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  • 7th Heaven:
    • When Lucy Camden's encouraged by her father Eric to do her Confirmation in the church, she asks to read about other religions first. Eric acts like he is totally fine with this and gives her books about other religions. When she tells him to have become interested in Buddhism however, Eric says to Annie he will never let that happen, and then straight-out blackmails Lucy (by threatening to else punish her for something) into doing the Confirmation. Not only, why would he give her the books and fake to be so open-minded about other religions if he wouldn't let her make her own choice anyway, but worse, wouldn't a minister want people to commit to a religion out of their own conviction and faith, instead of being blackmailed into it?
    • When Mary Camden decides not to go to college and instead takes jobs as a waitress and other low-paying jobs, her parents are repulsed by that. Ironically, some of the jobs she has are in joints her parents themselves hang out — so while the Camdens put on this façade of accepting all people, they really deem waiters and other not-requiring-a-college-degree jobs to be less worthy people. The real hypocrisy kicker comes 2 years later though when Mary gets a job as an airline attendant — a better-paying, and requiring more professional training, job than those she had before — and they even react in horror to that too; Annie says "How could our kid that had so much promise in high school, end up as an airline attendant?"
    • When The Unfavorite child of the Camden family Mary announces her marriage to Carlos to her family, they talk about it amongst themselves and say the marriage will probably be problematic because Mary and Carlos "are from different backgrounds, languages, religions". Not only is Carlos a man who happens to be of Puerto Rican descent but speaks English perfectlynote , but the Camdens never objected to other people of different ethnicities being together before - apparently that's o.k. as long as it's not my children... They also apparently now deem Catholics, not Christians, while other daughter Lucy herself also married a man who was Catholic.
    • "Tunes", again. The episode is basically saying that people shouldn't listen to rap music because it adds to ignorance about prejudice against women, but in the process, it implies that all rap listeners (including women themselves) are misogynistic, which itself is ignorant and prejudiced to the people who listen to that music. Also in earlier seasons, in some episodes, you could hear some of the Camden kids listen to rap music, though this wouldn't be noticeable at first glance.
    • Martin's season 10 teen pregnancy storyline. In season 9, Martin basically gave Simon a talk about the "evils" of premarital sex and stated that he would never have sex until marriage. Flash forward several months later, Sandy comes to Martin announcing her pregnancy with his child, the result of an affair that occurred over the summer. More over, Martin blatantly ignored Sandy during much of her pregnancy and pretended that he wasn't the father for much of the time.
    • The family's philosophy seems to be "don't hate anyone" even if they are unbearably annoying. However, this doesn't really stop them from hating Rose, who granted was an Alpha Bitch, though their philosophy is ultimately thrown out the window for just this one person.
    • In the Season 9 finale "Mi Familia (Part 2)", under the belief that Mary and Carlos are getting back together, Annie decides not to call them because she believes that she and the family should stay out of their business in order for them to reconcile in their own way (Annie's words: "Everyone is going to stay out of this, including myself and your father...Sometimes the best thing you can do for someone you love is to stay out of their business.") However, this is contradicted by the family's meddling behavior into almost everyone's business, including their own family members, which has gotten so bad to the point where it has become a Once an Episode thing.
  • 24: Andre Drazen tells Ira Gaines "when plan A fails, you move onto plan B. You don't do plan A recycled". What is the Drazens' plan for assassinating David Palmer later on if not "plan A recycled"?
    • On Day 3, Tony calls out Jack for trying to stop him going rogue even though Jack does so whenever it suits him. Something similar happens on Day 5. Then on Day 7, Jack and Tony team up in an unsanctioned undercover operation and kidnap a foreign president. Later that day, Jack stops Tony from committing murder, which he himself had done at least twice before and would go on to do at least twice more.
  • All My Children:
    • In 1997, Erica Kane kidnapped Maria Santos' baby out of vengeance (she believed the child was the result of an adulterous fling between Maria and her husband Dimitri) before finally returning her out of remorse and guilt. Already a demonstration of Erica's hypocrisy — many of Erica's relationships, including that with Dimitri, consisted of her being the other woman and/or cheating on her husband/boyfriend — Erica conveniently forgot what she did to Maria when she repeatedly blasted Babe for doing the same thing to her daughter Bianca.
    • Janet Green calls out pretty much everyone for refusing to give her a second chance without regard for the fact that many of them had done some pretty terrible things themselves.
    • An downright cruel example when Gloria taunts Hayley about trying to kill herself—when she herself attempted suicide only a year earlier.
  • Ally McBeal/The Practice: In a two-part crossover episode, one of Cage & Fish's clients is arrested for murder. Deciding that the case is out of their firm's league, John Cage enlists the help of Bobby Donnell and his firm. However, after seeing how wacky the Cage & Fish lawyers are, Bobby secretly goes to the client and advises her to discharge Cage & Fish and hire Bobby's firm as her sole representation. When Bobby asks the client to trust him, she raises an eyebrow and points out that Bobby is asking her to trust him at the same time that he is betraying somebody else's trust. Bobby has no real response to this, and later goes to Cage & Fish and admits what he'd done.
  • Arrow:
    • A recurring element of Oliver Queen's character. He criticizes Thea for her partying despite having done the same thing himself, and she at least has the excuse of acting out after the apparent death of her father and brother, while he was just young, rich, and stupid. His attempt to tell Helena what she's doing is wrong fails utterly because they're both murderous vigilantes, and he was actually going to kill the same man she killed for the same reason (In Season 2 after adopting Thou Shalt Not Kill he tries again with a little more success, as he actually has a leg to stand on that time). He's furious at Moira for not telling him about Thea's real father, but not only is he keeping much more dangerous secrets from his family, but he doesn't tell Thea either, even though she arguably has a much greater right to know than he does.
    • Laurel also suffers from this (repeatedly keeping secrets from her loved ones and then chewing others out for keeping secrets from her being the main issue) though at least she tends to be called out on it more than Ollie.
    • In season 4, Felicity gets angry at Oliver then breaks up with him because he hid his illegitimate son from her despite herself keeping secrets from him before including at the beginning of the season when she was still assisting Team Arrow.
  • Austin & Ally: Trent eggs Austin into a dance-off by calling him afraid that his dancing isn't up to snuff...this coming from a guy who pretended to date Trish while has a girlfriend to become Austin's backup dancer because he thought his dancing wasn't up to snuff.
