriously horrible controls, levels built out of narrow paths and time limits that generally do not let you screw around. The Recover ability is disabled on opponents if you're within a certain range, so they cannot just teleport away as you charge in for the kill. Unless you're talking about the PlayStation port...
  • Test Drive Overdrive lets the players practice their skills on different races before they're ready for the actual races. This only applies to standard races and not Duel Boss races.
  • Starting in Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 4, if a Story Mode stage is going south and you have retire (which force-quits your current play session, triggered by driving the wrong way for 3 seconds) enabled, retiring before the opponent crosses the finish will not count the stage as a loss (despite the fact it still counts as a Non Standard Game Over requiring you to reinsert credits to play again). This is very useful, because there are rewards for completing cycles of Story Mode with no losses.
  • Many early racing arcade (or arcade-style) games such as OutRun and Rad Racer have you race to the finish line on a timer, possibly with checkpoints that increase your time limit. Instead of getting an instant game over if you run out of time, the accelerator is disabled and the car slows to a stop and then the game over happens. If the player can coast to a nearby checkpoint, they still get the time extension and are allowed to keep going, and if they coast to the finish line it still counts as a win.

    Rail Shooters 
  • The fourth Time Crisis game moves away from hard science fiction by including bioengineered monstrosities as opponents. The termite-like things rush at you in a line and are almost impossible to beat without using a machine gun, and the literal Goddamn Bats appear in swarms and can only be handled with a shotgun. Fortunately, your NPC ally will give you his extra ammo if you run out during those fights.
    • Additionally, the game alters it's own health system while fighting these things - as opposed to 3 or so bites from the bugs, you are given a proper life bar that drains when they latch on and attack you, and it is only when that bar is emptied that you take damage.
  • House of the Dead 4 has enemies go up in a puff of orange or blue flame and blacken the moment they're killed, so even if a zombie is still standing while going through its death flops, the player knows it's safe to stop firing on it and start targeting the next threat.
  • Star Fox 64 has Sarumarine, a giant armored submarine boss with tough armor that can only be damaged by bomb for the first two-thirds of the battle. Throughout the rest of the game bombs are scarce, but Sarumarine spits out cannonballs that turn into bombs if shot at.

    Real-Time Strategy 
  • Starcraft II has a few cases of this kicking in. Forgot to evacuate your SCVs on Redstone during a lava surge? Raynor lets 5 new ones airdrop to get things running again. On a more general note, the defeat menu lets you easily restart a mission on a lower difficulty, and the game saves progress automatically quite often.
    • The Heart of the Swarm singleplayer campaign tweaks the Zerg faction significantly to make it much more player-friendly. Injecting larvae is removed, instead letting them spawn much more quickly and numerously by themselves. Numerous passive powerups make base management less fidgety. While this leaves it pretty far disconnected from the multiplayer faction, it's a lot of fun.
    • The Legacy of the Void single player campaign, the player's High Templar cannot damage friendly units with Psionic Storm. Additionally, High Templar (as well as the unit's alternatives, Ascendants and Dark Archons) are given a normal attack, giving them a use even if the player doesn't know how to utilize their spells.
  • In Star Wars: Empire at War in order to conquer planets that do not have a plot mission on them, you have to take the battle to the surface and destroy every enemy building and enemy unit. To keep the player from spending too much time running around trying to find the last elusive enemy units, after you have destroyed all the buildings, the game will helpfully remove the Fog of War so you can see where the remaining enemies are.
  • In Clash of Clans, if you get disconnected during the middle of a battle, the game will simulate the rest of the battle, giving you whatever loot, trophies and war stars that you would have gained from an attack.

    Rhythm Games 
  • In the single American version of beatmania IIDX, if you are playing on Hard Challenge mode and your Life Meter falls below 30%, the penalty for BADs and POORs will decrease.
    • This has been used since 9th Style in the Japanese releases, and applies to Hard, Expert Courses, and Dan'inintei Mode. Of course, Konami seems to have used this as an excuse to make the Dan'inintei courses use harder songs.
  • Before the Echo allows the player to switch the game difficulty freely up until after the third floor. Useful for players that overestimate their abilities or pick the hardest difficulty setting, Spasmodic, on a whim and quickly find themselves overwhelmed.
  • In Dance Dance Revolution, if your health gets too low during a song, the penalty for bad steps decreases, and the life bonus for good steps increases. This lasts until your health is outside of what the game deems a "danger zone." However, the more advanced modes and "Challenge" step charts explicitly don't do this in order to add to their difficulty.
  • In the DJMAX series, beginning with DJMAX Portable Black Square, if you hit the wrong key for a note, you will still get the full percentage for it, but only get 80% of the points. The inclusion of this has proven very controversial among fans, because now you can full-combo or get 100% on a song without even hitting the right buttons at all.
  • Later Guitar Hero and Rock Band games have a "no fail" feature, so you can finish the song no matter how badly you screw it up.
    • DJ Hero, unlike the other "Hero" games, never featured a meter showing the general quality of your performance, making failing a song impossible.
    • LEGO Rock Band, a game meant to be inclusive to young kids, includes a "Super-Easy" mode where not only can you not fail out of a song, you don't even need to finger the correct buttons on the guitar, match vocal pitch, or hit the right drum pads (you only have to strum at the correct time, sing at the correct time, or use the kick pedal at the correct time).
  • Many arcade Rhythm Games with multiplayer will allow all players in a multiplayer round to be "saved" from a GameOver if they fail as long as at least one player involved clears the song. This applies not only to games where all players share the same machine, but also games where multiple cabinets can be linked together as well as games that allow the player to battle with opponents over the Internet; examples include Dance Dance RevolutionHowever...  (shared machine), jubeat (LAN, online), maimai (LAN), amongst many, many other rhythm games.
  • A new feature added in the sequel to Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan was the ability to continue a song once after failing, rather than having to start over from the beginning. However, this can only be done on the easiest difficulty, and not on the final song.
  • Newer releases of pop'n music and Pump It Up will always give you a second stage even if you fail your first onenote . This allows you to utilize the first stage to practice more difficult songs or songs that you are not confident that you will clear.
    • This is also true for Drummania, Guitar Freaks (as of V6, at least, but probably earlier) and IIDX (at least as of Sirius, and again, probably earlier).
    • In DJMAX Technika, you can run out of Life Meter on the first stage of Pop Mixing and still get a second stage. On the second stage, running out of life won't end the game immediately, but you won't get a third stage. On stage 3, running out of life is an automatic Game Over. The same, however, cannot be said of Technika 2.
    • beatmania IIDX, but only if you play on a Level 6 chart or below on your first stage.
    • Sound Voltex if the song level is 7 or lower.
  • If you fail a minigame in Rhythm Heaven enough times, you can talk to the barista, who will let you skip that stage and go on to the next one. Naturally, you can't do this for the final Remix. Or the one pretending to be it.
    • If you're having trouble during the practice sections in Rhythm Heaven Fever, you'll have the option to see the computer do it themselves.
    • In Rhythm Heaven Megamix, if you're having trouble during the practice sections, the game will eventually display a grid on the bottom screen showing when you need to press the buttons and add a metronome sound to help. During the games proper, a starburst will appear on the bottom screen when you press a button, appearing closer to the center the more on-beat you are.
    • Also in Megamix, you can choose to tap with the stylus instead of using buttons. This removes the need to remember which button does what, and makes most of the DS minigames feel more like their original versions (though you'll have to get used to lifting the stylus up instead of flicking it).
    • The "Lockstep" minigame, which requires you to be constantly tapping on the beat, won't count near-misses as actual mistakes, allowing you to get a Perfect more easily.
  • Tone Sphere:
    • If you play on an iPhone or iPod Touch rather than an iPad, the markers will be made slightly larger relative to the screen.
    • The timing windows for slide notes are a little wider than for tap notes.
  • Sound Voltex III -Gravity Wars- features an alternate version of the Excessive Rate gauge, the Alternative Rate gauge. It starts off as an Excessive Rate gauge but switches to Effective Rate gauge at the level it would be if you had been using it the entire time instead of failing you out if you hit 0%. You can still fail if you can't get up to at least 70%, but at least you'll play the rest of the song. This was originally only available on Generator Standard Start, the most expensive play mode at the time, but Sound Voltex IV -Heavenly Heaven- incorporates it into Standard Start as well, which additionally guarantees a full set of stages per credit.
  • In Tokyo 7th Sisters, players are given a free roll every day as to give a small chance to get silver cards, which is stronger than regular bronze cards.
  • In 8 Beat Story, stamina consumed during virtual lives which freezes the game before they can start are returned to the player.
  • The Rhythm Portion of Idolish 7 has slowly been adding in new skills and abilities to make higher difficulties easier to play, especially for newer or lower-leveled players.
    • Exiting out of a live does not deplete your LP (regular lives) or tokens (event lives). Thus, the only thing you waste by retrying a live is your time.
  • Unlike many other mobile idol rhythm games, BanG Dream! Girls Band Party! does not actually limit how much you can play. Live Boosts are only used to multiply your rewards; once you run out you can continue to play songs, which is useful for getting the one-time score and combo rewards (which are mercifully not affected by Live Boosts) and simply practicing charts.
  • In March 2020, WACCA had a few Temporary Online Content events extended by about two weeks each due to concerns over the COVID-19 (also known as the coronavirus) pandemic in real life, as the spread of the virus makes it very difficult to determine if it's safe for people to go out even just for a trip to the local arcade.

    Roguelikes 
  • The Binding of Isaac:
    • The game has deep pits, but doesn’t let you fall into them: they just act like barriers, much like rocks, the difference being that they don't also stop projectiles. Speaking of rocks, you can fill these pits in by blowing apart adjacent rocks.
    • If you happen to be standing where the trap door to the next level is supposed to spawn at the end of a boss fight, it won't open until you move off of it, preventing you from falling through to the next level and missing whatever items spawned.
    • The game actually avoids one very common anti-frustration feature: Normally when you grab an item and hold it aloft dramatically, enemies briefly stop moving and attacking you. Not so in this game! (Rebirth lets you move while holding an item, though).
    • The effects of pills are random per run, and the game does not tell you which color combination will do what for that run. One pill, Bad Trip, will damage you, and another, Health Down, decreases your heart containers by one. To avoid cheap deaths by unidentified pills, Bad Trip pills will temporarily turn in to Full Health pills if you have less than one heart, and Health Down pills will turn in to Health Up pills so long as you have one or less heart containers. This also means that even if all pills are identified, no pill will kill you just by taking it. Horf! and Explosive Diarrhea still pose a threatnote , but at least those can be avoided by not using pills next to walls/obsctables and having decent dodge skills respectively.
  • Despite its punishing difficulty, Dungeon Crawl will stop you from executing a staggering amount of foolish actions. The game will stop you from doing certain things that would otherwise outright kill you (walking into deep water, auto-moving while starving), and will ask for confirmation on potentially risky actions (moving adjacent to deep water while confused, stepping into dangerous traps while badly injured). You're still likely to die for a thousand other reasons, but at least the game is rooting for you.
  • In FTL: Faster Than Light, it is possible for your ship's teleporter to get disabled while the entirety of your crew is on board the enemy ship. Should this happen and your boarding team emerge victorious, your boarding team will take a shuttle back to your ship so as to prevent an Unwinnable state.
  • The enhanced version of Spelunky has one right at the start of the game: when you enter the dungeon, there is always a pot, skull or rock right next to your adventurer, so you have something expendable to drop down and trigger any arrow trap you might immediately encounter.
  • In Nethack, one type of food item can be renamed by the player ("slime mold" by default). This item is classified as vegan, even if you name it to something that obviously contains or is meat, such as "cheeseburger" or "fried chicken"; this is to account for players on a vegetarian or vegan conduct who set the name to a diet-appropriate food.
  • In Tiny Heist, if you have low health, the game will put a first-aid kit on the next floor for you to pick up.

