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Jo Jos Bizarre Adventure / Tropes U to Z

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    U 
  • Uncle Pennybags: Speedwagon is this once he becomes a billionaire, taking Joseph on various trips around the world, sponsoring medical research and charities.
    • Joseph is this in Stardust Crusaders, footing the bill for the group's entire globetrotting adventure while putting them up in the best hotels available. He even buys an ultra expensive car to trade in a remote desert town just so he wouldn't have to waste time haggling, and buys an entire luxury submarine for the group to travel in.
  • Underestimating Badassery: Some villains, being the Smug Snakes they are, underestimate how powerful the heroes can be.
    • Dio underestimates Jonathan and all humans in general during Phantom Blood; it gets him almost killed and he wises up.
    • Red Hot Chili Pepper wants Josuke to punch him as fast as he can with his Stand to demonstrate his own speed. Crazy Diamond punches him across the room.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change:
    • Stardust Crusaders could be considered a narrative equivalent. It introduces the concept of Stand, a Guardian Entity which will fight instead of its user, whereas in the previous parts, the fighter fought more physically.
    • The fights in Steel Ball Run. Unlike the previous parts, which had a large number of humanoid Stands fighting directly, most Stands in Steel Ball Run tend to simply grant superhuman abilities, while their users fought personally, making fights even more complicated and tactical.
  • Unorthodox Reload: Mista's hat bullets, though he reloads the normal way as well.
  • Unsafe Haven: Averted by the Speedwagon Foundation. Once an object is under their care, even when it's the body of a villain that can regenerate without proper care, it is secured permanently. Especially notable because their agents tend to be Red Shirts in the field.
  • Unscientific Science: Many explanations of the bizarre phenomena in the series are quite unscientific. Breathing a certain way will allow you to channel sunlight energy; vampires are just humans who were stabbed in key parts of the brain; contracting sudden illnesses in one body part is explained as the body heat being sucked off by flying creatures called rods and so on. Though, considering the title, no one really cares.
  • Unsettling Gender Reveal: A number of times in the series. Most blatant with Anasui in Stone Ocean, since he actually was a woman in his first appearance but was retconned into a man for his second. Then inverted in Steel Ball Run with Hot Pants, who we find out is a woman when Johnny treats her wounds.
  • Unsound Effect: The Stand Echoes gets this in its Act 2 form. Write kaboom, and something will explode. Put zoom on something, it will go fast. Act 1 allows it to paste said sound on someone and force them to hear it over and over, while Act 3 gives Koichi Super Saiyan hair and the ability to put a gravity well on anything by saying "Freeze"; this can apply to anything from a person's hand to a car.
    • Sandman from Steel Ball Run, real name Soundman, has something similar.
  • Uplifted Animal: Animals that have Stands receive a higher degree of intelligence along with their Stand. The most extreme example would be Foo Fighters, a plankton colony who gained sentience through its Stand and is considering that Humanity Is Infectious.

    V 
  • Vampire Bites Suck: Vampires in the JoJoverse feed by shoving their fingers into your body. No, they don't have any powers that make this easier — they literally shove their fingers into you.
  • Verbal Tic: Many characters have one.
    Jotaro: Yare yare... [or "Gimme a break" in English]
    Josuke: Great!
    Joseph: Oh my god!/Oh no!
  • Victimized Bystander: Ubiquitous; bystanders will die if they happen to be near a villain.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: Araki likes to give in-depth explanations about the biology and physics behind certain abilities and Stands, despite the fact that most of the readers won't understand it. Half of the physics in the series are complete bullshit anyway.
    • And then there's all of the religious symbolism and imagery that's been popping up in Steel Ball Run lately. Though having shifted demographics and being a seinen now, it's a lot more likely to be picked up on by readers.
    • In Steel Ball Run, it is just turned to astronomical levels. The explanation of the first use of the Spin put on top of criminals for execution is not true. The weight was put there so the dead could not be turned into vampires, as an old superstition. Best misleading ever. Just understand that the Spin is a whole problem in itself.
  • Villain Ball:
    • Kars, transformed into the Ultimate Lifeform, thinks it would be fitting to go kill Joseph and finish him off with the Ripple. Joseph uses an Amplifier Artifact to cause a volcanic eruption and sends him into space.
