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What does humanity do in a perfect world?
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The Arc of a Scythe is a sci-fi novel series by Neal Shusterman that takes the teen dystopia genre and turns it on its head: rather than showing yet another science fiction Dystopia, the series deconstructs the very idea of a Utopia by taking the most common idea of Utopia and showing the consequences of a truly peaceful, conflict-free world.

In the far future, humanity has successfully eradicated all diseases. There is no war. All governments are under the control of a benevolent AI called the Thunderhead. There is no social or economic inequality, and mankind has even managed to conquer death itself. But with humanity no longer constrained by time, someone has to keep the population under control to avoid overcrowding the world and using up Earth's finite resources. Enter the Scythedom, an order of warriors whose sole purpose is to kill people for the long-term survival of humanity.

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The series follows two teenagers, Rowan and Citra, who are chosen to become the apprentices of a high ranking Scythe. As they train for a job that neither of them actually wants, they come to realize that underneath the surface, their perfect world has some very deep flaws. With their every need taken care of by the Thunderhead, humanity has lost its drive to improve and simply does things to avoid boredom rather than out of any enjoyment, while younger generations of Scythes begin developing delusions of godhood and enjoy killing for its own sake. Citra and Rowan must learn the ins and outs of the Scythedom and train to become elite killing machines while also confronting the cracks in their utopia.

There are a total of three planned installments in the series.

  • The first book, Scythe, was released in November 2016.
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  • The second book, Thunderhead, was released in January 2018.
  • The third, The Toll, will be released in 2019.

The series contains examples of:

  • Absurdly Youthful Mother: Thanks to advances in medical technology and the fact that all humans are immortal from birth, anyone has the ability to "turn a corner" and have their physical age reset to look younger than they actually are.
  • Apologetic Attacker: Rowan and Citra when they're forced to fight each other at the second Conclave. Also Citra when she accidentally shoots Scythe Faraday in the leg.
  • Back from the Dead:
    • Anybody who isn't gleaned or killed in space or by fire can be easily resurrected, to the point that some people kill themselves on purpose for the thrill of it, knowing they'll simply be brought back.
    • A more traditional example occurs in the first book when it is revealed Scythe Faraday didn't actually kill himself, but faked his suicide in an attempt to free Citra and Rowan from their apprenticeships. It also happens in the second book with Scythe Goddard, whose severed head was preserved until Scythe Rand could have it grafted onto the body of Rowan's friend Tyger.
  • Better to Die than Be Killed: At the end of the second book, Scythe Curie and the remaining Scythes on Endura self-glean rather than drown or be killed by sharks as the artificial island sinks into the Atlantic.
  • Big Bad:
    • Scythe Goddard in Scythe, the Ax-Crazy scythe who goes on mass killing sprees for the sheer pleasure of it, and tries to make the entire Scythedom follow his views.
    • In Thunderhead, Goddard is set up as the Big Bad of the entire trilogy, when Rand brings him back from the dead, and he proceeds to murder the Scythedom's global leadership.
  • Bittersweet Ending: In Scythe we get a mostly sweet one. Citra is a scythe, Rowan escapes with Faraday, and Goddard is dead, but Rowan is now a fugitive who kills cruel scythes, Citra has a bad reputation due to the events surrounding her apprenticeship, and many people who believe in Godard's views are still in the scythedom.
  • Body Snatcher: Scythe Goddard's head is attached to Tyger Salazar's body in order to bring Goddard back to life.
  • Brain in a Jar: Scythe Goddard's head was preserved in between books, and is later grafted onto a living body to bring him back to life.
  • City on the Water: The Island of the Enduring Heart (Endura for short). In addition to being the headquarters of the World Scythe Council, it also serves as a historical attraction for tourists and a refuge for Scythes' families. Goddard sinks it at the end of the second book.
  • Co-Dragons:
    • In the first book, Scythes Volta, Rand, and Chomsky are this to Goddard, though Volta isn't as loyal as the other two.
    • In the second book, Scythe Brahms steps up to this role along with Rand, who is revealed to have survived Rowan's betrayal at the end of the first book. After Goddard kills Brahms in a fit of rage, Rand is left as Goddard's last lieutenant.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Xenocrates threatens Citra with tor-turé, to get more information out of her. Ultimately subverted as he doesn't go through with it.
