Follow TV Tropes

Following

LGBT Representation In Media / Webcomics

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/transcendent_main_cast.jpg
Webcomics with a prominent focus on LGBTQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual and/or aromantic) characters and people. The subject/theme of these works may or may not be about LGBTQIA+ culture and identities and can be highly varied. To be listed here, the work must contain either a main or recurring LGBTQIA+ character, or there must be a high frequency of LGBTQIA+ figures appearing rather than limiting it to one or two offhanded/one-off appearances. Word of Gay examples do not go here: the character's identity must be established within the work itself. See LGBT Fanbase for works that do not have unambiguous LGBTQIA+ subject matter, but attract a significant LGBTQIA+ fandom.

Some of these works have characters coming out or being shown to be LGBTQIA+ as reveals, beware of spoilers.

See LGBT Representation in Media for a list of works in other mediums with prominent LGBTQIA+ representation.

See also Queer Media for works with a primary focus on LGBT people, queer subjects and themes and Queer Romance for works that focus on romantic relationships between queer characters as the main plot. See also LGBT+ Creators for a list of artists/media creators who are LGBTQIA+.


    open/close all folders 
    A-H 
  • 180 Angel: The main character, Chloe/Samael, is biromantic demisexual and one love interest is trans and bisexual; and the other is pansexual.
  • 30-Something Wolf: The main character is queer, and some of the strips revolve around LGTBQ+ jokes/subjects.
  • Acception: The lead is a Camp Straight, crossdressing boy, with the comic having several gay and transgender supporting characters.
  • Achilles Shieldmaidens: At least two of the six core Achilles mecha pilots are queer: Jane Willis is a trans woman who is seen both pre- and post-op (in the prologue she signed on to get her gender reassignment surgery paid for), and Sofia Gagarin is in a lesbian relationship with non-pilot Artemis.
  • Aerial Magic is a fantasy story set in a Non-Heteronormative Society. Wisteria, the protagonist, is bisexual, and her mentor Cecily is a lesbian dating a transgender woman.
  • Agents of the Realm is a Magical Girl series centering on a group of young women at college, most of whom are queer. There are also queer supporting characters and some subplots focusing on romantic relationships between women.
  • Alice and the Nightmare: The protagonist, Alice, is bisexual and shown to be attracted to both men and women, deuteragonists Edith and Quinn are lesbians in a relationship, and the major supporting characters, Dee and Dum, are nonbinary.
  • Almighty Protectors: Everybody on the titular team is LGBTQIA+, with the exception of Dispawn (Flame Thrower is a trans woman and in a relationship with the female Multiblades, Mineral is a trans man and in a relationship with the male Rearranger, female team members B.A.D. and Arianna have begun a relationship, and Pinball is nonbinary and has made reference to being asexual).
  • The Angel In The Forest: Two main characters, Larry and Montimer, are both pan and in relationship. There is also a gay couple in the background, a supporting bisexual character and an asexual recurring character.
  • Arcane Doodleverse: Vi and Caitlyn are now girlfriends instead of mutually attracted to one another. The "Star Guardian" strips also focus on Jinx and her crush on fellow classmate Lux.
  • Balderdash!: Both of the protagonists are queer witches.
  • Band vs. Band: The story follows two rival bands, and only one member of either of them is cis and straight.
  • Batman: Wayne Family Adventures: Multiple major characters are queer, as Tim Drake is bisexual and Kate Kane is a lesbian.
  • Beneath the Woods: The main protagonist, Max, is a trans boy, and the entirety of the main cast is queer.
  • Best Friends Forever: A continuing subplot in the comic before it was discontinued involved Vincent accepting that he's gay and that he has feelings for one of his friends.
  • Big Break (2019): Ai, a boxer and karate expert, is a lesbian and has an unrequited crush on Kris, one of the main characters and who works out with her at the gym.
  • Blades of Furry: The main characters are a budding gay couple. The rest of the major characters are a Cast Full of Gay composed of a non-binary person and another gay couple.
  • Born Sexy Tomorrow: The main character is a gay man, with his habit of breaking his lover's hearts without a second thought being one of his flaws.
  • Carpe Diem: Most of the main characters are gay or bi, with Josh being the only straight one in the group.
  • Cirque Royale has a Cast Full of Gay. For example, Kingston is bisexual demiromantic, Claudette is a lesbian, and Charlie is acearo. Quinn's twin brothers Will and Fred are a trans man and gay man respectively; Will's girlfriend Daisy is intersex and pan.
  • Childhood Friend Yuri the titular childhood friend is a trans woman and ended up in romantic relationship with the female protagonist.
  • Chrysalis: One of the main characters, Lady Garnet, becomes lovers with Lady Ash.
  • Cinderella Boy: The main character Chase is a young gay man who is attracted to members of Boy Bands and hot vampire guys.
  • Clover & Cutlass: The main character Maggie is a trans girl with a crush on another girl.
  • Court of Roses: Main character Merlow is trans, and supporting character Feliks is nonbinary.
  • Crimson Dark: The lead character Kari is a Butch Lesbian who's dating another female fighter pilot named Ren, with the latter turning into a main character over time.
  • Critter Coven: Among the main Coven members, Clara is a trans girl while Rosie is a demigirl who uses she/they pronouns, and they used to date but are on good terms with each other.
  • Crow Cillers: Zak and Mint Chip are transgender, and several supporting characters are gay.
  • Cucumber Quest: Both secondary protagonist Almond and antagonist/rival Peridot are queer girls with romantic feelings for one another. Additionally, Rosemaster, the Arc Villain of chapter 3, is a trans woman.