    • DIO, instead of using Za Warudo to immediately kill the helpless heroes in his Egyptian base, uses it to play pranks on them or monologue, when no-one (except Jotaro) can hear him. This gives the heroes time to escape, figure out his power, and for Jotaro to slowly learn how to perform it with Star Platinum and kill DIO with it.
    • Of course Kira had to loudly gloat about himself in public. He is overheard by Josuke and this leads to his downfall.
  • Villain Episode: Sometimes, the chapter/episode will be from the villain's point of view to break the pace.
    • The "Oingo and Boingo" chapters are all from the point of view of the two Stand users who try to assassinate the crew, but they lamentably fail.
    • The "Kira's new Situation" chapters focus on Kira trying to adapt to his new identity at the Kawajiri household.
    • The "My Name is Doppio" arc happens from the point of view of Doppio, Diavolo's right-hand man and alternate identity.
  • Villainous Breakdown: All of the villains suffer breakdowns as they meet their final fates and their plans are totally foiled.
    • In Battle Tendency, Kars, launched into space by a taunting Joseph, screams his lungs out as he realizes nothing he can do will put him back on Earth. The greatest scientist and mastermind of his species ceases to think due to the sheer horror of his situation.
    • DIO, defeated by Jotaro, screams This Cannot Be! as he dies, while not an hour earlier, he was the most serene man on earth and utterly confident in The World.
    • Kira, who constantly thinks of himself as being extremely lucky, is dragged away by the malicious spirit of the ghost alley, his soul and Stands being literally broken in many pieces, and he loses his composure one final time while disappearing.
    • Diavolo, whose pride defines half of his personality, must experience many deaths and cannot escape from it. The last we see of him is him terrified and begging a little girl to stay away from him.
    • Pucci, who spends the part following the instructions of Dio's plan, is foiled at the last step and all because of Jolyne and Weather Report, his two bitterest enemies who contributed to Emporio getting Weather's Stand. Begging Emporio to let him be, Emporio debunks Pucci's view of Fate and Pucci sinks in a deep rage, trying futilely to hit Emporio.
    • Valentine is hit by Tusk ACT 4 and he realizes that he's going to be trapped in a hole underground forever. However, he is the only main antagonist to recompose himself and prepares a Thanatos Gambit to ensure his goal is fulfilled somewhat after his death.
  • Villainous Legacy: Dio leaves the Joestar Family with the consequences of his actions after death such as turning Jonathan's sacrifice into a boon for himself, the initial foes of Part 4, his son in Part 5, the reason why Pucci starts his plan in Part 6, and still remaining a thorn to the Joestars in Part 7, to say nothing about Eyes of Heaven. While Dio remains the de facto main villain of the series, his legacy is the byproduct of Kars, the ancient Pillar Man from Part 2, who created the stone mask that made Dio into a vampire in the first place and caused Dio's ascent to power. In a way, Kars is The Man Behind the Man to Dio despite being overshadowed by him.
  • Villainous Valour:
    • In general, each Big Bad works just as hard as the heroes to accomplish their goal, and they have their own setbacks.
    • Rikiel has to work out his insecurities in the middle of his battle against Jolyne.
    • Prosciutto and Pesci are loyal to each other, and Proscuitto's sacrifice to the cause (you know, killing the heroes and kidnapping the Boss' daughter) pushes Pesci to become brave in battle (read: able to kill in cold blood and use the most underhanded ways to win).
  • Villain Pedigree: Vampires are quickly replaced by Pillar Men, who are quickly replaced by Stand users, mostly out of necessity. At the time, both Dragon Ball and YuYu Hakusho were running in Shonen Jump, and while JoJo was more in the vein of Fist of the North Star (which already finished) thanks to vampires and the Ripple power, it was still similar enough, and was behind both of them in popularity. Stands brought something fresh and new to the manga and differentiated it from its peers.

    W 
  • Walking Wasteland: Characters having Stands which have devastating powers in a large scale are this.
    • In Vento Aureo, Purple Haze and Green Day can release respectively a flesh eating virus and a mold with exponential growth which can both kill people in seconds, infect victims indiscriminately and at high speed, and are able to kill the entire population of a city in minutes.
    • Heavy Weather from Stone Ocean can hypnotize people into transforming into snails, said snail being able to transform other people by simple contact. This ensures a snail apocalypse that only Weather's death can really stop.
