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Logical Weaknesses in video games.


  • Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown: The Arsenal Birds defend themselves with a Powered Microwave Dome when threatened (well, that and a veritable swarm of Attack Drones). The shield has two weaknesses, though:
    • The PMD isn't a true Deflector Shield, it uses microwave radiation to prematurely detonate warheads and keep adversaries outside range for inert weapons. The last gun of Stonehenge is a railgun designed to shatter or deflect meteor fragments outside the atmosphere. The single massive, inert projectile it fires effortlessly penetrates the dome and destroys the first Arsenal Bird.
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    • A microwave field that size guzzles an immense amount of power. The main reason one Arsenal Bird keeps circling the Lighthouse even after the drone AI has effectively gone rogue is because it's hogging an entire orbital solar plant's microwave-transmitted output to keep itself juiced up. Having already been leaning on its PMD in desperation, when this link is cut, the attackers have it dead to rights.
  • Ashes of the Singularity: Post-Humans travel via quantum transmission, but if someone finds a way to block those transmissions, they can keep Post-Humans out. This eventually happens when Mars sets up quantum jamming across then entire planet which might as well be a solid titanium shell as far as the PHC is concerned.
  • Bendy, the Big Bad of Bendy and the Ink Machine is a soulless cartoon demon brought to life through magic. Thus, his old animator, Henry has to go up against him. However, Bendy cannot be harmed by any conventional means. So how does Henry end his cartoon? With the end card.
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  • BioShock and its sequel are set underwater. Apart from the "one-two" punch of slugging Splicers while they're stunned from Electro Bolt, you quickly learn that shooting an Electro Bolt into a pool of water makes for a very effective attack against most splicers. The "most" qualifier notes another Logical Weakness: you can't use an elemental power against a Splicer already imbued with the same power — their Required Secondary Powers protect them from your attacks as well as their own. Electro Bolt is also a logical attack to use against the electrically-powered defenses of Rapture (cameras, turrets, and bots), allowing you the chance to get close enough to hack them. BioShock Infinite preserves most of the logical effects with its electric Vigor, Shock Jockey. Shocked enemies take more damage and using it in water or in combination with the water-based Vigor Undertow are recommended.
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  • The Blood-Starved Beast in Bloodborne is easily distracted by pungent blood cocktails. You know, cuz' she's starved for blood and all.
  • In Bloons Super Monkey, the player's weapons come from one of five categories- Darts, Boomerangs, Explosives, Magic and Tech, and each of them have a corresponding bloon type they can't affect:
    • Darts and Boomerangs can't penetrate the thick-shelled Lead Bloons.
    • Magic, which consists of fire- and lightning- based spells cannot affect Ceramic Bloons since Ceramic is heat-resistant and is usually a terrible conductor of electricity.
    • Tech, which consists of light- based energy attacks can't affect Glass Bloons, since they are transparent and reflective.
  • "Riot" zombies in Contagion wear bulletproof armor. One efficient way to take them out is with melee weapons of any kind or explosives, exactly the kinds of harm that bulletproof armor fares poorly against IRL.
  • In Deus Ex: Human Revolution, the Final Boss is protected by a bullet and explosion proof glass shield, meaning you normally spend the bulk of the fight trying to get the shield down. However, glass still allows light to go through it. Lasers are made of light. If you have a Laser Rifle handy, you can end the fight pretty much instantly.
  • In Devil May Cry 3, you'll find that most of the bosses-and some of the regular enemies-are weak against elemental Devil Arms.
  • In Digital Devil Saga, Earth attacks are "shielded" against by flying enemies; see the Pokémon Ground-versus-Flying example above. This is one of the few logical immunities in the series.
  • In Disco Elysium all of your skills have the potential to be double-edged swords — the higher they are, the more they shape your thoughts and control you. What begins as advice can eventually become a compulsion, restricting what dialogue options you can choose in certain circumstances or just becoming overbearingly loud compared to the other skills.
