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  • The 8-digit password on the bottom left corner of Yu-Gi-Oh! cards serves as an identification number so that you can get the same card in any Yu-Gi-Oh! video game. Older games let you pretty much port your entire physical deck into the game for free, but there's nothing stopping you from just looking up the password of a powerful card online. Later games fixed the strength of this function by adding costs to it — some let you obtain any card at any time but at an exorbitant price, others restrict the use of the password function only to obtaining additional copies of cards you already have in-game, and a few place the corresponding card in the shop, so you still have to gather up the cash if you try to obtain a game breaker early on.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Dark Duel Stories:
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    • Change of Heart. Its effect in this game is permanent instead of only lasting one turn like in real life, so you can steal your opponents best monster from them for the rest of the duel if you use it right.
    • Thousand-Eyes Restrict. It's a normal monster in this game, requiring no tributes, which steals your opponent strongest monster, and increases its level by 2 (equivalent to a 1000 ATK/DEF boost), so you can deal massive amounts of direct damage right away. Broken for obvious reasons. Coupled with Change of Heart, Brain Control, and Relinquished, duels becomes a "I steal your monster, you steal my monsters" game against the tier 4 / 5 opponents.
    • Dark Hole is one due to a quirk in the tribute mechanics. You're allowed to tribute monsters, play Dark Hole, then tribute summon a monster in that order. Played with minimal monsters on your field to tribute, Dark Hole becomes cost free.
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    • Cocoon of Evolution will evolve into Great Moth after a turn on the field, which then evolves into Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth the turn after. With its high defense for a 4 star monster, it'll likely survive long enough to change once. Finally, the Cocoon can be used once your Duelist Level reaches 26! This is extremely low compared to the benefit this card gives you.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist and Link Evolution: In Single Player matches, there is no Forbidden and Limited list, allowing you to put 3 copies of ANY card you want. FROM THE START. Yes, you heard that right. This includes the broken Zoodiacs, Pot Of Greed, the Dragon Rulers, Magical Scientist, Last Will and freaking EXODIA. Now you can steamroll your opponent easily with these cards. This speedrun is just an example of how this can be abused.
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  • In Yu-Gi-Oh! 7 Trials to Glory: World Championship Tournament 2005, there is a special area in which there is no banned/limited list, which means you're not only allowed three separate copies of each Exodia piece in your deck, you're allowed three copies of Sangan and Witch of the Black Forest to search them out, AND three copies of Dark Hole, which destroys all monsters on both sides of the field, nuking the opponent's offense while allowing your searchers to do their job. There is also access to 3 copies each of Pot of Greed and Graceful Charity, which all together accounts for fifteen cards with essentially no penalty. The in-game currency reward system has a strong bias towards winning through non-standard means (and Exodia is considered non-standard); what this means is that you get ten times the normal winnings for performing poorly. You can even buy a Deck that is pre-made with all the above cards. Be wary, though, because the opponents in that area are also not bound by the banlist either, so you might get stomped by the opponent spamming similarly broken strategies, such as the Rare Hunter who's also using a no-banlist Exodia deck.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! The Sacred Cards had an absurd number of these... so many that the difficulty comes from trying to determine which of these are the most game-breaking. To give a few egregious examples:
    • Darkness Approaches. Rather ironic, as the real-life card game version is considered one of the worst spells in the game, but there's no denying how utterly game-breaking the SC version is. It turns all monsters on your whole field face-down for no cost at all, allowing them to re-use their instant Flip Effects—a great many of which are clearly meant to be used once per card. One extreme example is Revival Jam, a card that copies itself when activated. Not game-breaking by itself, but with a single Revival Jam and a single Darkness Approaches, you now have four Revival Jams on your side of the field ready to pounce.
    • Hourglass of Life. It powers up every monster on your side of the field by 500 attack and defense points. Permanently. Not only is this a Game-Breaker by itself, but combine it with the above Darkness Approaches and Revival Jam tactic, and you now have two 2500 ATK and two 2000 ATK Revival Jams (not to mention the now 1700 ATK Hourglass itself) in practically no time at all. It is possible to, with the right combination of Hourglass of Life, similar attack boosts, and Darkness Approaches, get a full field of garden-variety monsters to over 4000 ATK, without ever needing any tributes. To call this a One-Hit Kill is an understatement.
