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  • Yoshi is one of the last two characters to be shown in the Everyone is Here trailer. In Brawl and Wii U/3DS, he was the last of the original eight to be revealed.
  • The reveal of Ultimate makes a big deal about the number of fighters that had been in the series, eventually revealing that everyone who had been a fighter in Smash would be returning for this game. However, note the number given to the most recent fighter that had been announced for Smash prior to the proper reveal of Ultimate, Inkling. Inkling is given the number 64 as the 64th fighter to be in Smash as per Nintendo's official count. In terms of fighters, Smash had reached the most significant number in Nintendo's history... and then with the reveal of Ridley as the 65th fighter in Smash, surpassed it and kept going.
  • Link's new Final Smash has him using an Ancient Bow and Ancient Arrow, while Toon Link retains the Triforce Slash. Why didn't Toon Link get a new one? Consider the role the Triforce plays in their respective games. It was a key part of The Wind Waker, but wasn't very significant in Breath of the Wild, which placed more emphasis on the Sheikah technology. This fits with Zelda's new Final Smash too, since the Triforce was also important in A Link Between Worlds.
    • It's also worth pointing out that Breath of the Wild Link doesn't even have the Triforce. Zelda was implied to have had the whole thing. On the other hand, the Links of Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, and Twilight Princess all had the Triforce of Courage, and so all have/had Triforce Slash as their Final Smash.
      • Speaking of the Breath of the Wild Link not having the Triforce, when you go into the Zelda map within the Adventure Mode, it should be noted that Young Link is the one who wields the Triforce of Courage, not Adult Link, due to that fact.
  • Ridley's reveal trailer is full of brilliance:
    • He takes out Mega Man in one hit with his tail. Yes, it may be because he is huge and powerful, but remember that he has a sharp point at the end of his tail, AKA, a spike. What was the thing that kills Mega Man in one hit, again?
    • The way he takes out both Mega Man and Mario. As explained above, not only is Mega Man weak to spikes, but impaling things with his tail is Ridley's trademark killing method. As for Mario, he takes him out the same way Samus believed how he killed her father. The icing on top is him twirling Mario's hat on his finger, referencing a gameplay mechanic in Super Mario Odyssey while mocking the bright tone of said game.
    • Of all people to accompany Samus, why Mario and Mega Man? There are many reasons:
      • It's a Shout-Out to Alien. Samus mirrors Ripley, Mario mirrors the other human characters, Mega Man mirrors the android characters, and Ridley of course mirrors the Xenomorphs.
      • Mario and Mega Man have faced (traditional) dragons before. Mega Man has Mecha Dragon from Mega Man 2, and Mario has the Ruined Dragon from Super Mario Odyssey.
      • Mario represents Nintendo's first-party characters, while Mega Man represents third-party characters. Of course, Samus is there for her connection with Ridley.
    • Of course Ultimate is the fitting game for Ridley to finally make his playable debut. Part of the installment's theme is that 'Everyone is Here', with everyone from every Smash game returning, and guess who has been in every Smash game in some capacity but not playable until now? Ridley.
  • Ultimate adds a new "category" known as "Echo Fighters", which is a fancy term for Moveset Clones. But what's the point of this distinction and why is this so important?
    • This opens up new design possibilities when it comes to new fighters. For years, people have been clamoring for a certain character to show up as a playable fighter, but these ideas are often turned down by others due to the stigma of being too similar to another fighter, even if that character is distinct personality-wise. Echo Fighters allow these characters to mostly bypass that stigma. With Chrom (his up special being borrowed from Ike instead of Roy) and especially Ken (the sole semi-clone Echo Fighter) breaking the mold of what is an Echo Fighter, the possibilities are expanded even more.
    • They're easier to add on the developer's part. You could call it laziness, but coming up with brand-new distinct characters is still a very hard thing to do. Echo Fighters can allow the game developers to introduce a new character without potential backlash. It serves as a good marketing tool.
  • The Inklings applaud the winner as opposed to their usual behavior in their own games whenever they lose. Why? Because a temper tantrum is embarrassing to everyone and it reflects on your series badly. Not to mention, in their own game, they never had a platform fight game mode. Throwing tantrums for losing in a game you're good at is just as expected as applauding the winner of a game you're not good at.
    • They also don't have a personal stake in the outcome. Even the most casual Turf War has an Inkling risking their hot streak, which they get paid out for maintaining. They have nothing to lose in a smash, so missing the podium hurts less.
  • In the reveal trailer, it's fitting that Ryu is shown facing off against Ganondorf. Ganondorf is the closest thing Smash Bros has to an Akuma expy. Both are Dark-Skinned Redheads who use dark powers in conjunction with hand-to-hand combat.
  • The first three newcomers to Ultimate have parallels with the new designs of Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf.
    • Inklings and Link are both the protagonist of their respective games, and the games that they take the most influence came out after Smash 4. They both are projectile-based and were in the initial teaser of the game.
    • Zelda and Daisy are both princesses and their designs are a modified version of a previous design. They're also the most Genki Girl out of all the princesses in the game.
    • Ridley and Ganondorf are both the main villains of their respective series. They're some of the few characters to not have playable appearances before they debuted in Smash and they happen to be the most outright sinister villains of Nintendo.
  • In the reveal trailer, Snake appears to announce that "Everyone is here!". Immediately after Snake comes Pichu, a purposeful Joke Character who only appeared in Melee, and the character considered to be the least likely to ever return. This quickly hammers home that the trailer is serious when it says that it includes everyone.
  • Why would Donkey Kong's new Final Smash be his Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs from Donkey Kong Jungle Beat? Much like Donkey Konga, the inspiration for DK's original Final Smash, the original version of Jungle Beat was compatible with the DK Bongos, meaning that this new Final Smash is not only quicker and more appropriate, it also still fits the motif of using the DK Bongos (even if it's not shown).
  • Isn't it funny how Capcom lets Mega Man be stabbed by Ridley in the latter's reveal trailer? Well, those two characters share some similarities with each other. They were revealed in the second character reveal trailer for their respective game (and the first to not announce the game itself), they were revealed at the end of an E3 direct, their character reveals had dark CG visuals, and they were expected to be in the previous game due to how popular they were. Considering how everyone was expecting Mega Man to return in the game, of course Ridley would take him out to steal the spotlight.
  • Link in this game is based on his Breath of the Wild incarnation, whereas Ganondorf was based off his Ocarina of Time appearance. Consider that Breath of the Wild is the last game in the Zelda timeline, while Ocarina of Time is the first game to feature Ganondorf, both canonically and by release date. Ocarina of Time is also the game that splits the timeline into three branches. As for the other fighters in the Zelda series, they represent the three branches of the timeline. Zelda for the Downfall timeline, Toon Link for the Adult timeline, and Young Link (and Sheik if you consider her to represent Twilight Princess) for the Child timeline.
  • Of course Dark Samus is an Echo Fighter. After all, she debuted in Metroid Prime 2: Echoes.
  • It makes perfect sense for Dedede to dress as King K. Rool to scare the Kongs, as the former is voiced by Masahiro Sakurai, the creator of the Smash Bros. series, who has a reputation as a Trolling Creator. This is also another one of his trolls, as King K. Rool turns up, miffed that he was being made fun of, and smacks him out of the way. Sakurai was trying to make us think K. Rool was deconfirmed.
    • It's also a bit of a Mythology Gag, since K. Rool was a popular pick for the Smash Ballot, only to end up a costume for Mii Fighters, much to the outrage and frustration of fans. Fittingly, this time around, Dedede wears a K. Rool head and costume to prank the Kongs, only to get violently smacked out of the way by the real deal.
  • Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong are very surprised to see King K. Rool again. And why wouldn't they be? He hasn't been around for ten years!
    • When Dedede took off the K. Rool costume to reveal himself, the Kongs did a Jaw Drop with an expression that's less about What the Hell, Hero? and more like Oh, Crap!. Why is that? They probably saw something shaped like K. Rool sneaking behind Dedede.
  • Speaking of the Kremling king, his official art and in-game model reveals his cape is faded and torn in contrast to the bright red it once was. This detail represents two different things: the fact that he disappeared both in and out of universe for ten years to where he was seemingly forgotten and the fact K. Rool canonically became resentful and hateful of the Kongs that by 64, he wanted to exterminate them and their island. Considering the fact K. Rool acts more bestial in Ultimate, one can argue he became crazier in his decade-long absence.