  • Dwarf Fortress: Forgotten Beasts and Titans made out of fluids may seem like a cool concept, except they can take about as much damage as the material they are made out of. The result is giant blobs of grime, smoke, or water getting torn apart with one punch by a single, untrained dwarf. Just like how easy it is to splash water around with a simple punch. On the opposite end, Beasts/Titans made of metals are among the most dangerous entities in the game, especially if that metal is steel.
  • In The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Forsworn Briarhearts are semi-undead cultists whose hearts have been replaced with the magical herb briarheart. It's actually possible to pickpocket the briarheart, which will kill them instantly. But unless your sneak and pickpocket skills are high enough to get past their enhanced hearing, it's much easier to just fight them head-on.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • Some surprisingly-logical tactics have been introduced in the Final Fantasy games starting around IV. For example, such as harming undead with curative spells and items, or killing them completely with anything that causes resurrection, such as a Phoenix Down or casting a Life spell.
    • A stone based monster in Final Fantasy IX can be killed instantly by using a Soft on it, which is normally used on petrified allies. The game states that the monster "became too soft to live". There's even an entire area of stone-based enemies that are susceptible to this tactic. The boss at the end is a reanimated petrified tree, and can be instantly killed with Soft OR Phoenix Down.
  • Corrin, the player avatar and main character of Fire Emblem Fates, has dragon blood so dominant s/he is able to turn into one. Consequently, they're weak to anti-dragon weapons, even if they aren't using their dragonstone, or even if they've changed to a class that can't transform at all. Also, any children Corrin has will inherit the weakness, even if they don't inherit the transformation.
  • The "Poacher's Day" event in Granblue Fantasy reveals the weakness of Tweyen/Song, who is known to have an extremely strong sense of sight, capable of seeing far distances with clarity. As someone with such great visual acuity, it makes sense that she'd be somewhat photosensitive under direct sunlight... and that bright days out by the seaside, with tons of light reflection off the water, gives her so much trouble that she's practically reduced to the level of a totally standard archer.
  • Cole MacGrath from inFAMOUS is officially the first protagonist of a sandbox game that can justify his inability to swim. (In fact, he IS able to swim for a very short while, and he's perfectly fine if he steps in a small puddle, although if someone else steps in the puddle shortly afterwards they won't be so fine.)
    • Chain-link fences provide perfect cover from Cole's lightning for the same reason - electricity, by its very nature, follows the path of least resistance and gets grounded by those fences. Though one has to wonder why he can't simply climb the fence, especially since he's very skilled at Le Parkour. Does the fence suck the electricity out of him?
      • His inability to climb fences seemed to be a limitation of the game engine, since he got over it in the second game. His inability to shoot through metal fences, however, was shown to be completely diegetic, as he was rendered a sitting duck when he was trapped behind metal bars.
  • In Infamous Second Son, Delsin Rowe has Power Copying abilities that allow him to absorb the powers of other Conduits. Unfortunately, this means that he suffers from How Do I Shot Web? every time he absorbs a new powerset. The Big Bad tries to use this against him in her boss fight by letting him absorb her concrete powers, but he manages to absorb enough powers to fight back and beat her.
  • Kirby Star Allies has enemies with elemental weaknesses. Not all enemies have them, but those that do tend to be pretty obvious.
    • Whispy Woods, being a tree, takes more damage if he's attacked with fire abilities. You can even temporarily set him on fire and defeating him with fire leads to an alternative defeat animation that ends with him severely singed as he's doing his usual cry animation.
    • Kracko is a storm cloud that can call down thunder or rain. Its downpour attack is harmful to you, but also to it, as potent ice will freeze him solid while electricity flows upstream and hurts him too.
    • Francisca cools her axe so that Kirby and his friends can adhere to it when it is thrown; striking it with fire will melt the blade and make it useless. Likewise, her "soda gun" sprays water at a fast pace, but like Kracko, an electrical shock will fry her and leave her stunned.