  • Weaponized Teleportation: Several Stands (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Foo Fighters, etc.) can teleport between or instantaneously travel through things like electrical currents or water. Oftentimes, they use this offensively by dragging their opponent along for the ride.
  • Weirdness Magnet: Before Part 3, being a Joestar means you lead an interesting life. In and after Part 3, an explicit rule of the series is that Stand users are drawn to one another.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist:
    • The truly faithful Father Pucci, whose ultimate goal is to reach the "Heaven" he heard his mentor Dio talk about. He'll do anything and sacrifice anyone to get to it, and apparently, he does: he rewinds, remakes, and resurrects the world (that he completely messed up), but is killed before he can join it.
    • Funny Valentine from Steel Ball Run also qualifies; his motivation for gathering the Corpse Parts was so he could use them in conjunction with his Stand D4C to deflect any misfortunes that might have befallen America elsewhere, thus ensuring an everlasting golden age for his nation.
  • Wham Episode:
    • When Dio stabs George Joestar in the back and uses his blood to become a vampire, Phantom Blood goes from a Drama to a Supernatural Action manga. Then it all goes weird from here.
    • The ending of Phantom Blood implies that after destroying Dio, Jonathan will go on even more bizarre adventures (it's in the title, after all) — and then Dio comes back with a vengeance and kills him, turning the entire story into a Generational Saga about his descendants that all share his "JoJo" nickname.
    • The Tusk Arc in Steel Ball Run. Here we discover that the Steel Ball Run is a cover-up, concealing a cross-country hunt for the separated pieces of a saint, containing unfathomable power. Oh, and the President of the United States is involved in all of this.
  • Wham Line: After Jonathan Joestar's untimely death at the end of Part 1, the beginning of Part 2 has its new protagonist drop a line redefining the meaning of the series' Character Title.
    "Joestar - Joseph Joestar. You may call me JoJo."
  • Wham Shot: In the climax of Stardust Crusaders, we finally see how DIO's Stand works. He activates it, stopping time, and then summarily punches Kakyoin through the chest and into a water tower.
  • What Kind of Lame Power Is Heart, Anyway?: Subverted to hell and back. No matter how stupid or ridiculously limited a Stand power seems, the user will find a way to make it an advantage.
    • Played straight with Survivor, Cheap Trick, and Superfly.
      • Survivor is derided by DIO as a useless Stand because it's always on, cannot select its targets, and is woefully restrictive in what it does. It makes people fight each other, and relays to them their opponents' weakest points. That's it. It can play off of aggression, but it won't make people fight if they don't have much animosity. Its user didn't even fight, and got quite a large bridge dropped on him.
      • Cheap Trick kills its user if someone sees his back and goes to the person who saw it (even if they already have a Stand, breaking the "one Stand per person" rule). It tries to get people to see the back of the current "user" by whispering and taunting the victim, attempting to drive them into a frantic state where they lose awareness of their surroundings and any people around them.
      • Superfly "protects" its user by keeping him contained in its tower. The user can only escape if a victim is lured inside of Superfly, and even then the user/current victim has to escape before the new victim realizes what happened and tries to escape themselves.
      • Any attempts to destroy Superfly from the inside will automatically reflect the exact amount of damage back in the direction of the source.
      • Generally, nearly all Stands which function independent of the user and can't be turned off get a degree of this treatment just by the virtue that even the user can't control it if they wanted to. They often just try to get the user as close to their target as they can and let it operate naturally under the mentality of "Well, at least it's their problem too now."
  • What Measure Is A Nonhuman: Averted with any non-human members of the protagonists' True Companions, and even their enemies are largely treated the same as their human foes. In Stone Ocean, Foo Fighters (a Stand composed of pond algae) is even given a Heel–Face Turn and joins the core group.
  • Widget Series: Even before orangutans, dogs, swords, turtles, and plankton were allowed to be bestowed psychic powers, the series was just plain weird. Doesn't stop it from being manly, awesome, and badass as hell.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: The average Stand makes you untouchable by non-Stand users; ordinary people can't even see your Stand, much less do anything about it. This allows you to do pretty much whatever you want whenever you want to whomever you want. This is hinted now and then to be a big reason why so many of the evil Stand users are so Ax-Crazy.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Perks: Especially in the fourth part which has a Slice of Life tone. Many a Stand user enhances their daily lives by using their Stands in mundane ways, such as Rohan collecting interesting trivia by transforming people into books or Shigechi collecting extra pocket money with his Stand Harvest.