    Role-Playing Games 
  • Baldur's Gate
    • In the original game, opening the inventory screen didn't pause the action. Thus, if you tried to swap anything during a fight, you had to be really quick before hostiles could kill your characters. Furthermore, you couldn't refill your potions or arrows without opening the inventory, which was further frustrating. The sequel fixed this by pausing the game when the inventory was opened. The sequel also raised the number of ammo per stack from 20 shots to 80 shots, removing the need to open it as often. However, as a counterbalance, armor could no longer be changed during combat.
    • The journal in the first game was a chaotic collection of notes (some repeated) about hearsays, encounters, quests and major plot events. The sequel reorganized it by separing major plot events from side quests in different sections, aggregating related-notes in the same entry, and marking completed quests.
    • In the first game, characters kicked from the party would simply stay in place, even in the middle of nothingness, and there was no way to track them. In the sequel, you're given a dialogue where you can choose to let them stay in the party, let them wait in place, or rendezvous at a known location (like an important inn).
    • Many items left on the ground are teleported with the characters when major transitions automatically occur and you can't backtrack (like after the first battle in the expansion Throne of Bhaal).
    • Plot-relevant items and some other things will be transferred from any character leaving the party to the main character. Particularly useful when said character is leaving forever. However, it doesn't work with all non-plot relevant items and many equipped weapons can be lost.
    • The Enhanced Editions added some other quality of life improvements. The original games obviously didn't allow to equip a shield and a two-handed weapon (like bows) at the same time. But if you wanted to equip a shield in the off-hand, you had to pause, access the inventory, remove any two-handed weapons from the first-hand slots even if you were equipping a one-handed weapon at the moment, then equip a shield. This was rather tedious. In the EE, you can place a shield in the off hand, but it won't be used (nor will it be shown) while equipping two-handed weapons. If you swap to a one-handed weapon from the quick slots, the shield will be automatically equipped as if you did the passages above, just without micromanaging. This also frees a slot in the backpack that would be otherwise occupied by an inutilized shield.
    • Before the EE, in order to play a custom party you had to start a multiplayer game, assign all character slots to yourself, create the desired characters (or import them), save the game and then move the file into the single player savegame folder (unless you were ok with starting a new multiplayer session every time you wanted to load a game). Now you can directly create your own custom party and even pregenerate characters.
    • The dice roll at character creation now allows to store a result and recall it later if you are unsatisfied by subsequent rolls.
  • In all but the last two battles of the first entry of The Banner Saga Trilogy, losing battles still continues the storyline without a Game Over.
  • In the Baten Kaitos games, dying to a boss will allow you to modify your decks and start the boss fight over from the beginning, as opposed to kicking you to the title screen like normal deaths do. You'll be thankful for it; bosses in these games are hard and tend to have long-winded Exposition Breaks before the fight.
    • In Origins, the guardian spirit (that is, you, the player) has this power. The guardian spirit can manipulate the draws you get from your deck according to your needs. If you are setting up a combo, the spirit's effect helps you draw magnus to complete that combo. If a party member is at low health, the effect makes drawing healing magnus much more likely. The better the relationship Sagi has with his spirit, the more this effect kicks in.
    • Also in Origins, the final dungeon has 4 block puzzles where you must fly through several blocks without running into any wall or otherwise stopping as you go from one safe spot to the next. Failing results in you being sent to the start. Fail too much, and your party will add their power to yours, greatly increasing the amount of time you can fly in the area.
  • In Bloodborne Picking up more items after you've reached the inventory limit sends those items to your storage chest in the Hunter's Dream.
    • If you also have blood vials and quicksilver bullets in your storage, after dying (or transporting to the Hunter's Dream), you replenish your on-hand supply of your vials and bullets back in your inventory, just as long as you have such items in your storage.
    • If you just lost a huge chunk of health, blood vials will restore more of your life bar.
    • All of your equipment now scales to your stats. Attire/armor has a percentage based defense instead of a flat static rating, while attack items like Throwing Knives and Molotov Cocktails now have stat scaling to make them viable throughout the game.
    • With the Old Hunters Update, almost every boss now has NPC summons nearby to alleviate playing alone. Prior, only two bosses had NPC helpers, if you knew where to look.
  • Bravely Default
    • In the Updated Re-releasethe only version the rest of the world got — you have Sleep Points, which stop time in any battle at any time, and perform as many actions as you have Sleep Points. Using this feature allows you to surpass the damage/healing cap of 9999.
    • You can also change the difficulty and encounter rate whenever you want.
    • You can speed the game up, if the animations get too repetitive or slow for you. Summon animations are skipped entirely. Another addition to the Updated Re-release let's it go up to 4x the speed, which also makes it easier to make the most out of Special Move buffs. You can also pause the animation, making it easier to time Bravely Second, or take a screenshot through miiverse.
    • No worries about having to go through a dungeon when you die from a boss again, or having to go all the way back to stock up. Before every single boss is The Adventurer, who is a glorified savepoint, a shop (sells the wares from Norende) and a helpful reminder of what's coming up. He even pops up where it wouldn't make sense, i.e. places that the party would have been the first to get to. The only time this isn't the case is right before the Bonus Boss in the Bonus Dungeon, where the Bonus Boss is him. If you die then, you don't get a Game Over. You're just exited out of the battle with only 1HP.
  • BoxxyQuest: The Gathering Storm has intermittent Picross puzzles that can be freely and easily skipped if the player finds them too difficult.
  • In Child of Light, you can run away from any battle in the game, including all the bosses. There is also a way to heal up health and mana for free via wishing plants, but only in Normal mode. The player can also change the difficulty level whenever they want.
  • In Chrono Cross, you can run away from literally any fight in the game. If you're losing to a boss, you can escape, and while some of them will just draw you back into the fight, it'll at least reset your elements and give you a chance to heal.
  • Chrono Trigger
    • The first time you head to the prehistoric era, Crono has to beat Ayla in a drinking contest to get the Dreamstone to forge the Masamune. You win the contest by rapidly pressing a button faster than the AI can keep up. If you haven't beaten Ayla after four tries, Ayla says she's full and forfeits to Crono so the story can continue.
    • Just after getting Frog and going to storm Magus' Castle, Frog will ask if you're using magic (even if you didn't use it in battle), with the game throwing down a none-too-subtle hint that you should bring Frog to Spekkio to have Frog learn his own magic. Since the dungeon ahead requires exploiting elemental weaknesses, and Frog is a required member of your party until you clear it, you're going to need him to know those spells.
    • Both times you fight Ozzie, he's a Puzzle Boss. Just attacking him normally does almost no damage, and he hits with a strong counterattack each time. You have to hit a switch behind him to end the battles. If you still haven't figured it out after a while, the switch becomes the only thing you can target.
  • Conception II: Children of the Seven Stars does a lot of little things: Insta-wins against weaker enemies that give full Experience and Money, full team equipment optimization, a full-heal option at the top of the Skills menu, unlimited time, retaining gained Exp. on a game over, etc.
    • If you're wondering why several of these relate to the whole party, a full team in Conception 2 is a whopping 'eleven individuals, each with their own HP and equipment.
  • CrossCode
    • The "Assist" menu allows players who might find the game too hard to lower the damage received, reduce the frequency of enemy attacks, and slow down most puzzles, all without any penalty or cut content.
    • When a CP has been invested into a branching Circuit path, you can freely swap between the two paths out of battle at no cost. Circuit Overrides are also handed out during the game, which can be spent in Rookie Harbor to completely reset a circuit tree. Finally, patch 1.2.0 gave a player the option to reset all of their circuit trees at once for a few credits.
    • After beating the game, you can go back in time to the very beginning of Chapter 10, but keeping the levels and items you obtained. If you do so, you'll be able to skip the final raid, the entirety of The Very Definitely Final Dungeon, and even the Final Boss. This makes the good ending much less frustrating to achieve if you didn't get it the first time.
    • The game autosaves halfway through the fight against the final boss, and he has multiple forms. This means you won't have to fight the first part of the battle again if you went all the way through to the final part and lost.
  • Custom Robo lets you give your opponent an HP handicap if you lost to them repeatedly. If that's not enough, losing even more lets you give them even higher handicaps, up to taking away 75% of their health from the get-go.
    • In the GCN game this overlaps with Easy-Mode Mockery in the epilogue, as it lowers your score twice (you get penalties for losing and having to retry and for using a handicap, and beating the high score in each area unlocks some stuff).
  • While Darkest Dungeon is notable for lots of frustration, it does have a few of these features. Of course, it also has Stygian Mode, which is set to maximum frustration and also deletes your save if you lose too many heroes or take too long.
    • If you're unlucky enough to lose one or both your heroes in the tutorial, the game will hand you replacements (on top of the Vestal and Plague Doctor) when you get to the Hamlet so that you have a full party for your first proper expedition.
    • The Darkest Dungeon itself has a stable map and isn't randomly generated. This means that unlike most dungeons, where any engagement is a roll of the dice, you can come up with a plan for getting through the dungeon that avoids most of the worst enemies. You won't experience any nighttime ambushes either, so you can devote your Camping Respite to buffing and healing in preparation for a tough fight.
    • While heroes who have completed a Darkest Dungeon mission will refuse to return, they won't take up any roster space, so you have the capacity to train up a new team for the next one without dismissing your champions.
    • With the Crimson Court DLC, there's a repeatable blood-farming mission in the Court itself, a full cure when you defeat a boss, and a Sanitarium option that can cure the Crimson Curse when all bosses are defeated, to prevent your roster being devastated every few weeks due to a lack of The Blood for vampirism-afflicted heroes.
    • Playing in Radiant Mode lets you recruit higher-level heroes off the stagecoach, send higher-level parties out to engagements for when you need some quick levelling for one person, and makes upgrades cheaper to reduce grind.
    • If you don't agree with certain difficulty features, you can always toggle them in the options menu while in town.
  • Deltarune
    • One of Spades King's attacks has him latch his spade tongue to the dodge window and make spikes protrude from its inside walls, followed by him pulling it around the screen. The spikes pop out the instant his tongue sticks to the window, but there's a grace period where they won't damage your SOUL if you were unfortunate enough to move it towards the edges without knowing what the attack was.
    • The game notices if you're playing through a second time after completing the game. You can skip the entire opening scene in Hometown by going back to bed, warping you to the Dark World instantly.
    • If you make it to the first room of the Dark World in under eight minutes, there will be a special item there called the Wrist Protector. Obtaining it allows you to skip past all cutscene text quickly by holding down a button. The Wrist Protector also doesn't take up any inventory space. So if you're going for a speedrun or are playing the game again, you can skip past dialogue you don't want to see.
    • The first time you get a Game Over, you get a few screens of dialogue. It's changed to a simple "want to continue?" yes/no question every time you die after that until you quit the game. You can also skip the game over screen entirely by repeatedly pressing Z and X after dying.
  • The original Deus Ex. A laser sensor blocking a section of the hallway in an underground tunnel: You could lockpick the hatch to the canal that bypasses it or... oh, hey, is that an EMP grenade in the sewage pipe? An army of military drones patrolling an airport cargo yard: You could just elegantly sneak past them or... oh, hey, is that a multi-shot guided missile launcher on the guard tower table? Long stretches of water: you're guaranteed to find rebreathers nearby. This made some of the more specialized nanopowers pretty useless, since you could always count on the designers to cut you some slack and provide helpful gear—to the point of being patronizing.
  • Since Ally Kills in the Disgaea series can lock you out of certain endings, making a Prinny explode by throwing them doesn't count as one.
  • Disney Heroes: Battle Mode
    • If you fail a Friendship Mission, all resources you spent to do it, be they badge bits; hero chips (later missions); or diamonds (which you can use in lieu of missing badge bits), will be refunded, so you don't lose anything except time.
    • Each time you lose/retreat from a reinfected stage, the enemy levels will drop by one to keep you from being stuck.
    • If you're defeated on a campaign stage, it'll cost only a sixth of the energy a successful run would.
  • Divinity: Original Sin II has a lot of quality-of-life improvements from the previous installment. Among these:
    • Combining some skills into one another, so that a ranged fighter who is good with crossbows doesn't suddenly lag behind because they couldn't get any upgrades.
    • Much more generosity with movement clicks. You have much less AP than in Divinity: Original Sin, but fortunately you don't have to waste most of your AP moving. Even if it's a small click moving yourself a few pixels over, it does not drain your AP.
    • Carrying over the "Backstab range" from the Enhanced Edition.
  • Dragon Age: Origins has an example in in Orzammar, which is widely seen as one of the toughest sections of the game. Since you will be attacked in the street, even in what would be a safe area in any other of the game's cities, the game autosaves every time you come out a doorway, so on the off chance you get wiped, you won't lose too much progress.
  • In Earthbound, if a party member leaves the group but was holding a key item in their inventory that will be needed before the party member returns, Tracy will call Ness and mention the item was placed into Escargo Express storage. And calling the Escargo Express phone number after her first call leads Tracy to specifically ask if the player is calling to obtain the certain item, meaning the player will not find themselves stuck at certain points or run the risk of calling, but forgetting what they wanted to get.
  • Mother 3 vastly improved upon the Game Over and death mechanic of the previous game, where dying sent you back to a checkpoint with no PP and your entire party except for Ness unconscious. Unsurprisingly it was often an absolute nightmare to restore yourself since only hospitals or certain rare items could revive characters and you had to fight your way to one with next to no resources, meaning it was sometimes even possible to get stuck in a no win scenario. Fun times. Now a game over just reloads your last save (and you get to keep the experience points you gained), and an unconscious character can simply be revived by anything that heals your whole party (hot springs, the couch in Osohe Castle, etc).
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • After the tedious Escort Missions and instances of accidentally killing quest-important characters in Morrowind, the series introduced the "Essential" tag for plot-important NPCs in Oblivion. "Essential" characters can only be knocked out, not killed, and will spring back up after a few seconds. Similarly, Quest Items are clearly marked as such and cannot be removed from your inventory until their associated quest is completed to prevent that quest from being unwinnable.
    • Skyrim:
      • You have a limited inventory—it is loosely based on the amount of stuff your character could feasibly carry, divided into units—so your character starts with a capacity of 300 units, and gold ingots "weigh" one unit, a heavy armor helmet weighs maybe five units, so on and so forth. Every item in the game you can put into your inventory has a weight—including bees, flowers, and butterfly wings (thus making Skyrim a place where steel ingots and five butterflies weigh the same). There are only five exceptions to the weight rule: lockpicks, of which you'll burn five or more per high-level lock, easy. Arrows are also weightless, so being a bad shot isn't so painful. Thirdly keys, which can't be dropped but can be stored in chests, corpses, and other containers. Fourthly notes, maps and other single paper objects are weightless as well though books do have weight. And lastly, the game's currency is also weightless. Thank Divines.
      • Most quest items also weigh nothing despite having a weight value (particularly helpful as quest items cannot be dropped), although some quest items can lead to problems. If you pick up a common item that's also used in a current quest, you can't drop any of them until the quest item is removed by the game (for example, returning the item to its owner). It is quite possible to end up with 200 heavy Giant Toes in your inventory with no way to get rid of any of them short of using the console and little hint as to how to remove their quest item status.
      • Whenever you're hit with an arrow, there's a chance that the arrow will be added to your inventory rather than being destroyed. While this is present in multiple games, weightless arrows is unique to Skyrim. In older games, you could potentially find yourself becoming over-encumbered and unable to move after getting shot by an archer; in Skyrim, getting shot by an archer just leads to you wondering why you're carrying iron arrows now.
  • The Golden Sun series: Multiple:
    • Golden Sun (2001): Multiple:
      • A lot of thought was put into the game's reliance on Psynergy for puzzles to keep them fun instead of frustrating. One area that requires the spell Force (learned by equipping an item) to move an obstacle will be bypassed by a cutscene where the player gets frustrated that they have no Psynergy to get passed and just kicks it instead, and even though Mia's base class knows the spell Frost there's still an equippable item to bestow it as well so you won't have to constantly cycle her Djinn around if you're using a class that lacks it (the spell is frequently used in puzzles). You also casually replenish PP over time as you walk around the world map and dungeons: probably not enough to make much difference for combat and recovery, but you'll always have enough to cast Move or Mind Read, or if you're desperate to get out, Issac's Retreat spell.
      • The existence of the Frost Gem (which bestows Frost) also makes the glitch-powered Mia-Free Run possible, saving you from rendering the game Unwinnable by Mistake as it's the only spell she knows that is actually mandatory to beat the game. One wonders if said glitch was discovered during development and the devs decided to roll with it.
      • At the end of the Mercury Lighthouse you face a brutal fire-elemental Wake-Up Call Boss where near constant healing will be mandatory for survival. Thankfully Mia, your ice and water elemental party member with the solid healing spell Ply recovers 4 PP per turn from the Lighthouse's power: more than enough to spam all her spells without fear of running out. She even lampshades this after the fight when she reflects on the power boost it gave her:
        Mia: It's true... I could use my power without ever depleting it.
      • Certain "rare" items can be re-purchased from shopkeepers after selling them, like one-of-a-kind weaponry, Lucky Medals, and Tolbi Tickets. As the medals and tickets don't come into play until much later in the game and inventory space is limited, this allows you to sell them and free up your inventory, then simply buy them back when you reach the point in the game you can actually use them. It's also a handy source of money which is rare in the earlier parts of the game but plentiful in the end.
      • Because it's possible to save anywhere, there is the possibility of getting one's self stuck in a dungeon or area. To alleviate this, you can hold L, Start, and Select while loading your save to start from the last Sanctum you visited instead of the exact location where you saved your game.
    • Golden Sun: The Lost Age has Felix with the Cure ability so you can heal your party. However, it won't be fully adequate in later battles where you'll have to heal multiple people at once and the character who can use multi-target water healing abilities doesn't join your party until much later. To compensate, Jenna's default class can learn multi-target healing abilities to let you get by until you obtain your dedicated healer.
    • In Golden Sun: Dark Dawn, you won't get your dedicated healer character until quite a bit later in the game. Your wind adept party member can learn multi-target healing spells early on to help you get by until the dedicated healer joins you.
  • The Haunted Ruins: Starting at one floor above the deepest floor you've seen instead of having to go down all the floors again, when you reenter the dungeon.
  • Hero of the Kingdom 3 eliminates much of the backtracking from the two previous games by giving you a camp screen which can be accessed in any area. You can not only rest in it but, provided you have the skill, make your own weapons and potions and also cook the food which you need to rest. Another handy feature is that the map allows you to buy and sell items by clicking on the icon representing any of the vendors you've discovered so far.
  • In Kinder, if the player ended up using all of Shunsuke's money, but hasn't bought the Rust Remover from the vending machine yet, the item will be available for free when it becomes needed to progress.
  • Knights of the Old Republic gives you the ability to switch party members almost anywhere, avoiding the need to return to your base.
  • The Legend of Dragoon revived all killed players after combat with one hit point. Given that only one of the seven characters can revive party members (and only after reaching level three as a dragoon) and players can only carry a total of 32 items in their inventory, this is pretty much required. Likewise, blocking not only halves all damage taken for one turn and prevents status effects, it also heals the party member for ten percent of their health.
    • Kongol joins the party last and is second to last to get his dragoon spirit, on top of earning very little spirit points from his additions. Thankfully, the same city he gets his spirit in has a place players can buy spirit potions which grant a hundred spirit points. With either some patience playing minigames or a decent amount of gold, they can stock up and spend a couple battles against weak enemies using said potions to quickly level Kongol's dragoon spirit up.
    • Meru gets her dragoon spirit at the end of disc 2, half a disc after Kongol and a full disc after everyone else. To combat how far behind she is, her dragoon spirit reaches level three in a third the time of anyone else's and early in disc 4 she gets a weapon that grants her double spirit points.
    • Almost every dungeon in the game has a merchant selling healing items to help offset the limited inventory size, allowing players to stock up before and/or after a tough boss.
  • The Legend of Heroes - Trails: The series provides an option if a battle is lost to retry with decreased enemy stats for those who want to enjoy the story. The effect can be stacked multiple times per battle and enemies would only inflict minimal damage and have low defenses, though this doesn't apply to status aliments such as poison or petrification.
  • Liar Jeannie In Crucifix Kingdom:
    • The crafting system allows the player to break down consumables and equipment into their material ingredients. This can allow the player to recover rare materials and use them for something else, though that only works if the correct recipe was used with the rare material to begin with.
    • If you already tried fighting the secret boss before, later attempts allow you to skip the cutscene and go straight to the battle.
  • In Live A Live, the Mecha chapter has Item Creation, which allows the player to ask a scientist to enhance certain components or equipment into better versions of themselves. However, this scientist has a tendency to mess up at this and the item will not enhance. Contrary to the other chapter that contains Item Creation, though, the scientist screwing up with not mean the item is lost and it can be retried over and over, until he succeeds. Helpful, as getting certain equipment in that scenario can be difficult.
  • In Lufia: Curse of the Sinistrals, knocked-out party members are revived whenever you reach a checkpoint, which means they'll be back on their feet if the Reset device is used. Since everyone (but Dekar) has unique abilities that can be required for solving puzzles, this prevents having to leave a dungeon and start over from the very beginning if you've run out of Miracles.
    • If you get a Game Over, you can choose to try again with the levels of everyone in your party boosted by five.
  • Machina of the Planet Tree -Planet Ruler-, unlike most RPGs, shows the percentage chance of fleeing a battle, meaning a player isn't likely to waste a turn trying and failing to run.
  • Mario & Luigi series:
    • Mario & Luigi: Dream Team and Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam give you the option to Retry battles from the beginning if you die, rather than having to reload to a previous save. (This was also used to a lesser extent in the third game, Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story, with the Retry Clocks, though those were limited.)
    • It also provides an "assist" during battles, which shows which brother(s) will be targeted by a certain attack, though you can turn this off if you want (and it's not available in the rematches).
    • In addition (though somewhat controversially) it simplifies stat gain upon leveling up, removing the mechanic of increasing a stat of your choice by a random number - now all stats increase automatically.
    • Dream Team introduced Challenges that included, among other things, dodging a specific enemy's attacks a certain number of times. Dodging also typically lead to counter-attacking that enemy, so attempting to dodge a weak enemy might lead to killing it. It is not a coincidence that this is also the installment to introduce Boo Biscuits, which makes the Bros./Trio/Bowser unable to deal or take damage and skips to the enemy's turns, giving the player free access to practice dodging.
  • The version of Mary Skelter: Nightmares included within Mary Skelter 2 contains an expanded postgame to compensate for the sequel's lack of one. (This makes sense as Mary Skelter 2 ends on a Reset Button Ending that leads into the original.) Upon starting a new file, players are given the option of identifying the Big Bad. If the correct choice is made, the game boots to the second-to-final chapter with all of the items required to get the original True Ending on hand, saving players who already know the first game's main plot dozens of hours.
  • In Mass Effect 3, there are several weapons and upgrades that you can pick up during missions, as well as items required to complete minor Fetch Quests. If you miss the opportunities to get these items, then they become available to purchase on the Citadel, so they are not Permanently Missable or Unwinnable by Mistake (with the exception of a few secret weapons).
    • Related to the above, you have a requisition officer on your ship who can get you the items from any shop you've visited at only 10% higher price. Of course in Mass Effect 3, all the shops are on the Citadel so it’s not that hard to visit them all anyway.
    • When the game was first released, the requirements for getting the best ending practically required players engage in the otherwise optional multiplayer segment, making the best ending out of reach for those who did not have access to multiplayer, or otherwise did not wish to engage in it. The Extended Cut DLC relaxes those requirements, reducing the necessary Effective Military Strength from 5000 to only 3100.
  • Mass Effect: Andromeda: In conversations, any repeatable question is darkened out after it's asked, so that the player doesn't accidentally ask an NPC something they already did. (Though sometimes the game sneakily has the question remain the same, but the NPC's answer will have changed.)
  • Odin Sphere features one of these for the story, which is not only pretty complex on its own, but features 5 different protagonists who have to be played one at a time, with the chronology constantly jumping back and forth with lots of minor Time Skips. The result is a massive Jigsaw Puzzle Plot that would be a nightmare to figure out how everything fits together, if it wasn't for the fact that the game also has a cutscene theater, with brief synopses for each cutscene, all sorted by character into a comprehensive timeline.
  • In Ōkamiden, ink doesn't regenerate over time, unlike the previous game. Instead, they gave you twice as much ink, an item to restore three full bottles (Spirit Ink, and it restores more at larger sizes), and put things that drop ink restoring pickups everywhere, some of which respawn, as well as making bosses drop said pickups. It's still possible to get into an Unwinnable situation, so they gave you a redo option on the pause menu, which returns you to a nearby place.
  • Omega Labyrinth Life features multiple convenience features for fans of dungeon crawlers, the Mystery Dungeon variety especially:
    • Though you lose all items and equipment upon death in a dungeon, before diving in you can pay for a GPS tracker to be attached to your most valuable equipment. You need only pay twice its value in Omega Power to get it back from the shop.
    • There is a dedicated button to move and attack diagonally. While it can be iffy if your character is in a T-intersection and can't attack through walls without a 2-tile reach weapon like the lance, it does make maneuvering easier.
    • While holding down two buttons, you can have the characters move at hyper-speed down a track, until they hit an intersection, an enemy, or a dead-end. This particularly helps as some connecting paths between rooms can get very, very long, and especially the smaller labyrinths within the labyrinth.
    • After the first few chapters, you unlock Fairy Mode, which gives you absurdly higher Omega Power per run than a regular crawl with the main characters, without having to worry about setting of traps or hunger, at the cost of being forced to use the fragile fairies Nem and Pai, who have to keep their distance and use their long-ranged attacks to survive most encounters. They also have access to room-clearing skills, should you find yourself surrounded by enemies.
    • Size Ups can be skipped, and unidentified items processed in batches for even more efficiency. Sets of items of the same unidentified title will cost the same as identifying one, regardless of enchantments or quality.
    • The lengthy Full Blooming minigame can be skipped for a respectable sum of experience points and some Essence.
  • Phantasy Star I gave players the ability to save anywhere, but also had instances where the game could be rendered Unwinnable by Mistake, and if the player had the misfortune of saving after making a mistake that made the game unwinnable, they would be forced to start over from the beginning. To that end, Phantasy Star II replaced the ability to save anywhere with save points in cities and towns; while it would add more time to advance the game when loading a save, the player was less likely to put themself into an unwinnable situation. The ability to save anywhere would eventually be restored in Phantasy Star IV, which had far fewer ways to make the game unwinnable.
  • In Resonance of Fate, losing a battle gives you the choice of restoring your last save, restarting the battle over for a modest fee, or (where this trope kicks in) restarting the battle with a full Hero Gauge for ten times that fee. Ponying up that amount of money can smart, but when the alternative is running an entire dungeon again and hoping you don't lose as many bezels this time, you'll be happy the option is there.
  • Riviera: The Promised Land allowed you to retry a boss again and again, cutting out some of their HP until they reached 25% of their original life. A family of Palette Swap Bosses also blow you away if you anger them in the battle... And you can go back and engage them again after walking back to their screen, with the HP you whittled away from them never regenerating, and only your rank and reward suffering.
  • Fail a (fairly simple) multiple-lights puzzle enough times in Shadow Hearts: From the New World, and Johnny will simply kick in the doors it was locking.
  • Secret of Evermore allows you to skip the entire opening cutscene and Prolonged Prologue, thus skipping directly to the jungle and the start of the actual game, once you have played through it once and saved on a different file.
  • The various Shin Megami Tensei games have as a central mechanic the fact that you can fuse demons/Personas together to get new, more powerful demons. However, in Devil Survivor and the Golden version of Persona 4, you can look up fusion combinations for certain demons instead of working it out with a fusion chart and a guide. In both of these games, you can also choose inherited skills instead of leaving it up to the whims of the Random Number God.
    • In the Golden Ending version of the second Kudlak/Kresnik battle, Kaido joins you as an NPC ally. However, you have to let Mari (also an NPC ally) deal the finishing blow to the boss, or he Comes Back Strong and kills her in an unavoidable cutscene later. If Kaido would deal the finishing blow, he instead beats him down to 1 HP, making it very easy for Mari to finish him off.
    • Devil Survivor 2 couples this with Developers' Foresight. Unless the player follows Daichi's route, one has to fight against Daichi and Io at one point. And Io has a One-Winged Angel form by channeling Lugh, which she will use partway through the battle, and the only way to unlock Lugh as a potential Fusion, is to defeat Io in this form. Fortunately, if the player or a party member accidentally ends up defeating Io before she channels Lugh, she gets back up and does so, anyway.
      • The game has Death Videos that foretell a person's death, but without telling them where or when it happens. If the player receives such a video and cannot unlock the event to save a party member's life in time (whether accidentally or on purpose), that party member is dead and unavailable for the rest of the playthrough. However, if one of those party members played a vital role in another party member's Fate Events, their role is replaced by a different party member, meaning the player is not locked out of completing surviving party members' Fate events.
    • Persona 3 Portable gave the player selectable difficulty levels, with a second one new to this version: There's still Easy for those familiar with the game who didn't want too much of a hassle, which gave you 10 items that revive your party and restore all your HP and SP upon death, and in addition to that, there's also Easier Than Easy Beginner, which gave you 30 of them.
      • Even without taking difficulty into consideration, Portable takes a load off the player in many ways, with the biggest two being that the player can now assign direct commands to the party, whereas before (and infamously), the party was strictly A.I-controlled, with the player's choice of tactics often unreliable, and in regards to the party's condition, they'd only get tired after a dungeon run (or if they were K.O'd within the dungeon and not revived on the spot), as opposed to having members get tired in the middle of a run. This basically adds to Tartarus guardian fights being much easier to deal with (their weaknesses cannot be analyzed) thanks to direct control, and you can do long Tartarus runs from the beginning of the game. Other examples of ease include the Police Station and the Antiques shop (both weapon and item shops) now being open at night, an area skipping menu during school/daytime segments (lifted from Persona 4), and skill cards, which can be replicated for free at Naganaki Shrine. All of these are perhaps why the Maniac difficulty was added to this game.
    • Persona 4 added a quick-move option to allow a player to skip between areas on the map, abandoned the reversing Social Links on a major level, and allowed a player to assume direct control over party members, all features lacking in the previous game. P4 also abandons the Tired/Sick physical conditions of P3, making it much easier.
    • Persona 4 Golden adds a whole lot more to the original P4's features, though weirdly it removes the save points originally present outside of each boss chamber in dungeons. (This isn't here to nerf the game significantly, since it's a minor inconvenience at most; a Goho-M item, which is easily buyable, and a bit of walking easily will take you to the last save point.)
      • The ability to "skip through" both animated cutscenes and dialogue sequences, particularly handy when starting a New Game+ or facing Kunino-Sagiri.
      • On a game over, restarting will allow the player to resume play on the same dungeon floor they died upon, rather than at their last save point.
      • Rather than needing to try and "catch" persona cards during Shuffle Time, which requires a combination of perception, memory and reflexes, all of the useful cards are immediately displayed for the player and the player can then manually select which one they choose. As part of this, Shuffle Time also lost the Blank Cards (nothing, but chance of getting an Arcana Card in either the upright or reverse position) and X-cards (lose all items, experience and cash received from the fight) and regained the Minor Arcana Cardsnote  from Persona 3.
      • In a New Game+ on Golden, you can select anytime what the difficulty is going to be like. As in going to Settings and manually change how much or little you get EXP, money, how badly you take damage, etc.
      • The aforementioned "fast travel" method now allows a player to immediately skip up or down a level once they have found the stairs in a dungeon, making it easier to get around.
    • Shin Megami Tensei IV has several features designed to ease new players in:
      • Unlike past games, you can now save anywhere so long as you can open up the Burroughs menu.
      • In the event that you haven't saved in a while and you fall in battle, Charon can revive you for a fee of either Macca or 3DS Play Coins. If you don't have enough of either, Charon himself has an AFF: He'll revive you anyway, and simply put you on a tab and charge you once you have enough Macca—just don't die again before you do, or it's Game Over as usual.
      • If you die a second time, the easier difficulty level "Fellow" is unlocked.
    • The 3DS rerelease of Soul Hackers has the Hack menu, which is essentially a set of sanctioned cheats: You can lower the difficulty level (or increase it), lift the alignment requirement for recruiting demons, give yourself full Analyze data for every demon, and give yourself full map data for every area.
    • In Persona 5, the guard command is mapped to the same button that's used to back out of menus, so in case you accidentally mash the button too many times, the game asks for confirmation when you select the guard command so that you don't accidentally waste your turn guarding. Also, once you reach the final dungeon, you can't go back to the real world. Since the players would have no other way to refill their SP once they run out of items, Lavenza can heal you at the entrance.
      • The game breaks up lengthy cutscene sequences with save points, allowing the player to take a break if they can't view it all in one sitting.
      • In previous games, you can only switch Personas once per turn, which means that if you switched to the wrong Persona by mistake, you were stuck with it. Now, you can switch Personas as much as you want until you use a skill, at which point the Persona is actually locked.
      • Persona 5 makes completing the Persona Compendium much more manageable without the need of a guide in multiple ways. Most importantly, Personas that the player has never fused before are marked as "New", whereas in the past if the player wasn't sure they'd fused said persona before they'd need to back out and search the compendium. Additionally changes to the fusion system allow the player to sort by result rather than brute forcing every possible combination or pay a fee to fuse Personas above their own level.
    • Persona 5 Royal adds multiple features on top of the vanilla game to make for a much less frustating experience in certain ways. The player is given much more freedom on certain nights where originally they only had the option to go to sleep, which allows faster Social Stat increases or more chance to make consumables for dungeon crawling.
      • Dungeon crawling in Mementos can also become much more rewarding thanks to the ability to purchase boosts to money, experience, and items earned from battle in Mementos. The soundtrack of Mementos has also been changed from a short and often tedious loop to a more dynamic theme that various from section to section, much like Persona 3's Tartarus.
      • Guns were often considered Awesome, but Impractical in the vanilla game, running out of ammo extremely fast if the player used them, and only able to be reloaded by a consumable with rare ingredients require to craft it. Guns were mainly used for hitting the handful of enemies weak to it, trying for critical hits, or using the Gun Fu skills from the Tower confidant. Royal changes guns to replenish their ammunition after every battle, allowing the player to use them more frequently without penalty.
      • After a rank-up event with a Confidant, that Confidant will often call/walk up to Joker for a brief conversation. Said conversation has a dialogue prompt in which the right answer is usually somewhat obvious, giving the player another opportunity to get points with the Confidant. In many cases, making the right choice can prevent the player from having to waste a session with the Confidant that won't result in a rank-up.
      • Royal also enables players to spend time with the twins, who reward the player with skill cards. Since the Twins' Confidant requires players to fuse Personas with certain abilities (e.g. a Shiisa with Frei), this can make completing the Twins' Confidant much easier.
  • Sands of Destruction has a segment called the Cave of Memories, in which you must visit the rooms containing Kyrie's memories of the adventure in reverse order that they happened. This can be problematic, as not every plot point is touched upon (particularly if you had to visit a certain city twice; only one visit is actually counted), and if you had put the game aside for a while, you may wonder Now, Where Was I Going Again? If you mess up, Kyrie will helpfully remind you what he did before and where you should go next.
  • South Park: The Fractured but Whole:
    • In the quest involving helping Gay Fish's mother get to heaven, you have to play a minigame that's basically Flappy Bird. Make three mistakes and its game over. Each failure gives you more health to play with, though on the second try, you get five hits and on the third try, you get fifteen (at which point you have to go out of your way in order to lose).
    • If you can't figure out Mitch Conner's obvious riddles, The Coon will eventually just tell you where to go with a frustrated voice tone.
  • In Super Mario RPG all EXP gained before death is retained to cut down on Level Grinding, but everything else is reverted to their original states since your last save.
  • Super Robot Wars has you retain all exp and money earned on gameovers while bringing you to the intermission screen with a few variations in parts depending on the game. One of which is a possible penality of missing out the SR Point/Battle Mastery for the level, with games without such things, you can retry all you want until you finally beat the level. It's also well-known some players intentionally abuse it to do some Level Grinding.
    • 2nd Original Generations has one level where you can literally max out your money and the level of Fighter Roar by destroying Jinrai clones. They will respawn as soon as all of them are scrapped.
  • In TaskMaker, you can invoke a hidden spell to toggle certain options, such as the stepping sound your player makes when moving, the "ooph" sound for running into a wall, and the appearance of random monsters. You can also toggle whether or not the game automatically saves whenever you enter or exit a dungeon or town, which can be helpful for a quick revert if you die. The Tomb of the TaskMaker makes those options more easily accessible, and adds a further feature in that you can buy hint scrolls to help you if you're stuck on any task in the game's Fetch Quest.
  • Undertale
    • In general, the game will skip certain cutscenes you've seen before. For instance, you can skip Mettaton's opera scene if you've seen it at least once (Mettaton will note that you look bored and ask if you want to skip ahead). If you die while facing some bosses, the game will let you skip the first part of the boss battle in favor of going straight to the meat of the fight when you retry. This applies across all future playthroughs, too, so you don't have to see the cutscene if you already know what's coming.
    • On a No Mercy run, a save point will appear right before the room where you encounter Undyne the Undying, which does not appear in any other kind of playthrough. You're probably going to need it.
      • The introduction sequence of Undyne the Undying is extremely long, but if you lose to her and reload, it thankfully becomes much shorter (unless you quit the game, then do it again, in which case you'll get the full cutscene again the first time around).
      • On a non-NM run, an NPC will give you a cellphone upgrade that allows you to access your Dimensional Box at any time instead of at set points throughout the underground, and give you access to a second Dimensional Box. You won't get the upgrades on No Mercy; however, the Dimensional Box will appear at a few extra points in the late game to compensate.
    • Temmie will give you the option to buy "Temmie Armor" if you pay for her college degree. The armor is prohibitively expensive, and Temmie openly admits it's a Game-Breaker. However, the price of the Temmie Armor will drop every time you die, so if you need it as a last resort, it's there.
    • The fight against Photoshop Flowey is brutally difficult at first, but there's several segments that serve as checkpoints once you clear them so that you can start from there if you die. Dying to the boss in the first stage has him taunting you before forcing the game to close itself, but the taunting is completely omitted if you die after one of the checkpoints and the game just shuts down right away.
    • If you lose to Papyrus, you survive with 1 HP and he locks you in his shed, which is easily escaped. If you fail to him three times, he gives you the option to skip the fight.
    • The "don't step on the leaves" puzzle in the Ruins will eventually turn the entire floor solid if you fall too many times.
    • If Papyrus's snow puzzle is too hard for you, you can talk to him repeatedly and he'll eventually reveal that you can just press a switch on a nearby tree to solve it. Interestingly, pressing the switch before talking to him and then stepping on the switch that marks the puzzle as "finished" will cause him to react as if you had solved it properly.
  • A Very Long Rope to the Top of the Sky: The Major Update increased the rate of random item drops, as well as making it possible to disable Random Encounters from the very beginning. One wonders how many players Rage Quit during the first forest, without these features. Additionally, from the very beginning, there have been ways to easily regenerate MP, without the need for a Save Point or Healing Spring.
  • Vagrant Story has some rather fiendish Block Puzzles in the late-game areas and the Bonus Dungeon. Fortunately, the game includes an item called Faerie Wing which, when used, boosts Ashley's running speed and jump height, allowing some of the puzzles to be made easier or bypassed entirely.
  • The World Ends with You has difficulty levels that unlock as the game progresses, and that you can switch between whenever you're out of battle. Great for if you're just trying to beat the game, but switching between different difficulty levels is also necessary to get some of those Rare Random Drops. Additionally, if you get a Game Over, you have the option to retry on Easy so you can complete the battles easily without the punishment of escaping (which results in a drop in Sync Rate if done consecutively) or going back to the title screen (which erases any unsaved progress). In Final Remix, the Game Over screen will also include an option to set different pins to attack with instead of forcing you to go back to the title screen and lose all your progress since your last save, in case you were caught off-guard by an actually difficult enemy while grinding.

