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Literature / The Monsters of Morley Manor

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The Monsters of Morley Manor is a children's novel written by Bruce Coville. It tells the story of sixth-grader Anthony Walker and his sister Sarah, who make a startling discovery while exploring Morley Manor: a box containing five brass monster statues, who turn out to be living beings in a state of hibernation.

Coville freely admits this is the weirdest book he'd ever written, but he had a lot of fun doing it. (His own mother's response to it was "Bruce, you're getting stranger and stranger.")

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An audiobook version has also been produced, with Coville as the voice of Gasper Morley.


This series provides examples of:

  • Adaptation Expansion: When Coville was releasing the second half of his Bruce Coville's Book of... anthology series in 1996 and 1997, books seven through eleven each began with a portion of this story. The five portions - Little Monsters, Through The Starry Door, A Trip To The Land of the Dead, When Evil Wakes and The Coldest Touch - were revised and published in a single volume in 2001.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Sisters Darlene and Marie were renamed Ludmilla and Melisande in the full-length version of the book.
  • Adults Are More Anthropomorphic: Inverted - the younger versions are humanoid their queen and mother is shaped like a normal (if enormous) frog.
  • Ask a Stupid Question...: The climax has one.
    Martin Morleskievich: "This is Martin."
    Anthony: "Martin? As in Gasper's brother? As in the kid the Flinduvians brought back with them?"
    Martin: "No, Martin the next-door neighbor's dog. Of course I'm Gasper's brother."
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  • Body Surf: Martin Morley has, after being put into and pulled out of more copies of his own body than he can count, learned how to change bodies on his own. He uses this ability to help rescue his family.
  • Curse Escape Clause: Exposing the brass monster statues to water is all it takes to revive them, though they need to use Gaspar's lab to return to their normal sizes.
  • Down the Rabbit Hole: Martin Morley fell through "a hole in the world", sending him to the planet Flinduvia, and he's been effectively stuck there ever since, with a Flinduvian-made clone being sent back in his place.
  • Fallen Angel: Ivanoma, who claims to have taken the wrong side in an ancient war, and is punishing itself for this.
  • Friend to All Living Things: Melisande loves animals, and even the nastier ones (like Mr. Perkins) will listen to her.
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  • Frog Men: The frog-like residents of an unidentified planet.
  • Gorgeous Gorgon: Melisande's chosen alternate form, which lacks the powers of the traditional Medusa.
  • Hollywood Mid-Life Crisis: A rare female example: Anthony's mother went through a sort of one when she turned forty, buying the monkey she always wanted when she was a kid, but which her parents wouldn't get her. Her family isn't too thrilled by this, and her own mother takes it personally enough that she won't visit them anymore.
  • The Igor: Albert, the resident hunchback and Gaspar's friend.
  • Lizard Folk: Gaspar's chosen alternate form.
  • Loophole Abuse: The rules of the Starry Door prevent more than ten members of a species from passing through it in a day. However, they can transport as many corpses as they wish, which the Flinduvians plan to take advantage of in order to create a zombie army.
  • Maniac Monkeys: Mr. Perkins, Anthony's mother's pet monkey, is a jerk.
  • Our Vampires Are Different: Ludmilla's chosen alternate form. The only vampiric traits she displays are their speech patterns and turning into a bat.
  • Portal Network: The Starry Door, which allows for transport between worlds.
  • Powered by a Forsaken Child: The Flinduvians want to use Earth's ghosts to power an army of undead soldiers.
  • Serial Novel: How The Monsters of Morley Manor was originally published.
  • Sharing a Body: Anthony Walker and his deceased grandfather share Anthony's body for a time. He also briefly shares a Flinduvian body with Martin Morley.
  • Shrink Ray: The device the clone of Martin Morley used on his family worked as one, leaving them five inches tall, along with Taken for Granite.
  • So Beautiful, It's a Curse: Ludmilla and Melisande Morley were tired of the constant attention they got for their striking beauty, so when they went to Zentarazna and learned the people there could take strange new shapes effectively at will, they were immediately interested.
  • Taken for Granite: Martin's device, in addition to shrinking them, left his family as brass statues.
  • Totally Not a Werewolf: Bob, who looks like a werewolf, but is really a cocker spaniel and were-human.
  • Translator Microbes: The frog-like aliens the heroes visit use magic to let them understand and speak his language. The speaking part is later removed, but they can still understand other languages.
  • The Underworld: The Land of the Dead, functioning as the classic Purgatory - a place where spirits wait until they can move on to the true afterlife.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Flinduvians can enter a kind of "anger beyond anger" known as the Red Haze. It's part of why the rest of the Coalition of Civilized Worlds doesn't much like them.
  • Vampire Vords: Ludmilla uses them.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: The titular monsters have spent time on the planet Zentarazna, where people have developed a way of freely changing their bodies to resemble whatever they want through technology, which Gaspar, Ludmilla and Melisande quite enjoy. These transformations can also be done on Earth, but it's a lot harder and more painful than on Zentarazna.
  • When Elders Attack: During the final battle with the Flinduvians, Gramma Walker gets in on the action, beating one of them over the head with her shoe.
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