Follow TV Tropes

Following

Game Breaker / Mega Man

Go To

    Classic Games 

The "Rockman Complete Works", PS1 ports of the NES games, provided a feature using the Sony Pocketstation, a Japan only portable device, that featured mini games that allows the player to level up Rockman, and then add that data back into the main game. Stats boosts include more firepower, more health, and greater speed. While this feature was removed when the games were put into the Anniversary Collection this is a sample of what could've been.

  • The aforementioned Anniversary Collection featured an easy mode and the option to start any game with four extra lives. The extra lives is self-explanatory, it makes a power-up in 8 pointless, but the easy mode provides better defense, stronger weapons, and less enemies in the NES games. 7 has all the weapons at double power compared to normal settings. Sadly this doesn't affect MM8 or the two arcade games.

Mega Man

  • The Thunder Beam (called "E" in game). It has the ultimate coverage, being able to hit enemies above, in front, and below you with a single use. The projectiles deal good damage and can multihit because they're fairly large (which also lets it hit enemies that are low to the ground). It only consumes 1 energy per shot, so you can usually use it as much as you'd like, finding more weapon energy before you run out.
  • This game also has Fire Storm, called "F". It shoots a large fireball that moves quickly and deals great damage. It also raises a shield that, by itself, can almost kill a Sniper Joe in one hit. Energy consumption? 1 bar per shot. YES.

Mega Man 2

  • Metal Blades, the weapon you receive after defeating Metal Man (who is arguably one of the easier bosses to deal with when just using your default Arm Cannon weapon). Once you realize they can be fired in any direction (something the Arm Cannon/Mega Buster can never do in any of the games), they often mow straight through swarms of smaller but still troublesome enemies and that you almost always have an abundance of weapon energy for it, the idea of using the default weapon at all pretty much goes straight out the window.
    • To put the abundance in perspective, you have four Metal Blades for each bar in the Energy Meter. There are twenty-eight bars in that meter, which means you can fire 112 blades before the energy meter empties. The ammo amount doesn't even matter if you abuse a glitch in the game that gives the Metal Blades (and any other weapons that get more than one shot for each bar) infinite ammo. Simply shoot 3 blades, pause, and unpause.
    • And when you face Metal Man again during Wily stage 5, he goes down from two hits of it (or one on the US version's Normal mode).
    • With it you can defeat not only Bubble Man (heck, Metal Blade is his only weakness), but Wood Man and Flash Man as well. That's half of the Robot Masters.
    • The only downside? Several of the games bosses, Quick Man, Air Man, Crash Man, Mecha Dragon, Guts Tank, Boobeam Trap and Wily Alien, are immune to them.

Mega Man 3

  • The Rush Jet, which, unlike other games, can move freely in any direction. You can skip over nearly any set of Bottomless Pits or disappearing blocks by using it. The worst thing about it is that energy is only drained if you're standing on it, and it follows you left and right even if you're jumping or on another platform entirely. This means you can cross large gaps with virtually no weapon energy loss. It does become somewhat of a necessity, however, as the energy pellets collected to fuel the jet across wide gaps (such as in Needle Man's Doc Robot stage) are not restored if you lose a life.
  • 3 had a lot of tricks that could count here, though most were removed for the Anniversary Collection. Just by going to the password screen and putting in A6, either color, you start a new game with nine E-Tanks (that stayed in the newer versions). There are glitches for getting Rush Jet and Marine early. That and the controller 2 tricks.

Mega Man 4

  • The Pharaoh Shot can be charged up and thrown in any direction besides straight up & down, much like the Metal Blades from the second game. It's extremely powerful and charges up quickly, but the best part is that it destroys most enemies and bosses with ease, and this includes the Wily Capsule.
    • Further, this weapon also charged up by growing an energy ball over your head. Against Dr. Wily, the easiest method is to charge it up and then jump around until the energy ball impacted his invisible craft. Not only that, but if the ball over your head connects and you hold the button down, releasing it will fire the shot at the level you had it charged, including a full-sized shot. Basically, if you're savvy, you can manage two attacks with a single charge.

Mega Man 5

  • The debut of Beat, who essentially functions as Mega Man's version of Cream the Rabbit's Chao companion, Cheese. As long as you have weapon energy, Beat will chase down any enemy onscreen when summoned and destroy it. It doesn't stop there, as Beat also works on bosses; he even deals as much damage to most of them as a weapon a robot master has a weakness to. He even completely trivializes an otherwise very annoying encounter with spoiler: Dr. Wily. Granted, getting him requires finding all eight letters in the eight robot master stages. It was so bad that Capcom changed his function to only rescuing Mega Man when he fell into Bottomless Pits from 7 on. In 6, he was still extremely powerful, but he no longer hunted down bosses for you.

Mega Man 6

  • The Jet Adapter (Rush Jet Adapter in some regions), which lets Mega Man temporarily fly as long as the jump button is held, and recharges its energy quickly while on the ground. You're only able to fly for a short amount of time, and can't slide, use special weapons, or charge your buster while using it, but this armor makes the platform-heavy sections (and several other areas) a joke. Given the nature of the games, there's little reason to use the other form (or arguably normal Mega Man) over it except for cases where sliding or a special weapon is absolutely necessary. Getting this item is one of the first things many players do (as the robot master who has it is one of the easiest of the set) when starting a new game.

