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Kill ’Em All in video games.


  • The ending of Agarest Senki implies that everyone except the party members are going to die. And guess what? This is not the bad ending or the normal ending. This is the TRUE ENDING. Justified because the gods have supported the world and since you just kicked their asses, the world now belongs to the mortals but first, the ones who live at the continents have to die first.
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  • The True Ending in Akai Katana has all six heroes destroying the Blood Katana at the cost of their lives.
  • Alundra is an epitome of this trope. Its story revolves around villagers being killed through their dreams, and the titular dreamwalker Alundra trying to save them. However, he fails to save most of them, and by the end of the game, most of the cast has been killed off.
  • By the end of Asura's Wrath, only Mithra lived to tell the tale. Literally, as she is the one whose voice you hear in the next episode previews.
  • In Batman: Arkham City, this is the idea of Emergency Protocol 10: gathering as many of Gotham's criminals as possible, along with other prisoners, and once the "main attraction" — Bruce Wayne — is captured, proceed to have the Tyger guards level with city with missile fire. And the mastermind behind this, Hugo Strange, plotted to do this to Metropolis and Keystone City afterwards.
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  • In the bad ending of Breath of Fire IV, the final boss fight is against your former party members, ending with them all dead, as it's impossible to lose. It's then implied that your character goes on to end humanity as the credits roll over a black background.
  • In Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, nearly every character is dead by the end of the game; the only Retribution survivors are Salter, Brooks, "Boats", and Kloos. Additionally, a large majority of the armed forces of both the SDF and the UNSA have been destroyed; the latter, at this point, has literally no navy.
  • In Calm Time, the conclusion to the game ends with almost everybody except the main character dead. The main character was the one who killed everyone else.
  • The two "worse" endings in Cave Story:
    • In the "bad" ending, the only survivors are Quote and Kazuma.
    • The "good" ending adds to this list Sue, Sakamoto, and Itoh.
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    • The "best" ending, however, is not an example of this trope; as you have killed Ballos and prevented his powers from running rampant, preventing the freefall of the island to the planet's surface, which would otherwise kill everyone on the island, you also save Jenka, Balrog, Misery and a bunch of Mimigas. Everyone who wasn't already dead by the point you fought the Undead Core.
  • Downplayed in The Classroom. Although nobody actually succeeds in passing all the tests, many students are eliminated in non-lethal ways — fighting or being caught cheating and removed from the classroom, or implicitly disqualified from continuing offscreen. However, all of the main cast (appears to) die(s) — the geek is blown up by the grenade attack on day 9, the teacher is shot by the third student on day 10, and the protagonist is Driven to Suicide by this. Several other students also (appear to) die, including the initial suicide victim, who throws themselves out of the window, as well as the victims of the grenade attack, the only other student besides yourself to attend on the day of the shooting, and the shooter.
  • In Code 7, this is the objective of Big Bad S.O.L.I. Considering that everyone but Sam and Alex well, actually only Sam is dead, he's quite good at it as well.
  • Cognitive Dissonance: In the Bad Ending, the heroes all die trying to distract Gigyas from Zarbol travelling through time. Zarbol then promptly dies as per canon.
  • Dawn of War 2: Retribution has this occur in the Tyranids' ending: the resurgent Hive Fleet drives off the Inquisition, then proceeds to devour the subsector, killing 94% of all Guardsmen stationed there, and every last loyalist Blood Raven... to say nothing of the billions of civilians in the subsector. The last shot in the ending is bugs as far as the eye can see.
    • The Chaos ending is similar, with the entire sub-sector subjected to Exterminatus.
    • The original Dawn of War isn't much better, with the majority of the planet's population either slaughtered or corrupted, the planet itself about to be eaten by a Negative Space Wedgie, and all but three characters dead.
    • The Ork ending of Winter Assault has every character except Gorgutz and his unnamed Yes-Man dead.
    • The Necron endings of both Dark Crusade and Soulstorm have the omnicidal Killer Robots do what they do best.
  • Dead Space has you see everyone die, except Isaac, who goes on to the sequel Dead Space 2.
  • Tecmo's Deception series (and its PS2 sequel Trapt) winds up with almost every single character dead by the end of each game, that's any mook you see, any minor or major character along with the main character too, none of them are safe.