  • Some have commented that K. Rool has become even more deranged based on his "crazed eye twitch", bestial running stance, and slightly more aggressive mannerisms in his trailer. Considering that last we saw him, he had been defeated by the Kongs FOUR times in a row (not counting spin-off titles), one of which involved having his latest doomsday device malfunction when he was moments away from destroying DK Island, being betrayed by some of his own minions (K. Lumsy and Snide), and being defeated by five Kongs in front of his entire army, on his home turf! With all that's happened, he's likely cracked even more! Him and the Kremling Krew being reduced to cameos while the Tiki Tak Tribe and the Snomads took their place as villains for the series' revival likely didn't help.
  • The beginning of K. Rool's reveal trailer shows a bunch of still images of some Nintendo heroes with their respective "rivals". However, Yoshi and Pokémon are the only "Original 8" series to not have their own still images. The reasons for their exclusions are rather simple: Yoshi's main rival is BABY Bowser, not Bowser Jr., but Bowser is already represented as Mario's rival. As for Pokémon, Mewtwonote  isn't really a rival to any of the playable Pokémon cast. The only "true rival" it really has is the Mon it was cloned from, Mew, who's not even a playable character. Now as for why Meta Knight was chosen for the rival for Kirby, that's probably so they can do some fun slapstick with Dedede.
  • It was surprising to see, out of all people, Richter Belmont as the second Castlevania representative by nature of being an Echo of Simon. This was in light of there being more popular protagonists in the series than him, like Alucard (who was relegated to being an Assist Trophy) or Trevor (arguably behind Simon in terms of mainstream recognition, helped by being the main protagonist of the Netflix show). However, Richter's ties to Simon within the context of Smash are surprisingly strong:
    • Simon and Richter represent two different time periods within Nintendo's history; by virtue of being the player character of the first Castlevania, Simon represents the NES, whereas Richter's debut game — Castlevania: Rondo of Blood — made its overseas debut on the SNES albeit in the toned down Castlevania: Dracula X.
    • One argument that hurts Trevor is the fact that the only classic Nintendo title he was playable in (Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse) had him play almost exactly like Simon with little to no differences. Richter's gameplay, on the other hand, expanded upon the default Belmont movelist with running, aimed whip strikes, and Item Crashes — all of which are present in their appearances here. This is tied into one last point...
    • Richter is Simon's descendant, whereas Trevor predates them both. As someone who not only understood how his ancestors fought but allowed their fighting style to evolve, it seemed fitting that he gets his own chance to shine given how Simon has taken to using some of Richter's moves here.
    • Then there's his meme-worthy scene in Symphony of the Night, which is all too memorable for players of that game to not recognize him, even moreso given how Alucard and Dracula take more after their appearances from Symphony as well.
  • Simon's trailer is shown at the start of the August 2018 Direct, which is set at 7 AM PT. In other words, the morning sun has vanquished the horrible night.
  • Villager trying to steal K. Rool's crown has become a bit of a Running Gag in promotional material. K. Rool's crown looks very similar to the "crown" accessory item from Animal Crossing, which is the second most valuable item in the game at a cool million Bells. This is well over the price of even the largest of Villager's house loans, so if he can sell K. Rool's crown, he can pay Tom Nook and have a good chunk of change left over for public works projects and home decorating. No wonder he's trying to steal it!
  • In Simon's reveal trailer, why does Luigi use a plunger to fight a mummy? Well, a mummy's bandages look like toilet paper. Luigi, being a plumber, would probably have experience dealing with clogged toilets.
    • This is also not the first time he has fought mummies, which were ultimately Greenies in sheets. How did he fight them? Flash them to make them blind to make them charge at the nearest solid wall! And if his Poltergust's flashes didn't work, he'd bean them in the face! Though usually with things with more mass than a plunger, like a loose knight helm...
  • Of course the New Pork City stage is making a return in Ultimate. After all, it's the stage where the Ultimate Chimera appears!
  • What is Bayonetta's number in the official order of characters? 63. And how was Bayonetta conceived? As a female counterpart to Dante from her predecessor's game.
  • Why are Lyn and Waluigi still Assist Trophies? Because they're too popular and have plenty of exposure in recent games. All of the newcomers besides Inklings, Incineroar, Ken, and Isabelle, have fallen out in some way or shape:
    • Daisy and Chrom are characters that are in a lot of spin-off games, but they tend to get overshadowed by someone else and tend to have Memetic Loser status outside of Smash Bros. Them getting in as fighters is redemption for their reputations.
    • The two Belmonts have been ignored in favor for their Metroidvania counterpartsnote , with Richter only being known for his opening scene in Symphony Of the Night outside of hardcore fans. Them getting in puts focus back onto the Classic Series.
    • Ridley is the most recurring villain in the Metroid series, but the Metroid franchise has been on hiatus until recently, and even then Ridley appeared as a rotting version of himself in that game. Meanwhile, Dark Samus only appeared in the Metroid Prime series, and ceased to exist in the third game, making it unlikely for her to return at all. For these two to be playable characters, it shows that Smash Bros cares a lot for the Metroid franchise even if it's not the most relevant.
    • King K. Rool hasn't appeared since 2008, and he was replaced by two other villains in the Retro Studios games. His return means a lot for the fanbase.
    • Even the Inklings represent this in a way. The Inklings and most of the Splatoon-related content are based on the first game. Now, what console was the first game released on? The Wii U. Because Splatoon is the only franchise with a playable character in Smash Bros. that debuted on the Wii U exclusively, the Inklings are representing the lowest-selling Nintendo home console that the company has abandoned now.
    • Before their appearance in Smash Bros., Banjo and Kazooie's franchise had been dormant for over 11 years (the last game of which had the lowest reception and is considered a Franchise Killer).
    • Isabelle, however, is a subversion: she's a recent Breakout Character from a very popular series, smashing the trend against the rocks.
    • And the reason so many of the newcomers are characters that have been mostly forgotten? Because this game is supposed to comprise of all of Smash's history, and this is the chance to shine light on loved characters that might have been lost to history or have been overshadowed.
    • This even applies to the fighters who were cut from the last game, too. The Ice Climbers don't have much in the way of new games, as Smash makes up the bulk of their popularity, Star Fox had mostly remained dormant until the release of Star Fox Zero after Smash 4 ended its run of DLC (which kept Wolf in the cold), Pichu has long been overshadowed by its succeeding evolutions: Pikachu for reasons that are all too obvious and Raichu getting a fair amount of attention for its Alolan form. Barring Hyrule Warriors and the remake of Majora's Mask, the specific design of Young Link is by no means current. Lastly, Snake's last canon appearance was 10 years ago and the issues regarding Konami and Hideo Kojima made it unlikely we would get to see another new mainline Metal Gear game, let alone having him return to Smash at all.
  • When Ditto shows up and is shown off, it gets KO'd by Zero of all people. The hilarity here is: based upon a Ditto copy's color scheme, if it were to copy Zero, it would be a dead ringer for Nightmare Zero from Mega Man X6.
  • Legal issues regarding Hideo Kojima aside, the shift of the Metal Gear series logo from the FOX insignia to the trademark "!" does make sense in a few regards:
    • First, the "!" can be argued to be more of an Iconic Logo than FOX's, given that it is not only older but also more easily recognizable (and memed to death) even by non-Metal Gear fans.
    • Second, it does seem to fit Snake's M.O. in Smash. He's in a position where sneaking around isn't much of an option and his presence can be easily seen by opposing players, so he has to make do with direct confrontation.
    • Third, within his series' canon, Solid Snake himself (the one playable in the Smash games) was never affiliated with FOX, nor could he have been; the unit itself had long been disbanded before he was even born and he has much closer ties to its successor group FOXHOUND, which sports a different logo to begin with — never mind the fact that casual fans often mix up both groups when trying to credit the source behind the logo. It was his father/predecessor Naked Snake/Big Boss who actively served as a FOX operative in his youth when he closely resembled his son as he is in Smash.
    • Lastly, think about this from a meta perspective. Many Smash fans thought that even in the event that many older veterans who were cut in previous games like Pichu and Wolf were sure-fire picks to return if ever, Snake and Metal Gear weren't due to the controversy surrounding Konami's botched relationship with Kojima and their subsequent pachinko-focused business practices which have been negatively received. Thus, the "!" could very well signal the utter surprise that was seeing him in Smash, 12 years after he did it for the first time.
  • This time Ness receives help from Paula and Poo for his PK Starstorm Final Smash. Why isn't Jeff helping out? Is it because he's already an Assist Trophy? Yes, but there's another reason; in Earthbound, Jeff doesn't have psychic powers like the other three, which means he can't help with PK Starstorm.
    • Boney doesn't have psychic powers either. How could he help Lucas with PK Starstorm?