  • The Charmer: Scythe Goddard's greatest skill is his ability to charm others into liking him and agreeing with his views.
  • Cult:
    • Goddard forms one around himself that's dedicated to gleaning for its own sake.
    • The Tonists are treated as a harmless version.
  • Darkest Hour: The ending of the second book. Goddard has assassinated the global Scythe leadership, seizing the position of High Blade of MidMerica. Scythe Curie and several high-ranking scythes are permanently dead, along with thousands of innocent civilians. Citra and Rowan are trapped in an airtight vault two miles beneath the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. And the Thunderhead, furious with the politics of the Scythedom, has distanced itself from humanity in the hopes that the human race can learn to accept the consequences of their actions without having it there to solve all of their problems for them.
  • Deadly Decadent Court: The Scythe Conclaves are full of these, with lots of power plays happening behind the scenes.
  • Death Is Cheap: One of the major elements of the story is that humans have achieved immortality, and anyone who experiences something that should kill them in real life is quickly resurrected at Revival Centers.
  • Death of a Child: While children benefit from some element of (literal) Infant Immortality, they aren't immune to being gleaned. Scythe Faraday breaks into tears at dinnertime after he gleaned a child. Off-page, Scythe Volta massacres an entire classroom of Tonist children, which leads to his self-gleaning.
  • Developers' Foresight: An in-universe example. Greyson learns that the clubs that Unsavories frequent are designed by the Thunderhead to provide an outlet: the Unsavories get to beat people up without consequences, and masochists who enjoy getting beat up can get curb-stomped all they want.
  • Deus Est Machina: The Thunderhead is functionally a god, being able to care for literally billions of people simultaneously. However, it also explicitly does NOT want to be worshiped like one.
  • Died Happily Ever After:
    • One man Faraday killed was a master fencer; Faraday challenged him to a duel and was killed several times before winning. The man thanked Faraday for letting him die fighting.
    • Similarly, most of Citra's gleaning subjects have this because she lets them choose their deaths. The most prominent example of this was an actor who wanted to be gleaned onstage during a production of Julius Ceasar in which he played Ceasar. Despite a brief cringe when Citra broke character and called him out by his real name per scythe tradition, he seemed very pleased with his end, even going as far as to wink at Citra when she came onstage.
  • Disney Death:
    • In Scythe, despite seemingly dying about halfway through the story, Scythe Faraday turns up alive near the end and is revealed to have faked his death.
    • In Thunderhead, Scythes Goddard and Rand are both revealed to have survived being apparently burned to death after Rowan betrayed Goddard's cabal at the end of the first book.
  • Disney Villain Death: Tyger, Rowan's friend, invoked several of these to make his family pay attention to him. Later on in the first book, Citra invokes this to escape Xenocrates.
  • The Dog Bites Back: As an intitation, Scythe Goddard leaves the Tonist curate as a monastery's sole survivor so that Rowan can glean the last person. Rowan decides he has had enough of Goddard's cruelty and abuse, and instead beheads Goddard and burns the rest of his squad.
  • Downer Ending: The second book Scythe Curie, the World Scythe Counsel, and everybody on the island of Endura are dead, Citra and Rowan are trapped at the bottom of the ocean, Goddard has ensured his position as High Blade of Mid-Merica. On top of that the Thunderhead has marked everybody on earth except Grayson as Unsavory, cutting off communication with all of them.
  • The Dreaded: All Scythes are feared and avoided by everybody, but Scythe Curie in particular has cultivated this reputation over the years.
  • Driven to Suicide:
    • While non-scythes have emotional nanites that eliminate suicidal thoughts, the demands of the job lead some Scythes to self glean. Most notably, the entire first generation of Scythes killed themselves. It's also the only way a Scythe's death is ever permanent, as they are otherwise revived like anyone else.
    • In the first book, Scythe Faraday seems to end his life by throwing himself in front of a train, in order to free Rowan and Citra from having to glean the other. Turns out he was Faking the Dead.
    • Also in the first book, Scythe Volta succumbs under the pressures of mass gleaning after wiping out a classroom of children. Afterward, he slits his wrists. Rowan's fire incidentally hides Volta's true intentions.
  • Drop the Hammer: Rowan kills Chomsky with a tone cult hammer, even comparing it to the hammer of Thor.
  • Dumb Muscle:
    • Scythe Chomsky at least according to Volta.