    • Flamberge has a cannon with a powerful incendiary round she can load into it for exceptional amounts of damage, but the firing mechanism is linked to a fuse; put it out, and the incendiary will overcook and explode, with the resulting trauma knocking Flamberge out.
    • Zan Partizanne can use a trio of drums to help channel her electrical powers; striking the drums with water will trigger an electrolysis reaction, which causes the drums to overheat and explode, giving their user a massive headache.
  • Armors in Let It Die have their weaknesses mostly justified by their factions. D.O.D Arms are repurposed construction outfits like traincoat and work aprons which are resistant to elemental hazards but less so to regular attacks, War Ensemble are modern military gears which are great against projectiles but weak to slashing weapons, Candlewolf have fantasy armor really strong against slashing but less so against firearm and blunt weapon and M.I.L.K's gear are Blood Sport uniforms which give them resistance to blunt attack but not slashing.
  • In Magicka, while your characters are all Squishy Wizards already, you can shock yourself if you use electricity while soaked. Another logical sequence of attacks is to cast an ice spell on a soaked enemy, which will completely freeze them. Hurling a boulder on top of that will lead to Literally Shattered Lives.
  • Mario & Luigi: Paper Jam: The inhabitants of the Paper Mario universe take more damage from fire attacks because they're, well, made of paper. This extends to both paper enemies and Paper Mario himself. It even applies to paper enemies who use fire themselves, such as Fire Bros. and Fire Piranha Plants.
  • Often occurs in Mass Effect, due the hardness of the universe.
    • Spaceships use kinetic barriers that allow deflection of debris and mass accelerator rounds, but only up to a certain point. As their name also implies, they're kinetic barriers, and thus only effective upon physical mass; laser-based weaponry can bypass them completely but has yet to be developed beyond defensive weaponry.
    • Personal kinetic barriers are calibrated specifically to deflect small and high-velocity objects, but allow slower moving objects to go through ("so the subject can sit down without knocking away their chair"-gametext). This has led to special bullets that have different shapes and speeds than normal in order to be more effective against armor, as well as phasic and disruptor bullets that inflict part of their damage as electricity, which goes straight through shields.
    • Biotics have powerful Gravity Master/Mind over Matter abilities, but with the exception of the Asari (due to their reproductive systems and some Prothean genetic engineering), who have precise control over their nervous systems, any biotic who wishes to use their powers effectively have to have special implants. Also, since they use their own bio-electricity to fuel their powers, biotics who use their powers on a regular basis require greater caloric intake than normal.
    • Thanks to the Square-Cube Law, even with mass effect fields, the largest ships are unable to land on a planet. The Sufficiently Advanced Alien Reapers can get around this, but are still quite awkward on the ground. In addition, this makes their kinetic barriers far weaker.
    • The Salarians specialize in espionage and intelligence based warfare. Relying on crippling and removing an enemy's ability to fight before even officially starting a war. This dependence on preemptive covert action leaves them vulnerable to direct, prolonged warfare however, and also means they're not well-equipped to fight Reapers, who cannot be spied on or subverted, and who took them completely by surprise, so they had no chance for preemptive actions.
    • Similarly, the asari are considered to be on average the galaxy's deadliest combatants on a personal or small unit level, making them preeminent commandos and special forces, but due to the specialization in small-unit tactics they're at a disadvantage when it comes to large scale mass combat. Seen in the third game when Earth and Palavan are able to keep resistance against the Reaper invasions going for months (and the turians and krogan eventually drive the Reapers off Palavan) as humans, turians and krogan are more experienced in mass warfare. Thessia, on the other hand, falls to Reaper control within days or weeks.
  • The Mega Man (Classic) games often use this: Electric guys experience shorts when you stick a blade in them; fast guys are vulnerable to time stopping, and so forth. The Weapon Archive in 10 is a Puzzle Boss/Final-Exam Boss that requires you to know your Mega Man history and ask "Which of my weapons is most like what beat this guy the first time?"