    Shoot 'em Ups 
  • Bubble Tanks had Level Drain as a mechanic- when you killed enemies, you collected their bubbles as experience points. However, if you took any form of damage, you would lose experience points depending on how strong the attack was. Thankfully, if you get hit one too many times in an area, the next unexplored area will usually contain harmless Pinata Enemies who cannot attack and tend to drop a lot of experience bubbles.
  • Radiant Silvergun lets you keep your weapon upgrades when you die or continue. Saturn mode in the Sega Saturn version will even keep your old weapon upgrades when you start a new game.
  • In Star Fox 64, the boss of the planet Zoness can only be beaten with Nova Bombs. Ran out of bombs on your flight through the level? No problem — the missiles the boss shoots at you each produce a bomb when shot.
    • Likewise, in Star Fox: Assault, the boss on Filchina can only be destroyed by shooting a bomb into it. The tons of enemies it spits out drop bombs more often than not.
  • The Scarlet and Netherworld teams in Touhou's Imperishable Night have special abilities that help prevent wasted bombs: Scarlet drops an extra bomb item if you die while still holding one or more, and Netherworld gives you an extra bomb if you finish the stage with fewer than the starting three. Normally, bombs held at death are just lost.
    • Undefined Fantastic Object and Ten Desires from the same series do something similar for all characters: if you die with more than the starting two bombs, you keep the extras (including pieces).
  • If you lose your last life in Judgement Silversword while a 1-Up is on the screen, the 1-up turns into your next life.
  • Bullet Hell games by CAVE will intentionally slow down if there are a lot of bullets on the screen, to allow the player to more easily navigate patterns; this carries over to their ports, even on platforms that can take way more punishment than the original arcade hardware, such as the Xbox 360. As a result, it can come off as a shock when a game doesn't feature it; the North American Xbox 360 release of Deathsmiles initially had watered-down slowdown compared to its Japanese-release counterpart until a patch put the original slowdown back in, and the Windows port of DoDonPachi DaiFukkatsu has no slowdown at all in its Arrange A mode.
  • Gradius:
    • In games with high-speed stages, if you get killed in one you'll always be taken back to just before your ship accelerates, and there will always be at least two enemies that drop powerups so that you can get the two Speed Ups needed to get through the stage. If there is a checkpoint in the middle of the high-speed zone, you'll always restart slow so that you can pick yourself back up. In Gradius V, which by default respawns the player where they got killed (although checkpoints can be turned on in the options menu), the scrolling will slow down for a few seconds to let you get the necessary Speed Ups.
    • In Gradius Gaiden, having 2 players present (the game uses simultaneous multiplayer, unlike alternating play like in other games) changes the respawning system from checkpoint-based to just dumping you back into the stage with one less life. To alleviate the fact that dying removes all of your powerups, dying causes you to explode into 5 powerup capsules so you can get back on your feet. Do note that those powerups are available to the other player, and nothing stops a particularly rude partner from just swiping those capsules to delay your recovery.