    • Rowan's friend Tyger becomes one in the second book when he begins training with Scythe Rand.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Greyson's subplot in the second book. After being Un-personed and branded an Unsavory to fullfill his role as the Thunderhead's proxy, his designation is lifted and un-personing reversed at the end of the book while every other human on the planet is designated Unsavory.
  • Everyone Has Standards: When Citra points out that Goddard grafting his head onto Tyger's body and returning to the Scythedom like nothing happened is a violation of Scythe policy, the Grandslayers unanimously vote to disqualify Goddard from becoming MidMerican High Blade and make him repeat his apprenticeship in order to remain a Scythe.
  • Face Death with Dignity:
    • Most of the victims Citra kills as Scythe Anastasia react this way. While some Scythes call Anastasia out on this, the targets seem to generally appreciate this concession.
    • In Thunderhead, Xenocrates drowns himself rather than let himself be eaten by sharks as a last act of defiance against Goddard.
    • At the end of Thunderhead, Curie and the remaining Scythes in the Founders' Tower are calm and compassionate as they Mercy Kill the people around them when Endura sinks, and are just as calm when gleaning themselves.
  • Fake Defector: Greyson Tolliver. When he's marked as an Unsavory for saving Curie and Anastasia, the Thunderhead, through Agent Traxler, uses him as a proxy to root out who is responsible for the attempts on the two Scythes' lives.
  • Faking the Dead: Scythe Faraday fakes his own self Gleaning in a failed attempt to save Rowan and Citra from their apprenticeship.
  • Fantastically Indifferent: Since nobody can permanently die unless gleaned by Scythes, society as a whole is desensitized to things like car crashes and people throwing themselves off buildings.
  • Five-Token Band: Goddard surrounds himself with Scythes of various ethnicities, possibly invoked as a way to make him stand out more.
  • A God Am I: Goddard and his followers believe that Scythes are gods and should be treated as such.
  • Good Is Not Soft: The Scythes, what they do is a necessary public service and many are humane about it but they do still kill people.
  • Gilded Cage: Esme lives in a mansion and is treated well by everybody there, but she is unwittingly being used as a hostage by Goddard to keep Xenocrates in his pocket.
  • The Handler: Agent Traxler is Greyson's handler. His gleaning is a sign that Greyson will have to finish his mission on his own.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Chomsky's preference for using fire ends up backfiring when Rowan kills him and the rest of Goddard's group and the fire he started ends up preventing them from being revived.
  • Hope Springs Eternal: The final chapter of the second book. Despite Goddard's victory at Endura, Citra and Rowan can be revived. Scythe Faraday and Munira are on their way to the Land of Nod to investigate a failsafe built by the founding Scythes. And after spending the entire book as an Un-person and Fake Defector on its behalf, the Thunderhead rewards Greyson's perseverance and loyalty by ensuring that he is the only human on Earth not marked as an Unsavory.
  • Hunter of His Own Kind: At the end of the first book, Rowan becomes one, going around hunting those who agree with Goddard's views or who are otherwise corrupt Scythes.
  • Hypocrite:
    • Xenocrates lives in a log cabin to seem more humble, but the cabin is also perched atop the tallest building in Fulcrum City, flaunting his power as a scythe. This is lampshaded by Goddard.
    • Goddard himself has a few moments of Hypocrisy. He claims that his Gleanings are a "gift" to his victims, but also calls himself "generous" for giving out mass immunity. He calls our Rowan for killing Chomsky and trying to kill him and Rand but also kills the World Scythe Counsel and all of the Scythes on Endura.
  • I Have Your Wife: High Blade Xenocrates secretly broke the rules and fathered a child, and Goddard holds his secret daughter hostage to ensure his cooperation.
  • Immortal Life Is Cheap: Outside gleaning and the occasional fire, all other potential causes of death simply renders a person deadish, until they are healed back to full health at a survival center. Several characters end up deadish throughout the series.
  • Immortal Procreation Clause: Averted. Despite the lack of non-gleaning deaths, people keep on having children, sometimes having tens of them past age one hundred. Even at the end of Scythe, the Earth has yet to find a way to balance the birth and death rate.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice:
    • Scythe Curie's preferred method of gleaning is stabbing a person's heart.
    • At the end of the first book, Rowan impales Goddard before decapitating him.
  • Interim Villain: In Thunderhead after Rand is revealed to be alive, it seems like Scythe Brahms will be taking the role of antagonist until her public resurgence. This is Subverted when it is revealed that he is actually working for Rand.