    • The lesson of just how game-breaking these sort of attack boosts are is taught to the player very quickly via Witch's Apprentice, a card the player starts with. It works like Hourglass of Life, except it only powers up Shadow-element monsters. Which in itself is overpowered, because of how the game's Elemental Rock-Paper-Scissors works. In theory, it's Shadow > Light > Fiend > Dreams > Shadow. The problem with this is that Dreams-element monsters are ridiculously rare, to the point where encountering one in the entire game is an event unto itself, making Shadow an unintentional Infinity +1 Element. And on the off-chance that you do encounter such a monster...well, that's what your trap cards are for.
    • Torrential Tribute, which instantly wipes out every single monster on the opponent's field the instant they try to attack with absolutely anything. And unlike the real-life game, where Mirror Force (a WEAKER version of said card, as it doesn't hit face-downs) was limited to one at the time, you can have three Torrentials in your in-game deck.
    • For that matter, almost any trap card in the game, because the AI is stupid enough to attack every time it has a chance to win that particular battle. This definition of "chance" includes your face-down monsters. All you need to do is the following: set trap, set monster, end turn, laugh as the opponent kills themselves, attack with all face-up monsters, and repeat until you have won the duel. Traps like Invisible Wire (kills anything under 2000 ATK that attacks you, which no enemy except the final boss can summon without a tribute), Acid Trap Hole (everything under 3000 ATK), and Widespread Ruin (just everything) make the game insultingly easy. To make matters worse, these cards have a deck cost that is absurdly low; deck cost acts sort of like your Character Level, determining the relative power of your deck. Widespread Ruin costs less than the local Goombas to put in your deck, and the other traps cost even less than that. Only Torrential has anything even vaguely resembling a real cost...which you can still pay at the very beginning of the game with minimal effort.
      • To top that off, Trap Master has an effect that creates an Acid Trap Hole for free, while only taking up a little more deck capacity than the card itself. You can have what amounts to up to 6 Acid Trap Holes in a Deck, and that's before taking into account reuses thanks to Darkness Approaches. Its paltry 500 ATK matters very little when the opponent will subsequently try to attack it and lose their strongest monster in the process.
    • Beckon to Darkness falls under the same vein as Trap Cards, being able to destroy anything that isn't a God Card, having a very low deck cost, and always hitting the strongest monster the opponent has. From start to finish, it will always see play in the player's deck because it's so efficient at taking out threats they otherwise cannot surmount.
    • Don't even get started on Coccoon of Evolution. Its duelist level requirement is really quite low. You can have 3 per deck, 2000 defence, needs no tribute. After one turn, it evolves into Great Moth. Another turn later, and that evolves into Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth. 3500 ATK, usually only usable once you've already got two God Cards and quite overwhelming.
    • Ancient Lamp. While its moderately high level requirement means you can't use it until mid-late game without Level Grinding, it more than makes up for this with its ability to completely circumvent the level requirement system. As soon as it hits the field, it can summon La Jinn the Mystical Genie of the Lamp—whose level requirement is extremely high, and justifiably so. La Jinn overpowers every single non-tribute monster that can possibly be summoned by your opponents in the game—and the most common field effect gives it an automatic 540-point attack boost without you even needing to do anything, in a game where the 500-point attack boost from Hourglass of Life is a Game-Breaker, as listed above. And to cap it all off, it's Shadow element! Add a Darkness Approaches and a Witch's Apprentice, and with just 3 cards and no tributes you have not one but two monsters with 3340 attack, both of which are nigh-impossible to hit with Elemental Rock-Paper-Scissors, in just two turns. Wish your opponents luck, they'll need it.
    • You can use The Inexperienced Spy or Monster Eye to reveal all the cards in your opponent’s hand and change them to face-up position, preventing him/her from activating the temporary effects of Effect Monsters. Really useful against enemies that use effects.