  • DEFCON's motto is "Everybody Dies". Appropriate as everybody DOES die as a result of a nuclear war.
  • Deus Ex: Human Revolution can end up this way depending on your actions, with only Frank Pritchard, Megan Reed, the Tongs and Bob Page as the certain survivors (with all but Pritchard being Doomed by Canon).
    • Of the key characters who die, Zeke Sanders, Isaius Sandoval, and Faridah Malik can all die if Jensen doesn't intervene. Bill Taggart, Hugh Darrow, David Sarif and protagonist Adam Jensen also die should the player choose the "Cover Up" ending and destroy Panchaea along with most of the protagonists/antagonists.
      • Since Jensen returns as the main character in Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, the "Cover Up" ending is the canon one. As it’s revealed that Adam was rescued and recovered... somehow.
  • Not only does everyone die in Digital Devil Saga, the final dungeon is itself the afterlife (which is deep within the Sun!). Amazingly, you can still wrangle a good ending out of this.
  • Doom. By the end of the first episode every single living character, no matter how minor, is confirmed dead. That's every single one of the scientists your crew was sent to check up on, every single one of your teammates no matter what station, and the protagonist himself is killed in the episode finale to boot.
    • Luckily, by the second game, Doomguy has literally killed his way out of Hell, and through the events of the game goes back and kills the Icon of Sin, whose death throes lead to destroying Hell itself.
    • Then in Doom 64, it turns out part of Hell survives, and a new ruler came up to recreate all the demons destroyed through the events of Doom 2. Doomguy's response? Kill them all again, and then stay in Hell to make sure that no demon ever thinks of coming to life again. Which is to say, Doomguy killed Hell. Pretty good for one man hopped up on stimpacks.
  • This is more or less the goal of the Dragon Age: Origins expansion pack The Darkspawn Chronicles. In an alternate universe where the Warden dies during the Joining ritual, the Ragtag Bunch of Misfits who accompany him/her in the main game must prevent The End of the World as We Know It without his/her leadership. But in this expansion, you play the game as one of the darkspawn — and killing all of these heroic characters is your objective.
  • Drakengard's 4th ending does this to all the main characters. Even all the supporting characters are gone.
  • The inevitable end to your fort in Dwarf Fortress is when goblins/orcs/megabeasts/kobolds/zombie-carp/you massacre everyone in the fortress.
    • Although now it is possible to "retire" your fort. Losing control of it and giving it to the AI until you would like to "unretire" it. Although the fortress has to be able to sustain itself without your help to live for very long.
  • Lu Bu's ending in Dynasty Warriors 6 can count. In the final stage, an alliance has been formed against Lu Bu and his men. This alliance has many warlords including Liu Bei, Yuan Shao, Cao Cao, Sun Quan, Zhang Jiao and Dong Zhuo. Even the likes of Liu Yao, Liu Zhang, Yuan Shu, Liu Biao, Zhang Lu and Kong Rong get involved. When their first attack plan doesn't work, they all attempt to attack Lu Bu together. No points for guessing how it turned out.
    • Being an adaptation of Romance of the Three Kingdoms, it's no small surprise that when the games from 7 onward introduced a campaign for Sima Yi's conquest at the end of the Three Kingdoms era, the vast majority of the Loads and Loads of Characters are already dead by the start of it, and only a few of the survivors make it to the end.
  • In The Elder Scrolls series backstory, Wulfharth Ash-King, the legendary ancient King of the Nords and noted Shezarrine who has died and come back to life at least three times, was part of two such instances in-universe:
    • According to "The Secret Song of King Wulfharth", this was the fate of nearly all of the leaders at the Battle of Red Mountain. Wulfharth blinded Alandro Sul with a Thu'um shout, but was himself struck down with "grievous wounds". Meanwhile, Nerevar, Dagoth, Dumac, and Shor who had been reunited with his Heart all killed each other but not before Nerevar was able to cut out Shor's heart once again.
    • This was the result of the fight that ensued when Zurin Arctus attempted to trap Wulfharth's soul. Wulfharth killed all of Arctus' soldiers and then killed Arctus himself with his dying breath. However, Arctus' soul-trap spell succeeded. The two were apparently left merged into one undying being known as the Underking. (A title that Wulfharth possibly went by even before this event.)