  • Internal Reformist: Scythe Faraday and Scythe Curie both try to keep the Scythedom on the straight and narrow.
  • In the Future, Humans Will Be One Race: Humanity has progressed to a point where nearly everyone is a mixture of ethnicities, with genetic indexes keeping track of the percentages. Scythe Goddard nevertheless surrounds himself with scythes of distinct phenotypes, and scythe society makes sure that it gleans an even number of each race.
  • It Is Pronounced Tro Pay: Scythe Xenocrates calls torture tor-turé. He's unfamiliar with the word because torture, like most forms of violence, is very rare in the post-mortal age.
  • Jabba Table Manners: Chomsky wolfs down food quickly and messily.
  • Kangaroo Court: Citra is put through one when High Blade Xenocrates accuses her of murdering Scythe Faraday.
  • Kick the Dog: Goddard forced a man to give up his job and house, gleaned his pool boy randomly, and forced the homeowner to take the pool boy's place.
  • Kill It with Fire: Scythe Chomsky's preferred method of gleaning. In the setting's post-mortal society, death by fire is one of the few things from which one cannot be brought back, though that hardly concerns a scythe since their kills are permanent anyway. Later, Rowan does this to Goddard and his followers. It becomes his signature method as Scythe Lucifer.
  • Killed Off for Real:
    • The climax of Rowan's arc in the first book results in the deaths of Goddard, Volta, Chomsky, and Rand. Although in the second book, Goddard and Rand are revealed to have survived.
    • The second book kills off Tyger, Curie, Xenocrates, the entire World Scythe Council, and everyone on Endura save for Rowan and Citra.
  • Light Is Good: Scythe Faraday wears an ivory cloak, and is one of the most moral scythes around. And in fact, this is why black is the only cloak-color that is shunned by the Scythedom: because they are supposed to represent light in every spectrum, not darkness.
  • Living Forever Is Awesome: Deconstructed. Life may go on forever and you can be revived as long as you aren't marked by a Scythe for gleaning, but humans have begun to lose their drive to create and do things, simply going through the motions of life to stave off boredom rather than out of any passion for a particular activity.
  • Loophole Abuse: Used by Scythe Curie, Citra, Goddard, and The Thunderhead at various points.
  • Loss of Identity: Part of becoming a Scythe is casting off your original identity and thinking of yourself in terms of your persona.
  • Make It Look Like an Accident:
    • Citra suspects that Scythe Faraday was murdered and his death was made to look like a suicide. Turns out he's actually Faking the Dead.
    • Near the end of the first book, Rowan makes the deaths of Goddard and his crew look like they couldn't get out of the building before it burned down.
    • A non-lethal variation occurs at the very end of the first book. To avoid being forced to kill Rowan, Citra punches him in the face to give herself plausible deniability when hitting him with her ring hand grants him immunity from gleaning for a year, then helps him escape while the Conclave debates what to do with him until his immunity runs out.
  • The Mentor: Faraday for Rowan and Citra, he is later replaced by Scythe Curie for Citra and Goddard for Rowan.
  • Mentor Occupational Hazard:
    • In the first book, Scythe Faraday appears to suffer this trope, until he turns up alive in the last third of the book.
    • In the second book, played tragically straight with Scythe Curie. After making sure that Citra and Rowan will survive, she self-gleans rather than drown or be devoured by sharks as the floating city of Endura sinks into the ocean.
  • Mercy Kill: At the end of the second book. Curie and the remaining Scythes on Endura glean the non-scythes to spare them the pain of drowning or being killed by carnivorous sealife.
  • The Mind Is a Plaything of the Body: A rather literal example occurs in the second book After having his head grafted onto the body of Rowan's friend Tyger, Scythe Goddard finds Tyger's original temperament and personality subtly influencing him.
  • Murder, Inc.: The Scythedom are technically this, but they serve as population control so they are portrayed heroically.
  • My God, What Have I Done?:
    • Citra has this reaction when she accidentally shoots Scythe Faraday. In fairness, she didn't realize her mentor had been faking his death and assumed that she was ambushing his killer, rather the man himself.
    • Volta has this reaction to all of the mass gleanings he participates in. Later when he gleans an entire room of children it proves to be too much and he is Driven to Suicide.