  • Darkest Night: The lead character Mags is a Butch Lesbian, and she's initially seeing a closeted bisexual woman. Another bisexual woman who's also transgender soon turns into her love interest.
  • DeadEndia: Barney, one of the protagonists, is a transgender man.
  • Demon Street: Most named characters are shown to be LGBT+, with the main cast including sapphic characters, a non-binary character, and a trans girl. There is a romantic subplot with two of the girls. The importance of names in magic is a recurring plot point, with trans characters' chosen names being their true names.
  • Dirty Healings: Prequel comic to Hazbin Hotel focusing on Angel Dust, a gay sex worker. (The other named characters are LGBT as well, though it doesn't come up in this comic.)
  • Doki Doki Literature Girls: Not only are all the protagonists dating each other, but Natsuki is also depicted as a trans girl.
  • Drop-Out is about Sugar and Lola, two nonbinary lesbians who decide to take a cross-country roadtrip to the Grand Canyon, where they will then jump to their deaths. Throughout the comic their struggles with gender and sexuality are some of the topics that come up prominently.
  • Duncan And Eddie: The story is about a gay couple and a major sub-plot is a transgender non-binary person falling in love with their genderfluid best friend.
  • El Goonish Shive: Many characters, both main characters and secondary characters, are confirmed to be LGBT+ and are in committed relationships. Early in the series this was limited to gay, lesbian and bisexual characters but later on, characters were confirmed to be genderfluid, trans, or strongly implied to be asexual.
  • Ennui GO!: The main character, Izzy Pritchard, is a bisexual woman who's in an open polyamourous relationship with two women (Darcy and Tanya) and regularly sleeps with both men and women. Most of the main and supporting characters are implied to be/lean toward being bisexual, with some characters being strictly gay (namely Darcy along with Izzy's twin sister Adelie and her wife Bella, who are lesbians). The only character who's confirmed to be straight so far is Kirsty, Izzy's clone. In part 2, supporting character Andromeda has a Coming-Out Story in a minor subplot, coming out to her ex-boyfriend Vanitas as a lesbian. Likewise Orion, a new member of the main cast, is shown to be gay.
  • Empress: Mother Earth's Handmaiden: The protagonist is a lesbian superhero.
  • Experience Boost: There is a short arc involving main character Zhusen coming out as transgender.
  • The Fantasy Book Club: All of the main cast except one are confirmed to be LGBTQIA+ of some sort.
  • Flaky Pastry: All three protagonists are bisexual women.
  • Foxes in Love: The two titular foxes are both men, with Green being transgender and Blue being bisexual. Although most strips are Slice of Life fluff and their gender is rarely even acknowledged, a few comics do deal with queer subjects such as getting top surgery or coming out to your family.
  • Fur-Piled: The comic is about the everyday lives of a group of friends in California, almost of whom are gay.
  • George and Johnny: Both titular characters are queer, with a romance slowly developing between them over time.
  • The Glass Scientists centers around an entirely queer main cast. Jasper is a trans man, the Creature is nonbinary and asexual, and Jekyll and Hyde are both bisexual.
  • Goblins: One of the main cast members is gay.
  • Go Get a Roomie!: The fun adventures of a life-loving, happy-go-lucky lesbian. At least that's how it starts...
  • Goodbye to Halos: An all queer cast, including a trans lesbian protagonist.
  • Grant: Grant is a gay werewolf, with part of the story being about him realizing his attraction to men.
  • The Green-Eyed Sniper: The main cast is are all lesbians.
  • Griefer Belt: Many of the characters are gay or bi, including Scott, Lars, Seong, and Addie.
  • The Guide to a Healthy Relationship: Julian, one of the main characters, is intersex and uses they/them pronouns.
  • Gun Kitty: Two of the main characters are pansexual and one is bisexual.
  • Gunnerkrigg Court: The deuteragonist Kat is bisexual, which she realizes after getting a crush on her classmate Paz and which she needs a while to accept about herself. There are also same-gender couples among the supporting characters.
  • The Hazards of Love: The main character is a nonbinary teenager, with much of the supporting cast being queer.
  • Heartstopper: Six out of the eight main characters are either gay, lesbian, bisexual, or trans teenagers, all are friends who get on well and came together to support one another.
  • Hetalia: Axis Powers: Everyone Is Bi seems to apply to countries, as most of the characters are bisexual. Italy, the protagonist, flirts with women but was also in a relationship with Holy Rome and has a lot of Ship Tease with Germany.
  • Hitmen for Destiny: The protagonist is revealed to be a lesbian, and there is a romantic subplot involving her and another female character.
  • Homestuck: Includes a bisexual alien race and several same-gender romance arcs involving both humans and aliens, with one main human character coming to terms with being bisexual near the end of the comic.
  • Homestuck: Beyond Canon: Many of the main characters are queer: Roxy is transmasculine, Kanaya and Rose are lesbians, Dave and Karkat are bisexual, and Dirk is a gay man.
  • Housepets!: Multiple characters are part of the LGBTQ+ community. Keene, one of the main protagonists/antagonists/anti-heroes/anti-villains is gay and in a relationship with Breel and with his evil half Nega-Breel, the human-turned-squirrel Marion has an arc of accepting his new body, including his sex having changed, the kangaroos Bruce and Roosevelt are a gay couple, Todd is at least bi-curious as he makes out with an unnamed male aardvark and Fox is heavily implied to be bisexual, as he is in a relationship with two she-angels and has overt Ship Tease with the male Mungo.