  • Almost every protagonist in Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem is killed off. Technically there are three survivors (and Alex), as the three characters don't die on-screen, though the final character implies that even if they're still alive in the present day, they'll be hunted down for the rest of their lives.
  • This is the good option in the Fallout 4 Nuka-World DLC: the Open Season quest is to kill all three Raider groups who are living there instead of working with them. Of course, you can always wait to do so until after you've gotten all the equipment and perks from completing the evil stuff. Can also be done in Far Harbor if you feel like being a jerk. There's even a unique perk for doing so.
  • This is the fate of Appalachia in Fallout 76: the Scorched Plague has left the entire region completely depopulated of human life. All that remains are the Scorched, feral ghouls, super mutants, and the bodies of their victims. By the time you emerge from Vault 76, you and your fellow vault dwellers are the only living humans remaining.
  • In Far Cry 2, every named character (except for one) is dead, including all of your buddies and the player character. In fact, you kill them all yourself, other than the Jackal — who was the one you were sent to Africa to kill in the first place...
    • Same thing happens in the original Far Cry.
  • According to Tetsuya Nomura, at one point in development in Final Fantasy VII, Hironobu Sakaguchi and Kazushige Nojima both wanted to kill off every character in the party apart from Cloud and the two other party members the player brings with them. According to them, they were getting pretty excited until Nomura managed to talk them out of it, saying it would rob Aeris' death of its impact.
  • Final Fantasy XV also featured a lot of the main cast killed off. First off King Regis is killed during the invasion of Insomnia, a lot of Niflheim's generals including Loqi, Caligo, and Iedolas are also killed in the boss battles. Lunafreya gets murdered by Ardyn, which causes the starscourge and turns a lot of innocent people into daemons, and he kills her brother Ravus soon after. Noctis sacrifices himself in order to permanently destroy Ardyn in the spiritual world after defeating and killing him in the physical one. The fates of Ignis, Gladiolus, and Prompto are left ambiguous as they are last seen about to fight a bunch of Iron Giants while Noctis performs his sacrifice but Word of God has confirmed they did survive to rebuild the world in his absence. Cid and his granddaughter Cindy were revealed to have lived as was Gladiolus' sister Iris. Talcott was also confirmed to be still alive at the end of the game as was Aranea Highwind.
  • Depending upon your interpretation of the ending of Final Fantasy Tactics, it might be just this. Every villain is killed, possibly all of House Beoulve the entire playable cast might have been blown away by the Final Boss's death explosion in the Airship Graveyard, and as for Delita and Ovelia, they have a frank discussion of their mutual differences using knives. Every non-playable character you meet is murdered somehow. By the end the last surviving characters are the ones at Ramza's funeral — and one of them is said to have been executed by the Church in the frame story. Valmafra, Mustafo's dad, and ironically Aerith are the only confirmed survivors. Orran also survived long to have produced at least one son, but is mentioned in the epilogue to have been executed.
  • At the end of Final Fantasy Type-0, everyone from Class Zero with the exception of Machina and Rem (and she died once) dies from the final battle and the epilogue says that Machina dies with a smile after 50 years of bliss with Rem. The New Game+ ending gave them all a much happier ending, but you still have to see them die. And even then, this is a "what if" ending so, canonically, Class Zero are all dead.
  • In Final Fantasy X-2, losing, or taking too long, against the final boss Vegnagun will result in it firing, obliterating not only your party, but all of Spira.
  • Final Fantasy XIII-2 is just heartwrenching. Despite all the multiple endings, only one of them is actually canon, and it's the worst ending possible. In the true ending, Serah dies, then EVERYONE DIES (except for Noel, maybe). And then it's revealed that Lightning has been Taken for Granite. The end.
    • Lightning Returns clears up some of the confusion though. While it is revealed that not everyone died, a good chunk of the population was eradicated during the Time Crash. And the trailers for Lightning Returns show that Lightning, Noel, Hope, Fang, and even Snow are alive and well, along with some form of civilization.
  • In Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War, after fighting his way to the capital to clear his family name and defeat the real villains, Sigurd and his army are betrayed and killed by Arvis. Just before killing Sigurd, Arvis even shows off his new wife Deirdre who used to be Sigurd's wife before being kidnapped and brainwashed.