    • Instead of needing to Tribute when you're intending to Summon a high-level monster, you can manually Tribute monsters from your field at any point in your turn, and the game will only permit you to Summon if you've Tributed the right number. This means you can Tribute your monsters, play a boardwipe that would normally destroy them first, and then summon a high-level monster to attack a now-defenseless opponent. Or you can do things like use Brain Control on an opponent's monster, and then Tribute it just so they can't get it back.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Reshef of Destruction: Due to similar mechanics, almost every game breaker listed under The Sacred Cards also applies, even if some of them have been restricted to only 1 or 2 copies per deck or have had their deck costs inflated. On the other hand, you're probably going to need them to beat opponents with cards far stronger than yours.
    • Monster-destroying effects are even more vital to help you overcome the advantage the opponent has. Nothing except the God Cards have protection against them, so you can easily turn the tables after the opponent has spent resources on their strongest monster.
    • The Winged Dragon of Ra's Phoenix Mode can be discarded in the hand to immediately appear on the field in Battle Mode, negating the need for three tributes. note  You can only access it through a password, but given that it's going into a pretty steep Difficulty Spike, you might need it to level the playing field.
    • Dark Flare Knight can similarly be discarded from the hand to immediately summon Mirage Knight to the field, a 2800/2000 monster that normally needs two tributes. Mirage Knight then splits into a Dark Magician and a Flame Swordsman on the opponent's next turn, giving you two powerful beatsticks. Provided you can afford it in terms of money and deck capacity, there is no reason to not run Dark Flare Knight in most any deck you may end up building.
    • Castle of Dark Illusions constantly turns your monsters face-down, acting as a continuous version of Darkness Approaches. It also constantly turns the field into the Yami field which conveniently gives it a 30% power boost, creating a 3250 DEF wall with no drawback. However, its absurd deck cost makes it unlikely for a player to even run it until postgame, unless they somehow take control of an opponent's copy.
    • The Paradox boss rush has you winning specific cards from the Millennium Guardians on top of the normal duel rewards. If you answer Paradox's question wrongly or choose to leave in the middle of the boss rush by going left, you have to start over, but also get to keep everything you've won on the way. This means you can keep defeating the first Guardian to get a ton of Kuribohs to wager on duels, or keep beating the third Guardian to amass Giant Soldiers of Stone for large sums of money.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! The Duelists of the Roses has a lot of extraordinary cards only available through hacking, passwords, or the Destiny Draw mechanic. Card Reincarnation can get you Darkness Approaches, which is effective for the same reason as it was in The Sacred Cards, and there are two monsters it works wonderfully with: Mystical Elf, which when flipped raises the attack power of all Light monsters (including itself) by 800 points, and Wood Remains, which raises the attack power of all Wood Remains on the field by 500. The kicker here? You can get a Wood Remains by fusing a zombie and plant monster that both have less than 1000 attack points, and you can get a Mystical Elf by fusing either Dancing Elf or Wing Egg Elf with a Fairy-type monster with less than 800 attack points. These materials are easy to farm from the right opponents and significantly raise the number of potential copies of these monsters a deck can bring out.
    • You think those are bad? Try Spirit of the Books. An otherwise unknown normal monster in the TCG becomes completely effective here, because its flip effect is to summon Boo Koo, another otherwise unknown monster in the TCG. When Boo Koo is flipped, Spirit of the Books gains 700 attack points. If Boo Koo is fused with another Winged Beast monster with less than 1400 attack, it creates yet another Spirit of the Books. This creates an endless cycle of powerups so long as every newly flipped Boo Koo can be fused with another Winged Beast you draw. You do have to throw out the weaker Spirits so that new ones can keep coming in, but hey, three or more psycho cleric hawks with over 5000 attack? That's worth it.
    • in this game, Pumpking, king of ghosts pumps the attack of all your zombies when in defense mode permanently every turn (even the face down ones). Pumpking is particularly easy to fuse from your hand, using the games generic attack power based fusion system. (Plant+zombie = Wood Remains) + another zombie =Pumpking. Also not that hard to get in card form. One of the starter decks even has it. This game also has Coccoon of Evolution too. Just like before, fuse it with Larvae of Moth or Petit Moth to get Pupae of Moth, which turns into Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth, which decreases the attack and defense of your opponents creatures every turn permanently when in defense mode (even the face down ones). And Pupae of Moth enter the graveyard when Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth comes on the field, allowing you to resurrect it with many cards to get ANOTHER moth, and the pupae of moth enters the graveyard again, where it can be brought back AGAIN.... Now we add in Blue Eyed Silver Zombie, with a flip effect that turns all your creatures into zombies, which are then pumped by your many pumpkings. Call of the Haunted does the same thing, but on a spell card. You quickly build a field of 9999/9999 monsters and turn your opponents into 0/0 with large numbers of pumpkings and moths.