    • Mega Man 8 has these for six out of eight Robot Masters. Clown Man gets tangled in his ridiculously-long arms if hit with Tornado Hold; Thunder Claw is the only safe way to bounce Grenade Man's bombs at him; Sword Man (who's fire-based) is left smoldering if hit with Water Balloon; Search Man lights on fire if you hit his bush hiding spot with Flame Sword; Astro Man, a neurotic (listen to his greeting), freaks out and can't move if you lock on with the Homing Sniper; and Tengu Man, a flying boss, is grounded by the Ice Wave (like how airplanes are grounded if their wings ice up). The exceptions are Aqua Man (weak to the Astro Crush because the force of it breaks his supply tank, forcing him to fix it) and Frost Man (blinded by the Flash Bomb because, being An Ice Person, light reflects too well off him causing Snow Blindness).
    • In some cases, though, it requires some advance knowledge of the boss to be able to figure out what to use. In Mega Man 10, why would Strike Man's weapon be the best to use against Sheep Man? Because the former uses the Rebound Striker (which bounces around due to being a rubber ball) and the latter uses the Thunder Wool. There's also Nitro Man's weakness to the Chill Spike, similar to motorbike wheels getting punctured by spike strips. In fact, while every boss in Mega Man 10 has weaknesses that fall into this trope, most require knowing just what the boss does.
    • In the games, if a Robot Master's main strategy involves abusing Collision Damage, they will probably be weak to shield weapons (3: Top Spin—which protects you while in midair—vs. Shadow Man, 6: Plant Barrier vs. Tomahawk Man, 7: Junk Shield vs. Freeze Man, 11: Acid Barrier vs. Impact Man. The only subversion appears to be 2, where Air Man's best known for his tornado projectiles yet is weak to the Leaf Shield).
    • The various weapons acquired in Mega Man 11 are this twofold to the Robot Master that they are ideally used against; both due to the nature of the weapon versus the nature of the target, and the way the target moves in relation to the weapon's attack pattern. Take Torch Man, for example; not only is he fire-themed and based on an object which carries his element, but he often tries to get in melee range of Mega Man, with his most powerful attacks coming from above. What works best? Answer 
  • Mega Man X also uses this. Ice bosses like Chill Penguin, Frost Walrus, and Blizzard Wolfang can't stand fire (fire melts ice), while Fire bosses like Flame Mammoth, Magma Dragoon, and Burn Dinorex are weak to wind (wind blows out fire). The Boomerang Cutter can sever Launch Octopus' limbs, making him unable to use some of his most powerful attacks, such as twirling around to suck X in and using his tentacles to leech X's life. Using it on Flame Mammoth cuts off his trunk, denying him many useful abilities, including his signature Fire Wave, for the rest of the battle.
    • Mega Man X4 has a notable example with the final boss' first form, a cloaked Grim Reaper Sigma. He's immune to almost everything and only vulnerable to the weapon/technique obtained from Magma Dragoon, since cloaks are flammable and said fire-based abilities will cause it to burn.
  • Metal Gear Solid:
    • Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater:
      • Colonel Volgin, the Big Bad, can generate and control electricity, and while some of his weaknesses are merely personality quirks, others follow logically from his powers: his electric bolts can be pulled away from their intended target by conductive materials, he can't use his powers in water without hurting himself, and as a Required Secondary Power, his body is highly conductive, making him a human lightning rod. The first two weaknesses can be exploited in his boss fight, and the last ultimately results in his Karmic Death.
      • The Pain has the ability to control a swarm of bees, and who you fight in a large water-filled cavern. It's possible to avoid his attacks entirely by diving into the water, weaken them by waving a torch or applying bug spray, and disrupt his bee-armor by throwing grenades into the water and splashing him.
