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Literature / Kimi No Suizou Wo Tabetai

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It's never a coincidence. It's a choice. note 
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Kimi no Suizou wo Tabetai (also known as I Want to Eat Your Pancreas) is a novel by Sumino Yoru, published by Futabasha in June 2015. A live action film adaptation of the novel was released in August 2017 under the title Let Me Eat Your Pancreas. An anime film adaptation was released in 2018.

Despite its creepy name, Kimi no Suizou wo Tabetai is actually a sad story focused on "I" ,later revealed as Haruki Shiga, and Sakura Yamauchi during their high school life. I found a book — with the title Disease Coexistence Journal — which belongs to Sakura, and learns that Sakura is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, leaving only a year to survive. After that meeting, these two people who never talked to each other before begin to spend their remaining time together, and Sakura's influence on the protagonist starts to slowly change him for the better. This newfound relationship, however, does not go unnoticed by those around them, not least Sakura's wary best friend Kyoko.

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This novel and its adaptations contain examples of:

  • Adaptation Expansion: The live action film includes a segment from whole cloth set 12 years later showing Sakura's continued influence on the lives of those around her so long after her death.
  • Adapted Out: The animated film does not include the hardware store scene. Sensei doesn't appear either.
  • The All-Concealing "I": The protagonist. The only thing we know about the protagonist is that he's a guy and Named After Somebody Famous. We never get the name up until near the epilogue.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Sakura is fatally attacked by the criminal, but it is revealed she managed to read Haruki's final message to her. He also ended up befriending Kyoko.
  • Black Comedy: The protagonist remarks on how Sakura is able to pull this kind of joke, considering Sakura has her days numbered. Discussed when the protagonist read her Disease Coexistence Journal and ask if that was a joke.
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  • Black Comedy Cannibalism: The title itself. Pulled by Sakura at the beginning of the novel. And again by the protagonist when he was contemplating what to write in his last message to Sakura.
    Protagonist: Your cannibal spirit suddenly awaken, huh?
  • Bridal Carry: During a night together, the protagonist loses a game of Truth Or Dare with Sakura and has to bring her to the bed in this fashion. Note that Sakura herself is way too drunk to go to bed by herself.
  • Character Development: The protagonist. As he spent more time with Sakura, he starts to value other people and become more curious about social engagements.
  • Chekhov's News: A murderer on the run is mentioned on TV which later the protagonist and Sakura discussed. The murderer later kills Sakura.
  • Classified Information: Haruki Shiga. The protagonist's name is changed to punny nicknames which usually concerning how others see him. It was later revealed at the end of the story when he talked with Sakura's mother. Another example is that Sakura has scribbled out his name in every entry of her journal, leaving black circles on his name.
  • The Comically Serious: A lot of comedy is milked from the protagonist's deadpan reaction to most things.
  • The Confidant: The protagonist to Sakura.
    Sakura: You're probably the only one who can give me honest words and a normal routine for me.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Discussed. The protagonist says that it was just chance that he picked up The Disease Coexistence Journal and therefore met Sakura. Sakura disagrees, saying that he consciously chose to pick it up and that destiny does not govern everything.
  • Covers Always Lie: The scene depicted on the cover never happens.
  • Dead Man Writing: At the back of The Disease Coexistence Journal, there's a draft of Sakura's will. It was never finished.
  • Defrosting Ice Queen: Male version. The protagonist is shown acting indifferent towards Sakura's illness at first, but he starts to warm up after learning more about Sakura's true self. This is the reason why Sakura chooses him to spend her time with.
  • Deadpan Snarker: The protagonist himself.
  • Diabolus ex Machina: The foreshadowed criminal just happens to attack Sakura, rather than any of the other thousands of people living in the city, and shortly after she gets discharged from hospital and is looking forward to meeting the protagonist again at that.
  • Extreme Doormat: The protagonist. Although he refuses to do something (usually what Sakura commands), in the end, Sakura just makes him do it.
  • Foregone Conclusion: Sakura dies. In the prologue, we are shown the protagonist wasn't attending her funeral.
  • Friendless Background: The protagonist. Taken to the extreme by having him claim to not remember having a single friend since elementary school.