      • Possibly because Boney has been with Lucas the longest and is supporting Lucas emotionally to give him the confidence to perform PK Starstorm. Kumatora is obviously there as she was the one who taught him PK Starstorm, paralleling Ness and Poo. As for Duster's absence, while he and Lucas are friends, Duster's role was closer in helping Kumatora as part of the story Leder reveals near the end of the game, making him optional in that sense aside from also not having PSI abilities.
  • In the November 1st Nintendo Direct, it makes perfect sense that Kirby would be the last one standing after everyone else gets turned into spirits. Here's why:
    • Kirby was created by Sakurai, so of course the game's director would be playing favorites.
    • Kirby was one of the last fighters to survive Tabuu's onslaught back in the Subspace Emissary (because he ate one of King Dedede's badges).
    • Kirby is able to copy the abilities of defeated opponents, much like how the spirits seem to be taking on the form of fighters, giving said fighters the quality of the spirits!
    • Kirby also regularly topples otherworldly horrors to the point where it's practically his day job in his home series — for him, someone like Galeem is just another monster to throw on top of the pile. Galeem even looks the part of a Kirby villain.
    • On a practical level, it's because the Warp Star is able to travel to different dimensions. Sonic might have Super Speed, and Captain Falcon and Star Fox might have access to vehicles that travel faster than the speed of sound, but those can't save you from an all-powerful being. Confirmed by Word of God.
    • In a meta sense, Kirby makes for a pretty good beginner character, and his series was designed precisely with beginners in mind. So him being a starter would most likely help for new players willing to jump into Story Mode. Particularly since Sakurai stated that the only characters other than Kirby who might have escaped were Palutena and Bayonetta; both characters are more complex and less beginner-friendly than Kirby, especially Bayonetta whose mechanics are far more convoluted than most characters (with some outright breaking standard conventions, such as her recovery), making them sub-optimal fighters to introduce beginners to the game with.
  • The starting roster is restricted to the original 8. But a nice touch with how they are ordered (Mario, Donkey Kong, Link, Samus, Yoshi, Kirby, Fox, and Pikachu) is the exact same order as the original Smash 64's intro rollcall.
  • Piranha Plant might be seen as a weird addition, but there are a few things in mind.
    • The Mario spin-off games always have an Unexpected Character, notably in the Mario Kart series that not only includes Double Dash, which features Petey Piranha, their Final Smash, as a playable character, but also Mario Kart 7 which excludes Waluigi in favor for... Honey Queen. Since Smash Bros typically has at least one Lethal Joke Character/Fighting Clown as a playable fighter, it's a nice shake-up to switch the focus from a retro hardware rep to a Mario rep.
    • While Piranha Plants themselves aren't particularly popular enemies, its aforementioned Final Smash is a relative Breakout Character, having multiple playable appearances and a boss in Brawl. The Piranha Plant (as well as its subspecies) also has been a staple in the Mario series since Super Mario Bros, appearing in every main Super Mario game (barring USA Super Mario Bros. 2), and appearing in most Mario spin-offs as hazards and obstacles.
    • Piranha Plants have a Non-Standard Character Design compared to every other fighter in the game, as they have no obvious arms and legs. Their design is enough to work compared to Goombas, while also making sure to be unique within itself.
  • Fox is leading the fighters in the World of Light trailer. This makes sense, because he's the head of Star Fox and would be well-suited to organising the fight. But look at who else speaks in the trailer: Marth (a legendary hero-king), Zelda (a princess with supernatural wisdom), and Pit (an angelic general). They're also people who would be good at organizing this strange "army" against the threat.
    • Additionally, Fox is the member of the original 8 who talks the most. Mario usually only says a few catchphrases, Link is a Heroic Mime, Yoshi and Pikachu use Pokémon Speak, Donkey Kong and Kirby only do sound effects, and Samus doesn’t seem to be able to speak through her helmet. Fox, on the other hand, comes from a game with constant radio communication between his team, which has also appeared in Smash since Melee.
  • There's a gameplay-related reason for why Link was able to block Galeem's attacks with his Hylian Shield, but the various reflectors didn't. Every reflector will eventually fail if an attack is too powerful, but Link's shield will always block a non-Final Smash projectile no matter how strong it is.
  • Leave it to a phantom thief like Joker to once again steal the show like he did with his game's reveal.
    • The jokes were inevitable, but his DLC announcement was quite literally the "Last Surprise" before the release of the game.
  • Joker's inclusion in the game makes more sense than you think. This game's gimmick is the Spirits, where you can equip player characters with one or more spirits to aid them in battle. Now, what is the Persona series' gimmick again?
    • The Personas come from the collective unconscious of humanity, where figures from all sorts of mythologies and cultures mix and mingle in a giant Crossover Cosmology. This is a remarkably similar to the premise of Super Smash Bros., which takes place in a world where imagination has brought to life countless video game characters and allows for all sorts of strange combinations, i.e. a subset of the collective unconscious focusing specifically on video games. The more you think about it, the more Persona becomes the perfect fit for inclusion in the series.
    • Even if Joker himself hasn't done it, the Shin Megami Tensei universe is no stranger to using the spirits of powerful Nintendo characters to fight; just ask Itsuki and Tsubasa.
  • Wonder why Joker, a character from a video game series that has next to no connection to Nintendo, would be "invited" to Smash? Well, considering his role as a Phantom Thief and the nature of his announcement video, it seems much more likely that Joker actually stole the invitation, which would, In-Universe at least, explain why he's in the game over so many safer choices.
  • Why does Marx appear as the Final Boss of Inkling's Classic Mode, as well as Rosalina and Luma's? Well, several of Marx's attacks (raining seeds, ice balls, the mouth laser) are similar to attacks used by DJ Octavio, the Final Boss of Hero Mode in both Splatoon games, and they share a purple colour scheme as well as Flight (well, the DJ's mech flies). Also, Inkling's ink resembles paint; in Super Star Ultra, Paint was an ability Marx Soul could provide Kirby with. As for Rosalina and Luma, where does the battle against Marx in Kirby Super Star take place again? On a planet in outer space. In addition, the Galactic NOVA from that game is a giant clockwork comet that moves across the cosmos, similar to the Comet Observatory.
  • Sakurai had stated that besides Kirby, the only fighters who would potentially be able to survive Galeem's initial attack in World of Light are Palutena and Bayonetta; however, in that mode, they are among the last fighters able to be rescued. Galeem and later Dharkon must have kept them the most securely captured after realizing how powerful they would be if freed.
    • Shulk might have been able to escape, too, considering the Monado gets its power from the Conduit, which is explicitly referred to as a gateway to other dimensions. However, the last time someone (Klaus) tried that, he had all three of the Trinity Processor cores to help him, where Shulk at best has only one of them. And even then, Klaus did almost as much damage to the world as Galeem did: even if Shulk knew using the Monado to escape was possible, he's not the kind of person to risk an entire world just to save himself.
    • And we know Palutena was taken out because her attention was divided — Pit and Dark Pit don't steer her Power of Flight, she does. She was distracted trying to get the angels to safety and got overpowered because of it.
    • Also Palutena is the Goddess of Light, Galeem is the Lord of Light. Of course Galeem would want Palutena under his control as The Dragon. Bayonetta is also an Umbra Witch associated with darkness, and has defeated Gods before, and has a hatred of Palutena's kind, just like how Dharkon has a hatred of Galeem.
  • How does Galeem make puppet fighters with Kirby as their main body when Kirby was never captured? Well, Kirby might have escaped, but Meta Knight didn't, and it's long been a popular theory that the two are the same species. Take away the armor and cape, and there's a free puffball to make new Kirby-like puppet fighters.
    • Alternatively, since it's been shown that Galeem's attack had gone through time and space (for example, among the many spirits are Mario Tennis versions of the Mario Bros.), it's possible that he obtained Kirby through an alternate timeline and used that one as a base.
    • There's also Keeby, a character who is identical to kirby except his yellow color, and we see Galeem has no issue recoloring his puppet fighters.
    • According to an interview with Sakurai, Galeem managed to analyze Kirby at some point to make puppets pf him.
  • On that note, Galeem must notice at some point that Kirby survived and is freeing the other fighters, especially when his shield starts to weaken. So why doesn't he just wipe them out like he did before? Simple: He'd just recreated/rewritten the entire universe, which would take quite a bit of power. Most likely, Galeem was somewhat exhausted from the effort, which is why he just sits there, not bothering to do anything until confronted directly.
    • Which also explains why he was capable of being defeated, as he still hadn't fully recovered yet.
    • In addition, Galeem probably realizes that exhausting every last ounce of his strength will just make him easy pickings for Dharkon afterwards; Galeem has clearly shown that he does not care much for the fighters compared to Dharkon, because even when you come knocking at both their doors in the final battle, they are menacing each other for the most part and largely ignoring/barely taking notice of you.