  • First Encounter Assault Recon: Extraction Point, the non-canon Mission-Pack Sequel to FEAR, ends with all the protagonist's teammates dead, the protagonist himself on the verge of death, having failed to defeat the Big Bad, and The End of the World as We Know It looming.
    • The actual canon continuation, FEAR 2, isn't much better... Every ally that protagonist Michael Beckett comes into contact with except one dies throughout the course of the game, and Beckett himself is raped by the Big Bad at the very end, his fate after that left hanging.
  • The final mission of FreeSpace 2 unexpectedly ends with the local star going supernova, and both the player's character and his entire squadron are incinerated. If you replay the final mission forewarned and position yourself near the jump point and can escape before the star explodes, you survive but your team-mates' heroic sacrifice is mentioned in the final cut-scene, implying that it's a bit disappointing you didn't join them.
  • Ghost Recon: Future Soldier kills off the first player character and his squadmates in the prologue.
  • Surprisingly, God of War features this type of ending, with every member of the main cast dying by the end by the end of the third game with the exception of Kratos, who has a Disney Death that he survives.
  • The prequel game Halo: Reach is named after and takes place on the planet Reach, which in the Halo Expanded Universe has always been described as the humans' greatest and most devastating defeat, so terrible that it's not even called "the Battle of Reach" but usually just called "the Fall of Reach". The fact that virtually every survivor of the battle had already been long accounted for in canon, with you and your team not being among them, makes it clear from the very start how the game will end. However, later media confirmed that one member of the team, Jun, did survive.
  • This is essentially the entire goal of Hatred. The unnamed main character, his hatred for humanity having reached its boiling point, arms himself with as many weapons as he can get his hands on and goes on a rampage, killing everyone and anyone in his path.
  • It's quite possible to end Heavy Rain with all of the four protagonists (and quite a few extras) dead.
  • A self-imposed challenge done by players of the Hitman series of games.
  • Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number sees a number of its characters die at the end of their stories, not to mention those killed in the original game (Wrong Number is both a sequel and prequel). Even those who survive their own storylines die in a nuclear war between America and the Soviet Union.
  • In htoL#NiQ: The Firefly Diary, there are only four characters — the main character Mion, her mother, her father, and her dog. Mion is killed while she is sleeping and her parents try to bring her back through creating clones of her. Things return to normal, but the spirit of the original Mion is angry to find herself replaced and kills the entire family. The spirits of her parents become the fireflies Lumen and Umbra who leads a clone Mion through dangerous ruins. Eventually, in the true ending, they encounter the original Mion's spirit who kills the clone Mion and possesses her body which brings her back to life. However, the clone Mion's spirit becomes enraged at having been abandoned for the original Mion and kills Lumen and Umbra, destroying her parents for good, and causes the original Mion to be unable to use her body. After the clone and original reconcile, the two bask in the sunlight before their spirits disappear.
  • Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 has the Conquest ending, in which Nepgear literally kills off every single one of the CPUs and Gamindustri itself will soon crumble.
  • Infinite Space has quite possibly the biggest body count in any video game ever. By the end, billions of people and entire planets are dead.
  • The appropriately named Armageddon Ending in Live A Live. The worst part is that since you're playing as the bosses (which means you've already passed the Moral Event Horizon by picking Oersted/Odio as your final chapter protagonist), it's you who gives the command to nuke all of existence. And to gain access to the ending, you must let the heroes beat you within an inch of your life, so you pretty much have to go out of your way to get this ending. You just HAD to get 100% completion, didn't you? The Sad Ending also counts, despite having a far lower body count, because you still kill all the heroes, and at the end Oersted wanders around his now-empty kingdom, suggesting that he slaughtered the inhabitants before the chapter begins.
    • As far as individual chapters go, the Ancient China, Present Day, Far Future, and Medieval chapters end this way, and the player has the option of invoking it in the Feudal Japan chapter. However, it’s downplayed as in each case, the hero of the chapter lives. To wit:
      • China: Halfway through, the villainous kung fu school invades yours, and kills the two students who aren’t the successor. The Master and surviving student break into the villain’s lair in order to avenge their deaths, and slaughter each of the Big Bad’s minions in the room. Just after the Master passes on his final technique, he dies while taking the last of the Mooks with him, and the successor kills Odi Wang Lee.