    • The Man on Fire of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Being, well, a Man on Fire, he can be warded off by enough water, like a sprinkler system or Venom Snake's nigh-useless squirt gun. In the cassette tape "The Man on Fire's Weakness", Ocelot, despite expressing surprise at how simple it is to ward him off, nonetheless acknowledges that it makes sense.
  • At the start of Metroid Fusion, Samus needed to be injected with a serum containing DNA from the last Metroid hatchling in order to save her from the infestation of X parasites in her central nervous system. Since Metroids were the natural predator of the X, this enabled her to absorb the X on contact. However, she also inherited the Metroids' well-documented aversion to cold temperatures as a side effect from the injection.
  • The Gunlance from Monster Hunter looks very impressive but it has a major weakness. Because it is basically a multi-shot cannon on a handle with an oversized bayonet, the wear on the weapon from all the heat and stress is insane, causing the blade's Sharpness to rapidly deteriorate much more than an ordinary lance just used for melee.
  • In Mother 1, main character Ninten is an asthmatic, so anything that can trigger an asthma attack (like living cars belching toxic fumes at the party) will render him helpless.
  • Much of Pokémon's Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors falls into this. For instance, Electric-type attacks are strong against Water-types because water conducts electricity while useless against Ground-types (think "grounding").
    • This also applies to some other effects, such as how heavy rain will halve the power of fire.
    • Grass-types are typically weak to bugs since most bugs subsist on plants.
    • Similarly, Bug-types are typically weak to Flying types thanks to many flying types, being birds (and several flying type moves are bird based), are the natural predators of bugs.
    • Why are Pokémon with the Water/Ground type combination doubly weak to Grass? Because most plants need water and soil (Ground) to live. Similarly, Rock-types have trouble with the eroding power of water, not to mention rocks sink in water.
    • Fire-types are strong against Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel-types. Fire kills plants and bugs and melts ice and steel.
    • Dragon's weakness to Ice makes sense because dragons are typically reptilians, which aren't usually capable of controlling their body temperature. Grass-types can't tolerate cold temperatures very well, either - after all, cold temperatures can kill off plants.
    • Poison's weakness to Ground. Ever been in a chemistry lab (whether it's one in school or not) where kitty litter-like substances are used to absorb chemical spills? And it's useless against Steel (think stainless steel, a possible container for toxic chemicals, and the fact that poisons only affect organic matter, which steel is not).
    • Fighting does half-damage to Flying-types, because, well, it's kind of hard to punch a bird (and most birds are skilled at attacking their prey from above). It does no damage to Ghost-types, because ghosts are incorporeal. Then again, Ghost-types can't hurt Normals, either.
    • Psychic is weak to Bug, Ghost, and Dark types, all common phobias. It's hard to concentrate when you're frightened.
    • Fire-types are weak against Water-types because water puts out fire.
    • Fairy's weakness to Steel makes sense, considering the old legends that fairies are weakened by metal (specifically, Cold Iron). This same lore also shows them having power over Dragons (thus strong both ways against Dragons). Fairies are also commonly seen as symbols of pureness so are strong against Dark (natural guardians) and weak against Poison (taint).
      • An alternative interpretation of Fairy being strong vs. Dark and Dragon is the fact that in old stories, fairies are natural-born tricksters. They'd make any Dark-type look like a rank-amateur in trickery and out-perform them, possibly even turn their dirty-fighting against them. And as for Dragons? They may be some of the most powerful beings you can find in fairy tales, but the Fairy-types embody the very tropes of the tales themselves.
    • Another explanation for Fairy's weakness to Poison and strength against Fighting is based in fairies looking sweet and innocent. Since Fighting types are generally honourable warriors, they are likely to hold back against a foe that does not look evil. Meanwhile it is harder to keep up an innocent and cute appearance when Poison is making a Fairy look sick and unhealthy.
    • Fire's resistance to Fairy makes sense because fairies traditionally live in forests, which can be harmed or destroyed by fire.