    • The Spin gives even more perks due to its versatility; Gyro has made women more curvy with it, and Johnny can brush his teeth with his spinning nails.
  • The Worf Effect: The dangers of Sheer Heart Attack is hyped as it manages to defeat Jotaro, the strongest Stand user of the previous part.
  • World of Badass: By Stardust Crusaders, it's practically invoked as a law. Stand Users seem to be drawn together by fate. So if you're one, chances are your daily life will generally involve badasses.
  • World of Ham: Why talk when you can SHOUT!? Why stand when you can POSE!? Why walk when you can LEAP!?
  • World of Muscle Men: The male cast are almost entirely buff, manly men. Way back at the beginning of the series, Jonathan Joestar and Dio Brando can, at age 12, be easily mistaken for older because of this trope.
    • It was downplayed as the series went on; Vento Aureo had all the men be slender due to Araki wanting to overload his readers with Ho Yay and fabulousness, none of the men in Stone Ocean were notably heavyset and the main characters were women of healthy builds, and parts 7 and 8 had a large Art Shift that all but eliminated overt musculature in clothed characters.
    • Close examination shows that both Johnny and Josuke from JoJolion are very well-built, Josuke being about as muscular as Jotaro (who was clearly huge). The fact that they're drawn so thin is a tribute to how far Araki has gone to eliminate the trope.
  • World Tour: Half of the parts are about the heroes travelling around the world:
    • Battle Tendency begins in New York, then goes to Mexico, Rome, Venice, and Switzerland.
    • Stardust Crusaders begins in Japan, then goes through China, Singapore, India, Pakistan, Arabia, and then Egypt.
    • Golden Wind begins in Naples, but the squad travel throughout Italy, to finish in Rome.
    • Steel Ball Run is a race across the United States, from the West Coast to the East Coast.
  • Worthy Opponent: Subverted in Battle Tendency. Kars tells Lisa Lisa that he will give her a fair fight to honor the memory of Wamuu and Esidisi... only to disguise a mook as himself during their "fight" and stab her while she was distracted. He then tells her that he wanted the Red Stone of Aja, which she had on her person, enough to not take the chances his dead companions had. As you'd imagine, this comes across as a massive Kick the Dog moment, as it basically slanders the honor and struggles of his deceased companions.
    • Played straight with Joseph, who feels this way towards Wamuu as well as Esidisi for their determination in wanting to go all out for their master.
    • Wamuu himself feels this for both Caesar and Joseph after getting the chance to fight each of them one on one.
    • In Phantom Blood, Dio views Jonathan as this, after Jonathan uses Ripple to destroy Dio's body.
    • Bruford views Jonathan as this for defeating him, even lending him his Cool Sword in respect towards him.
    • Pucci views Jolyne as this, due to her tactical mind and flexibility that makes her more dangerous than Jotaro.
    • Jotaro views N'Doul as this, even thinking that they would've been allies if he weren't loyal to Dio. He also seems to regard the elder D'Arby as a Worthy Opponent; acknowledging that, while not powerful, he nearly took them all out in one go. After defeating the younger D'Arby, Jotaro mocks him by pointing out that his elder brother would have easily figured out his and Joseph's cheat.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Villainous characters have no qualms with killing children, but special mention goes to Alessi, who de-ages his opponents specifically into childhood so they're too weak to defend themselves.
  • Wouldn't Hit a Girl: Averted, big time. It doesn't matter if you're a man, girl, animal, or even a child. If you piss off a JoJo, and he/she gets their hands on you, then you're better off dead.
    • Wamuu, Kars' dragon, plays it completely straight, though.
    • Well, if said women aren't evil, then Jotaro could qualify.
  • Writing Around Trademarks: The English translation of the arcade game is loaded with this, as many of the bad guys have their names romanized differently to avoid copyright infringement (Devo becoming D'bo and Vanilla Ice becoming Iced, for instance).
    • Araki not letting it happen a second time is why the Vento Aureo game GioGio's Bizarre Adventure was not released stateside, despite Capcom's every intention to do so.