  • There are some parts of parallelism between the beginning and the Dharkon ending of World of Light:
    • When Galeem attacks the world and the fighters with light, Kirby is the sole survivor. But when Dharkon won against Galeem and covered the world in darkness, Mario turns out to be the last man standing before he faints.
    • Not only that, the two were standing on the same cliff while staring at the aftermath of the attack. While Kirby saw the new world that Galeem had created, Mario probably had it worse when he had to watch Dharkon fatally injuring Galeem and taking him hostage. This might be one of the reasons he collapsed. Might count as fridge horror.
    • Kirby and Mario are the two mascot characters who have appeared in the campaign, as they are Masahiro Sakurai's and Shigeru Miyamoto's creation. These two are always together in the series, such as in the opening of Super Smash Bros. 64, the cutscenes from Subspace Emissary, and in the World of Light story mode.
  • Joker being in the game and probably bringing some Spirits along means that Tokyo has been hit with an apocalypse. Not something that ever happens for real in his series, but a staple of what it spun off from.
    • The implication of this is that Joker was also part of the "strange" army of myriad warriors led by Fox, Marth, Zelda and Pit that was assembled to face down Galeem. When facing down an evil godlike being who wants to bring his own twisted sense of order to all of reality, our strange army brought in someone who... faced down an evil godlike being who wanted to bring his own twisted sense of order to all of reality. Even once you consider Dharkon, an evil godlike being who wants to bring his own twisted sense of chaos to all of reality, Joker (or at least, a hero from his franchise) still makes complete sense. Malevolent gods of order and chaos fighting each other with only the neutral path being the best ending, while relying on catching and using spirits to aid in battle, all in an apocalyptic landscape. For Joker, this really is just a Shin Megami Tensei plot!
  • Galeem and Dharkon's usage of each hand actually has a correlation: Galeem, who seeks to shape the world as he pleases, uses Master Hand, who represents creativity and order, while Dharkon, who favors chaos and discord, uses Crazy Hand, who not only embodies those traits, but also uses darkness-themed attacks. This correlation turns into a Foil, however, due to a key difference between the two pairs: Master Hand and Crazy Hand are partners and even use combination attacks when fighting together, whereas Galeem and Dharkon tolerate each other at best during their boss fight and not only make no attempt to prevent friendly-fire, they'll drop what they're doing and gladly take a swing at the other whenever they can get away with it.
  • Viridi's distaste for bananas seems odd at first, but it actually makes sense from her perspective. Bananas weren't created through natural selection, they were created through artificial selection by humans, and it's well established that Viridi hates humans.
    • This apparently doesn't stop her from wanting a cinnamon roll or sprinkle donut, though.
  • What happens when there's three players left in a game of Smash? In most groups, Chronic Backstabbing Disorder; any alliances made against a more powerful third party are typically dispensed with the moment an opportunity presents itself, and the third party can usually take advantage of Friendly Fire to ensure the pair ganging up on them regrets it. In this way, the True Final Boss fight with both Galeem and Dharkon represents a distillation of the spirit of free-for-all Smash — absolute chaos that favors keeping both enemies relatively even and giving them opportunities to betray one another.
  • Why is Castlevania in Dharkon's World of Dark, which is heavily associated with Chaos? Because Dracula's castle is a creature of chaos and Dracula himself is Chaotic Evil and has a hatred of humanity rivaling Viridi's. This may explain why he seems to be one of the few characters to side with Dharkon that doesn't seem to be brainwashed and controlled.
    • This extends to the other two bosses in World of Dark as well. Marx is well-known for his Chaotic Evil motivations, even if he decided to be the Evil Versus Oblivion in Kirby Star Allies. Ganon, meanwhile, most likely decided to join Dharkon instead of Galeem just to spite Master Hand for what happened in Subspace Emissary. Finding out that Dharkon had enslaved Tabuu probably also helped win the King of Evil's approval and allegiance.
  • The game's opening manages to give every single playable character at least one shot where they're the primary focus. After beating World of Light, you'll realize this includes Master Hand.
  • There's a specific line in Lifelight: "Everyone caught in the struggle." At first, you might think this is talking about the battles between the fighters. However, after beating World of Light, it could be a mention of the fighters being caught between Galeem and Dharkon's struggle.
    • Alternatively, it's referring to how everyone was affected by Galeem's initial attack. Not just the fighters and other characters with combat experience, but even the civilians and innocent people.
  • Within the official artwork/mural, there are a few clever parts:
    • R.O.B and Luigi are flying overhead, which is a nod to the latter doing the exact same thing in the official artwork (the one with all the characters) for Super Smash Bros. Melee. Luigi even has the exact same facial expression.
    • Villager is chasing a butterfly, but it's an emperor butterfly, which sells for a reasonable price in his home series. Add this to the fact that he's close to Marth, Roy, Mega Man, and Zero Suit Samus, and it's clear that Villager likes blue things.
    • Snake has his Nikita launcher pointed at Sonic, a possible reference to his Codec call in Brawl where he expresses his dislike for Sonic.
    • Lucas has his Rope Snake heading towards Snake — in other words, it's a Snake Eater.
    • Lucina is reaching out to Captain Falcon as if trying to drag him into a rematch from her 3DS/Wii U reveal trailer.
      • Made even more poignant with Chrom's inclusion — who is standing and looking over to Robin (as if consulting his tactician on what course of action to take) while Captain Falcon hovers next to him, making it look like Lucina is also rushing to her father's aid against the man that defeated him.
  • Ryu's Classic mode, "Seeking a Challenge", is a recreation of Street Fighter, with each fighter being an Expy of a character in the franchise. The fighters represented in order are:
    • Round 1: Ken. Since Ken is a playable fighter, he is fought as himself.
    • Round 2: Zero Suit Samus, representing Chun-Li. Both are female fighters who utilize kicks in their moveset.
    • Round 3: Incineroar, representing Zangief. Both are grappler characters who specialize in powerful throws.
    • Round 4: Donkey Kong, representing Blanka. Both fighters grew up and learned to fight in the jungle. DK is also in his green palette swap to further the resemblance to Blanka.
    • Round 5: Little Mac, representing Balrog/Boxer. Naturally, both are boxers who primarily use punches. As a nod to Balrog's more muscular frame, Little Mac is slightly larger than normal during the fight.
    • Round 6: Meta Knight, representing Vega. Both fighters wear masks and are renowned for their aerial prowess with bladed weapons.
    • Final Round: Master Hand and Crazy Hand, representing M. Bison. Both the hands and Bison are usually the final bosses in their respective games. Additionally, Ken is your partner for this fight, which references the Dramatic Battle mode in the Street Fighter Alpha games.
  • In the same vein as the above, Mega Man's Classic mode, "Variable Weapons System, Online!", is stylised in a similar way to the various boss battles in the Mega Man series. In order:
    • Round 1: Ice Climbers, representing Ice Man because of their ice attacks, or Gemini Man because the Climbers are two fighters in one.
    • Round 2: Samus, representing any of the explosives-based Robot Masters, particularly Napalm Man. Samus also shares the color scheme of Metal Man.
    • Round 3: Donkey Kong, representing the beefier Robot Masters, including Wood Man (the stage and music) and Hard Man or Stone Man (shaking the ground).
    • Round 4: Captain Falcon, representing the fire-based Robot Masters. His fighting style bears a similarity to Torch Man's own style, being fiery punches and kicks. In addition, he shares the colour scheme of Quick Man.
    • Round 5: 6 differently coloured Mega Men, representing the first game's Boss Rush.
    • Round 6: Galleom, representing the Wily Machine. It even has a second phase where it Turns Red (thankfully without a health refill)!
    • Final Round: Dr Mario, representing Wily himself, followed by Mewtwo (who looks like the Alien from Mega Man 2).
  • The fact that Autopick makes the game set the weakest spirits as your main isn't actually a flaw, but rather a subtle way of saying that you need to diversify your selection and not use one spirit to fight every battle. After all, overspecialization breeds weakness, and continuing to use a spirit that can't be leveled up anymore is throwing away experience points that the unused spirits could've used. Also, using a spirit that offers an overwhelming advantage penalizes you with reduced earnings after a victory, which is another way of saying that your victory was cheap.
  • Combined with Fridge Horror: Mewtwo's Classic mode is called "Psychic Control," in which it mind-controls several of its opponents into fighting alongside it. These fighters have all been mind-controlled canonically in their respective universes:
    • Lucas: Uses the palette swap of his brother Claus, who was brainwashed into serving Porky.