      • Present: Each of Masaru’s opponents are killed by Odie Oldbright, who is then killed by Masaru in self-defense. This is seven out of eight characters.
      • Future: The only survivors of the starship are Cube himself, Kato (who is badly injured) and Darth. Technically, OD-10 is still alive in some sense, but as all its memories were deleted and it was forcibly shut down with its murderous personality destroyed, its original self is pretty much dead too.
      • Japan: One of the paths the player can take is to kill all 100 people in the castle, including prisoners and innocent bystanders. In this route, the only survivors are Oboro himself, and Ryoma, the man whom he rescues from the dungeon (and it’s implied that the latter will soon be assassinated anyway).
      • Medieval: After the Disc-One Final Boss, Hash succumbs to the plague which he had the whole time but did not affect him before now, and Straybow is then crushed by a collapsing ceiling trap. What’s left of the party returns to the castle, and, in the middle of the night, Oersted sees the Demon King seated on the throne, and kills it. Only for it to turn out that the Demon was an illusion, and he just killed the real king. He’s arrested, and Uranus uses the last of his power to break him out, and then dies. He is then forced to slaughter all the guards who try to apprehend him, and escapes to the Forbidden Zone, where he tries to set things right by killing the Demon King once and for all. He makes it to the top, only to learn that Straybow faked his death, and arranged the whole thing. They fight, and Straybow dies for real this time. And when Oersted finally finds Alicia, she commits suicide because of all that happened. This triggers Oersted’s Maddening into Misanthropy, he completely snaps, and becomes Odio all along. The final chapter, which is a sequel to this one, shows everyone in Lucretia as ghosts, so Oersted/Odio killed them too.
  • The Manhunt series, where your objective is to kill enemies to rack up points and survive. Very few story characters remain alive by the time the games are completed.
  • The Base Defense missions in the middle-late portions of Marathon 2: Durandal have the player scouring a friendly base from evil clones of the friendlies. How to tell them apart (except that clones explode when approached)? Well, the first such mission is called God Will Sort the Dead. Yes, it's a very viable strategy, and on the Xbox 360 port, it's actually necessary for 100% Completion.
  • The final battle of Mass Effect 2 is the aptly-named "Suicide Mission". Anyone Can Die, up to and including Commander Shepard him/herself if you're insufficiently prepared. Anyone except Joker, anyway.
  • The Refusal Ending of Mass Effect 3. Everyone from every civilization in the entire galaxy is killed by the Reapers.
    • Also the low-EMS Destroy ending, in which the Crucible misfires and causes massive destruction on Earth and presumably throughout the galaxy. While the final cinematic in the Extended Cut shows that some people survived, every main character is implied to die except Admiral Hackett, who is shown to be in a situation where he probably won't be alive for much longer.
  • Most of the lead and supporting cast of the Max Payne games is dead by the end of the second game, with only Max himself and one of the minor secondary characters surviving, unless you beat the game on the hardest difficulty, in which case Mona Sax also survives.
    • Max Payne originally kicks this off with Max Payne, Alfred Woden, Vladimir Lem and Vinnie Gognitti being the only major characters to live to the second game (with the Gognitti barely doing so when Max leaves him bleeding to death in an alley).
    • Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne takes this to the extreme, as Woden is shot, Lem is shot and falls to his death, Gognitti is blown up, newcomer Valerie Winterson is shot by Payne, and Mona Sax even comes Back from the Dead only to die yet again. The only major characters that live to Max Payne 3 are Max himself and Jim Bravura (and Jim later dies from a heart condition in the MP3 midquel comic.) Hell, it really isn't too surprising that many fans ignore the third as only Max returns.
  • The vast computer system that controls the Precursors of Mega Man Legends. Good thing Mega Man's the only surviving entity that can override it, or else it would've actually happened. Twice.
    • Similarly, though it hasn't happened yet, the Classic Megaman Franchise must end with everyone dying to kick off the events of the X Franchise. Most of the fandom agrees that Zero will end up murdering them.
    • The Elf Wars that took place between the Mega Man X and Mega Man Zero series resulted in the deaths of 90% of all reploids on Earth and 60% of all humans. It's safe to say that every character in the X series who's not X or Zero probably died during this period, or in Copy X's purges after he took control of Neo Arcadia, since none of them appear again afterwards.