  • Named After Somebody Famous: All Scythes select the name of a famous historical figure as an alias upon becoming ordained as a Scythe. Notable examples include Marie Curie, Michael Faraday, Volta, Robert Goddard, Nelson Mandella, and Anastasia Romanov.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: The Grande Dame of Death, and Scythe Lucifer.
  • Necessary Evil: The Scythes kill civilians in order to keep humans from overpopulating the planet.
  • Neck Snap: At the Harvest Conclave test, Rowan snaps Citra's neck to render her deadish. His illegal move results in her loss and his disqualification, ensuring that their tie remains.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!: Chomsky's fondness for the flamethrower allows Rowan a tidy means to permanently kill Goddard's depraved circle and destroy the evidence.
  • No Kill Like Overkill: Goddard's assassination of the World Scythe Council at the end of the second book. Using his own engineers and programmers, he hacked the systems keeping Endura afloat to cripple the floating city long enough to kill the Grandslayers with a shark attack. He ends up sinking the entire island.
  • Not-So-Omniscient Council of Bickering: Played With. The Scythe Conclave does get some things done but Xenocrates normally ignores most things that pertain to the main characters due to time.
  • Oblivious to Love: Scythe Faraday was clueless to the fact that Curie was in love with him while she was his apprentice. He thought she wanted to kill him. Once they were both older and wiser, he finally recognized her attempts at flirting for what they were and started a relationship in secret.
  • Official Couple: Citra and Rowan show signs of being this, but because Scythes are forbidden from romantic attachment, nothing comes of it in the first book.
  • Off with His Head!: Scythe Goddard is gleaned when Rowan decapitates him with a samurai sword.
  • The Older Immortal: All of humanity is immortal now, except in the off-chance that they're gleaned or die by fire, so some people are centuries old.
  • Older Than They Look: With the option to "turn the corner" and reset their body to a younger state, people rarely look the age they actually are.
  • One World Order: All governments are under the control of the Thunderhead.
  • Outside Man, Inside Man: Rowan is the outside man and Citra is the inside woman to the Scythedom in Thunderhead.
  • Parental Abandonment: Due to his constant "splatting", Tyger was legally made a ward of the Thunderhead by his parents.
  • Parental Neglect:
    • The reason Rowan decided to take up Scythe Faraday's offer of an apprenticeship is because his family avoids him and often acts like he isn't there, leaving him feeling overlooked and ignored.
    • Greyson Tolliver's parents liked the idea of families more than actually raising them, so they were largely absent from his life after a certain point.
  • Parental Substitute: The Thunderhead did more to raise Greyson than his own parents. Being branded as an Unsavory in order to help the Thunderhead subvert the loopholes of its programming hits him hard because it means he can no longer talk to it.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • Faraday decides to lie about a man who resisted his gleaning and spared his family.
    • Scythe Curie allows the families of her victims the opportunity stab her without consequence.
    • As a reward for his hard work and the Trauma Conga Line he endured working as its proxy, Greyson is the only one the Thunderhead allows to talk to it directly after it labels the rest of humanity as Unsavory in anger over the Scythedom's corruption. It also restores the records of his real identity so he no longer has to use his cover story.
  • The Philosopher:
    • Scythe Curie has quite a lot of philosophy regarding the world in her gleaning journal.
    • The Thunderhead as well. It spends a large portion of the second book thinking about its own nature, its limitations, and its purpose in the world.
  • A Pupil of Mine, Until He Turned to Evil: Goddard was originally the student of High Blade Xenocrates.
  • Pyro Maniac: Chomsky is never seen without his flamethrower while out on gleaning, and refuses to part with it even when told to put it away.
  • Rage Breaking Point: The Tonist's long prophesized "Great Resonance" is in fact The Thunderhead's screams of impotent fury as it finally becomes fed up with the machinations of the Scythedom and cultural and creative decline of the human race, and it distances itself from everyone but Greyson.
  • Raised as a Host: Tyger is recruited for an unofficial Scythe apprenticeship in the second book solely for the purpose of providing a new body for Scythe Goddard's still-living head.
  • Red Baron: Scythe Curie is known as "The Grande Dame of Death". Rowan earns the moniker of "Scythe Lucifer" when he becomes a Hunter of His Own Kind.
  • Resistance as Planned: The whole counter-culture of Unsavories was designed by the Thunderhead to provide humans who enjoy being rebellious and destructive with an outlet for their destructive impulses.