    • Cloud: Was mentally manipulated by Sephiroth through their shared Jenova-cell infusion.
    • Ken: Brainwashed by M. Bison in Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie, leading to the creation of Violent Ken.
    • Richter: Brainwashed by Shaft in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night and serves as its Disc-One Final Boss; non-lethally defeating him here is needed to progress further.
    • Pit: Had his soul forced out of his body when Palutena was possessed by the Chaos Kin, falling under its control.
  • All of the characters that are playable in Spirits Mode/World Of Light have an identifiable reason for their pick:
    • The original 12, because... they are the original 12. As the oldest Veterans of the game, it makes sense why they are playable.
    • Each franchise has at least one playable representation. The only ones who aren't either part of the original 12 or here to represent a franchise could be considered The Lancer for either (i.e. Falco, Diddy Kong, or Isabelle). They join the fight because they don't want their friends to go alone.
    • One character who doesn't fit into either is Bowser. Why is Bowser playable despite being the Big Bad of his series? If you played the RPG games, you would know that Bowser has a heroic side and will oppose any villain nastier than himself. Additionally, Galeem killed Kamek, who raised Bowser, as well as Junior and the Koopalings, his son and foster children. Old Koopa probably wants a piece of the angelic monster purely for his family's sake. And then there's Peach — the one person whose being in mortal peril can make Bowser and Mario shake hands and work together without quarrel.
      • It might look weird that other villains of the roster like Ganondorf, King K. Rool, Dark Samus, or Ridley might also be assisting the heroes, until you realize it might be a case of Pragmatic Villainy. Ganondorf, Ridley, and Dark Samus have been shown in their home series to be very cunning. Seeing a threat bigger than their common enemy by a large margin might be enough to put them on a begrudging alliance until it's taken care of. While K. Rool might be insane, he's intelligent enough to assume a mad scientist persona and build functioning machinery; even for some of his most questionable moments, not accepting to help the Kongs to deal with something that can threaten him would be stupid.
      • Not to mention that not only is Ridley intelligent, he is also very much of a Sadist. If anything, apart from taking down the greater threat, his main motivation would just be to see such a mighty threat suffer the most painful death imaginable — just so Ridley can have a laugh out of it, and prove that he is the one to be feared.
    • Kid Icarus: Uprising establishes that the gods aren't allowed to directly interfere in the affairs of mortals, and that's why Palutena has an army to protect mankind. However, it's also mentioned that the Centurions are quite fragile, which is why she only sends Pit to do the job. But Galeem is someone who doesn't just threaten mortals, but also all of existence, which seems to be enough for Palutena to take on the action herself. It also explains why Pit was the only soldier of her army present.
    • Mr. Game and Watch is rather significant as well, because he has no understanding of good or evil according to the Smash Dojo. However, since he's made of Shadow Bugs, he would definitely feel threatened by a being of pure light like Galeem.
    • For Bayonetta, who shares an intense rivalry with Palutena, why would they work together? Bayonetta probably sees Galeem just like how she saw Jubileus and the Cardinal Virtues, and the fact that even Palutena and Pit want to stop Galeem means Bayonetta must have had to realize Pit and Palutena aren't malign like she angels she's used to dealing with, which in turn would get Palutena to see that Bayonetta may not completely hate all light-based entities after all. Bayonetta also considers Dharkon in a similar sense to the demons that betrayed her in Bayonetta 2, and she's not one for pets who don't listen to their masters, which would help distinguish her from the malicious Underworld Gods that Palutena has no love for. In addition, Bayonetta and Palutena's relationship is a Foil for Galeem and Dharkon's relationship. Palutena hates Bayonetta's guts and vice versa, with both characters being Light- and Darkness-based just like Galeem and Dharkon, and they can be heavy-handed in how they deal with oppositely aligned-beings, but when the universe needs saving, they are willing to work together against the bigger threat and can even put aside grudges to enjoy a friendly match or two. This is completely unlike Galeem and Dharkon, who are in no way willing to work with each other in virtually any fashion to focus on the bigger threat in the fighter-spirit army and are constantly at each other's metaphorical throats, to the point that the two's goals are ultimately laid broken before them with their demises in the true ending.
  • How do spirits fit into the classic Smash Framing Device of a kid playing with his toys? In terms of the lore, these spirits are characters without physical bodies of their own, and so they are forced to use one of the 70+ playable fighters as vessels. In Spirit Battles, each battle is catered to evoke the idea of fighting the spirit, essentially pretending that the playable character is the unplayable spirit instead. In real life, children may not have very many toys (let alone 1,297), so if they want to play with a toy they don't have (i.e. the spirit lacking a physical form of its own), they may use one of the toys that they do have as a substitute (i.e. the spirit using a puppet fighter) and, using their imagination, pretend that this toy represents that other toy (i.e. the Spirit Battles). For example, a kid wants to play with Salamance but does not have that toy in his collection; since he does own a Charizard toy instead, so he chooses to use that Charizard toy while pretending it's Salamance.
  • The Sacred Realm dungeon/sub area in the World of Dark is basically just one big reference to the Zelda series in how its gimmick is set up.
    • The southwest area has some simple puzzles, just requiring the player to solve a clock based puzzle twice to unlock some more Spirits. As this tests the player's knowledge, it's pretty fitting that the Triforce of Wisdom gets revealed once this section is cleared.
      • The solution to one of said puzzles involves setting the clock to the 4:40 position. What occurs as a result of this? You get to fight and unlock Mii Brawler, who was introduced in the fourth game in the series.
    • The southeast area is a forest, basically being the Lost Woods. With a lot of fog everywhere obscuring some paths, this tests the player's courage to venture into the unknown, revealing the Triforce of Courage once this section is cleared.
    • The northern area doesn't really have any gimmick or puzzle so to speak; it's really just a bunch of Spirit battles. Just a bunch of tests of strength which leads the way to the Triforce of Power.
  • Kirby's Switch game has him using magic hearts to befriend his enemies. Kirby is also the first character you get in World of Light. Suddenly, evil spirits joining you makes a lot more sense.
  • Most of the Bayonetta cast have all been turned into spirits, except for three. Jubileus (who is already dead, considering this game takes place after Bayonetta 1), Queen Sheba, and Omne. All three of these are cosmic god-entities that apparently recreated the universe anew alongside Aesir with the Eyes of the World. No wonder they're not spirits; they're considered roughly equal to Galeem and Dharkon, who are capable of doing the exact the same thing.
    • How do you explain similar-tier characters like Arceus and Tabuu being vulnerable to getting turned into Spirits?
      • Tabuu was heavily weakened after his near death in Subspace Emissary, and Arceus gets captured by a 10 year old in a Poké Ball; if Arceus was in his Poké Ball, it wouldn't be able to defend itself with a Judgement.
    • On the topic of Bayonetta, it may seem strange that Prophet/Loptr isn't a enhanceable spirit, considering in Bayonetta 2 he turns into Aesir after obtaining the Eyes of the World. But he doesn't have the Sovereign Power anymore, due to the Eyes of the World being erased in Bayonetta 2, and Balder and Bayonetta are both spirits, so there's no way for him to become Aesir.
  • Alex Roivas of Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem being a Spirit might seem like Nintendo just showing the IP some acknowledgement after sixteen years, but "World of Light"'s finale actually contains a strong parallel to that game's. In Eternal Darkness, Alex is forced to summon a rival Ancient to combat the one Pious spends the game summoning; however, once Pious' Ancient is killed, she has a vision of the one she summoned wreaking untold havoc on the planet in its stead, and it's up to the ghost of her grandfather Edward to seal it away before it can do so. Given that there are three Ancients in the story, you have to play the game three times to earn a secret ending which shows that Mantorok, the Corpse God who provided the Tome of Eternal Darkness to the heroes, then combined all three potential timelines into one, obliterating all three Ancients simultaneously. Take out the alternate timelines aspect, and you get exactly what happens in "World of Light": defeat Galeem or Dharkon separately, and the other just wreaks havoc unopposed; defeat them simultaneously, and the world is saved.
  • Why does Chrom share the original Fire Emblem victory theme instead of the new one shared with his Awakening comrades Robin and Lucina? Maybe it might be by pure coincidence, but he has one thing in common with Marth, Roy, and Ike: they've all canonically used the Fire Emblem in their own games, whereas the other two have not.
    • This also explains why Corrin has a unique theme as well. While they have used their own Fire Emblem, it is again worth pointing out that the Omega Yato is the Emblem itself; unlike the four main Lords who share the main theme, Corrin actively uses their Emblem in Smash.
      • As of the 3.0.0 update, Chrom has now been given the Awakening victory theme.