  • The Yu-Gi-Oh! Tag Force Series games allow you to use certain cards that were only in the anime.
    • The Tag Force games allow you to use the Dark Synchros. Ordinarily, they're Difficult, but Awesome, with their raw power balanced out by the trickiness in using a 0-ATK, high-level Dark Tuner to summon it... unless that Dark Tuner is Doom Submarine. Doom Submarine can revive itself once per game while you control no monsters, and it's Level 9, meaning it can summon pretty much any Dark Synchro you could want. Discard Submarine, Summon Submarine, Normal Summon something else... free Dark Synchro.
    • Even as Dark Synchros go, Hundred-Eyes Dragon is incredibly strong. It can be played with a simple combo of Doom Submarine/Infernity Randomizer or Mirage, it has a nasty 3000 ATK, and it has three effects. The first shuts down opposing Spells and Traps while it attacks, the second gives it the effects of all the Infernities in your Graveyard (which can include piercing and burn damage, drawing a card every turn, indestructibility by battle or effects, summoning Infernities from the Graveyard, or making it impossible for you to lose the Duel), and the third lets you, whenever the Dragon is somehow destroyed, add any card from your Deck to your hand. This last effect combos perfectly with fellow anime-only card Cursed Prison, letting you Summon it instantly in DEF, so that you'll be able to grab a card when it gets taken down.
    • Fog Castle, which revives a monster up to four times after it gets destroyed, is incredibly abusable with any card whose effect activates upon destruction. How does knocking 35 cards from your opponent's Deck with a Voltic Bicorn sound? How about using Sangan to instantly draw out Exodia? If that wasn't enough, when Fog Castle runs out of uses, you get to take four monsters from your Graveyard and add them to your hand, massively boosting your advantage in the unlikely event that you haven't just won the Duel.
    • Philosopher's Stone Sabatiel may be limited to one, but it can be added from your Deck to your hand whenever you lose a Winged Kuriboh, so it's incredibly easy to draw (especially with a Flute of Summoning Kuriboh). It lets you pay half your LP to add any card from your Deck to your hand. And then it goes back to the Deck, letting you play it again. After three activations, it turns from its original effect to one that multiplies one monster's ATK for a turn by up to 5, potentially giving you a card with over 10,000 ATK... and somehow, that feels like a downgrade.
    • Trick Battle (a card that reverses the results of a battle so the stronger monster gets destroyed, but damage is still calculated normally) sounds like a quirky bit of fun... until you combo it with Colossal Fighter, a card that can revive itself when destroyed. Summon Colossal Fighter, activate Trick Battle, attack a weaker monster. Your opponent takes damage, but the weaker monster stays and Colossal Fighter gets destroyed. Since it was technically destroyed by battle, you can Summon it back, and since you Summoned it back, you can attack again. Repeat until the opponent dies.
    • The Destiny Draw mechanic, which automatically places a designated card on top of your Deck if you were losing, was remarkably abusable, letting you put game-winning cards on top of your Deck in the second turn with some good management of your Life Points. The Tag Force version of Afterglow, which shuffles itself into the Deck and wins the Duel if you draw it on the next turn, was probably the worst offender. What made it more egregious is that you can set a handicap that starts you off at an immense Life Point disadvantage, which allows you to immediately access Destiny Draw.
    • The trio of the ZEXAL shout cards are illegal in the real card game (for very good reasons) but are legal in this game.
      • Creator of Hope: At the start of your Draw Phase, if your LP is lower than your opponent's and this card is in the GY because this card in your possession was destroyed by an opponent's card and sent there since your last Draw Phase (you can ram it into your opponent), you can put ANY CARD from your deck and place it on top on your deck before conducting your normal draw. How about the aforementioned Afterglow, that instantly OT Ks your opponent?