  • Modern Warfare has one of the main characters as well as his entire squad, a pilot he just rescued, and countless other Marines, dying in a nuclear explosion. On the SAS side, the player is forced to watch as his entire squad is slowly killed off before being able to kill the Big Bad once and for all.
  • In Modern Warfare 2, only three characters of the main storyline survive. The same three that surived the first game. In the Washington side plot, everyone with a name seems to survive.
  • In Modern Warfare 3, Soap dies at near the end of the game, and Yuri buys some time so that Price could kill Makarov. Price survives, along with Nikolai.
  • Mortal Kombat
  • In NetHack, some advanced players choose to accept the "extinctionist" challenge, a special form of play where you have to drive every single monster to extinction. This can be accomplished by casting an appropriate spell on the monster you want to wipe out, or killing 160 of it. NetHack being how it is, most of those players' characters end up dying anyhow.
  • The original "good" ending for Neverwinter Nights 2: due to having a Load-Bearing Boss, The Very Definitely Final Dungeon collapses, burying the party. Mask of the Betrayer rectified the matter; over half the party survived.
  • By the end of NieR, a large portion of the main cast dies with only Emil, Yonah, and either Nier or Kaine, (depending on which ending you choose) being alive at the end. Also, thanks to Nier's actions, all of mankind dies between this game and NieR: Automata.
    • Its sequel, NieR: Automata, both plays it straight and subverts it during Route C/D which begins with the Bunker and most of the Yo R Ha units dying, 2B being infected by the Logic Virus and being killed by A2 (by 2B's order). Later, the virus infects Pascal's village, ending with a few slew of survivors (all of them children) who commit mass suicide, and you can kill Pascal as well, if you want. Devola and Popola sacrifice their lives later to allow 9S to proceed to the final area to defeat the Terminals who are the ones behind the whole war. Ending C ends with A2 performing a Heroic Sacrifice with a stinger who implies that 9S also dies, while Ending D ends with 9S killing A2 and, depending of the player's choice, 9S dying on earth. Ending E, the pods, having gained emotions, rebuild 2B, 9S and A2, giving them a second chance at life, making it the happiest outcome in a Yoko Taro game.
      ...All of which make it sound more optimistic than it is. The sum total of all survivors in the Golden Ending are the rebuilt 2B, 9S, and A2, Jackass, Anemone, the minority Resistance androids lucky enough to survive multiple assaults on their base, relatively few straggler Machine Lifeforms wandering aimlessly now their network is gone, and a couple of crackheads out in the desert too stoned to notice the world ending.
  • Odin Sphere ends in Ragnarok — the game's five protagonists must each fight against the five harbingers of apocalypse. Fighting them in any but one order (as hinted at through a series of prophecies) results in everybody dying, regardless of the player winning the fights.
    • The Good Ending isn't much better. Four of the five main characters survive, but everyone else in the world is dead.
  • OFF's endings both qualify. At most, the merchant, the tutorial's teacher and a Bonus Boss survive. Otherwise, you and the Batter literally pull the plug (or rather, the switch) on the entire world and everyone in it.
  • Pandemic has you setting out to achieve this across the entire Earth via disease.
  • In the Persona series, this tends to be the bad end result... except for Persona 2: Innocent Sin, in which this is the only ending; the world is destroyed except for Sumaru City, and party member Maya Amano is speared to death. You go back and change it, wiping the party's memories of each other in the process... until the protagonist remembers, causing the events of Persona 2: Eternal Punishment when it all happens again.
  • Planescape: Torment ends with the entire party dead and one's character sent to eternal punishment in the lower planes or erased from existence entirely. It's possible to save everyone but the main character, who goes to his eternal punishment if you do so. And that's the good ending. Though it is implied that he kicks ass in the afterlife, as well.
  • Power Stone 2 has meteors rain down from the sky and kill all the players should they take too long to kill each other in sudden death.
  • Radiant Silvergun. The game opens with the end of all life on the Earth at the hands of the Stone-Like, with the protagonists conveniently not being on Earth. Guy dies in a senseless (and rather bone-headed) sacrifice, ramming himself into the Stone-Like in a futile attempt to destroy it. Tengai loses it immediately after and does the same thing, his suicide run buying Buster, Reana and Creator time to flee into orbit. Buster and Reana are then teleported to 100,000 BC, and are vaporized in one final flash of light emanated by the Stone-Like. Creator, the sole survivor, permanently deactivates years later. Fortunately, this is immediately after successfully completing and awakening clones of Buster and Reana, the first two human beings, in a bizarre Eternal Recurrence plot.