    • The anime primarily doesn't have to (or at least wouldn't in the US) do this because it's funded by Warner Bros. (owned by Time-Warner), whose music label owns the rights to the majority of artists referenced.
      • A few instances do come up, however, such as J.Geil becoming Centerfold (which was Araki's suggestion) and Captain Tennille becoming Captain Dragonnote .
    • Araki lightened up on it with All-Star Battle and Eyes of Heaven, where the name changes are actually of his choosing.
  • Written Sound Effect: Araki takes this trope very seriously. Very notable written sound effects are one of the notable traits of his style and he considers them an integral part of his artwork. As a result, they have shown up in all of the video games and the 2012 anime. Two separate characters have sound effect-based powers, as well.
    • Example: Memetaa, the sound of a frog being punched
  • Written Roar: Oh, constantly.
    WRYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!

    Y 
  • Yandere: Yukako Yamagishi.
    • One example of her crazy love is when she discovers that the one she loves (Koichi) isn't exactly an upstanding individual. Of course, this was a plot set up by Koichi's friends in order to make her stop liking him. This fails, however, because it instead makes her kidnap him in order to make him the perfect man. Then it got worse...
    • Daiya Higashikata from JoJolion was a yandere as well, seeing as she steals her new brother Josuke's memories because she wanted to share his experiences and be with him forever. Like Yukako, she tones it down as well.
    • Dio is infamous for his disturbing obsession with the Joestars, especially Jonathan. Enough to steal his body because he felt him worthy enough to host to "live gorgeously" forever.
  • You Are Already Dead: Played with. When DIO uses The World to stop time and circumvent Kakyoin's 20-Meter Emerald Splash trap, he has The World punch a hole through his torso, then casually comments on how, as a result of time having stopped, he didn't realize yet that he was dead.
    • Before, in Part 2, when Lisa Lisa kills the vampire named Wired Beck.
  • You Can't Fight Fate: Surprisingly a case in this series. Pucci used Made In Heaven to make everyone relive their lives once until a singularity in time created another identical universe in which people would live normally with the exception of the visions they have of their own future, preparing them to accept their fate. However, Emporio put an end to that.
    • There's a prequel chapter at the end of Vento Aureo as well, which retroactively predicts Bucciarati's death.
    • The recent chapters of JoJolion revealed that Johnny still ended up dying young, just as the original Jonathan did to save a child (this time, his son George as opposed to Elizabeth/Lisa Lisa in the original timeline) as well as his wife after a failed attempt to save Rina from an unknown illness using the Corpse.
    • Boingo was correct in saying that his Stand is never wrong, no matter what the prediction is. It just never tells you the whole story. For example, the last prediction we see Thoth making in the manga states that Hol Horse's bullets would "go through Jotaro's head", which Hol Horse nearly screwed up by his watch being fast and his trying too hard to ensure it would happen. As a result, Hol Horse consults Thoth in desperation to find out what will happen next and ends up eating his own bullets, which happen to tear through the image of Jotaro's head that it displayed beforehand, fulfilling the prophecy, more or less.
    • King Crimson's predictions are always true as well, until Gold Experience Requiem comes into play.
  • You Can't Kill What's Already Dead: Stands usually operate on the logic that if their user dies, they die, and vice-versa. Come Vento Aureo, and we're introduced to Notorious B.I.G., a Stand that activates after the user dies. The Stand itself is nigh-untouchable, and it's stated to have infinite durability on its stats page.
  • Your Size May Vary: Stands are usually of the same build as their users, but several scenes make the Stands bigger for dramatic effect.
    • During the "Lovers" arc, Kakyoin and Polnareff disclose the ability to shrink their Stands.
  • You Shall Not Pass!: Jolyne sacrifices herself and stays back to fight Pucci, who is now many magnitudes more powerful than her, as Emporio flees on a dolphin since she places her hopes on Emporio's ability to stop the priest and knows that she is dying.
  • You Taste Delicious: Vento Aureo. "This taste... it's [the taste] of a liar!" To clarify, according to Bruno, sweat tastes sweeter when the person sweating is nervous, indicating they're hiding something. While he was correct in that instance, slipping a severed eyeball into the person's hand and licking the person's face probably doesn't help them keep their cool.
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: A staple of every major villain's plot in JoJo's Bizarre Adventure.
  • Your Head Asplode:

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