    I-Y 
  • Ignition Zero: An Urban Fantasy comic where most of the cast is queer- Robbie and Orson are asexual and dating, Neve is genderfluid, and Marin is aromantic.
  • Inverted Fate: Frisk and Chara are confirmed to be non-binary, with them choosing their own names and the latter having a deadname that won't be revealed.
  • ISO: Much of the cast is gay, with the protagonist struggling for a while with internalized homophobia.
  • Jackson's Diary: Exer and David are Childhood Friends who develop mutual feelings as the story progresses.
  • Karabear Comics Unlimited: Many of the superheros are trans. Eiderdown, Sparkle, and Swimmer are trans women and Astral and Runner are trans men.
  • Kiwi Blitz: Protagonist Steffi is revealed in a late chapter to be bi. Among the supporting cast, Chandra is into girls, and Cho is later revealed to have a wife.
  • Lemonhead and Lollipup: Lollipop is a transgender lesbian poodle.
  • Loserz: One of the three main characters, Jodie, is bisexual.
  • Love Unlimited (2022): Features rotating protagonists that include many queer characters such as Hulkling and Wiccan, who are a gay couple, Gwenpool, who is aroacenote , and Viv Vision, who is a lesbian.
  • Maddie on the Island Hue: Supporting characters Siobhan and Ebony are a bisexual girl and a lesbian respectively, and become a couple.
  • The Magpie is a horror comic whose main character is a queer woman.
  • A Matter of Life and Death: The story is about the personifications of life and death, who both take the form of human men. Death, the protagonist, is deeply in love with Life.
  • Meanies Comic: All of the Meanies are gay, and The Noid is transgender.
  • Ménage à 3: Most of the cast is either gay or bisexual.
  • Monsterkind: The lead characters Wally and Kip are both queer, though their exact sexualities aren't specificed. Wally develops a mutual attraction for his landlord Ben, while Kip is hung up on an old flame that returned to the neighborhood, Pascal. Both of these romances are recurring plots. Louise, one of the supporting characters, is genderqueer and uses they/them pronouns.
  • Monster Pop!: George is a queer cyclops girl in love with a gorgon girl, who in turn is in love with George's human friend Franny. Additionally, Percy, a supporting character, is a trans man.
  • MoringMark - TOH Comics: In addition to characters who were LGBTQ in canon, like Luz (bisexual), Amity (lesbian), Raine and Masha (both nonbinary, with the latter being depicted as being in a relationship with Vee), the comics depict Gus, Matt, and Alador as bisexual, with the latter dating Darius, Skara and Viney are depicted as married in the future, and Luz and Amity's daughter Ayzee is in a relationship with Skara and Viney's daughter Milan.
  • My Life In Blue: Alex is gay, Marius is transgender, and most of the other characters are gay or bi.
  • Nebula: The entire cast are nonbinary personifications of planets and stars, with Saturn and Uranus being the only two who use they/them pronouns exclusively.
  • Neo Kosmos: The main characters are nonbinary (Tye and Z) or transgender (Iris) children who were raised by an alien species who are a One-Gender Race.
  • Nevermore: Two main protagonists are lesbians, and recurring antagonist named Prospero was confirmed to be aromantic.
  • Never Satisfied: The story takes place a Non-Heteronormative Society, and most named characters are queer by means of gender, orientation, or both. Lucy (the main character) is nonbinary.
  • Never Say Goodbye: Judy is married to another woman, Shay.
  • Les Normaux: Most of the cast is queer: Sebastian is a gay man who falls in love with his neighbor, a bisexual vampire, Drew is a pansexual Frankenstein monster, and Pam is an asexual lesbian cyclops.
  • Oglaf is a sex comedy whose subject matter frequently includes same-sex sexual pairings and LGBT+ characters. As the comic as a whole is largely gag-a-day, most have been one-shot, though there is a reoccurring subplot of Sandoval attempting to woo Ivan to little success.