    Simulation Games 
  • In Crimson Skies, if you fail a mission repeatedly, you get the option to skip it.
  • Disney Magic Kingdoms offers daily rewards for playing, including a character and attraction for 30 days. Luckily, missing a day doesn't completely reset the rewards counter, just missing out on the reward for that day (in this case, a day of Magic).
  • In Harvest Moon: A New Beginning the player unlocks the Multiplayer/Wi-Fi feature of the game. This allows the player to trade items and interact with other players' animals while there. This is not only a great (and fast) way to obtain animal produce from animals you have not unlocked yet, but also a way to obtain items that you won't unlock until much later in the game, like the infamously necessary Yam Seeds.
  • The Hunter: Call of the Wild:
    • Tracks are highlighted a color of your choosing, which takes a lot of frustration out of the game by making it easier to locate animals, so less time is spent wandering aimlessly and you're less likely to lose a animal that didn't die immediately when it was shot. They also can be turned off for players that prefer a more realistic and difficult experience.
    • At night time, you can turn on a flash light so you can actually see what you're doing and don't have to stumble around blindly in the dark. Animals mercifully don't spook or react to it.
    • Animals don't appear to react to the loud sound effect a bow makes when unloading an arrow when switching to another weapon, avoiding frustration if you happen to change your mind about what to kill it with.
    • Need Zones. Animals visit certain areas each day within certain time ranges. This is useful for when you are trying to hunt specific species, such as for a mission.
    • Many missions are location based. You can select them on the menu and it will highlight the relevant zone on the map. Being that the maps are very gigantic, this is almost necessary.
  • I Can't Believe It's Not Gambling is a parody of lootbox-based microtransaction games. Since it doesn't actually have microtransactions (lest it fall victim to Poe's Law and be exactly what it's making fun of), the "game" part of this lootbox simulator awards an actually substantial amount of the currency you need to buy more boxes.
  • In the browser-based nation sim Politics And War, if you lose a war against another player, the game would puts you in "beige mode". In beige your nation can't be attacked by other nation, but you will receive some income penalty.
  • The Sims:
    • In the original The Sims, advancing up one's career ladder requires your Sim to have a certain number of friends. For example, reaching the level ten job in the politics career track, Mayor of Sim City, requires a whopping seventeen friends. This is made even more difficult by the fact that relationships degrade by a few points every day regardless of what you do, and once the relationship score falls below a certain threshold, the friendship ends and must be restored. It's very difficult for a working Sim to have enough time to form and maintain so many friendships. However, the friends requirement is actually household friends, not personal friends, meaning that the friends of all the people in the working sim's household count toward his friend total. A classic strategy is to have one Sim work and a second to do all the socializing.
    • In The Sims 3, fulfilling your Sim's daily wishes earns you Lifetime Happiness points which can basically be used to buy anti-frustration features. You can make it so that your friendships decrease much more slowly over time, or various other needs of your Sim do not decline or decline much more slowly, among numerous other perks. Essentially, you are rewarded for keeping your Sim happy by making it easier to keep them happy in the future.
    • NRaaS Industries is a mod group for The Sims 3 that specializes in ironing out mechanics and streamlining the game's coding in order for the player to have a more enjoyable experience. Some examples include preventing Sims from re-reading the same book, allowing groups to enter movie theaters (when only individuals can enter at a time in the vanilla game), and preserving wishes so they can never disappear before they're fulfilled/erased.
    • In The Sims 4 expansion pack, Get Famous, it would seem that the developers had some foresight as to how easy to acquire and annoying some fame quirks could be. For example, the Vain Street quirk that famous Sims have a chance of getting whenever they interact with a mirror which causes them to need to look at themselves in a mirror frequently, or else they'll become tense. In the Acting career, practicing in front of a mirror and as such getting this quirk is pretty much inevitable. No need to fret, though. In the Rewards Store, there is a cheap Quirk-B-Gone potion that only costs 250 Satisfaction Points.
  • Trauma Center:
    • During one mission in the first game that requires you to work on five Kyriaki patients, if you've got at least three of them done and run out of time, the backup team takes over and you move on... so long as the patient who you were working on when time expired survives. If that patient dies, you don't get this relief and the Medical Board will be notified.
    • Also when you to work on a Pempti patient, you're given a special high-powered laser. Gameplay-wise, this means the laser never breaks or needs to cool down and you can fire it for as long as you like. Given how much you need to use the laser on Pempti, this is definitely necessary.
  • In Wing Commander IV: The Price of Freedom, the map that you could pull up to navigate around your home ship also has markers to indicate where a conversation can be had with another character, after players complained that in Wing Commander III some plot conversations were missed because the player had no indication that they even existed, if they didn't have a guide book or website to point them out.
  • In Hay Day, you can only have a single one of most types of buildings, but since a smelter takes several hours to produce an item, you can buy up to 5 smelters.
    • Also, regardless of when you buy your smelters, any mastery star benefitsnote  you build up from using the first one are automatically applied to all the smelters you buy after that.
    • In the valley, you spin a wheel with numbers from 6 to 10 to determine how much fuel you get for free every day. Even getting the lowest number ensures that you still have enough fuel to visit a few houses.
    • The notice board is where NPCs can post orders for you to fill. These orders don't have a time limit, and if you can't fill an order for some reason, you can ignore it or delete it with no penalty besides having to wait 20-30 minutes for a replacement order. Similarly, NPCs asking for individual items will not leave until you either give them the item or tell them that you don't have it. So if you don't have the item, you have all the time you need to harvest or produce it.
    • When buying something with diamonds (a premium currency that is difficult to get in-game), the game interface gives you a "tap again to confirm" so you don't accidentally hit a button and waste diamonds when you didn't mean to. If you like buying things with diamonds, you can adjust the settings so that you only have to press a button once to buy something with diamonds.
    • When fruit trees and bushes die, they can be revived once by another player after their owner puts a "!" signpost next to them. But some players have very big farms that make it hard to find signposts, so trees with signposts will also visibly shake and rustle to alert a visiting player that they need to be revived.
    • If an item in your shop isn't bought after a certain amount of time, Greg (an NPC) will automatically buy it. (Items can't be returned to your inventory after you put them up for sale.)
  • Yes, Your Grace:
    • For the first eight weeks, Eryk doesn't need to worry about feeding his army. Considering that it's also impossible to keep the army from being huge for a few weeks, then lose the bulk of it, having to feed it during that time would make the game unnecessarily frustrating.
    • One important questline involves buying at least two items from two different merchants who come to the throne room. If everything needed from each of them is purchased from them on their first visit, neither of them are ever seen again. If Eryk forgets to get something from them, they both visit a second time.

