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Literature / Halo: Envoy

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Halo: Envoy is a novel set in the Halo universe by Tobias S. Buckell. The Halo Fractures short story Oasis served as a quasi-prequel to Envoy, introducing the novel's central setting and conflict.

It has been six years since the end of the Covenant War...and yet on the planet Carrow, a world on the edge of the Joint Occupation Zone (JOZ), a decisive new battle suddenly erupts. Human colonists and the alien Sangheili have already been living a tension-filled co-existence in this place, with Unified Earth Government envoy Melody Azikiwe attempting to broker a lasting peace between their two species.

But as civil war now engulfs the Sangheili settlers, Melody must act on an additional covert assignment courtesy of the Office of Naval Intelligence: find a way to free the SPARTAN-IIs known as Gray Team, held in stasis since the end of the war by a cunning Elite fleetmaster consumed with vengeance. And none can anticipate the ongoing violence leading to the discovery of an even greater, unstoppable threat, hidden for eons below the surface of the planet.

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This novel contains the following tropes:

  • Badass Abnormal: Jai-006, Adriana-111, and Mike-120 are this as they're Spartan-IIs.
  • Big Bad: Hekabe the Brute serves as this. He is far more dangerous than Thar'Sarov, who is more of a Big Bad Wannabe.
  • Big Good: Rojka and Governor Ellis Gass serve as this for their factions but both become Well-Intentioned Extremist types by the end of the book. They both redeem themselves in the end.
  • Bittersweet Ending: The Brutes are defeated along with the Sharquoi. Governor Ellis Gass is killed and much of the city is devastated. Rojka is demoted from kaidon to being an envoy, which he accepts and wants to use as a chance to make things better.
  • Canon Immigrant: Sharquoi make their first appearance outside of cut video game content.
  • Cycle of Revenge: Dealt with realistically as the Elites struggle with the loss of their colony world, Glyke, while the humans have suffered the loss of many worlds to the Elites. The Brutes have a similar history of loss to the Elites and hate humans for destroying the Covenant. In the end, the humans and Elites manage to put aside their grievances to work toward peace.
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  • Enemy Civil War: This happens twice in the span of the novel with the Elites going to war with each other then the Brutes attacking the Elites they backed.
  • Fish out of Temporal Water: Gray Team has been in cryo-sleep for six years and while not helpless by any means, it takes them some getting used to upon learning the war is over and the Elites are technically allies now (well, the ones not desiring to kill humanity). It also comes as a shock when they realize they're basically war-criminals for destroying a planet and its inhabitants after the war was already over.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Gray Team has this reaction when they find out the war was already over by the time they detonated a Nova Bomb on Glyke, wiping out the entire civilian population of that world.
  • Obligatory War-Crime Scene: The Brutes engage in a lot of these throughout the novel to let us know they are the bad guys.
  • Only Sane Man:
    • Melody and Lamar Edwards are the only two people in the book who want a peaceful resolution.
    • Subverted with Rojka'Kasaan, who starts as a Reasonable Authority Figure only to become blinded by revenge. He manages to put it aside by the end.
  • The Peter Principle: Governor Ellis Gass was a civil engineer who ran against a more hardened military commander on a platform of civilian spending. She is woefully out of her depth when war breaks out with the Elites.
  • Revenge: Governor Ellis Gass struggles with her desire to destroy the Elites and Brutes for wrecking her attempts at building a new society on Carrow. Also, for killing her son.
    • Many Elites want this against Gray Team for their belief the Spartan-IIs destroyed Glyke. They did.
  • Villain Has a Point: Hekabe's motivations are surprisingly sympathetic until he decides to conquer the galaxy. The Brutes have been treated abominably by the Elites over the centuries.
  • Visionary Villain: Hekabe believe the Forerunner artifacts on Carrow can secure the future of the Brutes.

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