  • While Ridley is capable of racking up damage like no one's business, he has some difficulty in actually killing a target, as most of his moves that reliably kill at lower percentages are slow and/or unsafe. As a result, his gameplay revolves around bursts of pressure to rack up damage, then falling back to bait the opponent into making mistakes that he can capitalize on. This lines up perfectly with his established personality: he's a cruel, sadistic predator who treats it as one big fucked-up game, and he delights in torturing others and causing pain until he either finally decides to deliver a coup de grace, or the opponent makes a serious mistake that he can punish them for.
  • In the Sacred Land, you come across a village that also counts as a puzzle resembling a large clock. In other words, you’re in a Clock Town.
  • At first, Marx being the final opponent of Kirby's Classic Mode route seems to be nothing more than fanservice to longtime fans, considering the fact that the theme of the route is opponents who, like Kirby, are Big Eaters. But then you think back to Star Allies...
    The famous jester from Kirby Super Star has finally arrived to get in on the action! Sure, he's had a diabolical past as a final boss, but he'll be your buddy if you keep him well-fed. It's a dream come true!
  • The initial teaser pre-E3 saw the Inklings stare at a giant fiery Smash logo with the shadowed cast underneath it. The final character reveal trailer focused on Incineroar and Ken, characters best known for Playing with Fire. What happens when something is set on fire for long enough? They get reduced to ash — exactly what everyone (minus Kirby) ends up as after being disintegrated by Galeem. For bonus points, the army of puppet fighters from the World of Light opening cutscene look eerily similar to the hidden cast from the Inklings' teaser.
  • Lucina mirrors Marth not only in her moveset, but also her character art. Lucina's stance is similar to that of Marth in his character art, but with a few differences. Lucina's Falchion points towards the right, whereas Marth's Falchion points to the left. On the other hand, Lucina's cape flows to the left, whereas Marth's cape is flowing to the right. Lucina is also looking away from the viewer with her hands also away from the viewer, while Marth is looking more towards the viewer with his hands also towards the viewer.
    • Dark Pit also mirrors Pit in his art, albeit to a lesser extent. Dark Pit takes a stance that mirrors Pit's, just like Lucina and Marth. Additionally, Dark Pit is holding his eponymous staff away from the viewer, while Pit is aiming his Palutena Bow in its bladed form towards the viewer.
  • The yoga pose Wii Fit Trainer was taking as the beam hit her? That move has invincibility frames in Smash 4.
  • Piranha Plant's classic mode titled "New Bloom" is a fight against all the newcomers and Rathalos. Why that boss specifically? Well, Master Hand and Crazy Hand, Giga Bowser, Ganon, and Galleom have already appeared before in the series. Meanwhile Marx and Dracula, while new in Smash, are still pretty old characters compared to Rathalos.
  • The opening starts off by showing Mario, Link, Samus, and Kirby each on their own, then it shows an image for Fire Emblem by using Marth, Robin, and Lucina, then continues the previous trend for Mega Man and Inkling. Why is Fire Emblem using multiple characters unlike the others? The other heroes saved the day on their own, but Fire Emblem is a game about commanding an army all at once.
  • All-Star Mode being replaced with All-Star Smash might seem like a letdown but think about it: in the last game, All-Star mode was a daunting and harrowing task to complete in one go and that was without the DLC added in! Trying to beat 70+ fighters with a limited number of healing items would be an exercise in masochism. At least in All-Star Smash, the characters have the durability of a Mii Fighting Team member, so you can send 'em flying easily. Just be aware, don't get swarmed, and you'll do fine.
  • While most of the fighters are under Galeem's servitude, some have been claimed by Dharkon and stay in his realm. As a representation of darkness and evil, the particular fighters under Dharkon's control have some reason why he must've corrupted them. First and foremost are the Obviously Evil villains under his control, unlike Bowser and Dedede: Wario is a self-centred greedy jerk willing to betray his own friends as shown in WarioWare and Brawl; Ganondorf wants to obtain the Triforce and rule the world; Dark Samus wants to infect everyone with Phazon and make them worship her; Ridley is a sadistic psychopath who enjoyed killing Samus' friends and family while taunting her about their deaths and K. Rool is an Ax-Crazy Bad Boss who's willing to blow up DK Island with his Blast-O-Matic while his victims are still inside. There are also heroes and less monstrous antagonists who were mainly tempted to serve Dharkon through their problems and vices: Luigi always spent his time stuck in his brother's shadow to the point where his Final Smash in Brawl, Negative Zone, reflects his envy and bitterness towards being unappreciated for so long; Daisy is known to be rather hot-blooded and aggressive; Meta Knight is an Anti-Hero; R.O.B. is lonely about being the Last of His Kind, Mewtwo suffers from existential crisis due to being a clone; Wolf has a rivalry with Fox and his father James, and so on.
  • While Snake's strategy to avoid Galeem isn't foolproof, credit where credit is due for the series' first Guest Fighter. He's actually among one of the last on-screen disintegrations while characters who either possessed faster speeds (Sonic, Captain Falcon, Falco) or superior defenses (Link, Palutena, Zelda, Mewtwo) all fell before him; the implication here is that for a split-second, the man who fittingly defined stealth action games was able to use those same tactics against this almighty deity and *almost* get away with it.
  • In an interview, Sakurai clarified that to the dev team, the reason why Galeem was able to copy Kirby into puppets was because he analyzed him. This may be seen as a wave off comment, until you realize he exhibits this in-game: During his boss fight, he can create puppets of fighters even if the player has freed any of them, meaning that he doesn't need the originals for the cloning process after all, just information on them.
  • Certain Assist Trophies won't appear in specific stages. Knuckles won't appear on Green Hill Zone because he's a background character. Same applies for Moon in Great Bay and it won't appear in indoor stages, moving or transitional stages (hard to hit a mobile target), or retro stages (it would feel out of place). Alucard won't appear in Wii Fit Studio due to the background being a mirror and his vampiric traits despite being a Dhampir. Nikki from Swapnote won't appear in Training Mode stage or Final Destination for reasons unknown, though for the former, it might be seen as cheating and the latter might be too scary and overwhelming for her.
  • If the final bosses throughout the series all come back to a kid playing with their toys...then what the heck are Galeem and Dharkon supposed to be? It's actually quite simple. They represent two children, most likely siblings, fighting over said toys. Rather soft compared to Tabuu and Master Core, no?
  • At the end of the Inkling/Smash Ultimate reveal in general, you can hear a faint bit of Lifelight when the Smash Logo appears. Comparing it to the lyrics of Lifelight, it comes from the end of the chorus; specifically "Bare this torch against the cold of the night, Light will guide you on your way to the ultimate fight". The 2nd half is the brilliance,because that trailer was our first stop on the way to The Ultimate Fight.
  • Daisy hasn't been seen using Peach's usual abilities from Smash or from where she derived her moveset from. So why is Daisy able to use them? Well, if you follow the fan theory that Peach borrows Daisy's clothes to use as one of her alts, it makes sense that some of her powers wore off on Daisy's outfit, thus conferring them to her. Thus, Daisy gained the ability to levitate where she couldn't before, just like Peach does now.
  • While it's weird that in a cutscene a puppet of Pokémon Trainer was seen but in gameplay whenever one of his Pokémon are fighting there is no Trainer puppet, it makes sense when you realize that Galeem is controlling the Pokémon. Galeem is the Trainer himself! As for why the cutscene puppet existed, well, Word of God says Galeem only needs information to create more puppet fighters, perhaps he created that one to get better information on how to command them and then disposed of it.
  • It's stated that Joker's invitation to Ultimate was actually stolen, which leaves many to wonder who was the intended recipient. It's possible that the invitation was meant for Piranha Plant since it's separate from the Fighter's Pass and it was possible for it to be reimbursed rather than have an unlucky fighter miss out due to circumstances beyond their control.
    • Given the fact that of the DLC Fighters in Ultimate, only Piranha Plant has a Palutena's Guidance, development on Joker could have indeed made it so that Piranha Plant could not be completed in time for the base game. If one looks at the development of Ultimate in that way, Joker did quite literally steal Piranha Plant's invitation, but it all ended up working out in the end as both still get to be in Ultimate!
  • Joker stealing K. Rool's crown and Wario's motorcycle looks like a typical "thief joke", but take a look at the characters' history. K. Rool is an insane tyrant who goes around trying to murder the Kongs and steal their banana hoard, while abusing his subjects (he's quick to invoke You Have Failed Me and Klubba even says that K. Rool "treats [the Kremlings] rotten" in DKC2). Wario is a greedy treasure hunter-turned-video game developer who steals and swindles others to make a quick buck. Joker isn't just stealing their stuff for fun, he's stealing their treasures to change their hearts!