Mega Man 7

  • The Super Adapter. Like MM6s adapters? This one is BOTH of them in one neat package — plus, if you want it, the homing add-on from Mega Man V. Once you get this puppy (quite literally, and as early as four bosses in), you'll rarely want to take it off.

Mega Man 8

  • The Mega Ball has a secondary function to it. By pressing and holding the jump button and landing on the ball, it explodes and Mega Man is propelled upwards with a bit more height than the normal jump. However, the ball does not have to be on the ground to do this. With practice, you can fire the Mega Ball in mid-air and land on it, still in mid-air, resulting in a double jump (or triple jump, if you can chain it and still have weapon energy). This trick completely trivializes many platforming sections in the game. The best thing about the Mega Ball is that it's given to you for free during the halfway point of the introduction stage.
  • The Arrow Shot upgrade. This thing can kill nearly any stage enemy in one hit, shielded or not — and the plasma spread after it hits something can damage enemies behind your first target. The Laser Shot can hit anything as well, but has less stopping power — though, it also charges ridiculously fast.
  • The Tornado Hold received from Tengu Man is a powerful weapon that makes a wind pillar that damages enemies rapidly. It also protects you against most enemy projectiles, and also works as an elevator when you step into it, which lets you reach secret areas, retrieve items, and bypass many tricky parts of levels. It's especially effective against flying enemies — including Bass when you fight him in Dr. Wily's fortress.

Mega Man 9

  • This installment gives us an entire slew of Game-Breaker weapons. Jewel Man's Jewel Satellite is considered the best barrier weapon in the series, combining the best qualities of the Leaf Shield, Junk Shield and Star Crash with the ability to reflect your opponents' bullets back at them for damage. Splash Woman's Laser Trident fires rapidly for strong, armor-piercing damage. Hornet Man's Hornet Chaser is fairly weak, but homes in on enemies and grabs most powerups for you. Galaxy Man's Black Hole Bomb consumes a lot of energy, but can swallow up nearly any enemy in the game in one sitting. The lack of the Charge Shot and slide in the game is more than made up for by these babies.
  • Also, the Jewel Satellite gets much more versatile once you get the Energy Balancer. Once you've recharged the energy you used to fire it, any extra weapon energy you get will go straight to the weapon with the lowest energy level thanks to the Balancer.
    • It gets even worse when you have both the Jewel Satellite and the Energy Balancer. With this combination, you can go to Plug Man's level, and just activate the satellite under the first hole in the wall which spawns infinite enemies that attack you from above and drop their items on you until you decide to throw the satellite away. This means you can essentially put Mega Man in the right place, put the controller down, leave for a few hours or so, and come back to find that you probably have enough bolts to make anything else you will need in the game. This is also the best way to get the trophy for getting the maximum amount of bolts at one time. The best part about this strategy: The Jewel Satellite is Plug Man's weakness.

Mega Man 10

  • Bass still has many of his powers from & Bass, except the double jump. He can't shoot through walls, and his shots are half as powerful as Mega Man's, but he can still fire in seven directions and has a rapid auto fire to boot, making a lot of bosses and damn near everything else cannon fodder. His dash works like Proto Man's slide, letting him dodge out of the way of attacks that would be much harder for Mega Man to avoid.
  • Mega Man being able to have the Ballade Cracker by default. It's got the Metal Blades' 8-direction effectiveness, but in exchange for not going through things or having a ridiculously low energy usage, it has an explosive blast radius around it. In its original appearance, this was balanced by receiving it near the end of the game, but beat Ballade once in 10 (via Special Stage 3), and you permanently have it from the get-go.
  • The Triple Blade received by Blade Man definitely qualifies, with it firing a spread shot of 3 blades that can decimate most enemies at close range and covers a wide area. The fact that Blade Man is pretty pathetic compared to some of the other bosses in the series doesn't help matters. With your new sword gun you could defeat most of the other bosses in the game pretty easily, especially Strike Man.

Mega Man 11

  • The Auto-Charge Chip auto-charges the Mega Buster. Once installed, set the auto-fire to the fire button from the options menu. Use Speed Gear and most enemies and mini-bosses can be easily shredded by a close range Buster Barrage.
  • Power Gear-boosted special weapons can be this. Tundra Storm turns into a screen nuke, and a powered up Block Dropper is like summoning an avalanche in midair.
  • Screw Catcher increases the chance of enemies dropping screws by 30%. The downside is that the game must be played on Saturday, unless the player messes with the system clock.

     Game Boy Games 

Mega Man: Dr. Wily's Revenge

  • Ice Slasher is by far the most valuable weapon in your arsenal. Not only does it trivialize the Big Eyes, the most annoying enemy in the game, but can also be used on otherwise invincible hazards such as the Super Cutters which completely eliminates the need to do the fast jumps and dodges otherwise required to fight enemies where Super Cutters are present.

Mega Man II

  • Remember the Metal Blades and the fly-anywhere version of Rush Jet, already the two most infamous examples of Mega Man Game Breakers? Now imagine what they would be like if you put both in the exact same game. Actually, no, imagine what they would be like if you made them even more powerful after you put them in the same game. Because in Mega Man II for the Game Boy, that's exactly the case. Not only does nearly every single thing stated above apply, but the Metal Blades cut through enemies they didn't originally cut through in this game (for instance, the Kukkus on Wood Man's stage, the chicken-like enemies, were immune to them in the NES Mega Man 2, but they die in one hit to them in this version) and the Rush Jet uses energy even slower. And Dr. Wily thinks he has the slightest chance of winning... why?
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report