  • In the Gamecube's Resident Evil (which is for all practical purposes the original RE), everybody but the player could and probably would die. In the worst ending, everyone dies except for the player character. Canonically, Jill, Chris, Barry, Brad, and Rebecca all survive, although this is impossible to achieve in the game.
    • In Resident Evil 3 the entire city is nuked, killing all but the lucky few who escaped.
  • Saints Row IV kills off a sizeable portion of the series' cast, as well as another seven billion people, with an Earth-Shattering Kaboom in the first few hours of the game.
  • The Shin Megami Tensei series has this in every mainline game.
    • Shin Megami Tensei I in the Neutral Ending. Starts off an ordinary day in a modern Japanese town setting. By the end, it's just you, the Heroine and the Old Man left alive in the entire world, more or less. The Lawful Ending has God's chosen people Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence, which sort of fits. It's averted in the Chaos Ending, but the survivors have a far worse world to look forward to.
    • Shin Megami Tensei II does nearly the same on the Law Route: Satan fires the Megido Ark thus killing off everyone on the planet, only those aboard the Ark survive, and even then, a horrified Satan turns on YHVH and kills Him in the final battle, and following that, Satan dies. By the end of it all, only Aleph, Hiroko, and Gabriel are alive.
    • In Nocturne: The True Demon ending involves preventing creation from ever happening again, breaking the cycle of destruction and rebirth.
    • Shin Megami Tensei IV: Siding with The White has you destroying the Yamato Perpetual Reactor (Particle Accelerator) to trigger a massive black hole which engulfs everything. The Law Route involves using it to wipe out Tokyo, including the protagonist and Merkabah.
    • Shin Megami Tensei IV: Apocalypse: Siding with Dagda leads you to the "Massacre" route where, in order to destroy all gods and create a new universe where gods do not exist, you kill everyone who believes in them.
  • At the end of Sine Mora, Argus kills his dad, Myryan dies of cancer, and the Enkies are extinct in the end.
  • In Soul Nomad & the World Eaters, the bad ending of the Demon Path leads to the killing of most of the cast on-screen, followed by Revya destroying both worlds and killing everybody else, him/herself included. This happens if you win.
    • Also the Asagi Route; in a divergence from her normal characterization, Asagi spitefully destroys the world, forcing you to start a New Game+ with her on the team.
  • Spec Ops: The Line has this through all of the endings as part of the heavy anti-war moral; ignoring the fact that most of Dubai is already dead or doomed before the game even begins, or that Walker's team dies before he reaches the conclusion, or the additional probability that the truth could get out and ignite another world war, the player then gets a final whammy depending on the ending chosen:
    • In the non-epilogue ending, Walker is horrified by a revelation after confronting Konrad, and kills himself out of guilt over his actions, resulting in Walker joining the already huge body count.
    • If Walker doesn't commit suicide, he is one of the few survivors and the game unlocks the epilogue endings:
      • Attacking the US squadron that finds Walker and dying means that Walker dies horribly along with the truth.
      • Attacking the US squadron that finds Walker and surviving only increases the chance of conflict and leaves Walker trapped and alone in a barren desert city.
      • Surrendering to the US squadron that finds Walker grants the only "happy" ending, but Walker remains shell-shocked and even alludes to the possibility that just because he didn't die doesn't mean he survived.
  • A humongous number of named characters are dead by the end of StarCraft: Brood War, with only 5 characters from the first game surviving (Kerrigan, Jim Raynor, Zeratul, Artanis and Arcturus Mengsk). The Epilogue hints that even all the player characters (with the possible exception of the Protoss Executor) were subsequently killed, either because they have outlived their usefulness or, because of the sequential nature of the campaigns, were on the losing factions.
  • Star Wars Legends:
  • While few characters are shown dying in Sunset Over Imdahl, the end implies that absolutely nobody within Imdahl's walls got out alive — the few who survived the plague were slaughtered by soldiers and dumped in a mass grave, which is found in a Bad Future that the hero utterly fails to avert.