    • K. Rool is a classic example of a ruler letting their power go to their head, so stealing his crown makes sense, but Wario's bike is more complicated. While calling Wario a hero is a stretch, he's shown to have a Hidden Heart of Gold in the Wario Land games and a few of the Mario spin-offs. But after his game company took off in the WarioWare series, his greed and selfishness became heavily flanderized. As for why Joker is stealing his motorcycle? WarioWare was when Wario got his now signature biker look, suggesting it's the cause of his distorted desires.
  • Why does Joker summon Arsène and not one of his more powerful Personas when facing off against other Smash fighters? The same reason that the Demifiend as the Bonus Boss of Digital Devil Saga uses low-tier Demons against the party: To him, they are simply a mid-tier Random Encounter. For Joker, using a Persona other than Arsène would skew the battle in his favor to the point of making it too easy. Case in point, Joker using his final Persona, Satanael, allowed him to kill a god, something that only a handful of characters within Smash can really boast about.
    • Alternatively, he may simply not have it yet, similar to how the Pokémon Trainer sticks to starters rather than using powerful endgame legendaries.
  • Why is Morgana present when Joker taunts? In Persona 5, you have a navigator for each palace, which is filled by Morgana or Futaba, depending on which dungeon the player is in. Considering the events of the game, Joker probably asked Morgana to be his navigator for the "palaces" of Smash, in order to keep Futaba — the sole non-combatant within the Phantom Thieves — safe from harm.
    • It also gives an explanation how the other Phantom Thieves can quickly get to Joker for his Final Smash, since Morgana can quickly leave the "palace" that Joker is presently in and rally them up to assist Joker.
    • Also considering in Persona 5, you can have Joker potentially going in all alone to palaces instead of having a team by his side, it references one of the palace exploring mechanics in the game, where you swap out team members while the other ones stay behind, but also close enough if backup is needed.
    • It could also be a reference to how Morgana never quite leaves Joker's side under any circumstance. He remains active as a navigator for the first four Palaces even if he's not in the active party, and accompanies him throughout his civilian life in the real world.
  • A lot of jokes were made about how Joker uses a gun in Smash when Fantasy Gun Control disallows Snake from using anything but grenades, mines, and rocket launchers. On the other hand, Joker's not using a real gun! In Persona 5, the Phantom Thieves bought their weapons from a vendor selling model guns which are no more deadly in the real world than an airsoft gun. In the Metaverse, however, Your Mind Makes It Real, so to someone within who doesn't know any better, a model gun is just as deadly as a real gun with live ammo.
    • Alternatively, while Nintendo and/or Sakurai may have prevented Snake from using guns when he was introduced in Brawl, they seem to have suddenly lightened up when it comes to newer characters like Bayonetta and Joker. In order words, they had a change of heart. I wonder who could have caused that?
  • In Joker's Classic Mode, he gets each fighter he defeats as an ally in his next fight. The story is called "Shadows". Shadows are representations of people's repressed feelings and desires. When a person's Shadow is defeated and accepted by the host, that person gains a Persona and can potentially join the party. So in other words, Joker helps people overcome their internal issues and gains them as allies, which is pretty much his modus operandi in his home series!
    • So how come Incineroar (the last opponent in Joker's route before the final battle) doesn't join Joker to battle Master Hand/Crazy Hand, then?
      • That's simple. The Hands are a stand-in for the Final Boss of the game, Yaldabaoth — specifically, the final phase of his fight. That fight ended with Joker taking him out by himself, which sort of translates over to his Classic route ending in the same way.
      • As for Incineroar, it could be a stand-in for Masayoshi Shido, the Big Bad of Persona 5, as both are Bare-Fisted Monk type fighters, and even his battle theme Rivers in the Desert plays.
  • Of course Arsène is invincible: Personas were never targetable in Joker’s home series, either in combat or otherwise.
  • If the player listens carefully, Galeem's battle theme only just uses the second verse of Lifelight note , while Dharkon uses the third verse note . This most certainly signifies how they are both opposites and make up half of the Big-Bad Ensemble. But, during the final three-way fight, both parts play...and the first versenote , which wasn't there in either previous version. But then the realization sets in; the final battle is a Mêlée à Trois between you, Galeem and Dharkon, and two thirds of the song are associated with both the antagonists...and the last third is associated with the playable fighters themselves.
  • As sad and unfortunate it is that the long-time tradition of collecting trophies has ended and been replaced with a new system of utilizing spirits, there's actually a lot of valid justification behind the decision. Imagine that Sakurai asked himself what was the point of making trophies and collecting them if it felt more of a tedious chore than a fun task and that the players would look at the trophies just once and never again, going on to literally collect dust for the rest of their existence. What would the answer be? The eventual realization is that trophies were a self-defeating effort, both for the programmers and the 3D modelers who put in so much time and effort to make them. So in essence, the spirit system not only provides a usable functionality for collectibles, like the stickers and badges, but frees up a lot of memory space that would've been reserved for the trophies to be better utilized for more important things like more characters and more stages.
  • It may seem odd how in this Challenge Board image, Incineroar is chosen as the "Pokémon villain" rather than the much more accepted Mewtwo. Notice, however, that the image otherwise only contains either truly evil villains (Ganondorf and Ridley) or villains who, despite occasionally teaming up (Bowser and Wolfnote ) or even having friendly competitions with their enemies (Bowser again and K. Rool), almost always revert back to their villainous roles in following installments. Assuming the Mewtwo in Smash is the (first) one from the main Pokémon anime series, it shares a distinction with the Kirby antagonists and Wario as being one of the few playable "villains" to have made a Heel–Face Turn and rarely (or never) reprises their antagonist role in following installments, thus making it plausible that Mewtwo simply refused to join a force with motives it no longer agrees with. In the case of Incineroar: unlike that specific Mewtwo, most (if not all) Pokémon species don't really have a sense of morality, only following orders from those who caught them. Thus, Incineroar would likely be more willing to join the forces of evil if only because it doesn't know any better. Additionally, Incineroar is straight-up based on a villain archetype (that being the Heel wrestler in Professional Wrestling) more so than most other Pokémon species, so it actually fits in better with the villains than Mewtwo in atleast an aesthetic sense.
    • The simpler reason is Incineroar is a Dark-type Pokémon, which is known as the Evil type when translated from Japanese.
  • So why are Malon and Ruto in their child forms instead of adult forms? Because they match Young Link and Ganondorf’s designs pre-seven years.
  • In Banjo & Kazooie's reveal trailer, the Kongs and K. Rool cheer him on when he's properly introduced. They used to be part of Rare, so of course they would cheer for their brethren.
  • Banjo & Kazooie joining Kirby in the World of Light and being undetected will be Galeem and Dharkon's undoing. In the lords of light and dark's eyes, the bear and bird were seen as "useless" and not worth collecting.
    • Why would they pick a yoga instructor and a dog who is just a secretary over two beings that have Toon Physics as an advantage and have stopped a magical witch, then? And even if not as fighters, we have had things like infants, regular non-fighting children, and characters from relatively ordinary worlds like the Nintendogs be turned into spirits and possess puppets.
    • Or it's possible that Mumbo Jumbo received Palutena's message to hide Banjo and Kazooie before Galeem's initial attack and bring them out during Galeem's moment of weakness. Kamek would do something similar with Piranha Plant as well.
  • The Heroes from Dragon Quest also enter the domains of Galeem and Dharkon's undetected due to Palutena possibly giving out a telepathic distress call to the various deities to hide their chosen heroes and bring them out when the time is right.
    • Igor and Lavenza would receive the same message as well and told Joker and Morgana to get away from Galeem as not even the Velvet Room is safe. Like Kirby's warpstar, Morgana in bus mode can travel between dimensions where Galeem's light cannot touch. When they reach the world of light, they join forces with Kirby, Piranha Plant, The Hero, and Banjo and Kazooie to stage their counterattack.
  • The reveal trailers for both King K. Rool and Banjo & Kazooie take place in DK's house, and they both involve Bait-and-Switch. Of course they would, DK's house is located deep in the Jungle Hijinx.
  • The TV scene at the beginning of King K. Rool's reveal trailer actually has a specific order; the villain character's debut, and thus their number, in Smash. First it's Mario vs Bowser at #13, then Link and Zelda vs Ganondorf at #23, then Kirby vs Meta Knight at #27, then Fox and Falco vs Wolf at #44, and finally Samus vs Ridley at #65. Banjo & Kazooie's announcement trailer continues this with an extra TV scene at the end between DK, Diddy, and K. Rool (based on the ending of his own reveal trailer), who is fighter number #67.