      • Winning Formula allows you to Special Summon any Number monster from your Extra Deck, except a Number C monster, if only your opponent controls a monster. So now Superdreadnought Rail Cannon Super Dora and Galaxy-Eyes Full Armor Photon Dragon( by using Galaxy-Eyes Prime Photon Dragon as material) is easily splashable in any deck that can use this card.
      • Creator of Miracles targets 1 Number C39 monster you control, and lets it attack your opponent directly, and if you have activated the effects of "Creator of Hope" and "Winning Formula" previously this Duel, when it inflicts battle damage to your opponent,YOU WIN. You could just Special Summon Number 39 using Winning Formula then upgrade it to Utopia Ray to easily activate this card's effect, making it the easiest Duel Winner to ever exist in this game.
    • Ultimate Offering is not banned in Tag Force and in Tag Force 6 you even start with it. Enjoy.
    • You can unlock the option to disable the banlist in ARC-V Tag Force Special by paying 1000 JP, allowing you to use 3 copies of the above cards.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel is essentially a digital parallel to the modern card game, and as such most cards that break the game in the real life card game will also apply here. However, due to a different release schedule of its cards and its best-of-1 format, the banlist adjustments made in this game would differ significantly from in real-life.
    • The Destroyer Phoenix Enforcer package (using Verte Anaconda to copy Fusion Destiny and fuse DPE using Celestial and Dasher from the Deck) was as impactful as it was in real life when it hit Master Duel, and it was addressed much differently. Master Duel didn't ban DPE or Verte (yet), but Celestial took the bullet instead. Celestial's draw 2 Graveyard effect meant that, after you've summoned DPE, whether it was properly dealt with or not, you now had an extra Pot of Green when you're down on cards, giving you the leg up in the long-term advantage game. Now, without Celestial, players looking to use this package would resort to Denier as a body on board, but Denier itself is much less valuable than Celestial's draw power.
    • A Rhongomyniad with 4 or more Xyz materials is unaffected by card effects and also prevents the opponent from Normal or Special Summoning so they can't out it by Tributing it for a Kaiju or Ra Sphere Mode. Normally designed to be an Awesome, but Impractical payoff, but the inclusion of Bamboozling Gossip Shadow, who can transfer itself and its Materials to a Number monster, made a high-Material Rhongo much easier to accomplish. Rather than ban Rhongo outright, Gossip Shadow was the one to get banned, removing the easiest method to access a high-Material Rhongo.
    • Floowandereeze Decks are very irritating to play against, usually requiring Highly Specific Counterplay to fight effectively. In a game without the Side Deck, you essentially cannot afford the Deck space for anti-Floo tech without hurting your strength against most other opponents. Floowandereeze is so effective at searching and Normal Summoning on the opponent's turn that they would usually slap down a Barrier Statue of the Stormwinds to render most non-WIND Decks unable to play, while the Floowandereeze goes largely unhindered by it. The Barrier Statue would get banned to deny Floowandereeze Decks a strong floodgate that they can play under.
  • The various forms of the fanmade YGOPro tend to have an "anime cards" feature—and as it turns out, there are a lot of cards that, either when they're made Purposely Overpowered or when removed from the context of Hikokubonote  trying to fill a deadline, become laughably overpowered. A fully anime-legal duel is basically going to consist of a race to FTK the opponent; notably, at one point the most well-known version featured an "anime banlist", but simply gave up because even relatively innocuous cards could be snapped in half with ease.
    • In the real game, cards that let you easily draw are rare—in the anime, they're everywhere. Generic "draw 2" cards with minimal or easily-circumvented requirements include Akashic Record, Card of Variation, Card of Adversity, or Card of Compensation, and those are the ones substantially worse than Pot of Greed, not even getting into cards like Spell Books from the Pot (both players draw 3), Kuribandit(draw 5 cards then send all monsters drawn to the graveyard by tributing itself), Roll of Fate (roll a die, draw cards equal to the result and then mill equal to the result), Card of Safe Return (draws whopping 3 cards each time a monster is special summoned from either graveyard), Card of Demise (draw until you have 5), Nibelung's Treasure (toss your opponent an Equip Spell that locks down one of their monsters, then draw 5) or especially Card of Sanctity (both players draw until they have 6). There's a very good reason Card of Sanctity was played in so many anime duels.