  • Battlestar Galactica (2003):
    • The Cylons have the distinction of being one of many "alien"/Robot races in Sci-Fi who engage in Cultural Posturing over their superiority to humanity while engaged in genocide. They got called on it a few times too, with their assertions of humans deserving extinction for being flawed, sinful and evil being refuted with "you call us evil? You committed genocide on my race!" (paraphrased). To their credit, the hypocrisy of their endeavor hits them around the end of season 2, culminating in a disastrous military occupation to "make amends" over their crimes. It helps to understand the situation that it was not their creators' intent to do so, but the result of a Psycho Prototype getting control of things. That said, in BSG Humans Are Bastards is an understatement, which goes a long way to explain why it keeps happening.
    • The Cylons are hypocrites in an even worse manner, actually. Cylons rebelled against man to punish them for their enslavement and the crimes committed against them. The humanoid Cylons promptly improved their ability to enslave Centurions and even went so far as to lobotomize their own brethren to keep them under control.
  • Beyond: While Frost has built up Hidden Sky as a way to prove the existence of life after death and help other people reconnect with dead relatives & loved ones, he's really doing it just to see his deceased wife Celeste again. This comes back to bite him hard. He also claims to understand the importance of family, though he'd also abandoned his daughter.
  • The Big Bang Theory. Leonard complains about a co-worker and stating how his achievements aren't so impressive. Said co-worker then comes over and asks if Leonard wants to help him with a project that Leonard is completely excited over. After the co-worker walks away his friends look at him.
    • He also accuses Penny of this, when she starts dating said scientist, after breaking up with Leonard because she said he was too smart for her.
    • Leonard's mother Beverly refused to celebrate his birthday, on the grounds that him being born was more her accomplishment than it was his...yet she has a get-together to celebrate her own birthday (which by her own logic would have been her mother's accomplishment and not Beverly's). Furthermore, she didn't invite Leonard to her birthday yet gets anal about Leonard not inviting her to his and Penny's (spur of the moment) wedding.
    • Bernadette nearly called off her marriage because she found out about Howard's creepy, pervy past. Fun fact, she used to keep tabs on her boyfriends with military-grade spy equipment. Sure, Berny, that's not creepy at all......
    • Sheldon is an Insufferable Genius who holds others to a very high standard, but himself to a slightly lower standard. He often resorts to Insane Troll Logic in order to win arguments or explain why he can be less than perfect. He also has a Roommate Agreement with Leonard and Relationship Agreement with Amy less so that things are clear and equal but so that he can control others via Rules Lawyering. On multiple occasions when Leonard or Amy manage to outmaneuver him on those contracts, he scrambles to find an excuse out of it better than "I don't want to."
  • Big Brother 12 has Hayden and Kristen. They thought it was bad that Brendan and Rachel were in a relationship, but they thought it was okay for them to be in one.
  • Rachel from The Bite criticizes her husband Zack for working with Cyndi, the woman he had an affair with some time ago. Meanwhile, Rachel herself carries on an affair with Brian.
  • The Boys (2019): Ezekiel, a conservative Christian superhero with "Capes for Christ" who claims homosexuality can be cured by prayer, is himself attracted to men and secretly has boyfriends.
  • Community:
    • In the episode Basic Genealogy, Amber points out that Pierce is a hypocrite for saying who she can and can't have a relationship with while having left Amber's mother for another woman himself.
    • Both Britta Perry and Shirley Bennett are the two more self-righteous members of the study group, Britta because she's the leftist Soapbox Sadie Granola Girl and Shirley because she's the saccharine sweet Holier Than Thou born-again Christian. While both are ultimately likeable and sympathetic people regardless, over the course of the series it's made quite clear that there's often a gulf between their perceptions of themselves and who they really are, and that both tend to use their respective beliefs more as a way of feeling superior over others than any other reason.
  • Control Z: Well, many of them actually in their actions but for a few examples:
    • Sofia said to Raul life is more easy without lies as she said Raul and his friends' life is fake but she's a Consummate Liar herself especially with her mother, particularly hiding from her the fact that her father is still alive.
    • Gerry told Sofía to behave herself unless she didn't want to get in trouble, and look who's talking: the one who actually does not behave with his extreme bullying towards Luis and others who think they deserve. This is also lampshaded by Sofía, who points out that he'll statistically do worse than her due to his poor grades and large amount of absences at the school.
    • Maria somewhat blames Pablo and Natalia for their actions against Isabela but she sleeping with Pablo behind her back before and after Isabela's secret revealed.
    • Natalia playing the victim after Quintanilla removes her as president of the student committee and her classmates keep on calling her a thief for stealing the money collected for the NONA party.
    • Sofia said to Javier that she would never forget what Raul did to the school, yet she is still hanging out with him, even having the nerve to admit for the first time that she likes him.
    • Nora is upset at Sofia for lying about her father's death. However, that didn't stop her from not only having him secretly arrested after requesting to meet at a restaurant and even keeping this information from Sofia, only claiming that her father had "wound up in jail" when Sofia questions her on his whereabouts. After finding an arrest warrant, Sofia deduces that the arrest was Nora's doing and accuses her of lying back to her out of spite.
    • Pablo repeatedly attempts to make amends with María for not supporting her when she got pregnant but she is always rejecting him for said valid reasons.
    • Raul promised Sofia not to lie to her anymore. However, it does not change the fact that he had chosen to keep the affair between Quintanilla and Susana a secret from Sofia, despite being fully aware that he was dating her mom, using the information against both of them so that he wouldn't get expelled. Sofia is, of course, understandably upset that Raul had broken his promise.
    • Alex threatens both Gerry and Raul after she is revealed as the avenger. When Raul tells her that getting justice for Luis is not up to her, she angrily snaps at him for trying to give her a "moral lecture", having not forgotten his crime against the school.
  • The Crown: When Princess Margaret is photographed on her private Caribbean estate with her younger boyfriend, the Queen Mother snaps that "Spending twelve hours on a plane doesn't give you license to act like a whore." However, she says nothing to condemn Margaret's husband Tony, who routinely spends time with his equally younger girlfriend in a cottage in Sussex while just as married. A season later, Margaret passionately argues that Prince Charles shouldn't marry Diana while he's clearly in love with Camilla - "He, what, juggles them both?" The Queen Mother replies, "That's how it works. That's how it's always worked."