    • Ground does no damage to Flying, because it doesn't make sense to manipulate the ground while your enemy is hovering in the air.
    • Rock however, is effective against flying, since it involves launching the rocks at the flier, and basically has the same effect as shooting a bird with a rock via a slingshot.
    • Ice and Rock are weak to Fighting. We've all seen those demonstrations where master martial artists use their hands, feet, and heads to break open blocks of ice and concrete, haven't we? Same with bending Steel.
    • Grass is weak to Poison...why? Weed-killers and herbicide are made to get rid of plant life.
    • Fighting is weak to Psychic, because of the old "brains over brawn" conflict. Also it's hard to hit someone when they're reading your mind and foreseeing your every move.
    • Rock and ice are weak to Steel, because metals, especially when refined into usable tools, are harder than stone and ice.
    • Flying is weak to Electric, because you fly in the air, which is where lightning comes from, so flying makes you especially vulnerable to it.
    • Why is Psychic strong against Poison? Either because the brain controls the immune system and can get rid of most illnesses and diseases (the "poisons" of the body) or it's symbolic of how common sense and learning can prevent poisonings from happening.
    • Why is there a Dark element? Primarily to present a surreal element: something beyond the realm of normal thought and existence. Thus why the paranormal elements, Psychics and Ghosts, are its natural strengths.
      • Dark is based more around dirty fighting and is Evil type in Japan (even though dark types can still be good, so we get a weird case of Evil is Not Evil). They're immune to psychic types either because Good Cannot Comprehend Evil or because A Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Read; they're advantaged against ghosts because the most threatening end for a ghost is demons (Houndooms?) coming to collect them; and they're weak against bugs because bugs are too stupid to be fooled or be evil, while fighting-types are too skilled to be tricked by underhanded combat.
    • Why are Dragon- and Ghost-type attacks strong against Pokémon of the same type? Basically, they're rare or strange enough that it takes one to know one.
    • Any Pokémon using Dig takes double damage from Earthquake and Magnitude. Makes sense given that being underground is generally one of the last places you want to be during an earthquake.
    • Why are ice types strong against ground? Same reason cities in temperate climates are often notorious for potholes. When water gets inside cracks in the street and freezes, it makes the crack expand.
    • The reason why Gust, Twister, and Whirlwind ignore Fly, Bounce, or Sky Drop's invulnerability effect is that they are manipulating the air. That also explains why the former two deals double damage as being in the air is the last place you want to be when a tornado or a hurricane is ongoing.
    • Any Pokémon in the rain or in the air are definitely going to be hit by Thundernote , as lightning strikes are common during rain storms and like the previous example, being high up in the air is a great way to be stuck by lightning.
    • Gravitynote  has such effects because it's going to be very difficult to move about if the gravity is higher, which can also make attacks more likely to land as the opponent needs more time between reacting to the attack and actually getting out of the way. Also, having high gravity negates Levitatenote  and the Flying-Type since trying to stay airbrone is very difficult under high gravity.
  • Alex Mercer of [PROTOTYPE], due to the way his offensive and defensive abilities are set up, and the fact that he absorbs people and thus incorporates their mass into his own, is literally too dense to swim. This is apparently true of everything that gets infected with either Redlight or Blacklight and is mutated, given that none of them survive being pushed into the drink. Though he can jump off the bottom of the East River because he sinks nearly as fast as he falls, but then again this applies to everything in the game, infected or not. Anything not capable of jumping like that dies instantly on contact with water.
    • However, despite his immense mass he can still glide along a decent distance. The in-game description states that he ejects biomass, propelling him in a slight upward trajectory. It also leads to some rather nasty Fridge Horror about the infection.
