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Earthrise is a Science Fiction book series by Daniel Arenson.

In the 22nd century, humanity is on the verge of extinction. Various hostile aliens from across the galaxy have hunted humans for many years with little resistance. However, after having to endure the wrath of alien foes for so long, humanity decides to bang together to fight off the aliens and preserve their species before its too late.

The series is split into three separate sub-series, with Earthrise still ongoing.

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Earthrise

  1. Earth Alone
  2. Earth Lost
  3. Earth Rising
  4. Earth Fire
  5. Earth Shadows
  6. Earth Valor
  7. Earth Reborn
  8. Earth Honor
  9. Earth Eternal
  10. Earth Machines
  11. Earth Aflame
  12. Earth Unleashed
  13. Earth Remembers
  14. Earth in Darkness
  15. Earth, Our Home

Children of Earthrise

  1. The Heirs of Earth
  2. A Memory of Earth
  3. An Echo of Earth
  4. The War for Earth
  5. The Song of Earth
  6. The Legacy of Earth

Soldiers of Earthrise

  1. The Earthling
  2. Earthlings
  3. Earthling's War
  4. I, Earthling
  5. The Earthling's Daughter
  6. We are Earthlings

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The Earthrise series contains examples of:

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    In General 
  • Anyone Can Die: Men, women, children, recurring characters, main characters—it doesn't matter. Nobody has Plot Armor in this series. Even some of the lead male and female protagonists perish over the course of some of the books.
  • Gorn: As expected, given it's a Daniel Arenson book series. Gory deaths are all over the place, and the author isn't shy about going into horrific detail.

    Earthrise 

    Children of Earthrise 

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    Soldiers of Earthrise 
  • Big Bad: President Henry "Hank" Hale for the first half of the series. He's the one who started the war against Bahay and is keeping it going until the Bahayans are wiped out. After the war ends and President Hale is driven out of office, the Red Cardinal, a vicious Bahayan tyrant, replaces him as the new threat against Bahay.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Jon defeats Papa Dominus, Maria kills Ernesto and Dark Mother, and their friends, family, and other Bahayans succeed in finding new homes to live their lives in peace. The Earthling/Bahayan War has finally ended, and a newer, peace-loving president now rules Earth. But millions of innocents and soldiers have perished—George, Lizzy, and Carter among them—Kaelyn can never have children due to the injury she suffered, Jon loses an arm fighting Papa Dominus, and Maria kills herself upon learning that Jon married Kaelyn.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Maria's father's dagger, which she keeps around throughout all six books after she has a vision explaining it'll be useful for something. She ends up killing herself with it in the final book.
  • Deconstruction: Of the Earthrise series itself. Most of the books in the franchise are about humans banding together to fight off alien forces and to keep their species alive. In this sub-series, it's made clear that humanity is just as vile and murderous as the alien foes that have appeared in the other books. Humans are fighting other humans in a war not much different from the wars that occurred throughout history. On top of this, halfway into the series, it's revealed that a human president is intentionally sending soldiers to die on the battlefront just to boost his political ratings.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Her: Lizzy Pascal, a hardened Space Marine who fought in the war for years and survived being raped and tortured, is shot to death in a parking garage.
  • Happy Ending Override: Most of the Earthrise books end with the alien foes defeated and humanity sticking together no matter what happens. This series makes it clear that no, peace within humanity is just not possible, as there will inevitably come a time period where humans will start fighting and killing humans when there are no other enemies for humans to defend themselves from.
  • Heroic Suicide: A very morbid one. In the final book, Maria uses her father's dagger to kill herself. This way, Jon will be forced to head back to Earth with Kaelyn instead of staying on Bahay, and Lily can have a wonderful life away from all the senseless violence that occurred on Bahay and Mother's Womb.
  • Karma Houdini: Subverted with Clay Hagen. He doesn't end up in prison for conducting a massacre that led to the deaths of five hundred villagers, but he suffers horrific third-degree burns. On top of that, the fifth book reveals that he's devolved into a homeless beggar.
  • Kill the Cutie: George Williams is one of the few characters who managed to stay sane and was incorruptible. He dies a third of the way into the fourth book, sacrificing his life to save his best friend even after Jon told him not to.
  • Murder the Hypotenuse: Maria, shockingly, kills herself after finding out Jon married Kaelyn so that Jon would be forced to stay with her instead of having to bounce back and forth between both of them.
  • Non-Action Big Bad: President Henry Hale never steps foot on Bahay, but he's the one who's manipulating Earth into fighting Bahay and sending all the soldiers there to begin with.
  • Sacrificial Lion:
    • Michael Carter from Earthlings, whose death shows how deadly the Red Cardinal is and to make it clear that even the main characters can bite it.
    • Lizzy Pascal from Earthling's War, whose death turns her into a martyr for the anti-war movement against President Hale and cements Kaelyn's position as the protestors' leader.
    • General Ward's death serves as a villainous example, as it seriously compromises the conspiracy to keep the Earthling/Bahayan War perpetually going and leads to President Hale's downfall.
    • George Williams from I, Earthling, whose death was a precursor to Jon hitting Despair Event Horizon later on in the book.
  • War for Fun and Profit: Earthing's War reveals that President Hale and General Ward don't care about preserving humanity or keeping the planet safe from hostile aliens. They're just fighting Bahayans to keep the war economy going and to profit from the publicity and trillions of dollars they've earned over the years.

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