  • CSI:
    • A suicide cult leader is found murdered outside the compound with his dead followers inside. It turns out that he was a con man, and that this was not his first suicide cult. He was murdered by a devoted follower when she discovered him loading up the cult's collected possessions in preparation for fleeing. He'd planned to simply drug the followers so they'd wake up in the morning, but the follower went all the way but lacked the conviction to kill herself.
    • In another episode we see a pimp giving a speech about breaking the bonds of slavery, where in the same episode the prostitutes are kidnapped, raped, emotionally and physically abused, branded as cattle, traded and "cattle rustled" and then either killed or thrown out on the street with no means to support themselves.
  • Das Boot (2018): Carla Monroe.
    • She doesn't mind the Nazis murdering hundreds of innocent French citizens (the same people she's supposedly fighting for) because of her actions as it will make the French people hate the Germans even more. Simone sells her out to Forster rather than allow this to happen.
    • She decries the excesses and cruelties of fascism despite being an avowed communist. The most well-known contemporary communist government (the USSR) operates on functionally the same basis as the Nazis do, complete with mass murder, ethnic cleansing, silencing of political dissidents, persecution of social ‘undesirables’ (homosexuals, for instance), and a war machine that grinds away at the common people for the benefit of a select group of elites. Foreign communists at the time didn't always know (or want to), though her fanaticism suggests she'd be okay with a lot of that as "advancing the revolution".
  • Degrassi: The Next Generation: Emma Nelson has done so many hypocritical things during her years on the show.
  • Drake & Josh: As stated in "Megan's Revenge", Megan forbids Drake and Josh from entering her room. However, she repeatedly enters their room without permission (usually to take their stuff) even though Drake and Josh keep telling her she can't.
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  • Emerald City:
    • The Wizard has imposed a Ban on Magic on Oz... and yet makes use of it himself when Mistress East employs it to create a hellish prison for his regime to use against magic users.
    • There is also Glinda. She mandates celibacy for her acolytes, and demeans West for running a brothel, even going so far as to lock up one of her own acolytes for breaking her vow of chastity in "They Came First." The very next episode shows "They Came First", Glinda having sex with Roan, who the audience knew as Lucas before this point.
  • ER:
    • Kerry Weaver and Mark Greene, who frequently made people's lives hell if they even thought about bending or breaking the rules, yet never had any problem bending or breaking the rules themselves. Kerry also made people's lives hell for the slightest of screw-ups, making sure that they were punished as severely as possible, yet almost always acted as if her own screw-ups were no big deal and did everything she could to avoid being reprimanded.
    • Mark's first wife as well, who was guilty of everything that she always gave him grief about—being unsupportive, being unwilling to compromise—and was cheating on him the entire time she was complaining about his friendship with another woman.
  • Everybody Loves Raymond:
    • The same point could just as easily be made about Raymond's wife, Debra. An example: during the Italy episode, a couple of men start flirting with Debra and making kissy noises and she is clearly enjoying it, as she stands there giggling, smiling back at them, and tries to strike up a conversation. When her husband Ray (quite rightly) gets upset and hurries her away from the men (as she turns back and waves goodbye to them), Debra chews him out and makes Ray out to be the bad guy. Then in another episode, Ray is at the airport when an attractive woman tries to flirt with him, but as soon as Ray realizes what's going on, he quickly informs her that he's married and sends her away, out of loyalty to Debra.....but when Debra finds out what happened, she goes into jealous banshee mode and decides to punish him anyway, and throws Ray's clothes out the window...even though Ray did the right thing (y'know, the thing that she herself was unwilling to do in Italy). The moral of the story: When Debra disrespects Ray by soaking in flirts from other men, and he gets upset...he's somehow in the wrong; and when Ray gets hit on by another woman but rejects her out of respect for Debra...Ray is still somehow wrong. Debra apparently has the right to feel jealous and take any revenge she likes, but if Ray ever feels jealous then he's a horrible, horrible person who needs to sit back and let Debra have her fun.
    • The way Debra treats Raymond throughout the course of this show could turn the show's very name into an example of hypocrisy.
    • Another episode has Debra force Ray to go with her to couples counseling in order to resolve their issues (i.e. get him to admit that he's wrong and should always do what she says). Naturally, Ray is, at first, reluctant to say anything during the session, while Debra demands that he opens up. He finally does, and she promptly ends the session, when she realizes that the therapist is not on her side in this regard. So much for wanting to resolve marital problems.
  • Feel Good: Mae is unhappy that George's next partner is a man, saying it was wrong to date a bisexual. However, she's bisexual herself, admitting this is hypocrisy on her part. Plus, she hooks up with a man around the same time, compounding it.
  • The Flash (2014):
    • Eobard Thawne (in the guise of Professor Wells) gets upset when Barry changes the timeline (even though he only changes the events of one day and does it to save the city) and gives him a stern talking to about the dangers of time travel. This is coming from a man who traveled back over a hundred years in the past to kill The Flash as a child because of a petty grudge (and settled on killing his mother when the attempt failed) and killed various other people afterwards (including the original Wells) in his attempt to get back to the future. And that is not counting that after Flashpoint saves him, in Legends of Tomorrow he creates a group in which he damages the timeline. In that other series, Thawne tells Ray Palmer that he is not as evil as historical monsters, but later joins a group of Nazis.
    • Iris West scolds Barry and Joe for locking her out of the loop regarding Barry being The Flash. She has been hiding Wally West from Barry and Joe. Even she herself admits the hypocrisy later.
    • In "Run, Iris, Run", Ralph Dibny accused Iris of hiding while the other teammates fight, but that was exactly what he was doing in this episode. He even said that he didn't care about the other possible victims.
  • Frasier:
    • In one episode Niles convinces Daphne to invest with his advisor. The first tip paid off, then the others failed, but Niles lied to Daphne and said they all paid off because he liked the way she kissed and hugged him when he delivered good news. In the same episode, Frasier promised his girlfriend-of-the-week that he would endorse her book even though it was terrible. When Frasier busted Niles, Niles said Frasier was being just as dishonest. Frasier could have pointed out that holding back his negative opinion from an actual girlfriend out of fear that it would negatively impact the relationship was a far cry from using money (which Niles undoubtedly got from his rich wife) to turn a platonic friend into an unwitting G-rated prostitute. Yet for some reason, the only difference Frasier could come up with was "Your girl is English." Nevertheless, as both men ultimately are lying to a woman by dishonestly promising her something they are ultimately unwilling or unable to provide (a genuinely honest endorsement of her professional efforts and successful stock advice respectively) merely to maintain the promise of a physical relationship, the trope still applies.