  • In Quake, using the Lightning Gun while in water is a bad idea.note 
  • The Combat Triangle of RuneScape nominally works this way. An armored melee fighter resists ranged attacks but is vulnerable to magic because metal armor conducts spells. Lightly-armored rangers can dodge magic attacks, but melee attacks go right through. Since mages wear only robes, they are vulnerable to piercing ranged attacks, but can prevent melee attackers from ever reaching them. Hybrid armor has none of these weaknesses, but also none of their strengths.
    • Exploiting this is also how you figure out how to kill Vampyres. The stronger Vyre can read peoples' minds to predict and avoid attacks. Like with Eneru in the Anime and Manga page, it doesn't do any good if the enemy has no idea where their attacks are going. The first method of getting past this is with a flail, since flails are extremely difficult for even experienced users to control, and therefore the wielder will have no exploitable knowledge of where the attack will come from. Weapons made of Blisterwood also bypass the mind reading by changing shape frequently outside of the wielder's control.
  • In the Shin Megami Tensei: Persona series, calling a Persona requires the summoner to speak the Persona's name. There is an ailment called "silence" which prevents the target from using spells, because spells require your Persona, which you can't call if you can't make a sound. Persona 5's "Forgetfulness" ailment fulfills the same purpose, since despite being able to speak the summoner cannot remember their Persona's name to call it out.
    • The protagonists of Persona 5 must know someone's name in order to find their shadow and steal their heart in the metaverse. With more information being required to infiltrate the palaces of especially loathsome individuals. So when the group goes after a secretive mob boss they are initially unable to do much. Later when they are targeted by Medjed, a group of anonymous hackers they are completely unable to retaliate and must recruit an expert hacker.
    • The weaknesses of many of the Personas themselves are based on their actual mythological stories. For instance, Yusuke Kitagawa's Persona Goemon is weak to fire because the original Goemon was boiled to death. The Persona Messiah is weak to dark (an instant-kill element) because his purpose is to sacrifice himself.
  • Soul Sacrifice describes the weaknesses of several Archfiends in their Librom entries. Quite a few of them make sense. The Harpy, as one example, was originally a massively overweight noblewoman; as an Archfiend, she's weak to fire because of how combustible fat is.
  • In Spec Ops: The Line, sometimes you have to get past a machine gun nest but aren't given flashbangs. Well, those gunners need a line of sight to shoot you, explosions tend to kick up a godawful amount of dust, normal grenades are plentiful, and there's sand everywhere. Do the math.
  • StarCraft:
    • The Overmind and its brood leaders, the Cerebrates, are all technically immortal; once they've received fatal damage, their tissue regenerates over a period of time and makes them whole again. However, their one weakness is Void Energy — the same energy used to create them — which is also utilized by the exiled Protoss Dark Templar. The energy causes them great physical and mental harm, and completely prevents their tissues from regenerating. The energy is powerful enough to even shock the Overmind vicariously through its cerebrates.
    • StarCraft II: Legacy of the Void - It turns out that The Khala, the greatest unifying force of modern Protoss society, is tainted by the fallen Xel'Naga Amon. He uses the Khala's telepathic links to corrupt the Protoss to do his bidding. Only by severing their nerve cords, like the Dark Templar have ritualistically done, can they be free and fight, though at the cost of feeling spiritually and emotionally isolated.
  • In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and Ultimate, Little Mac is an absolute beast when fighting on the ground, fitting for his Boxing Battler status; but the fact that he's a boxer means that his air combat is subpar at best, being barely able to land a punch or jump back to the battlefield.
  • In Undertale, Undyne is an anthropomorphic fish wearing a full set of armor. When she chases you into Hotland, she doesn't get too far before overheating and collapsing. In an interesting inversion, you can revive her by pouring water on her.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 2:
    • Mythra's Foresight ability allows her to predict how her enemies are going to move and attack. Most of the time, this serves to make her nearly untouchable since she always knows exactly what her opponent is doing. However, it proves completely useless against Jin due to his incredible Super Speed - his attacks are so fast that Mythra physically can't react fast enough to stop them, even though she sees them coming.