  • Sadist Teacher: Scythe Goddard is this to Rowan after Scythe Faraday's death.
  • Sadistic Choice: Happens frequently. The most notable example is that, after the first Conclave, Rowan and Citra are informed that whichever one of them is ordained as a Scythe at the Winter Conclave will be required to glean the other as their first assignment.
  • Secret Test of Character: Curie and Faraday are fond of pulling these on Citra and Rowan.
  • Shame If Something Happened: Goddard holds High Blade Xenocrates' secret illegitimate daughter hostage to ensure his cooperation, using both the threat to the girl's life and the threat of revealing Xenocrates' violation of the Scythe commandments to force the High Blade to support his controversial attitudes and actions.
  • Society of Immortals: All humans on Earth benefit from immorality.
  • Take a Third Option: How Citra and Rowan get out of the whole "one must kill the other" requirement of their exam." Rowan had brutally injured her at the previous Conclave, so after receiving her Scythes' ring, she punches him in the face "ignorant" of the fact that by striking him with her ring, she's granted him immunity from gleaning.
  • Teacher/Student Romance: Faraday had one with Curie years before Citra and Rowan were born.
  • Threatening Shark: Because the sea life around Endura can be remotely puppeted through nanites, Goddard sics a school of sharks on the Grandslayers at the end of the second book.
  • The Unfavorite: Rowan is this within his own family, hence his desire to find purpose in his life.
  • Un-person: Agent Traxler erases Greyson's records in order to forge his cover story as "Slayd Bridger". This becomes a problem when Agent Traxler is gleaned and the new probation officer assigned to his cover identity is Locked Out of the Loop.
  • Unusual Euphemism: "Gleaning" is used as a substitute for a Scythe permanently killing someone. "Ending" is used to refer to people permanently dying from other means.
  • Villainous Breakdown:
    • At the end of the first book when Citra's name is cleared Goddard looses it and goes on a violent mass gleaning, violating the 2nd Scythe Commandment and coming up with a weak justification for violating the Quota.
    • In the second book, Goddard becomes even more unhinged, when his dramatic return from the dead is undercut by Citra sabotaging his attempts to become the MidMerican High Blade. And when he takes that anger out on Rowan, he becomes even more infuriated when Rowan refuses to react to his words.
  • Vigilante Man: Rowan spends the second book hunting down cruel scythes that abuse their positions.
  • Vocal Dissonance: Goddard has his head transplanted onto Tyger's body in the second book. This leaves him speaking with Tyger's voice for the remainder of the book.
  • What You Are in the Dark: The final exam of all Scythe candidates is to temporarily kill someone they love to demonstrate how dedicated they are to the Scythedom's purpose.
  • Weapon of Choice: Chomsky always uses a flamethrower. Inverted with Faraday, who prefers to use a different weapon for each gleaning.
  • We Used to Be Friends: Goddard was Xenocrates' apprentice, meaning they got along in the past, but now Xenocrates considers that his greatest mistake.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: One of the central themes of the story.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Scythe Goddard threatens to kill Esme so to manipulate High Blade Xenocrates.
  • Xanatos Gambit: The second book ends on a devastatingly effective one. Goddard returns from apparent death thanks to being transplanted into Tyger's body and runs for the position of High Blade in opposition to Curie. Worried the vote might end up being against them, Citra raises an inquest, citing that most of his body is that of Tyger, who wasn't an officially bejeweled Scythe and thus he is technically not Goddard and thus ineligible to run for High Blade. This gets taken to the Grand Counsel and in the end, they agree with Citra. Goddard, rather than be forced to becoming an apprentice all over again, hacks the island of Endura's computer system and sinks the entire island, not only permanently killing the World Scythe counsel, but also ensuring their ruling never is heard and killing off Curie too. Citra and Rowan meanwhile are locked away in a vault by Curie to ensure they're preserved and can be revived, but they're still buried under 2 miles of ocean. Goddard is left with no opposition to his rise to High Blade.
  • Your Days Are Numbered: Scythe Anastasia's preferred method of gleaning. She injects the chosen subject with a time-delayed poison and gives them one month to decide how they wish to die. They can call her to let her know their chosen form of death or let the poison kill them painlessly in a month. If they try to get immunity from someone else, they'll be gleaned on the spot and the poison will instantly kill them if they try escaping to another region.
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