  • In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the cinematic for the "World of Light" adventure mode shows the cast standing against Galeem, who absorbs an enormous amount of energy, unleashing a devastating destruction upon the entire universe, killing the entirety of the cast... except Kirby who managed to reach safety.
  • The bad ending of Tales of Xillia 2 does this by having Ludger turn on and kill off every single member of the party for the sake of his protecting his older brother, who doesn't want to live and needs to die for the sake of the world. You actually have to fight all of them in a proper battle, which understandably isn't easy, with it being one versus eight (Though mercifully, you only have to fight four of them at a time, with replacements coming in as each one falls).
  • The losing team in Team Fortress 2 is stripped of their weapons and made to run slower while the winning team gets a speed boost and 100% critical hit chance. Hilarity Ensues.
    • In the finale of Payload maps, both teams will be usually be near the bomb as it explodes (one team pushing the cart into the others spawn point), usually resulting in both team being killed.
    • The Heavy says this after eating a sandvich.
  • At the end of its second part, Traffic Department 2192 kills off the entire population of the planet on which it was set, except for a few members of the Traffic Department who escape. In part 3, everyone in the Traffic Department except Velasquez, Bob, and Velasquez's young son Ian dies, but they take with them all of the alien chain of command in their region of space except Orlok, who wants to reform the invaders from within, and Mala, another child. Between the two factions a species of Silicon-Based Life is completely annihilated. Velasquez's cybernetic implants are damaging her brain and will kill her soon, so that leaves a grand total of four survivors out of everyone who appears onscreen.
  • In Transistor, the entire city of Cloud Bank slowly is absorbed by The Process until only the main character Red is left alive. with the rest of the city dead, she decides to join her friend in the transistor.
  • In Undertale, you can do this, earning the most difficult Final Boss and the absolute worst ending in the game for your troubles, aptly nicknamed by the fandom: Genocide Route. Emphasis on all — you must grind until there are no more monsters in each area so that random encounters only say "but nobody came", because you killed them all. And if you spare even one Boss or Unique Enemy, or you kill a boss before killing every monster in their area, you get one of the Neutral endings instead depending on which bosses you killed and how many mooks you killed. But if you do succeed in your slaughter of absolutely everyone, you'll kill Sans, Flowey, and the world itself.
  • Unreal II: The Awakening ends with a massive Bridge Drop on the whole squad except the main characters. While there was a vibe of The War Has Just Begun, the sequel hook was surprisingly vague and no actual sequel materialized. Downer Ending all around.
  • A possible ending to Until Dawn with the anti-thesis of this trope and everything in between also possible.
  • Telltale Games' take on The Walking Dead ends with Clementine as the only confirmed survivor. Whether or not Omid and Christa survived is not covered.
    • As of Season 2 Episode 1, they survived for a few months before Omid was killed, then nearly a year and a half later Christa goes missing and her fate is unconfirmed
    • Season 2 ends with only Clementine, AJ and possibly Jane or Kenny surviving, depending on the player's final choice.
  • By the time Xenosaga Episode III's credits roll, all but one of the major antagonists are dead or otherwise out of the picture, three party members (Jin, chaos, and KOS-MOS) are either dead/gone or incapacitated, all of the series's supernatural figures have ascended to another plane for the time being, and about 90% of human life in the universe has been transformed into Gnosis. Episode III's second disc alone is responsible for the majority of these deaths.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 2 eventually got a Prequel bonus campaign called Torna: The Golden Country, taking place during the Aegis War in the titular country. The main game doesn't even try to keep secret that the entire continent of Torna sank in the climax of the War. Sure enough, by the end of it all only a handful of characters make it out alive (including not even half of the main party), and most of those are either going crazy, suicidally depressed, or both.
  • Japan-only Wii game Zangeki No Reginleiv has this as the ending, which is fitting, as the whole story is basically a version of the Nordic Ragnarök mentioned in Mythology. This tends to make the story a bit of a "Shaggy Dog" Story, as Frey and Freya fight off the giants and save civilian lives all for naught in the end, with the Giants eventually wiping out everyone but them. Their final battle with Surtur sees him die in a great ball of fire, as in the myth, which consumes everything, but The Stinger implies that Frey and Freya themselves survived, and became Adam and Eve for our world today. Don't try to think about it too hard...


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