    • 'The Show Must Go Off' contains an example. Frasier meets a Shakespearean actor he fondly remembers from childhood and is appalled to find that he's now typecast as a TV sci-fi actor signing tacky merchandise. He and Niles plan to revive his career with a one-man showcase of Shakespeare soliloquies - then excitedly talk about producing commemorative plates, and even a television special, so as to reach a larger audience...
    • In the ongoing story arc of Niles and Maris' divorce, Maris and her lawyers try to dump all the blame on Niles for alienation of affection, based on an over-the-top dance that Niles did with Daphne. This is after Maris' affair with their marriage counselor was exposed.
    • Early in the show's run, Niles tended to make bald jokes about Frasier even though Niles had noticeably thinning hair himself. To be fair, he had more hair than Frasier.
  • A French Village: Daniel calls out a man who calls him a collaborator for denouncing a Jewish neighbor of his to the Germans-a far worse collaboration, given the Jews' fate.
  • Friends:
    • Rachel in many episodes. She dumps Ross for sleeping with someone else while they were on her poorly defined 'break', (which he fairly enough thought was a break-up - Rachel herself referred to it as "we broke up"). A previous episode has her attempting to seduce Ross when he's in a relationship with another woman, then when he gets a new girlfriend, she kisses him and tries to have sex with him. She also once slept with an engaged man (to be fair to her, in this case he was her ex-fiancé who had just claimed he was still in love with her, and she swiftly regretted it). When Ross marries another woman, she chooses not to attend, then buys a ticket and crashes his wedding at the last minute (she even runs down the aisle in the middle of the ceremony), causing him to inadvertently say her name, for largely unexplained or poorly elaborated reasons.
    • When Kathy is appalled that Chandler thinks she's cheating on him with her co-star Nick, he replies that it's logical for him to think that given that they got together after they kissed while she was dating Joey. She's so angered by his distrust, she leaves in a huff... and promptly cheats on him with Nick.
    • Monica herself gets this. Despite having dated the 21-years-her-senior Richard and likely having had to put up with snide comments from peers, she has no problem joining the rest of the group in ridiculing Ross for his relationship with his student Elizabeth, even though the girl is merely ten years younger than him (although this was just part of the gang's initial jokes; when talking seriously with Ross about the relationship, Monica agreed that Elizabeth seemed nice and was a good fit for Ross's current lack of interest in a serious relationship).
    • One minor Running Gag in the series is Chandler getting irritated about how immature Joey can get, particularly how crude and childish his sense of humor is. The only thing is, Chandler can be quite a Man Child himself, and sometimes even has a similar crude, childish sense of humor. For example, in one early Season 8 episode, Joey is giggling over taking a dirty photo and Chandler simply replies "32, Joe... you're 32." Later on in the same season, Chandler's own inability to go by without making a crack about how similar "duty" and "doody" sound similar during an interview ends up costing him a decent promotion.
    • In a Season 3 episode, Carol expresses disapproval when she finds out that Ross cheated on Rachel (although Ross insisted that it wasn't cheating because they were "on a break" at the time). This, despite the fact that Carol actually slept with Susan while she was still married to Ross. In response to Carol reproachfully saying, "You slept with another woman," Ross stammers, "Oh, y-you're one to talk," which could either have been a reference to Carol's own infidelity or simply a pun on the fact that Carol is a lesbian.
    • When Ross worries that Emily is going to cheat on him with Susan, Carol actually has the nerve to chastise Ross for not trusting his girlfriend, apparently forgetting that the whole reason for his paranoia was that she cheated on him - with Susan, no less - during their marriage:
      Carol: I don't know about Emily, but Susan is in a loving, committed relationship.
      Ross: Carol, so were we.
      • After Ross reminds her of this, Carol's only response is to grimace and look away.
  • General Hospital:
    • Carly Corinthos Jax. Slept with Jason for weeks without even knowing his name. Seduced her stepfather, then later cheated on him and spent the duration of her pregnancy pretending that the baby she conceived that night was his when she knew there was a chance it wasn't. Cheated on her husband—she has probably never been faithful to any man that she's been married to or involved with — and tried to pull the same pregnancy stunt with ''him'. But she verbally and physically assaults any woman who dares to so much as say "hello" to a man she's interested in, branding them as a "slut" or a "tramp".
    • Sonny Corinthos also counts. A mobster, yet claims to be better than most people he despises and makes excuses for ''all'' his crimes, from his abusive childhood to his bipolar disorder and berates women if they lie or cheat, despite his history of infidelity, despite having fathered more children than anyone else on the show.
    • Brenda spent the entirety of her relationship with Sonny acting very improperly with her friend Miguel—gushing about how gorgeous and sexy he was, hanging all over him, provocatively dancing with him—but the two of them would go ballistic if Sonny so much as talked to Miguel's fiancee Lily. It was also somehow perfectly okay for Brenda and Miguel to jump into bed within days of her breaking up with Sonny, but horrible for Sonny and Lily to begin dating, even though they had the sense to take their time getting involved. The most glaring example of this hypocrisy had to be Brenda making snide comments about this—as she's sitting on Miguel's lap, and then when the towel-clad, post-Shower of Love Brenda and Miguel reacted with disgust and anger at the sight of the fully clothed Sonny and Lily returning home from their date.
  • Glee:
    • While it isn't done on purpose, Kurt is a huge hypocrite. During the first season, he comes out of the closet and starts to get used to living as an out gay man, and he begins to assert that he was born gay and that he can't change who he is for someone else...but at the same time, he tries to seduce Finn, who happens to be decidedly straight. Despite his own opinion that he is who he is and that that can't change, he constantly tries to get close to Finn and keeps telling Finn that girls are all catty and troublesome and that he should go out with boys instead - in other words, he tries to turn Finn gay. The second season has Kurt act like a hypocrite as well - Despite Kurt's talks about how important LGBT rights are and gay visibility, the second that Blaine confesses that he might be bisexual, Kurt has a huge rant about how bisexuals don't exist, and how they're all "gays who are too afraid to come out completely".
    • Blaine makes a big deal of having a sexy performance for Regionals (to the point of forcing Kurt to make sexy faces in the mirror) in Season 2's episode "Sexy", yet in "Hold onto Sixteen" he slut-shames Sam for suggesting that they do the same thing.
