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"Didn't I promise you fireworks?"

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  • The film opens with a plaque left by the Apollo 11 astronauts, with a recording of Neil Armstrong reciting its words: "We came in peace for all mankind."
  • A little minor example from Marty within the first 25 minutes of the movie. The moment that a City Destroyer is said to be heading to New York, the first thing he does is tell everyone to stop working and evacuate to the basement. This is even more heartwarming because this would most likely cost a cable company transmitting news about this event millions just for not being operational, but Marty cares more about the safety of everyone rather than the lost revenue.
  • The line just after Russell Casse crashes his plane into the LA City Destroyer, destroying it and killing himself.
    Major Mitchell: What your father did was very brave. You should be proud of him.
    Miguel Casse: ...I am.
    • Just before that.
    Russell: Tell my children, I love them very much.
    • They heard you Rus, they heard.
  • Steve and Jasmine's reunion, after each thought the other was dead.
  • Jasmine picking up survivors and taking them all to the camp with her. The brief bonding she shares with the dying First Lady (even though she voted for the other guy). If not for Jasmine, the President might never have known what happened to his wife, or shared her dying moments with her.
  • Julius tearing into the President and his staff for being disrespectful towards his son.
    Julius: Hey, hey, hey, don't you tell him to shut up! You'd all be dead now if it weren't for my David!
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    • A minor moment before that; when Whitmore finds David and Julius in the Oval Office, he wants to blow them off. Julius walks right up to the President of the United States to politely urge him to listen to his son.
  • Julius comforting David after the failed attempt to nuke the Invaders's ships.
  • Steve and Jasmine's wedding, made extra heartwarming by David and Connie fully reconciling.
  • President Whitmore and General Grey's trust in each other to the point of occasional First-Name Basis.
    • Particularly the moment when Whitmore decides to fly in the final battle.
    Grey: Mr. President, I'd sure like to know what you're doing.
    Whitmore: I'm a combat pilot, Will. I belong in the air.
    • The look on Grey's face says it all. He has severe reservations about having his Commander-in-Chief and (in all likelihood) former subordinate to risk his life. But, they're short on pilots and Whitmore does have combat experience. In addition, if they lose, then it won't matter if he comes back or not.
    • Also, the simple fact that the President of the United States is leading troops into battle, the first since Washington and the Whiskey Rebellion.
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  • The farewell scene before Steve and David attempt to infiltrate the mothership. Especially the exchange between David and Julius:
    Julius: (hands David a pair of airsickness bags from Air Force One) Here. Just in case.
    David: (hands Julius a yarmulke and a Torah) Here. Just in case.
  • In the special edition, David tries to find Connie's private cell number. He tries numerous variations and nicknames, but it doesn't come up. Julius suggests searching for "Levinson," even though she didn't take his name when they were married. David types it in to prove he's wrong...and sure enough, "Connie Levinson" appears.
    Julius: Hehe, so what do I know?
    • Also the fact that, despite being rebuffed in his attempt to warn her over the phone, David still drives all the way to Washington to convince Connie in person.
  • The novel features an extension of the scene with the RAF pilots. As they head for the communications tent, they're joined by an Israeli soldier. The Arabs are understandably nervous, but a few jokes by the British, the Arabs, and the Israeli help to alleviate the tension. As one of the Brits says, forty-eight hours of an alien invasion have done what seventy years of diplomacy couldn't.
    • The entire desert scene is heartwarming. Iraqi, British, Israeli and Belgian fighter pilots, who a mere week ago had been enemies or at best ambivalent to each other, would have been at each others throats as they had been for so long, are now collaborating together in the interest of mutual survival, country, race and flag be damned.
  • Even after Nimzicki has spent the whole movie being a full-on Jerkass, Julius still urges him into joining the prayer group Julius is leading.
    Nimzicki: I'm not Jewish.
    Julius: Nobody's perfect. [resumes praying in Hebrew]
  • Humanity celebrating their survival, as the movie cuts to an African nation (implied to be Kenya), Egypt, and Australia all with downed City Destroyers cheering.
  • As they're planning to launch the attacker, Connie tries to talk David out of going. He replies that something may go wrong and may need to think quickly, but punctuates his point with:
    "You know how I'm always trying to save the planet? (tosses an empty Coke can into the recycling bin) Here's my chance."
  • A small one but when General Grey tells Whitmore that they lost contact with Steve and David, despite being just as worried as Connie, Jasmine puts a hand on the other woman's shoulder in a show of support.
  • The ending. Steve and David are reunited with their wives and congratulated by President Whitmore and General Grey. Whitmore turns to David and says "Not bad. Not too bad at all!" Julius laughs upon seeing his son has finally loosened up enough to smoke a cigar. And of course, Steve reminding Dylan that he did promise fireworks.
  • David and Steve's It Has Been an Honor / Face Death with Dignity moment as they realize they can't escape from the alien ship. It gets better when they get out after all.
  • At the end of the film when Hiller and Levinson are being welcomed back, President Whitmore and General Grey salute Hiller. For those who don't understand the significance of this, in the military, it's the subordinate soldier who first salutes the superior officer, who returns the salute. Captain Hiller received a salute from a four-star general and the commander-in-chief, making this a military version of Kneel Before Frodo.
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