  • O Human Star: Al is a gay man's mind uploaded into a robot body by his lover Brendan after the original Al died. Sulla, their first robotic creation, was intended to be a copy of Al but developed her own personality completely different from his and transitioned to female.
  • On a Sunbeam: Almost every person in the comic is a queer woman.
  • The Order of the Stick: Haley Starshine is canonically bisexual and supporting character Bandana is a lesbian.
  • Paranatural: There are multiple LGBT+ characters among the cast, including main cast member Mr. Spender.
  • Parhelion has a central gay relationship, lesbian side characters, and about seventy percent of aliens go by 'they' when addressed in English.
  • Penny and Aggie: Over the course of the comic, Penny realizes that she's bisexual (or at least open to dating one girl), while Aggie realizes that she's only interested in women.
  • PepsiaPhobia: In Season 4, Phobia's child comes out as a trans girl and changes her name to Pepsia.
  • Peritale: Two of the supporting characters, Lavender and Dagmar, are nonbinary.
  • The Prince and the Princess: The title characters Edmun and Emilia are a gender-nonconforming pair who reject the attributes expected of them, switching clothes as a result. It turns out their parents understand and accept this. Edmund transitions to be a transgender princess, while Emilia is content as a masculine girl, becoming a knight.
  • Princess Princess (2012): The story of two princesses, Amira and Sadie, who fall for each other. At the end, they marry.
  • Questionable Content: Of the main human characters (depending on who you count as "main"), four are bi and one is trans.
  • The Quick and Dirty Life of Fritz Fargo: Eddie is a gay man, Fritz is bi, and Mona is a lesbian.
  • Real Life Comics: The main character over time realizes she is a trans woman.
  • Realta: Set in a fantasy Non-Heteronormative Society. The main character is nonbinary and their love interest is female.
  • Relativity follows the effects of a lightspeed space travel mission on an astronaut's relationship with her wife. As well as what happens when she ends up in an alternate universe where she and her wife divorced.
  • REVEAL OUT!: A closeted lesbian whose life is a shambles is mysteriously sent back in time to her college years, with the chance to correct her past mistakes, live true to herself, and get a girlfriend.
  • Rock and Riot follows the high school life of two rival gangs in the 50s, with queer couples abounding.
  • The Rock Cocks: Dakota is a trans man, Seth and his boytoy Georgie are gay, and Clover and Coral are lesbians.
  • RWBY Doodleverse: While Yang and Blake are in a relationship with one another, Ruby and Weiss are shown by some strips to be sapphic as well. Canon lesbians Coco and Ilia are recurring characters, with the former often giving other characters advice on getting a girlfriend.
  • Sandra and Woo: Recurring character Zoey Irwin is a lesbian, and her A Day in the Limelight arc centers around her coming to terms with her sexuality.
  • Scandinavia and the World: Most of the main characters are gay or bi. Sweden is gay and Denmark is bi.
  • Silver Bullet Nights: Seek, the protagonist, is an extremely buff, burly gay vampire mercenary.
  • Sister Claire: The main cast is mostly sapphic women and includes multiple couples, including a trans woman and an asexual woman. Word of God is that there are no cisgender heterosexuals in the comic.
  • Sleepless Domain: There is an sapphic romantic subplot between the protagonist and another main character. In this setting, anyone who is a girl can become a Magical Girl, including trans girls; one such girl is a major character.
  • Slightly Damned: The main protagonist, Rhea, is aromantic asexual, Buwaro and Kieri are both bisexual and Jake is genderfluid and pansexual. Not to mention many, many queer Demons.
  • Soft and Shattered: The entire main cast is LGBTQIA+, and met in a college dorm specifically for LGBTQIA+ people.
  • Spinnerette: A long-running subplot in the comic is lesbian Mecha Maid's crush on the heroine, who after some reflection eventually comes to the conclusion that she's bisexual since she desires Mecha Maid too. Later they start dating.