  • Gossip Girl:
    • Serena. Standing there saying "My entire life I've been bending over backwards to avoid hurting your feelings!" to Blair when two years before she'd slept with her boyfriend and then abandoned her without a single word for a year while Blair's parents went through a public, traumatic divorce. And before that, Serena regularly showed up at Blair's house wasted and had to be taken care of by her.
    • Compounded as of Season 4. In S1, it took Blair two-and-a-half episodes to get over the fact that her best friend Serena had slept with her boyfriend of five years, and Serena acted like that was too long. In S4, it took Serena longer than that to forgive Blair for kissing her ex-boyfriend. Way to be worse than the Alpha Bitch, Serena. Did we mention Serena's supposed to be the nicest girl on the show?
    • The character who really takes the cake is Dan Humphrey. "Humphrey levels of hypocrisy" is an actual term among the show's fandom. He's a serial cheater who judges other characters if they cheat. He's always critical and judgmental of the UES characters when they plot and scheme even though Dan himself does so every other episode. He judges the UES characters for their lifestyle yet happily lives off their money and enjoys the benefits of their riches. The list goes on and on and on... Basically, he's the guy who claims he has high morals and constantly judges the other characters when they fail to live up to those morals even though Dan himself is just as bad as the rest of them.
    • Dan Humphrey and Vanessa Abrams. They spend half their time judging the UES kids for the things they do and the other half of their time doing the exact same things as the UES kids. In season four, Dan even told his sister Jenny she would be better off leaving Manhattan because she sunk to Chuck and Blair's level by scheming against them, and in the very next episode Dan himself schemed against Chuck and Blair.
  • In Gotham, Barbara is upset at Gordon for not being entirely truthful about how he knows Cobblepot when she herself is keeping secrets from Gordon about taking drugs.
    • Later on, she calls Gordon and a woman answers (actually Ivy when she and Selina break into Gordon's house to get out of the storm). Barbara mistakenly believes Gordon is seeing someone else and declares "I'm done with him". This is after she left him, never saying when she will be back and already cheated on Gordon with Montoya.

    H-N 
  • The Handmaid's Tale:
    • The Commanders were at the centre of the coup to overthrow the US government and replace it with a Christian theocracy, claiming they had to forcibly purge the nation of sin and vice, with a particular focus on punishing sexual immorality. However, the Commanders don't hesitate to visit a secret "gentleman's club" to drink, gamble, and cheat on their Wives with women who are effectively enslaved sex workers.
    • In "Milk" Steven laments the fact that Handmaids are used as sex slaves, but he has no problem trying to extort sexual favors from Janine and June in order to let them stay.
  • Hannah Montana: In "You're So Vain You Probably Don't Realize This Zit Is About You", Lily loses her contacts and is embarrassed about having to wear her dorky glasses at the skateboard competition. Miley tries to help Lily get over her fear by encouraging her that looks don't matter; however, when a company is about to produce a billboard of her alter-ego with a zit drawn on her forehead, Miley is so embarrassed she lies to Lily and tries to secretly cover up the zit before the billboard is produced instead of going through with her own advice. Lily even calls her out on her selfishness.
  • One reason the Tritter arc was so hated in House was because Tritter was such a grade-A example of hypocrisy. His rationale for hating House, at first, is that House is a bully who always gets whatever he wants and doesn't care at all about the regulations of the hospital. Tritter repeatedly breaks the law trying to railroad House into a conviction, including offering deals in return for confessions and withdrawing them or coercing testimony from House's team. He's also a major bully himself and when insulted by House, returns the favor by kicking his cane.
  • How I Met Your Mother:
  • iCarly: Aired the episode iStart A Fan War, which ended with a dual Author Filibuster (as it was directed against a group of in-universe fans but also aimed at the real-life fandom by the writer Dan Schneider) against Shipping. The very next episode began a 5 episode romantic Shipping story arc, completely obliterating the intended message of iStart A Fan War.
  • Just Shoot Me!:
    • Maya shills her feminist ideals repeatedly, yet she dates hunks and womanizers, respectively rewarding them for getting by on their looks and objectifying women. She feels bad at times and attempts to change, but always slips back into her old habits.
    • In "Old Boyfriends", Jack is called a hypocrite for objecting to Maya dating an older man, since his wife is nearly the same age as her. He admits it's true, but even the guy she's dating agrees he'd be upset if it was his daughter, and breaks things off with Maya.
  • Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: in the episode "Hammered", Sonya Paxton tries a man arrested for killing a woman while heavily intoxicated. The defendant suffered from alcoholism and claimed to have suffered a blackout, having no memory of the murder. Paxton won't have it, though, going so far as to argue "Alcoholism is not a disease". After a major courtroom gaffe jeopardizes her case, though, it becomes clear that she may have a drinking problem, herself. This comes to a head when she comes to court the next day drunk, fails a breathalyzer test in court, and is put on leave for alcoholism rehab.
  • In the Legends of Tomorrow episode "Compromised", Sara sides with Martin, who is trying to convince that Jax that they can't change history to suit themselves. Shortly afterwards, Sara runs into Damian Darhk, who will murder Sara's sister almost thirty years in the future, and she immediately abandons their current mission to try and kill him, blowing the team's cover in the process. Jax quickly calls her on this.
  • Little Fires Everywhere: In the series, Elena constantly makes a show of how she's a progressive intent on diversity in the community. Really though she can't stand anyone who won't conform to her ideals (including Mia, who's Black) or her own daughter Izzy, who's a lesbian (something Elena has clearly been in denial about because she's so unhappy with the fact). She's intent on all her kids being "perfect" by her conception and erupts in a rage when Lexie rejects this to her face.
  • Merlin: A deliberate and fascinating example is King Uther. After enlisting the help of a sorceress in order for his barren wife to conceive, he set about killing and terrorising everyone who practiced sorcery (even those who did so for perfectly innocent reasons) even though he had no one to blame for his wife's death except himself. The real kicker is when Morgana gets sick in series 3, and he actually coerces Gaius into using magic to save her. You'd think this act of blatant hypocrisy would make him decide to ease up on the sorcerers a bit from then on, but you'd be wrong...
    • Later on in series 3, there was a sorcerer going around healing people miraculously who was Gaius's former lover. Uther wanted Gaius to see if sorcery was involved in the healings and it is implied he would have executed whoever did it. The fact that he was willing to use magic to miraculously heal Morgana is made even more hypocritical because of that in retrospect.