    Sports Games 
  • In Mario Tennis Ultra Smash, you can use coins you earn after playing matches to unlock star stats, characters, courts, harder COM difficulty & Amiibo Training Mode if you find any of the achievements to earn them hard.
  • MLB: The Show is supremely friendly towards player customization and accessibility for all skill levels and types, from gameplay to presentation, so that the game can be complex or as simple as a player demands without compromising the whole experience:
    • Having trouble fielding or baserunning, or simply don't want to do it? There's an option for the AI to do that for you.
    • Want a simpler 16-bit style approach to hitting, fielding, and pitching over the modern day meters and mechanics? There are independent options to turn each of those into an old-school aim-and-press-X mechanic.
    • Want a quicker game? You can turn off all the presentation flairs like camera cutaways and even the AI delay between pitches.
    • Players can save mid-game and finish it later if they need to be elsewhere, simulate half-innings (if the player just wants to hit or pitch), full innings (if the player wants to skip to crunch time), and to game completion.
    • Hitting and pitching have separate difficulty levels and sliders, so players can find a sweet spot for both stages of the game independently. The game also offers dynamic difficulties for both, where the game will slowly raise or lower the difficulty level batter by batter depending on how well/poorly the player is doing. Even the scale of how much the game auto-adjusts difficulty can be adjusted.
  • Punch-Out!! for Wii features an interesting rule: if Little Mac loses 100 matches, he is allowed to fight with protective headgear. Unfortunately, this rule applies to all boxers—and after KO'ing the 1-99 Glass Joe for your first fight, he's your first opponent when you're defending your title, and he's got the same headgear.

    Stealth Games 
  • Splinter Cell:
    • Though the light mechanics are largely realistic, if exaggerated to keep the game from being too difficult, with Sam being completely visible in broad daylight and completely invisible in pitch darkness, the game only takes into account the light around you in order to not be too frustrating. Even though you in the shadows would still logically be visible to a foe if there was a source of light behind you to be silhouetted against, that foe won't be able to see you because, as far as the game is concerned, you are in the shadows.
    • As of Chaos Theory, you're no longer subject to the three alerts rule which would cause you to instantly fail a mission if you were spotted three times. Now each time you are spotted cumulatively increases enemy diligence and patrols, and while this can potentially render the level so difficult you'd be better off just restarting, the mission is still possible and you're free to power through. There are still occasional missions where being spotted causes a game over, but there's always a mission-specific reason for it.
  • Thief: The Dark Project had a level named "The Lost City" that could be rendered Unwinnable if Garrett jumped a certain gap before retrieving a lever and extending the bridge to be able to cross back. When Thief Gold was released, in addition to some other changes, the lever and bridge were rendered mostly moot by a hallway that had been added to allow the player to return to the previous area with only a small jump.