  • Splitting Image: None of the main characters are straight. Mortimer is bisexual, his son Spinelthorn is gay, and his friend/supervisor Veriesin is demisexual and pan.
  • Star Trip: Khut is a non-binary shapeshifting alien, and their human companion, Jas, originally left Earth to escape from her family's homophobia.
  • Star Impact: Buzz and Teddy, two side-characters and friends of Aster, are boyfriends. Additionally, a few scenes imply that Aster and Phoebe have crushes on each other.
  • Stellarscape: The main cast are the nonbinary personifications of stars.
  • Sunstone: One protagonist is a lesbian and the other is bisexual.
  • The Sunjackers: The main cast consists of a lesbian, a trans woman, and an asexual.
  • Switcheroo AU: A recurring element in the comics is Spinel and Japser's infatuation with each other, with Lapis being annoyed at Spinel getting together with her "awful ex".
  • Tamberlane: Belfry is asexual and several of the supporting characters are queer: Ainsley is nonbinary, Marie is transgender, and her parents are two women.
  • Tiger, Tiger: Remy, the twin brother that the main character is impersonating, is gay, and Luck the pirate is nonbinary.
  • Total Trauma: Several characters are given Adaptational Sexuality or Adaptational Gender Identity. Alejandro and Sierra are aromantic, Courtney is bisexual and in a relationship with another woman, Cecily, Gwen is also bisexual, Heather is a lesbian whose relationship with the aforementioned Alejandro in the original show is recontextualized as queerplatonic, Justin, Noah, and Owen are bisexual and in a polyamorous relationship, Cody is a trans man, Dakota is a lesbian, Harold is nonbinary, Jo is in a relationship with another woman, and Sam is a trans woman.
  • Trashy Vampire Romance Novel: The main characters are gay vampires, with the titular 'trashy romance' being between two men.
  • Twokinds: many characters of main and recurring cast are LGBT - Natani is transgender and gay, Keith and Kat are queer and Lynn is genderqueer. Alaric was also confirmed to be gay, and Maddie and Maeve were stated to be lesbians.
  • Unknown Lands: Vard is poly, Marya is a lesbian (with a wife and child at home), and Kai is demisexual.
  • Val and Isaac: Being LGBTQIA+ is normalised throughout the universe. Val is a queer woman, Isaac is an asexual man who both work together as mercenaries. Their ship's mechanic Minnow is a lesbian, who's dating a Robot Girl called Doris, and was adopted by two men. Recurring character Space Dread is a lesbian trans woman (who has a few comics about her coming out, which was mainly angst freenote ). In fact, the only place where there's any trace of heteronormity is the totalitarian empire Val grew up in.
  • Vinci and Arty is a slice of life comic that centers around a gay couple.
  • Walkyverse: Started introducing queer characters toward the end of It's Walky! and was eventually RetConned into the original Roomies!, though both examples are, as the author admits, rather cynical Bury Your Gays variants.
    • Shortpacked!: Introduced queerness to the Walkyverse in full. Of the three leads, Ethan is gay, Amber is (probably) straight, and Robin (after much confusion) identifies as "generally undefinably queer". Most of the supporting cast is some manner of queer.
    • Dumbing of Age: Of the seventeen listed under Main Characters, eight are LGBTQ, and this doesn't include Leslie, Marcie, Robin, or numerous secondary and background characters.
  • When She Was Bad: The Villain Protagonist is a lesbian who gains superpowers and decides to become a supervillain instead of a magical girl.
  • Winter Moon: The main protagonist, Florence, is openly Depraved Homosexual and constantly flirting with other male players.
  • Witchy: Nyneve, the protagonist, is a queer woman who wants to settle down with a nice girl someday. Her classmate Prill is a transgender woman.
  • Yellow Brick Ramble: Tip is transfeminine and has clear signs of gender dysphoria.
  • The Young Protectors: Kyle is a closeted gay man in training to be a superhero.

Top