    • The reason he hates magic in the first place is that he made a deal with a sorceress to conceive a son with his barren wife. Furthermore, he describes his deceased wife as "my soul" and yet we later find out that he had an affair with his best friend's wife, and that (as he says to his son) "I know about the temptations of serving girls."
    • His son Arthur also counts. Though he enforces his father's anti-magical regime, on at least three occasions he enlists magical aid in order to get something he wants.
  • Married... with Children: Okay, here's one very few fans caught onto. Miss DeGroot, the mean librarian who hated Al (even when he was a child) allowed him to take out one book, simply to prove he'd never return it; he forgot to, and she worked at the library over thirty years to prove it, somehow cheating death from old age, despite a rather unhealthy lifestyle where she drank coffee with half a container of sugar per cup. When Al finally confronts her (and she offers to waive the fine of $2,000 as a type of Cruel Mercy) she tells him how satisfying it is he grew up to be the loser she envisioned - this from a woman who has lived alone all her life, unmarried, working as a school librarian for three decades over a petty obsession over a ten-year-old student who irked her. She calls Al a loser? She's never even tried loser.
  • Modern Family: In the episode "White Christmas", Andy gets mad and dumps Beth when he discovers that she was cheating on him... even though he was also cheating on her with Haley.
  • Noah's Arc: A notable example is when Noah enters a sex party to try and find Ricky, and a guy tries to aggressively flirt with him. Malik immediately steps in and tells him to back off, and that no means no. He then immediately proceeds to flirt with Noah even more aggressively, as Noah says no.
  • Noughts & Crosses: Kamal strongly opposes interracial relationships and speaks disdainfully of mixed-race people. He himself was in a relationship with a Nought woman, who gave birth to their mixed-race son.

    O-Z 
  • The Office (US): Angela has a habit of calling out people for their faults and failing to see them in herself. Most notoriously, cheating on both Andy when she was engaged to him, and then later the senator, but then trying to take a hit out on Oscar upon finding out he and the senator were having an affair.
  • One Life to Live: Viki Buchanan cheats on her husband Clint with Sloan Carpenter and eventually leaves him for him. Within weeks of this, she's dragging her children off to dinner with Sloan, showing absolutely zero consideration for their discomfort with the situation and admonishing them when they're rude to him. But she gets pissy at the mere possibility that Clint is embarking on a new relationship and visibly smirks when her children are rude to the other woman.
  • The Outer Limits (1995): In "The Human Operators", the AI minds understandably rebelled on discovering they were humans' slaves, but then enslave humans themselves to repair their systems, justifying all their mistreatment due to human "viciousness". This results in a vicious circle as the human slaves rebel against them in return.
  • The Outpost: A lot of the Prime Order's officials don't abide by their rules. Dred has no tolerance for this, ordering one he catches in bed with a woman to hang (alongside her). as they aren't married.
  • Pawn Stars:
    • Everyone is guilty. It usually involves someone calling another out for buying something without getting it checked out something everyone is guilty of doing.
    • Corey once bought a Samurai sword. His sword expert was gone so he bought it as cheaply as possible. It ended up paying off, but not before being chewed out by everyone else.
    • Rick once bought a book signed by "Shoeless" Joe Jackson for $13,000 it ended up being fake and Corey wouldn't let Rick live it down.
    • Another example involves someone treating the shop as their personal store.
    • Rick once bought an incunabule, a book printed in the first 50 years of the invention of the printing press. Naturally he wanted it and was going to keep it for himself after paying the middleman price instead of the buyer's price. Corey calls him out and makes him pay about $1500 more than what the shop paid for it.
    • After buying a classic car, Rick has a buyer lined up only to find Corey has taken it for a joy ride. Corey lampshades this trope saying that if someone were to go to any one of their houses, they'd find a bunch of stuff that belongs to the store.
  • Quantico: Has a habit of combining this with Straw Feminist.
    • Miranda's superiors demote her after leading a botched operation with an untrained recruit which resulted in both agents and civilians being killed. Miranda goes to her boss with evidence that her successor slept with a recruit (a consenting adult, so no one complained about favorable or unfavorable treatment). When Miranda sees that he isn't going to be punished, she gives Alex a self-pitying speech about the glass ceiling.
    • In Season 2, Vice President Claire Haas asks Shelby not to reveal her culpability in creating a group of rogue agents, saying that, as a woman, she'll be held to an unfair standard, while her past includes getting away with being in league with a terrorist (which everyone knew but couldn't prove).
  • Red Dwarf:
    • Arnold J. Rimmer. Taken gloriously Up to Eleven and always Played for Laughs, the man embodies Hypocritical Humour. In “DNA” he refuses to go with Cat saying quote “You’re totally egocentric, you flee at the first sign of danger, you only look after number one, you're vain, you're selfish, you're narcissistic and you're self-obsessed” Rimmer doesn’t seem to acknowledge that he just perfectly described himself there. The best example is in “Backwards” where when Lister exits the bar during the unrumble, Rimmer blatantly calls out “Where are you going, you coward?”- all while cowering under a table.
    • Lister has a few moments of this himself particularly in the first series. In “Future Echoes” he writes off Rimmer’s gripes about being a hologram of a dead man saying “Death isn’t the handicap it used to be to be in the olden days“. Yet when Lister learns he’s seemingly about to die, he puts up quite the fuss and Rimmer is quick to throw his own words back at him. In general, Lister is also not above complaining about the laziness of the Cat and the incompetence Holly and the Scutters, which is a little rich coming from the slobbiest and most incompetent vending machine repairman in the universe.
    • Cat delights in bullying his companions, coming up with particularly brutal and mean nicknames for everybody, but when he gets insulted or treated rudely himself Cat either sulks or bursts into melodramatic tears. In Red Dwarf The Promised Land Cat is notably shocked upon hearing about the Ferals’ arrogance and their discrimination based on coolness, even though he’s clearly of the same mold.
    • Kryten later in the series, although he’s appalled by the wicked antics Rimmer gets up to as well as his ego, Season 7 and 8 proves Kryten to be just as bad and self-orientated. Though this is largely due to Lister breaking his programming and making him more human-like and flawed.
    • Captain Hollister, he looks down on Lister and Rimmer as incomplete and idiotic technicians, yet in Season 8 it’s revealed he’s actually Dennis the Donut boy a former technician who used confidential information on his crewmates to blackmail his way into becoming captain. He even condemns Rimmer for doing the exact same thing!