    Survival Horror 
  • Titles such as Alien: Isolation and The Evil Within offer the ability to decrease the difficulty level mid-campaign. So if you're feeling overconfident and take a harder difficulty on your first playthrough only to get the floor wiped with your mangled corpse over and over, you can drop the difficulty down to normal for the rest of the game (you cannot, however, raise the difficulty midway through.).
  • Speaking of, Alien: Isolation gives you three options when you're killed. 'Load Current Save' which takes you back to the last time you saved, 'Load Previous Save' which takes you back to one save before your last save, and 'Load Mission Save' which takes you all the way back to the beginning of that particular mission. This three-tier method of keeping saves makes it almost impossible to end up in an Unwinnable by Mistake type scenario, since it is for all intents and purposes impossible to not have at least one save you could go back to that would put you back in a winnable state. It also allows you to be a little more liberal with ammo and supplies since if you save after bombing through all your ammo you may be able to go back to a save where you still had some.
  • Clock Tower: The First Fear has the Quick Start option, which skips the intro cutscenes, starting Jennifer in the main foyer after the girls have gone missing and the lights have gone out. Since Multiple Endings is a massive part of the game and you'll need to play through numerous times to see them all, this saves you from having to sit through the introduction events over and over. This feature was inexplicably absent from Clock Tower, forcing players to play the Prolonged Prologue every time they wanted to challenge one of the game's twelve endings much to the chagrin of those familiar with the earlier game.
  • In Cold Fear, saving takes the form of scripted checkpoints that occur right before a Difficulty Spike or That One Level. Chances are that if the player gets a Game Over, it's never too far away from the last save.
    • Tom gets half of his health back before the Final Boss so that the arduous fight is not rendered Unwinnable by arriving with low health.
  • Dead Space: When your health meter is glowing red, killing the necromorph that's trying to pull your face off will usually cause it to drop a health pickup (although whether or not you survive that long, especially if it brought friends, is another matter).
  • In boss battles of Eternal Darkness, the Dutch Angle is the only sanity effect that will trigger. Everything else, which would very likely interrupt your chances of survival, won't start triggering again until the boss has been defeated.
  • Fatal Frame:
  • Five Nights at Freddy's 2: During most of the Phone Guy's call on the first night, the music box won't wind down at all until after he's explained its significance in order to keep unsuspecting players from getting jumped by the Marionette before they know why.
    • The game also gives you unlimited electricity in order to alleviate the game's cranked-up difficulty. You'll still have to worry about the flashlight, but if it runs out of battery juice, it doesn't translate to sudden death like in the first game.
  • It's impossible to lose on the first night of Five Nights at Freddy's 3, which was done as a way to show players that not every jump scare causes an instant game over anymore.
  • Five Nights at Vault 5:
    • The game autosaves every in-game hour. In addition, the game will wait with autosaving if you are currently in immediate danger.
    • The doors are modified to allow you to close them also by aiming at the empty space, not just the tangible bits (something that can't be done with any other doors in Fallout: New Vegas).
    • Your radiation is always cleared at the start and at the end of the night.
  • The only section in Outlast where there are absolutely no enemies, besides the very beginning of the game, is the one in which Miles also doesn’t have his camera and can’t see in the dark. When he gets his camera back and realizes he’s surrounded by enemies, the game actually waits a few seconds for the enemies to notice you after the Scare Chord plays so Miles can get a head start.
  • In Silent Hill, if you run out of bullets at most times, you're in trouble, but if you run out of bullets in the last boss fight (or simply enter with none in the first place) the boss keels over dead straight away.
    • Ditto for Silent Hill 2. Upon entering the boss without any ammo, the game then becomes a timed battle, with the boss dropping dead upon the timer running out.
  • In Silent Hill: Homecoming, if you die and get sent back to an Auto-Save checkpoint, the game will restore you health to 50% if it was below that amount at the checkpoint. This prevents the game from being unbeatable if you end up check-pointing at almost no health with no healing items left.
  • Silent Hill: Shattered Memories addresses the biggest complaint fans had about the lack of combat by letting the player take on puzzles without interruption from Raw Shocks, as they never appear in rooms where a puzzle has to be solved (save for one which involves taking pictures of things in Raw Shock territory).
  • While Siren is notoriously difficult in that it lacks any form of radar or real-time map and often limits your field of vision with darkness or fog, it does offer a few caveats to make it a bit easier:
    • When you are spotted by a Shibito the screen will briefly flash red and give you a split-second glimpse of what the enemy sees, not only warning you that you've been spotted but also giving you a hint to their location and what they are armed with. Also, you can tell a Shibito's status by sight-jacking them: normal color means they're unaware of you, a vague red tinge means they are aware of your presence and are searching for you, and an overly red tint means they know where you are and are actively pursuing or attacking you, akin to Metal Gear Solid's infiltration, caution, and alert phases.
    • When escorting Harumi Yomoda in the school, she can be ordered to hide in closets while the player goes ahead to clear the area before returning to collect her. She is also immune to firearms, as the bullets will not register a hit on Harumi.
    • No matter how much noise your companion makes, with their voice or footsteps, nearby enemies will remain undisturbed.
    • Not all Secondary Objective Keys are required to complete the game. There are some missions that can still be completed even if you missed an important key item in past levels.
  • Soma in a later patch added a "safe mode" that allows players to explore the dystopian setting with death disabled. Monsters can still attack the main character, but he will be only temporarily knocked unconscious and any danger will move away before awakening. Developers wanted to give an option "without risk of failure", since, using the words of a reviewer, the game's sense of existential dread is driven more by dialogue and story arcs than jump scares or murderous opponents.
  • Vanish: The game will never spawn more than one moleman at a time in order to prevent getting stuck in one area or cause an unwinnable situation. They also will not follow you into the smaller tunnels, making them safe spots. Finally, they are blind, so they can walk right past you if you stand still and stay close to the walls.

    Tabletop Games 
  • In The Dresden Files official RPG, thaumaturgy can take a long time to set up and involves a lot of rolls, with one bad roll meaning catastrophic, instant failure. The core rulebook advises that you forgo the rolling entirely if it's either (a) a small spell where the failure wouldn't do much; or (b) a hugely plot-important spell that's necessary for the plot to move forward. Its general rule is summed up as, "Don't roll unless failure would be just as interesting as success."
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • Resurrection mechanics mean Death Is a Slap on the Wrist for a Player Character that's been around long enough for the player to get attached to. 3rd Edition made death more survivable by removing the Constitution-based chance for a resurrection to fail and render a PC Deader Than Dead. 5th Edition downgraded the Resurrection Sickness side effect from a Level Drain to a temporary penalty on dice rolls. 3rd and 5th Editions also have the Revivify spell, which avoids most Resurrection Sickness penalties as long as it's cast immediately after the character dies.
    • 3rd Edition removed the worst frustrations of the Level Drain mechanic. In earlier editions, monsters with Level Drain applied it with every hit, items and spells that blocked the effect were extremely rare, and drained levels could only be regained the hard way. 3rd Edition replaced this with a "negative level" debuff that disappears after a day and/or can be removed with status-healing magic.
    • Earlier editions' Vancian Magic limited low-level spellcasters to a handful of spells per day, after which they became a Squishy Wizard that was all Squishy and no Wizard. 4th and 5th editions mitigated the low-level weakness of spellcasting classes by putting the most basic of spells into their own "Level 0" tier of spells called cantrips. These cantrip spells can be cast an infinite number of times per day, and often have effects that scale with character level to prevent them from being Useless Useful Spells.
  • Mage: The Awakening: Spells with blatantly supernatural effects usually risk a Magic Misfire where the universe notices you're breaking the rules. Most Healing magic is an exception, which one sourcebook Lampshades and suggests is a gift from benevolent Atlantean mages who ascended to the Supernal Realms in The Time of Myths.
  • Pathfinder introduces several anti-frustration features compared to its predecessor, Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 Edition:
    • The cost of several resurrection spells is downgraded from permanent Level Drain or Constitution loss to a "negative level" debuff that lasts indefinitely but can be removed with healing magic, so a resurrected character is no longer stuck lagging behind the rest of the party.
    • Primary Spellcasting classes have at-will use of their lowest-level spells and gain extra abilities specific to their school (if Wizard), domains (if Cleric), or bloodline (if Sorcerer), mitigating the small amount of Vancian Magic available to them at low levels.
    • Experience point costs for certain spellcasting and Item Crafting are replaced with expensive Eye of Newt components so that the spellcaster's level progression isn't delayed and the costs can be shared amongst the party when appropriate.
    • Instead of an Experience Penalty for dipping into multiple Character Classes, characters declare a "favoured class" and gain access to a range of minor bonuses for leveling up within that class.
    • The Cleric class's role as The Medic is supported by a "Channel Energy" class feature, which simply heals everyone within a certain radius (and can be fine-tuned to avoid healing enemies) and isn't drawn from the Cleric's limited pool of spell slots.