    • Mill cards are even more nonsense, either for the player's graveyard setup or to deck out the opponent in the blink of an eye. Golden Castle of Stromberg (forces the opponent to send half their Deck to the Graveyard each turn, cannot be destroyed, in addition to summoning level 4 or lower monsters from the Deck and destroying opponent monster that attacks as well as burning their LP for half their ATKs), Crush Card Virus (destroys all monsters with 1500 ATK or more in hand, field, and Deck), Virus Cannon (discards ten Spell Cards in the opponent's hand and deck), Final Attack Orders (both players pick three cards and send the rest to the Graveyard), Underworld Circle (banishes all monsters from both player's Decks upon activation along with Dark Hole nuke), Level Pod (spins the entire field, then forces both players to draw cards equal to the combined level of the sent monsters, discarding them if they fail to draw one of the spun cards), and Monster Register (players have to discard a large amount of cards each time they summon) can all pretty much deplete an opponent's deck singlehandedly.
    • There are many more card recycling effects here as well, and the ones that benefit players the most are Elemental HERO Flash (adds any spell or trap from graveyard when it's sent there by any means), manga version of Spell Reproduction (adds any spell from graveyard), Altar of Restoration (adds any card in the graveyard by banishing 2 top cards of the deck), Burning Soul (adds any card from graveyard, a quick-play spell), and Blade Graveyard (adds any card from either player's graveyard by banishing itself). But the one that takes the cake is Graveyard Rebound, which allows the player to activate any Spell or Traps from the Graveyard, which'd mean it can be infinitely re-activated as those cards go there after activation. This card can make Jar of Greed draw your entire Deck!
    • Stealing cards that can be a bit too overpowered are Road Raven Red Queen (takes control of any number of opponent's monsters, albeit their ATK are changed to 100), Traitor Fog (takes control 1 of the opponent's monsters each time they summon something, as long as it's on the field), and Forceful Deal (when opponent summons a monster, pay half of your LP and tribute all monsters you control to permanently take control of opponent's monsters). There are cards that even steal something from opponent's Deck, like Amazoness Chain Master and Darkness Outsider.
    • Hand control cards here can have Game-Breaker-ness that surpass the banned real-game ones, such as Pillager (look at the opponent's hand to take one of their cards), Summon Capture (normal summoning one of the opponent's monsters in their hand), and Topologic Gumblar Dragon (destroys all cards in the hand instead of only discarding 2, and its Extra Link effect is unnegatable).
    • Cards that can bring out extremely powerful monsters easily, even in laughable levels, potentially ending the game quickly, such as Future Fusion (fusion summon by picking materials from the Deck), Past Life (similar to Metamorphosis, but adds similar ATK requirement and can summon any type of monsters in Extra Deck rather than just Fusions), Numbers Evaille (summons a Number with the same number in its name as the total number in the names of the chosen monsters as Xyz materials), and Sphere Field (both players can Xyz summon random Number with 2 same level monsters from hand).
    • Mass summon cards that qualify include Soul Charge (other than only 500 LP per monster instead of 1000, this doesn't prevent the Battle Phase in that turn, only that the summoned monsters can't attack), Call of the Haunted (mass summon while also granting them battle protection), Sea of Rebirth (picks any monsters from Deck each time opponent special summons), Multiply (summons multiple copies of any monster, complete with its effects, as long as it's 500 ATK or lower), as well as rapid token generating cards like Toy Robot Box, Hippo Carnival, Grinder Golem, Blackwing - Gofu the Vague Shadow, and Graveyard of Wandering Souls.