    • Blades don't produce magic on their own, but draw it from a Background Magic Field. So naturally, anything that removes ether particles from the atmosphere chokes them of their powers. Examples include Obrona's ether manipulation, a custom anti-Driver prison, Jin's ability to rob the area of thermodynamic energy, or the ether-adsorbing particles in the Spirit Crucible.
      • As a weakness of a weakness, Poppi produces her own ether internally from her Black Box, rendering her immune to many of these.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X:
    • Large enemies and machines are especially vulnerable to gravity-based attacks. The bigger they are, the harder they fall, after all. In addition, wearing bulky armor reduces your defenses against gravity attacks — it's heavy, after all.
    • Insectoids and Theroids are often vulnerable to thermal attacks. Living beings are vulnerable to Kill It with Fire, which makes sense.
  • In Total War: Warhammer:
    • Bretonnia is a kingdom that could be described as King Arthur gone wrong. Their army is built around Magic Knights on horseback, so while they do have a frankly superb cavalry selection, everything else in the army is subpar - their peasant infantry are too skittish and lightly armoured to be a reliable battle line, their archers can't reliably penetrate armour at range, they only have trebuchets for artillery support and their magic game is really nothing to write home about either. This means they can be very effective in open battle, where the Bretonnian knights can fully utilise their mobility, but in sieges they suffer greatly. The optional Peasant Reserve system adds another detail: as a feudal kingdom without a professional army, having too many peasant units causes economic penalties as they're out being the Redshirt Army rather than working the fields.
    • The Dwarfs are a daunting opponent on paper for many reasons: they are all the Pint-Sized Powerhouse, every single Dwarf is a trained fighter from the lowliest goat cheese merchant to the High King himself, and not only do they have some of the most advanced technology in the setting but they also go to war decked out in some of the finest weapons and armour in the Old World. However that heavy armour (as well as their short legs) means they are slow, and since their armies are also small, they can be easily flanked or enveloped. Being so slow also makes them vulnerable to cavalry and chariots; they have no cavalry themselves and their only unit that is effective at fighting cavalry are a mob of crazed Death Seekers who go into battle shirtless (after all armour is only worn by people who want to survive) and so drop like flies when the cavalry counter-charge them. Finally their precious armour doesn't offer any protection against enemies with Armour Piercing Attack, like Empire Handgunners or Orc Big 'Uns.
    • Monsters and Monstrous Infantry. They are usually very fast as well as very strong, and their heavy mass and devastating effects on enemy morale make them fantastic linebreakers, and no army can bring as many giant monsters as the Warriors of Chaos can. However Monsters also tend to be very large and thus an inviting target for artillery and missile troops, and they are also very expensive in an Elite Army where powerful but pricey infantry are the order of the day. Consequently Warriors of Chaos nearly always fight outnumbered. Also while the devotion of the Warriors to their Chaos Gods makes them fearless in battle, it also brings them issues with mass routs - each Warrior is only concerned with their own personal glory, and a charismatic warlord who can convince them that he is favoured by the gods is the only thing that can bring them together; if this warlord falls in battle then the warriors following him will be convinced that they have offended the gods somehow, their peerless convictions will melt like midsummer snow and they will flee the field.
  • The Abyss Watchers in Dark Souls III have a very nimble, hard-to-follow combat style that excels at getting around defences and striking hard and fast, but both in their boss fight and in regular gameplay with the Farron Greatsword, it has certain vulnerabilities: the lack of a shield makes it more vulnerable to ranged fire, the flips have long wind-ups and recoveries (in particular, the third off-hand attack is a flipping sword strike that leaves you extremely exposed), the inability to not one-hand the greatsword makes it extremely parriable, and its focus on mobility and speed means that fights on narrow ledges can lead to some easily avoidable deaths (not that you get to take advantage of this in the Watchers' boss fight arena, which is an empty rectangular room).

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