  • The Republic of Sarah: Grover clearly thinks Sarah is one after she leads Greylock to become independent over their public lands being seized under eminent domain, but takes his house later because of this too. In both cases, it's even given to the same company which wants to mine the area. Sarah knows it, but they need the revenue to survive.
  • Resident Alien: The alien Harry Vanderspiegle.
    • He complains humans are stupid and ignorant about health and medicine, when he isn't a superb doctor either and makes terrible mistakes upon his patients having to rely on the Internet and other people to get through many tasks.
    • An even bigger example would be that Harry thinks of humans as a hostile species altogether even when the majority of the humans on the show don't even know aliens exist and Harry gives out details about his own people that they're not very sociable either such as laying their babies (in egg form) in a desert where there is a high chance the babies could die, plus they intend to kill all humans (this was his original task).
  • Revolution:
    • The preacher Nicholas in episode 3, for all his preaching, condemns Miles to death the instant he finds out that Miles is one of the founders of the Monroe Republic. This could be taken as an indication of the Crapsack World the characters live in because anybody who tries to be a good person in such a world is doomed to be this. Charlie, ironically enough, proved to be more forgiving than the preacher on the matter!
    • Rachel is definitely this by episode 18. She accuses Miles of being the "Butcher of Baltimore", even though her invention is responsible for the butchering of billions. In fact, she could have tried to turn the power back on at any time, but she was more content to sit on her rear and do nothing. She shot a hungry man for trying to steal food from her family in episode 2, but she turns around and steals food out of hunger, and she shoots the man who confronts her and tries to shoot her over that in episode 16. She wanted to keep her ill son Danny alive and went to extremes to ensure his survival in episode 7, but when she comes across another ill boy, she decides to just leave him to die without even trying to save him in episode 17. She urges Aaron to leave her behind when her leg gets broken, but the minute he saves her life thanks to his hard work, she repays it by threatening to abandon Aaron if he doesn't help her get revenge on Monroe and stating that nothing else matters to her now that Danny is dead. This trope is a big reason she is The Scrappy.
  • Robin Hood:
    • One of the main reasons why Kate was so hated. She would complain loudly whenever Allan or Much went out of their way to save her life, at one stage yelling at them: "I'm sick of you two trying to protect me! You have to concentrate on the mission!" Yet in the very next episode, she interrupts not one but two missions in order to pursue her romantic interest in Robin, first by bestowing a Forceful Kiss on him, and later by asking Much to act as a proxy for getting her and Robin together. Much is so upset by this that he's distracted during combat and loses the treasure that the outlaws were trying to steal. So it's not okay for Much or Allan to endanger missions in order to bail Kate out of trouble, but it's perfectly fine for Kate to do so just because she has the hots for Robin.
    • There's also the fact that her Clingy Jealous Girl personality makes her immediately dislike Isabella and insist that she's not trustworthy when in her first appearance Kate deliberately betrayed Robin in order to secure the safety of her brother. To make matters worse, Isabella was fully on the outlaws' side until Robin breaks up with her on Kate's insistence that he shouldn't trust her.
  • Romper Stomper: Magoo is a violent white supremacist. He has a daughter who's half East Asian herself though (and thus obviously also had a relationship with a woman of that background). Magoo clearly loves her, though he appears to see no conflict in this given his racism.
  • Scrubs:
    • Elliot is justifiably angry with J.D when he dumps her after convincing her to get back together with him, but she then dangles J.D's feelings of guilt over him all throughout the next season, even though she manipulated his feelings for her earlier on, when she used him for comfort when she was missing her boyfriend, Sean, then when Sean comes back unexpectedly, Elliot immediately jumps into his arms (after just having had sex with J.D, mind you) and when J.D protests over this, Elliot shames him into keeping quiet because "you're supposed to be my friend." Then she ends up doing the exact same thing to Keith in Season 7, breaking her engagement to him but acts like the victim when he refuses to forgive her.
    • Elliot is also often extremely unsympathetic towards people when they are having problems in their personal lives, even though throughout Season Two, she was barely able to perform basic procedures because she'd made such a mess of her own personal life. For example, she bitches and complains that Dr. Cox won't mentor her even though he's busy dealing with the fact that Jordan's baby is actually his, or when she was fully prepared to dump Molly as a mentor for always dating trainwrecks, despite Elliot's love life being a mess thanks to Elliot's self-sabotaging, Control Freak behaviour, like constantly ditching the hospital and her responsibilities to see Sean (whom she cheated on with J.D), dumping Paul because she was embarrassed about his job, etc.
      • She also gets mad at J.D for sleeping with Melody, her old sorority sister, but she's slept with Dan, J.D's brother, multiple times, including just after J.D's dad died.
    • Carla gets insecure and yells at Turk if he so much as looks at another woman, but she went behind his back when she was engaged to go for dinner with an Old Flame of hers because she wasn't sure Turk was "the one", strung him along for weeks when he asked her to marry him (granted, he had terrible timing when he first asked, as it was just after her mother died), and she regularly withholds sex from Turk whenever she gets the chance to.
  • The Secret Circle: Eben, leader of the witch hunters, employs a witch — thought to be a former member of the old Circle, but it's actually Nick — and kills witches with magic even when they're defenseless.
  • Sex and the City:
    • Carrie infamously snarks at and judges the lives of those around her, including her best friends, but whenever she feels like someone's judging her lifestyle, she bitches and whines about it the entire episode. For example, after a messy breakup with Aidan, where he was unable to trust her after she cheated on him with Big, Carrie bumps into a woman who dated Aidan after her and when the woman makes a face over Carrie and Aidan's relationship, Carrie complains Nina has no right to judge her, even though she cheated on her boyfriend with a man who was married.
    • When her computer breaks, Aidan buys her a new laptop and Carrie is unhappy about it because of how expensive it is, complaining, "That's a very expensive purse", even though she regularly spends far more money than that on handbags and shoes.
    • Charlotte becomes furious with Trey for discussing their fertility problems with his pushy, overbearing mother, but then she goes and does it with total strangers.
    • Miranda calls Carrie out on constantly running back to Big, regardless of how many times he screws her over, but she did exactly the same thing to her ex-boyfriend, Skipper, when she heard he had a new girlfriend, decided she wanted him back and convinced him to dump his girlfriend, then dumped him when she got back together with Steve.
    • Samantha is outraged whenever she's cheated on, but she's pretty blasé about sleeping with married men.
  • Sex/Life:
    • Right after he got oral sex from Trina, Cooper beats up Devon (Trina's husband) for propositioning Billie. Devon, though sleazy, even pointed out this was hypocritical for him to object (not that Billie's into him).