    Third-Person Shooters 
  • In Gears of War 2, there are parts where you have to use your Lancer's chainsaw bayonet to cut through obstacles blocking your path. No worries if you drop your Lancer to pick up another gun, though, as there is always a Lancer on the ground somewhere near the obstacle; though these Lancers are always nearly depleted of ammo so as to not provide players that DID keep the Lancer with an unfair ammo advantage, and to help players realise that you don't shoot the obstacle.
    • Found in the first Gears of War game, where any time you absolutely need a Hammer of Dawn to progress, one will be found somewhere nearby. This is made even more obvious by the fact that two will be found side by side. This is even more required to avoid headaches than the obstacles in the sequel. The Lancer actually has some motivation for you to keep it, but the Hammer of Dawn is a worthless piece of trash when you're out a boss fight that needed it, since the satellites always seemed to be out of alignment shortly after completion (or you had to go indoors).
    • On the other hand, when you do get the chance to use the Hammer on ordinary Mooks (for example, when a Seeder is protected by a Mook Rush) it is awesome.
    • The game makes the final bullet in each magazine do extra damage. This helps reduce the chance that you will be caught reloading while trying to kill an enemy, as well as increase the number of One Bullet Left moments a player will experience.
  • Max Payne:
    • In the first game, the final scene is unwinnable without a Grenade Launcher (or any other explosive) and a sniper rifle. And just in case you run out of ammo, the final group of Mooks has two guys who wield just those two weapons. You'd wonder what use are they in THAT situation...
    • In the third game, in some cases your health will reset to full if you die and need to go back to a checkpoint, even if you were on the verge of death when you trigger it. Keep dying and you'll get additional painkillers and ammo, just in case shortages are the problem. Also, for most of the Achievements/Trophies where you have to kill a certain number of people during a scripted Bullet Time sequence, there will be a checkpoint immediately beforehand, allowing you to retry immediately rather than slog through part of the level first. The sequences will also give you Bottomless Magazines with no need to reload, but rate of fire remains the same so you're out of luck if you only have a slow-firing handgun.
    • During the third game, Last Man Standing ignores body armor or ammo straps. You can shoot at an enemy anywhere to get back up, as opposed to needing a headshot as Max is falling.
  • The Ratchet & Clank series lets you retain all the experience for your weapons and maximum HP if you die. Plus, you've got an infinite number of lives, so dogged persistence will eventually get you through any part of the game.
    • Two skill points in Ratchet & Clank: Going Commando require playing levels under strict conditions. "Old Skool" requires defeating the enemies in the Testing Facility using only weapons from the first gamenote  while "Wrench Ninja II" requires completing the trek to the Megacorp Games on Joba using only the wrench. Luckily the challenges are much easier than you'd think - by finishing the levels normally then returning to the planet at a later time the number of enemies in these locations are heavily reduced.
    • A Crack In Time features puzzles that make you use several recordings of Clank to stand on multiple switches to open the door to the next section. If you fail enough times, the game will give you the option to skip the puzzle, but you won't get any bolts.
    • In Into the Nexus and Ratchet & Clank (2016), if you have a low jetpack fuel level (blinking red, beeping), staying on the ground for a few seconds will cause you to generate a little bit of fuel so you can get to a refueling station and get a full tank.
  • Whenever a situation arises in Sniper Elite V2 that requires a lot of bullets to solve, you will always have nearby a box with a full refill for your sniper rifle, just in case you've managed to run out to get to that point.
  • In the first Splinter Cell game, the final step of the final level requires you to snipe the Big Bad with a head shot. Fortunately, there is a magazine of rifle ammunition conveniently placed on the railing of the balcony from where you need to take that sniper shot, and his may be the only body the player doesn't have to worry about hiding.
    • In Conviction Sam has infinite pistol magazines, and picked-up weapons "magically" gain any upgrades that the player's already bought for them.
    • While Sam may only have one Mark and Execute token (granted by performing a melee takedown) at any given time, in several areas with multiple enemies there's often a lone enemy guard in the vicinity or earlier in the level whose position is relatively isolated, allowing for a stealthy takedown before having to deal with those remaining guards. For example, the second level practically frontloads them: a guard in the nearest corner of a low wall surrounding the mansion may be taken down from above without the two guards at the front door noticing, while soon afterward a guard looking out of an open window can be dragged out to his death without the guards in the adjoining rooms overhearing the kill... and quietly opening the door nearest to the middle of the room reveals another lone guard leaning over a railing with his back to the door, who can be taken down quietly without any of the guards downstairs or in the adjoining rooms noticing.
      • The Persistent Elite Challenges do not have a difficulty requirement, so for example there's no in-game penalty for attempting a "no detection" run or a "no firearms use" run on the lowest difficulty setting instead of a higher one, and there are only two co-op challenges but while other challenges are mode-agnostic.
      • At the very end of the single-player story, if you actually want to hear the Big Bad give a Motive Rant, he'll walk into melee range least three times and strongly hint on the third one that he's about to wrap it up and execute Sam if you don't take that last chance.
  • In Warframe, if you fall into a Bottomless Pit, you will be automatically brought back up with no penalty aside from losing any buffs or abilities you had active on your frame when you fell, such as Rhino's Iron Skin.
  • In Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine, when your game autosaves it doesn't save your health. If you die with a sliver of health left after the autosave, you revive with full health.
  • The final boss in The Warriors can only be defeated by throwing a knife at him after you get his health down a certain amount. If you managed to fudge it up, the boss will send mooks after you with knives.
  • Uncharted makes liberal use of checkpoints, especially in platforming sequences and gunfights. Typically if you do a "milestone" of sorts, the game will mark it as a checkpoint. Unfortunately, gunfights are likely to kill you more often than the platforming sequences. Also, during the segments where you have to shoot while hanging from something, if you run out of ammo, the game will give you enough for another clip. This way, you're never helpless.
    • In Uncharted 4 and Lost Legacy, your companion characters will not be spotted by enemies even if they are right in front of them, as long as the player is still in stealth and has not yet alerted the enemies themselves. This makes it very unrealistic, but the alternative would leave a player pulling their hair out.
  • Splatoon:
    • Splatoon has a subtle version of this in matchmaking. According to Word of God, the servers try to match players who like to paint more together, and players who like to kill more together, allowing players who are focused more on painting up the level some degree of relief from those who are just out for a good K/D ratio.
    • In the first game, losing a Ranked Battle will cause your ranking to drop, even if one of your teammates got disconnected early on (which is a big disadvantage as you're now outnumbered). This no longer happens in Splatoon 2, and there is an in-game message telling you of that too.
    • In Splatoon 2: Octo Expansion, if you have less than 100 CQ Points (needed to enter levels and purchase continues), one of the characters will give you a loan of 3000 CQ. You can finish the campaign while in debt, and the only restriction the game places on the player for not paying it back is the inability to use the train station vending machine.

    Turn-Based Strategy 
  • The seishin search menu, first added in Super Robot Wars Gaiden, lets you select multiple pilots with the same seishin and activate them all at once in Shin Super Robot Wars. This is a big improvement over past SRW games where you could only activate one seishin at a time.
  • Deadlock requires the player to carefully balance income and morale; most actions that'll bring in money will affect morale negatively, and a demoralised population will refuse to work, decreasing your income, not fixing damaged buildings and generally making the situation miserable until you stop doing whatever it is that made them angry - usually at the cost of income. Newbie players who can't get the hang of morale management have an anti-frustration option at their disposal: choosing the Cyth race, which has morale permanently stuck at 90%. While this means you permanently give up 10% of your workforce, it also means you can tax the remaining 90% to within an inch of their life and they'll just pony up the cash without complaint - or contact the resident black-market traffickers for a boost in resources and/or research without suffering the massive morale hit you usually get when your dealings are inevitably discovered.
  • Disgaea D2 adds a lot of features that make the grind much more streamlined:
    • There's a Cheat Shop that lets you adjust EXP, HL, Mana, and Weapon Mastery gain by shifting one of the rates to another, and you can increase your gain by clearing special maps. You can also make enemies stronger or weaker freely from there. No more having to pass a bill every time you want to adjust enemy levels once.
    • Speaking of bills, you also don't have to pass a bill to add higher level gear to the shops. That's now done by progressing through the game. Also, their stock is no longer randomized, so no need to reload to buy basic items in bulk, but there's still a way to buy randomized gear.
    • And speaking of items, item rarity values are standardized to three tiers instead of being abstract numbers and you can upgrade an item's rarity if you put some time into it. Also, there's no more "Item Bag" and you now have access to all your items anywhere.
    • Passing spells between characters is much easier. Apprenticeship is no longer locked to the character you used to create them. Now you can assign any character to be an apprentice then learn their spell off of them freely.
    • There's now the option to Promote a generic unit to a higher tier after they've leveled up, instead of being forced to reincarnate to change their class.
    • You can now Throw things diagonally however you please. Previously, you had to use a jank method of pressing the button to throw in between changing the direction, which was imprecise to say the least.

    Virtual Reality 
  • In Job Simulator, if you accidentally throw or drop a task-critical item outside of the play area, it will teleport itself back into the play area automatically, preventing you from having to restart.

    Visual Novels 
  • In Doki Doki Literature Club!, you can normally only skip dialogue you've already seen from loading a save from a previous day. However, the player can skip through part of Yuri's event in Act 2 even if they haven't seen it before. After Yuri kills herself with a butcher knife, the player can freely skip the hundreds of paragraphs of Corrupted Data that don't say anything important.
  • Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Dual Destinies adds a whole bunch of featutes:
    • Your partner give advice if you keep screwing up a cross examination by flat out telling you which part of the testimony is false, but you still have to use your own brain to figure out what piece of evidence contradicts the testimony.note  If you happen to lose a trial, you can opt to try again on the part you screwed up with a fully restored life bar, which helps curb on Save Scumming.
    • A stenograph-like record of the last few dozen lines that were spoken, so if you zone out and miss a bunch of dialogue, or are forced to save and quit and come back at a later time, you can look over the past several lines to re-initiate yourself with the context.
    • A to do list for investigations, which flat out states when you need to present evidence to characters.
    • An option to fastforward text despite not having seen it yet.
    • A chapter select to get right to the fun parts when replaying.
    • Moving between investigation locations no longer requires going to all the locations on the way, preventing a lot of maze like wandering.
    • Hotspots in investigation locations now have a checkmark like the discussion topics to avoid repeating dialog.
  • Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney – Spirit of Justice retains most of the above features, but tones down the significance of the hint mechanic. It is only accessible under circumstances where you've already been heavily penalized, and the feature can even be disabled entirely.
  • Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney: Hint coins are extended to the trial segments. They will lock out a majority of the wrong answers and flat out reveal the correct spot for spot the image problem questions.
  • Danganronpa:
    • Both the original game and the sequel, Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair, let the player continue from wherever they left off in the trial upon running out of influence, to prevent them from having to go through all the other deductions that they've already solved (with the main penalty going to their score more than anything else). Danganronpa Parody hangs a lampshade on this.
      Makoto: Kind of takes the edge off it though when you realize that no matter how many times you lose, Monokuma will just let you carry on.
    • Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc: Obtaining all of the Free Time Events for all of the characters in the original release, while not difficult, was incredibly obnoxious since a single playthrough of the lengthy visual novel allows for a maximum of 19 events out of 65. Since the events unlocked new abilities, the best way to see all of them and get the rewards was to restart the first chapter over and over again, skipping through the large amount of dialogue on the way to the Free Time periods (and even then, there was one character whose events were unavailable in Chapter 1). The sequel introduced Island Mode, a time management post-game minigame that would allow you to quickly access all of the Free Time events and even obtain an "Island Mode Ending" for each character (essentially a bonus Free Time Event). This minigame was retrofitted into the Updated Re-release of the original game under the name "School Mode".
    • In Chapter 4 of Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair, the player ends up having to solve several puzzles in a locked room. If the player's unable to solve the puzzles (and they are pretty difficult), they have two options: either talk to Monomi about the current puzzle, where they'll blatantly tell her what the solution is; or, they can skip the room entirely and go the the next major scene, only losing out on some bonus Monocoins.
    • Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony adds the option to start a chapter from the first Free Time period, making it easier to get the Friendship Fragments, especially for Kaede's events, which cannot be gotten in Love Across the Universe, the game's equivalent of Island/School Mode.
  • After obtaining an ending in Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, the player needs to play through the game from the start, including the very first room, which becomes a drag even though they have the option to skip through dialogue they've already seen. The sequel, Virtue's Last Reward, presents the player with a flow chart of events so they can revert to any point in the story after getting an ending (or at any point in the game, for that matter). This feature then becomes a plot point. The flow chart function was then added to the Updated Re-release of 999.
  • Several events in Zero Time Dilemma take the form of a Luck-Based Mission. The player is encouraged to savescum their way to the desired outcome, but to prevent excessive time wasted rerolling, the game will rig one of themnote  in the player's favor after a few attempts.
  • In Murder by Numbers (2020), Easy Mode lets you complete most puzzles easily and without penalty, though you can't unlock all of SCOUT's memories that way.

    Wide-Open Sandboxes 
  • Dead Rising 2: Off The Record has a slew of features that address grievances with the original Dead Rising 2 and the first game, such as:
    • Since Frank himself needs Zombrex, instead of someone else, he can inject it himself whenever he needs a dose, instead of having to run back to the Safe Room.
    • Frank uses a Bluetooth earpiece instead of a walkie-talkie, allowing him to answer calls while keeping his hands free to protect himself.
    • Money is easier to obtain, particularly in Sandbox Mode. Considering one of the Case Files requires you to pay a million-dollar ransom, Sandbox Mode is almost necessary.
  • Elite: Dangerous is a space game that does not hold your hands and has a steep learning curve, but it has certain features to make it more fair:
    • If your ship is destroyed, you can rebuy the same model and all of your modules for 5% of their original price.
    • In the case you don't have enough credits for the aforementioned ship insurance, you can make a loan to pay for it. Your loan limit is based on your current rank and 10% of all your earnings is deduced until you finish paying up the loan, but you still have some coverage against permanently losing your ship and upgrades in case of lack of money.
    • You can activate a flight assist, which helps the ship to move in the desired direction at the desired speed, by countering your thrusters so speed and direction are maintained. Without it, thanks to the mostly accurate Newtonian physics that the game uses, if you accelerated, you would keep accelerating until you made a thrust in the opposite direction, or, if you turned, you would keep spinning until you applied a thrust to the other side.
  • In Fallout 4, the inhabitants of your settlements can be set to various tasks while in Workshop Mode, but early on, unless the settler was standing right next to their job, it was nigh impossible to figure out what it was, or whether or not the settler even had a jobnote . A few months after release, Bethesda released a patch that places an icon on the screen, telling you their job. This cut down on the really annoying tendency to assign settlers tasks when they already had one to do.
  • Grand Theft Auto:
    • Grand Theft Auto: Vice City has the mission "Death Row", which is unique, as it is the only mission in the game that gives no monetary reward for completion. As compensation, however, the enemies drop significantly larger sums of cash than normal when killed, ensuring that you will at least get something out of the mission.
    • In Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, the final story mission, "End of the Line", has CJ blast his way through a giant crack fortress, take out Big Smoke, escape said crack fortress, and chase Tenpenny, who is in a fire truck. If the player fails during the driving sequence, the mission starts there for future retries.
    • Grand Theft Auto IV: The Lost and Damned added mid-mission checkpoints for the first time in the series. This meant that players no longer had to replay entire missions, which often began with a long driving sequence.
      • Whenever Johnny invites one of his friends to an activity, the other two will automatically tag along, thus enabling you to maintain your relationship with all of them at once. This new feature is also present in Grand Theft Auto IV: The Ballad of Gay Tony.
    • In Grand Theft Auto V, if you fail to complete a multiple-ending mission with the ending you wanted (e.g. "Unknowing the Truth"), you can go back and do it properly. This is particularly useful because said mission deliberately tricks you into not doing it properly.
  • In Just Cause 3, there are 2 trophies/achievements that require the player to liberate a base in a particular way ("...Without Bullets!" requires you to destroy all of the Chaos Objects without using weapons, grenades, or bombs; just your Grappling Hook, while "This was Supposed to be a Western" requires you to break all the Chaos Objects without getting out of your vehicle). So, are you screwed if you've liberated all of the bases? Nope, because upon beating the game, you gain access to the Re-Oppression feature, which allows you to reset almost any location in the game to the default state, meaning that all of the enemies, Chaos Objects, and other such things come back, allowing you to try again as much as necessary.
  • L.A. Noire has an option to let you skip an action sequence if you fail it three times in a row, along with letting your partner drive to a destination you set to avoid bad driver penalties, or as a form of fast travel.
  • Red Dead Redemption:
    • The game is quite open-handed with its autosaving, automatically securing any sidequest you may have completed. Finish a Stranger mission and then get mauled by a cougar on the way back to town? When you respawn, you'll see that the mission is still complete. As a bonus, if you don't like what happened (for example, if you unwittingly made a really bad moral choice), the autosave is on a different file in the HD than your manual save.
    • The bandana also counts in some situations. For example, one of the Sharpshooter challenges requires you to shoot the hats off two people. It's very easy to shoot them in the head and kill them by accident, netting yourself negative honor and a bounty on your head. But if you're wearing the bandana, these consequences are negated.
  • Saints Row:
    • The series in general is good about teleporting the player when they find themselves trapped. Notably, it has a "Warp to Shore" feature when in the water, to prevent the player from having to look for a way out of the water.
    • In the "Veteran Child" mission in Saints Row 2, you have to use flashbangs to separate the eponymous boss from his human shield Shaundi. Don't have enough? Well, VC was kind enough to leave some lying around.
      • When Saints Row IV has you relive that fight in Shaundi's simulation, they let you just shoot them with a taser to separate them.
    • In Saints Row: The Third, in the one mission Oleg (who can't ride in most cars) joins you that involves vehicular travel, the game is very generous in spawning utility trucks. Even then, it will waive the normal failure condition of abandoning followers, having him catch up and rejoin you at the next objective without penalty.
    • Saints Row IV has the Warden fights. These end in a minigame where you have to repeatedly hammer one of the buttons to move up the progress bar while the system tries to push it back down. While the pushback speeds up as the game goes on, if you lose and get spat out, it will slow right down for your second attempt.
  • In The Simpsons: Hit & Run and The Simpsons: Road Rage, if you fail a mission five times, it lets you skip it. However, Hit and Run doesn't allow it for the final missions, preventing many from finishing the game. Unfortunately, doing so also skips the cutscenes you see after completing the mission, resulting in some confusion (for instance, skipping the last mission of the first stage of Hit and Run will make you have no clue why everyone stopped suspecting Mr. Burns or the black vans).
  • In Sleeping Dogs, when Wei Shen is at less than half of his original health (or a quarter of his maximum possible health) and not taking damage, he will regenerate health until it reaches half of his original health/a quarter of his maximum possible health. Filling the Face Meter in combat and/or consuming foods can regenerate his health past that point, while entering one of Wei's apartments will immediately break off combat and sleeping will immediately restore Wei to full health.