    • Overly generic searchers with little to no or potentially benefical conditions like Three-Eyed Ghost, Kabuki Stage - The Rough Seas, or Elegant Light LV4 for monsters, Magician's Library, Spell Sanctuary, or the manga version of Left Arm Offering for spells, and the ones which add any card like Mathematician, or especially Sabatiel - The Philosopher's Stone (adds any card from the Deck or Graveyard for half LP, and if it's not enough, it'd return to your hand after said picked card is used until 3 times, instead of just shuffling itselt to the Deck like Tag Force version). Those cards would increase your deck's consistency up through the roof as you can search any card of your liking such as archetype searchers, board wipes or even other draw cards including the aforementioned Card of Sanctity.
    • Removal cards that can stop almost anything like Beckon to Darkness (sends a monster to graveyard without targeting or destroying it) or Briar Transplant (banishes a card without targeting or destroying it), not to mention the mass removals like Giant Flood (sends all monsters in the field and hand to the graveyard), Prominence (destroys all opponent cards by destroying the equipped monster, as well as 500 burn for every destroyed monsters), and Drawber (returns all opponent cards in their field and hand to the Deck if the card they draw as per this card's effect is the declared one).
    • There are cards that allow the player to use the opponent's monsters freely as the materials for their needs, which can double as both mass removal as well as their field setup, such as Soul Exchange (tributes, not only restricted for summon), Synchro Material (Synchros), and Destiny Overlay (Xyz).
    • Many cards have no HOPT or even OPT clause, allowing endless loops to be created, like constantly re-summonable monsters such as Blackwing - Zephyros the Elite and Glow-Up Bulb, self bounce cards like T.G. Recipro Dragonfly and Compulsory Recoil Device, stat gaining cards like Photon Satellite (level) or Performapal Laugh Maker, and burn cards like Catapult Warrior.
    • Beastborg Medal of the Crimson Chain institutes such a hard lockdown (completely shutting down a single monster, blocking all Spells, Traps, and summoning for the opponent) that it may as well simply read "if your opponent summons a monster from the Extra Deck while you control a Beastborg, you win the Duel.". There are other overly deadly floodgates as well such as Domain of the Dark Ruler (negates all Spell and Traps on the field), Freezing Dance (prevents summoning monsters from hand for 2 turns, destroys itself after opponent's 2nd turn thus the controller is able to act again first), and especially the equally devastating Ivy Bind Castle (negates all opponent's face up cards, prevents attacks, 800 damage per opponent's monster in their Standby Phase).
    • When Z-ONE is destroyed by a card effect, it can banish any card from your hand, Deck or Graveyard to have Z-ONE copy its effects and activate it. Moreover, it's indestructible on the field if it's activated this way. Other than acting as an overly generic searcher, this can be especially devastating if it's used together with either aformentioned Beastborg Medal of the Crimson Chain or Ivy Bind Castle to get their devastating floodgate effects while eliminating their self-destruction effects.
    • There are even more cards that can steal the effect of other cards here which can give huge benefits like bypassing the once per turn restriction of those cards, unlike the real game where it's either banned or heavily limited in use, such as Spirit Illusion, Synchronic Ability, Synchro Alliance, as well as Number 69 and Hundred-Eyes Dragon mentioned below.
    • Cards that can skip turn for no cost like Turn Jump means the entire turn is also reset, and that'd mean the player can attack again, Normal Summon again, activate OPT or HOPT effects again, activate previously set Traps, advancing turn-based cards like Final Countdown, Wave Motion Cannon, or Destiny Board, and more. Cards like Mischief of the Time Goddess is even nastier as it doesn't have Battle Phase restriction, which'd mean it can be used at the first turn to attack, though it helps less with the turn-based cards as it skips straight into your Battle Phase.
    • Relay Soul summons a monster, then changes your loss condition to be "if the monster summoned is destroyed." That means that if you can get the monster off the field by other means, such as bouncing it, you essentially cannot lose, ever.
    • The un-nerfed version of Hundred-Eyes Dragon is even more horribly busted than the Tag Force version, gaining the effects of every Dark monster in the player's graveyard. Think about how many broken Dark monsters exist, and now imagine a card with all of their effects put together—Vennominaga alone gives it superlative protection and an instant-win effect.