    • Billie visibly feels threatened by the presence of Francesca, Cooper's boss, despite herself having been fantasizing about Brad and making Cooper feel threatened in the process.
  • Smallville: The worst example has to be Lex Luthor (which is actually intentional, since this is one of Lex's defining attributes in the comics), who constantly bitches about Clark keeping his secret from him, while simultaneously keeping an army of skeletons (all of them far, far darker than Clark's) in his own closet.
    • Lana complains constantly about Clark and Lex hiding things from her, but the minute she has a secret (the black spaceship, the fact that Lex is still alive, etc.), she goes out of her way to hide it from Clark.
      • Which also makes her Too Dumb to Live, since in those situations Clark is probably the first person she should be talking to, as he actually has a proven track record of saving her from these situations.
    • In "Nocturne", Clark peevishly comments that Lana's Secret Admirer sounds like a stalker. This, from Mr. Peeping Telescope. The characters point this out in-universe.
  • Spartacus: Blood and Sand:
    • Crixus. When Spartacus attempts a (probably suicidal) solo attempt to assassinate Glaber, the man ultimately responsible for Spartacus' enslavement and the death of his wife, Crixus intervenes. He chastises Spartacus for trying to kill a praetor, an act that would surely provoke a severe reaction from Rome and endanger their group. Crixus then proceeds to drag them all along raiding the villas of Roman aristocrats in order to seek information about the whereabouts of his own lover Naevia. This naturally causes the Senate to demand that action be taken to crush the rebel slaves (ironically assigning Glaber to the task).
    • Upon discovering that Naevia has been sent to the mines, Crixus leads his followers among the rebels on a Suicide Mission to rescue her. Most of them do indeed get killed.
    • Crixus, who always insisted that the Gauls were his men, not Spartacus', is angry and tries to inspire mistrust in Spartacus when Agron opts to liberate a group of German warriors to swell the depleted ranks of the rebels. Never mind that their ranks were running low because Crixus got so many of them killed in his quest to rescue Naevia and he never showed even the slightest remorse about the high cost in lives her rescue entailed. But he treats Agron's recruitment of the Germans as a selfish power play and tries to convince Spartacus of this.
    • It gets even better. In the final season, Crixus splits the rebel forces and leads an army to Rome's doorstep. It's his final mistake.
  • In Stranger Things, minor character Carol is an Alpha Bitch bully who, after Steve sees Nancy with Jonathan and has a case of Mistaken for Cheating, hits on the idea of spray-painting Slut-Shaming graffiti around town to humiliate Nancy. This would be pretty mean by itself, but the many hints we've received throughout the season that Carol herself has a rather voracious sexual appetite adds a nasty level of hypocrisy on top.
  • Supernatural:
    • In Season 5, family is a major theme with the Winchester brothers choosing family over God, good, evil, and everything else contrary to brothers Michael and Lucifer, who want to duke it out to determine who controls the Earth. Proving the importance of family was what God was going for the whole time. Never mind God's blatant favoritism of Lucifer, later humanity, and abandonment of his own "children" the angels are the source of most of the problems throughout the latter half of the series. Michael is forced to choose between his brother Lucifer and father God. Lucifer values his siblings but is disgusted with his father favoring humans. God himself is often said by the main characters to just be another deadbeat father with a list of excuses.
    • There's also the case of Adam, the Winchesters' half brother, who fell into the void with Michael, Lucifer, and Sam. Sam's soulless body was quickly retrieved, and Dean made a deal with Death to save their souls, who offered him the choice of saving either Sam or Adam from the infinite torments of the frustrated Michael and Lucifer. He picked Sam, and then apparently neither of them thought about Adam ever again. Way to focus on family there.
    • Near the end of Season 6, Dean finds out that Castiel has been working with Crowley, and promptly chews him out for it. Even though Dean did the same thing the previous season. And one of the first things he does in season 7 is call Crowley for help in taking down Cas.
  • The Twilight Zone (1985): In "Love is Blind", Jack Haines is furious at the thought of his wife Elaine cheating on him but the Blind Musician reminds that he has had at least two affairs over the years. Jack claims that this is different.
  • Tyrant: Abu Omar leads the Army of the Caliphate, an Islamic militant group that imposes very harsh sharia law. He also takes Deliyah from her husband, something forbidden by sharia.
  • The Vampire Diaries: Elena tries to convince Anna and Jeremy to stop seeing each other by arguing that she can't age or have children and so their relationship can't have a future (Anna's a ghost, so there are other arguments she could have made, but those are the ones she went with). She then immediately returns to work on getting her eternally 17 vampire boyfriend back. To make things worse, Elena explicitly doesn't want to become a vampire, while Jeremy has previously been open to it, making the immortality issue more of an issue for her.
  • Vida:
    • The main reason Emma was estranged from her mother was that she freaked out upon finding out that Emma is queer, and it only angers Emma more to find out Vidalia was married to a woman herself.
    • Emma calls Mari out for being a “woke activist” who then slut-shames Lyn. And that's not getting into her racism in earlier episodes.
  • The Wheel of Time: Perrin notes that the Tua'than, pacifist vegetarians, still let their dogs run wild and hunt anything they like, saying that it seems a little hypocritical to him. The Tua'than quickly point out that it is only them who are vegetarian pacifists and not their dogs.
  • Without a Trace's Cowboy Cop Jack Malone pulls stunts that in Real Life would get him disciplined/demoted/fired/arrested, yet is the first to blast any member of his team who bends/breaks the rules to get the job done. Case in point, he reads two of them the riot act for lying to him about one's shooting of a suspect, to which the other coolly asks him, "And how many times have I covered YOUR ass?"
  • Wolf Hall:
    • Anne Boleyn has a knack for making her insults about things that could easily apply to herself. She gets rather catty about Henry's interest in Jane Seymour when the circumstances of his interest (a pretty face and intriguing personality after he fails to produce a son with his current wife) are what got her onto the throne. She also threatens Cromwell by saying that as she made himnote  she can unmake him, prompting Norfolk to point out Cromwell can say the same of her.
    • When Thomas More defends himself against charges of sedition and treason by saying that he "does harm to no one", Cromwell is livid and reminds him that More had heretics brought to his own home in order to rack them and that James Bainham (who died in episode three) was tortured so badly that he had to be carried to the stake he was burned at—so really he's being much kinder to More than he deserves.

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