    Other 
  • M2's SEGA AGES series of ports on Nintendo Switch normally just require you to tap A to navigate the menus, but for more significant actions like exiting the game, resetting the game, or reverting settings to default, the game will require you to hold A for a second so that you don't perform such actions by mistake.

    Non-Gaming Examples 
  • Some "mud run" obstacle courses have a few challenges that can be skipped for the sake of attendees that aren't physically capable of doing them.
    • In the Spartan Race obstacle course, if you fail to complete an obstacle or choose not to attempt it, the race requires you to do thirty burpees (a push-up followed by a jump) before you're allowed to move on. However, you have the option to skip certain obstacles without penalty if failing the obstacle could be potentially dangerous, such as a rope climb or a net ladder, where your strength giving out partway up would mean a very long fall.note 
    • The Tough Mudder race has an obstacle called the Warrior's Carry, where you have to walk a certain distance with someone else on your shoulders in a fireman's carry position. Should you be unable to carry someone or be carried through the obstacle for whatever reason, you can just run through Warrior's Carry without stopping by yourself, and it will still count.
  • The Google Chrome browser will mark tabs playing sound with a speaker icon, so you can quickly pinpoint and silence tabs that are suddenly playing music. Firefox also does this as of November 2015, and further allows users to mute the tab directly by clicking the speaker icon there.
    • Many browser improvements over the years have been designed to avert frustration. Gone, for example, are the days when accidentally closing your browser or tab meant that you lost a huge post you were writing in an input field, and Chrome's practice of separating each browser component and tab into its own individual process means that one misbehaving component probably won't crash your entire browser. (Although browsers still close the entire app when the last tab is closed, instead of opening a new tab. Firefox has an extension that helps this, but it requires that another tab be pinned to the browser.)
  • Additionally, say you click on a YouTube video and tell it to open in another tab (or quickly swap to another tab). The video won't play until you click on the tab.
  • Web browsers eventually filtered out the feature that makes a user go back a page when pressing the Backspace key. The "Go Back" command was changed to Alt + Left Arrow, which is much harder to do by mistake and prevents accidental data loss when typing a long post.
  • In the book Heir Apparent, there's a hidden 'cheat' in the titular virtual reality arcade game that makes the game easier to play, causing the NPC characters will act out of character to help the player's avatar if the player starts to cry. As the game is designed in-universe for a young audience, the player crying would mean that they are likely stuck and getting extremely frustrated, hence the game drops some of the difficulty to help them out.
  • Some Friending Networks like Facebook and Twitter will prevent you from making the same post in a short amount of time, so as to prevent one from double-posting by accident.
  • The "Restore Previous Session" in Mozilla Firefox allows you to re-open the tabs in your previous sessions with most unsaved changes kept, in case you want to read them again or accidentally exit the browser. Chrome has a watered-down version; so long as you haven't shut the computer off beforehand, you can use the History submenu to recover your last session.
  • In baseball, runners are allowed to run past first base and still be considered safe, as long as they come back to the base fairly quickly. This means batters can run at full speed and try to beat the throw, without worrying about being called out or slowing down to stop exactly on the base. However, since this only applies to first base — more specifically, to tagging first base without "rounding" it (i.e. turning to run towards second base, as opposed to continuing to run straight ahead) — runners have to be careful when trying to go to second or third.
  • In many email clients, if you type "attached is/are..." in the body of the email without actually attaching a file and then hit "Send," the client will point this out, then ask if you want to attach anything before the message is sent. The client may also point out if you left the subject line of an email blank, since many spam filters block emails without a subject.
  • Windows 9x will force a restart if you press CTRL+ALT+DEL twice. Windows NT-based versionsnote  instead bring up a menu of choices and no longer force-restart your PC if you mash CTRL+ALT+DEL, in the event that your machine is stuck.
  • Some SMS apps on Android, such as Evolve SMS, allow you to include a delay when sending a message so that you can cancel sending the message if you catch a typo in your message.
  • With some portable music players and music player apps on tablets and smartphones, if your headphones are unplugged (or whenever you get a call, obviously) whatever song is playing will automatically pause, so you won't suddenly get music blaring out of the speakers and annoying everyone around you if they're unplugged accidentally.
  • Games Done Quick: Runners are allowed to use savestates for tricks that could result in the game crashing, softlocking, or otherwise cause a massive loss in time that could kill the run.
  • Discussed in Outside Xbox's "6 Ways Games Tricked You Into Thinking You're Awesome".
  • Golf features the "Unplayable Lie" rule, to deal with situations that can arise where playing the ball as it lies is practically impossible to do in a way that would make any progress at all. Once a player has located his ball, he can unilaterally determine it to be unplayable, which offers him three options. First, he can take a drop within two club lengths of where the ball lies, no closer to the hole. Second, he can take a line that connects the flag stick with his ball, and take a drop as far back along that line as he wishes. Finally, he can go back to where the previous shot was played and drop the ball there (or place it on a tee if the previous shot was the tee shot for that hole). To prevent obvious abuse, all of these options cost a one stroke penalty, but can still be the best option if attempting to actually play the ball as it lies would result in MORE strokes due to whiffs or having no clue where a stroke could potentially send the ball.
    • Players can mark the position of their ball on the putting green with a coin or the like, in order to get their ball out of the way of players farther from the hole, who usually play first, who might also have a closer ball in the way of where they intend for their ball to roll. Before this one would have to putt around another player's ball, or chip over it (which could damage the greens), and suffer stroke penalties if a shot played from the putting surface hit another ball on the putting surface (this penalty remains, but being able to mark your ball makes it largely irrelevant).
  • Educational institutions (primary schooling, college, etc.) have a few, because instructors that aren't Sadist Teachers want their students to learn but also want them to pass, as "fails a lot of their students" is generally considered a mark of a poor instructor.
    • Instructors may ignore the grade that's based on your assignment and test scores in favor of giving you a higher grade, often if they believe that you've made enough of an improvement in understanding the course material over the academic quarter/semester/year. For example, if you needed a 70% to pass the course, but you got a 69.9% and your last two tests were 95% each, they may just give you the pass as if you got a 70.0% anyways. Or even bump you up to a B instead of a C.
    • This is why grading curves exist. Instructors may see how their students are doing on their coursework and adjust the requirements for each letter grade accordingly if the instructor feels they were initially too harsh on their students.
    • Some instructors will opt to drop the lowest-graded assignment you have from your course grade calculation. This is usually seen with instructors who grade entirely based on tests with "no making up missed tests for any reason" policies.
    • At many colleges/universities, you are not required by law to attend your classes (whereas skipping school in primary schooling without a valid excuse is always met with consequences). While instructors often frown upon skipping, and may include penalties per class if you do miss one, there's nothing legally saying you have to attend. Many students with learning disabilities (including those who are great at learning new information on their own but not in a classroom or lecture hall environment) see this as a boon.
  • As of October 2018, Fox began to feature an ad-break timer to let the viewers know how long the breaks will last until these programs like The Simpsons and Family Guy return.
  • Once in a while, when you check into a hotel, you may be offered a complimentary upgrade to a better room type. This is usually because the room type you reserved ended up with an overbooking (which can happen if the hotel's reservation systems receives reservations in rapid succession, as the various interlinked systems can take time to communicate with one another and say "hey, we're out of rooms, don't allow reservations of this type to our hotel anymore") and the hotel would rather take the loss than make you pay extra because of something that's entirely not your fault.
  • Many Pee Wee and Youth sport leagues feature a House Rule where a team's score stops being increased if they get too much of a lead over their opponents and keep scoring. For example, if the limit was five and the Red Team was leading 6 to 1 and kept scoring, their score would remain locked at 6 until the Blue Team scored a goal and closed the gap, then Red could score again and go up to 7. This is to prevent the trailing team from getting so frustrated by getting their butts handed to them that they rage quit and/or lose all motivation.
  • The Los Angeles Metro Rail allows for free transfers up to two hours of using a one-way pass. This is a lot more fair to passengers that need to make more transfers while commuting, and also more economically feasible to those commuting longer distances.
    • This is a fairly common feature in many urban transit systems. London's rail network doesn't feature a transfer time limit, but transferring between stations close enough to each other (typically within a 10 minute walk) will count as a single journey for the purpose of fare calculation. Also in London, the "Hopper" fare valid on buses and trams claim that it allows free transfers up to 60 minutes after your first journey, but in actuality it is up to 70 minutes to give customers a small grace period.
  • The Nuzlocke Challenge in Pokémon has two core tenants: if a Pokémon is knocked out, it can no longer be used, and you can only catch the first mon you encounter in each area. The second one has developed a few universally-accepted caveats:
    1. If the Pokémon you encounter is one that you already have, you may elect not to catch it and try again. This is to stop the party being glutted with early-game Com Mons with no variation.
    2. If the Pokémon flees, it doesn't count as the one encounter you're allowed in an area, since wild Pokémon running away is rare and beyond your control.
    3. If you encounter a shiny Pokémon at any time, you can attempt to catch it, regardless of where and when you found it. The chances of encountering a shiny Pokémon are so unbelievably small (about 1 in 8000 for most games) that it would be a shame to not try and catch it.
  • Whenever Chopped requires the contestants to make an ice cream component, a second or third ice cream machine is provided. This is because ice cream makers must be cleaned between use (more time than contestants realistically have), so this avoids making the round Unwinnable by Mistake.

 
Feedback

Video Example(s):

Alternative Title(s): Anti Frustration Feature

Top

Feel free to start-scum

Cradle of Empires does not penalize you for [[SaveScumming restarting a level before you have made any moves]]. (However, it will not refund any resources that you paid to enter the level if you choose to exit outright. Also, [[GuideDangIt the game does not outright tell you about any of this]].)

How well does it match the trope?

5 (1 votes)

Example of:

Main / AntiFrustrationFeatures

Media sources:

Main / AntiFrustrationFeatures

Report