    • Chaos End Ruler - Ruler of the Beginning and the End, a rather obvious Continuity Nod to the Envoys which only existed as a Freeze-Frame Bonus in the anime. More or less: it banishes the opponent's entire hand, field, and graveyard, and then does 500 LP damage for each card banished, at the cost of only 1000 LP. If this thing uses its effect, you basically win. Even if you didn't get 16 cards banished which itself is an instant OTK there is little hope for a comeback after you don't have any resources except your next draw and that is if you get to that point.
    • Supreme King Z-ARC is hilariously easy to bring out through the effect of Astrograph Sorcerer, and it doesn't only contain the superior version of its real life version's monster effects such as opening up by nuking the opponent's field and likely doing hefty burn damage, summoning up to 2 (instead of 1) Supreme King monsters upon destroying a monster by battle, and basically cannot leave the field, but its real life pendulum effects are this one's monster effects as well (with the only pendulum effect being summoning itself by tributing a Supreme King monster) by making your field immune to the majority of Extra Deck summoning methods and locks the opponent out of drawing by effect or searching (not OPT unlike the real card). It being a Fusion, Synchro, and Xyz (with rank equal to its level) monster all at once allows it to gain supports tailored to those monster types as well. There are methods to deal with it, but many Decks simply can't handle this thing.
    • The majority of anime Numbers get some kind of buff (particularly in the form of battle-indestructibility), but those cards stand out even by those standards:
      • Number 39: Utopia Beyond grants effect immunity to all of your cards. Not just itself, but your entire field (another card similar to this is Spectral Ice Floe by banishing a DARK monster). A single unaffected monster (that also has battle immunity for non-Numbers in this case) can be a pain to deal with, let alone a field full of them! Not to mention, it'd further protect your plays by protecting all of your Spells and Traps from card effects too, such as using Mask of Restrict to prevent your monsters to be Tributed (by cards like Kaiju) would have the Trap itself be a pain to remove as well. The higher ATK monsters aren't exactly safe either, as if this card is summoned by ranking up the base Utopia, it'd turn the opponent's monsters ATK to 0 in each of your Battle Phases.
      • Number 69: Heraldry Crest is remarkably overpowered. It gains an additional layer of protection in the form of immunity to card effect destruction, and can detach a material to block attacks while destroying a card on the field, but what pushes it here is its signature ability: it negates the effects of all Monsters on the field (the real-game version only negates Xyz monsters), and gains their effects on top of that (the real card can only copy one Xyz Monster and needs to detach a material to do it). So it's a Skill Drain on legs that's difficult to get rid of and only becomes more powerful if the opponent has an established field—and all for the cost of three Level 4 monsters.
      • Number 88: Gimmick Puppet of Leo is the opposite of real game's usually Awesome, but Impractical instant win condition cards including its real life version, as the anime version only requires it to detach all its Xyz materials to win instead of having 3 Destiny Counters. Its effect to detach Xyz material has no conditions or restrictions as well unlike the real life version. Meaning this card can be summoned only with 1 material (especially with the aformentioned Numbers Evaille) and you'd instantly win the duel by then for detaching its single material. Its upgraded version, Number C88: Gimmick Puppet Disaster Leo adds immunity to monster effects and 4000 burn when detaching Xyz materials.
    • Earthbound Immortal Wiraqocha Rasca's anime incarnation lets you skip the Battle Phase to do an HP To One maneuver on the opponent. After you're done with that, a single Sparks can finish them off. On top of that, it's immune to Spells and Traps. It's little wonder that the real game retooled Rasca's effect almost completely, which made the real card almost useless.
    • Unsurprisingly, the Purposely Overpowered Egyptian Gods are considered borderline unbeatable, being immune to nearly all removal and boasting effects (which are all quick effects) that skyrocket their already impressive power output, with Slifer stopping decks from making plays by destroying any summoned monsters that has 2000 ATK or DEF (or heavily weakening it when it has more than 2000 ATK or DEF) or less and Obelisk easily finishing off the opponent with huge 4000 burn (along with a field nuke) or infinite ATK in 1 attack by tributing 2 other monsters. Ra in particular, as a result of being given all its manga effects, has some of the longest text in the game to reflect its New Powers as the Plot Demands, gaining huge stats by various means, its attacks being unstoppable by any means, and removing any monsters ignoring their effects are among some of its abilities, and can win games by itself relatively easily, even against modern decks.
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