  • Gallows Humor: By Sakura. No surprise, as she's the only character who is about to die. Maybe falling into misery isn't a choice for her.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: A minor character makes a brief appearance by chatting with the protagonist after a rumour that he and Sakura are going out together. Later, this minor character appears and beat the protagonist after seeing him going to Sakura's home.
  • Groin Attack: Sakura does this to a guy harassing an old woman.
  • Ill Girl: Sakura Yamauchi. She has pancreas cancer, hence the title.
  • It Always Rains at Funerals: It does indeed rain at Sakura's. Lampshaded by the protagonist, who says that she wouldn't have liked it.
  • Killed Offscreen: The criminal's attack on Sakura is not depicted and protagonist and audience alike only find out via a news broadcast on TV.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: The protagonist delivers this twice. First, he says that only readers know where the first chapter is. Second, he says that this is not a novel.
  • Loser Gets the Girl: After the 'incident' in Sakura's home, a minor character punched the protagonist and made him fall to the ground. Sakura rushes to him and yelled at the other guy while Sakura brings the protagonist to her home.
  • Love Confession: Downplayed. During an after-school stride, Sakura and the protagonist had this exchange:
    Sakura: If I say that I want a boyfriend, what will you do?
    Protagonist: Actually, what will I do?
    Sakura: [shakes her head] Nothing. Never mind.
  • Named After Somebody Famous: The protagonist. Both parts of his name come from famous Japanese novelists and are frequently mentioned on this site. Guess who. Haruki Shiga.
  • Near-Rape Experience: When Sakura pisses the protagonist off by pretending to want to do "the forbidden" with him and then dismissing it as a prank, he slammed her to the bed. When he sees Sakura starts to cry, he realizes that she's just a girl after all and runs away.
  • Not What It Looks Like: When Sakura forces the protagonist to hug her in the hospital, Kyoko walks in. Cue a friend's rage.
  • Opposites Attract: How the protagonist and Sakura view each other.
  • The Philosopher: Sakura Yamauchi. Despite her 'messy' attitude, her view of life and death is remarkable.
  • Plot-Based Voice Cancellation: During a train ride, the protagonist tells Sakura his name. The animated film cuts to a noise from the train as he's saying it.
  • The Pollyanna: Subverted with Sakura Yamauchi. Although she's shown to be carefree and has a happy-go-lucky attitude, she's actually desperate that she wouldn't be able to tell the truth to her beloved ones and she'll die. Alone.
  • The Prankster: Sakura Yamauchi.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: Red-eyed Kyoko is one of the more hostile characters to the protagonist.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: The protagonist's blue to Sakura Yamauchi's red.
  • The Reveal: The protagonist's name and the contents of the Disease Coexistence Journal.
  • Running Gag: One of the classmates keeps offering the protagonist gum. One of the signs of his change in attitude is his eventual acceptance.
  • Secret Diary: Sakura's Disease Coexistence Journal.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: Female version. Sakura usually answers this every time someone asks about her relationship with the protagonist.
    Some Random Kid: Are you two going out?
    Sakura: Nope! We're just good friends.
    Some Random Kid: [confused]
  • Spiritual Successor: A number of reviewers and viewers, including IGN and this one, (spoilers!) draw comparisons between this and Your Lie in April, with both involving an energetic Ill Girl secretly afraid of her mortality who draws a troubled, withdrawn male protagonist out of his shell. Both female protagonists die with unfulfilled promises to the male protagonists. Both works also draw heavily on Cherry Blossoms imagery and its connotations regarding the transience of life and love.
  • The Stoic: The protagonist.
  • The Stinger: After the animated film's credits, the protagonist and Kyoko visit Sakura's grave together.
  • Suicide as Comedy: Pulled by Sakura during the hardware store scene. It made the shop assistant confused, though.
    Sakura: Excuse me, I'm looking for a rope for suicide. But the one that won't leave a scar. What kind of rope do you think will do?
  • That Was the Last Entry: The Disease Coexistence Journal stopped on the date of Sakura's death and the protagonist's final message to Sakura.
  • There Is Only One Bed: Subverted by the protagonist. After bringing Sakura to the bed in the hotel, he sleeps on the sofa.
  • Title Drop: See Black Comedy Cannibalism above.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The third trailer makes no attempt to hide that Sakura's cheerfulness is a Stepford smiler act.
  • Two-Teacher School: The only teacher that shows up is Sensei, the librarian.
  • Wham Line: Sakura being the victim of the criminal as relayed through the news comes as a shock to protagonist and audience alike.
  • What Does She See in Him?: The protagonist and Sakura's classmates are wondering why Sakura want to spend her time with the quietest and most unattractive guy in the class.
  • What Is This Feeling?: The protagonist is unaware of his own feeling up to the point where he reads Sakura's journal after the funeral.


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