  • If you recall the fact that Banjo & Kazooie had gotten lazy and out of shape from the lack of adventuring in the eight years after Banjo-Tooie, then either they got themselves back to normal for Ultimate or Nuts & Bolts didn't happen.
  • Banjo & Kazooie's inclusion as DLC in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as well as the possibility of Spirits from other Rare Ltd. games gives the game's tagline of "Everyone Is Here!" a whole new meaning. As of now, every company who has ever been considered a part of Nintendo itself is now truly involved in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate in some way. Everyone Is Here!
  • This one brought to you by Ethan Mouta's Twitter:
    Guys, I just made the best discovery ever. In King K. Rool's trophy description [in Smash 4], it says "He probably could have been Donkey Kong's most trustworthy animal friend. Think he'll ever have a change of heart? Not likely." But look: we know they're friends now [as of Banjo & Kazooie's reveal trailer]. Did he have a change of heart? And the answer is yes! Joker stole his treasure [in his gameplay reveal trailer, "The Masked Rebel"]! King K. Rool had a change of heart!
    • If he did have a change of heart, the fact that the Kongs have accepted him as their friend is heartwarming on its own.
      • And furthermore, if the Tiki Tak or Snomads decide to cause trouble again, they might not just have the Kongs to deal with, but the entire Kremling Krew and their mind-boggling amounts of resources, especially if K. Rool suddenly turning into a Benevolent Boss galvanizes them. K. Rool himself might even rise to Player Character status in this hypothetical game!
  • The end of Banjo and Kazooie's reveal trailer features a shot of many Nintendo characters cheering his big return, but one character sticks out a bit: Sonic, who is not a Nintendo character and was mostly absent during Banjo's heyday with no major games in that period. So why is he cheering with everyone else? Because in his case, he's greeting a fellow competitor from a previous crossover game.
    • So how come Isabelle and Inkling, two characters that were introduced long after Banjo left the Nintendo family and quite a long time after the last game in his series (Nuts & Bolts in 2008), are cheering for him, then?
      • It's possible that they are regarded as Nintendo legends and thus are excited to be able of meeting them. If anything, the real oddballs are Pac-Man and Mega Man, 3rd parties that have nothing to do with them, and while it can be argued that Mega Man is an icon associated with Nintendo like Simon, it still doesn't explains Pac-Man.
  • Arsene not only serves as Joker's Super Mode, but also his Comeback Mechanic: the Rebellion Gauge fills up faster the closer Joker is to losing a match, which fits their literal personas as thieves quite well, as fighting back from the jaws of defeat allow them to literally steal away a win.
  • Why do the protagonists of Dragon Quest go by such a generic name as Hero? Consider just how influential Dragon Quest is as a franchise in Japan. Its influence is to the point where any reference to an Eastern RPG or a Fantasy setting in Japan after Dragon Quest III will invoke tropes created by Dragon Quest. He isn't just a hero. He's THE Hero, the definitive article from which all other Eastern RPG heroes are derived.
    • It also makes sense on why he shares some of his traits with characters like Link or Marth, both who had their series influenced by Dragon Quest. The Hero isn't copying them, they are the ones copying him.
  • Rather unusual for Joker's gun to be counted as a physical attack thanks to Hitscan rather than a projectile which can be absorbed or reflected. However, consider that in a Joker mirror match, Arsene counters with Tetrakarn rather than Makarakarn if hit with the other Joker's gunshots. This exchange is actually accurate to how said skill works in Persona 5, as Tetrakarn reflects both Physical and Gun skills, which in turn makes the gunshots being physical attacks within Smash accurate as well to their source material.
  • Final Fantasy VII received no representation at all in regards to Spirits that are found on the Spirit Board or in World of Light. Meaning that FFVII's world, as well as characters like Barret, Tifa, Aerith, and Sephiroth, weren't dusted by Galeem, and managed to survive his destruction of what seems to be almost everything.
  • The stage Spiral Mountain has a never-seen-before rotation with the mountain as the center. The reason for this mechanic could be because Banjo-Kazooie is one of the pioneers of the 3D Platforming genre. Even though other characters in Smash like Mario could be considered pioneers of the genre as well, Banjo and Kazooie were conceived as 3D Platforming characters first and foremost, and as Smash operates on a 2D plane, have a rotating stage is a good way to implement this aspect of the series.
    • There's also the simple fact that it's named Spiral Mountain. It's only fair the stage has some kind of circling mechanic when it's named after a line that keeps turning around towards the center. Still, the 3D platforming explanation only holds more water when you consider the gameplay of Super Smash Bros is already heavily influenced by 2D platformers, seen most obviously in its movement and stage layouts. Just as Banjo-Kazooie had one dimension more than their platforming predecessors, so too does their stage in a 2D platform brawler.
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    Fridge Horror 
  • Ridley's Final Smash has him shooting a huge plasma beam at Samus's gunship, which you can see crashing in the background afterwards. If he uses this Final Smash in stages like Fourside or Wrecking Crew, which show a sprawling city in the background, the crash will likely result in civilian deaths. And to make matters worse, Ridley would want that.
  • Ridley's new design has some rather unpleasant implications. Aside from being smaller, he has several areas that show exposed flesh (mostly around his legs and eyes), which shouldn't be possible due to his Healing Factor. Because he was rejected from joining the roster for being "too big", as well as his psychopathic personality, it's not a stretch to think he dismembered and regenerated himself until he was small enough to compete, all for a chance to fight and torture Samus and her friends.
    • Ridley's design is based on his Super Metroid sprite, the game where he died for good. In other words, Ridley actually came back from the dead and looks more like an animated corpse because of that.
    • His Meta Ridley costume shows his skin to be more saturated and overall healthier, with cybernetic implants on most of his body. Take note that the Metroid Prime Trilogy takes place before Super. Now compare his default appearance with Meta Ridley, and you will see that the battles with Samus have seriously taken a toll on the Space Pirate commander's body, with newly exposed flesh near his eyes and back, pale, dehydrated, almost skeletal looking scales and skin, sunken glowing eyes, and a very large scar across the front of his right leg — which his Meta Ridley costume features a cybernetic implant on that exact same region. As Metroid Prime said, Ridley's transition into a cyborg was immensely painful; so it must have been even more painful regenerating and pushing all the implants out of the body. The only saving grace about this? It's Ridley experiencing this.
    • Hell, even his reveal trailer is chock full of disturbing, if not heartbreaking implications. Samus' fear of the monster, though not as crippling as it was in Metroid: Other M, is still apparent. Once you get over Ridley's reveal and the gruesome demises of two of gaming's biggest heroes, what we're left with afterward is a girl who just came face-to-face with the very monster responsible for her parents' deaths and is desperately trying not to lose it at the mere sight of her childhood terror. Thankfully, she's still willing to take him down, even without the Power Suit.
    • Also, take a moment to consider what must be going on through the mind of not just Samus after having lost both Mega Man and Mario to this monster in a heartbeat, but another innocent bystander who was there to witness everything — Cappy. The poor little guy's undoubtedly paralyzed in unadulterated terror and anguish after what happened to his longtime partner and from being unfortunate enough to get caught up in the sadistic claws of said friend's murderer…
  • Death severing Luigi's soul from his body may seem like Bowdlerization, but remember that Death serves Dracula. What does Dracula do? He "steals men's souls and makes them his slaves".
    • It wouldn't have been the first time Luigi was brainwashed by a powerful enemy faction, either.
      • Luckily, Simon's arrival may not have been early enough to stop Death from separating Luigi from his body, but it was enough to stop Death from keeping his soul and taking it to Hell. Plus, it is implied at the end of the trailer (and from a tweet from Nintendo UK) that Luigi is OK, as he tries to rejoin with his body, only for Carmilla to show up and scare him. Since Carmilla hasn't been shown attacking, it seems it was only trying to frighten Luigi for the sake of it.
  • Spirits are the souls of those defeated by Galeem's insanely powerful light attack, which was unleashed in one burst. Among the Spirits are Calamity Ganon, The Shadow Queen, Infinite, Arceus, Galacta Knight, Rodin, Dyntos and Tabuu! Let that sink in for how strong this guy is.
  • Why can't Sonic, the fastest character in gaming, outrun the beams? He's not running at full speed because he's trying to grab Pikachu. In Sonic's games, he's frequently shown rescuing small, cute animals from the bad guys, so it's only natural that he would try to grab Pikachu. Unfortunately, he fails, and because he's not at his normal speed, he can't outrun the beams to save himself.
    • Also, the beams are made of light. Sonic may be the fastest thing alive, but he's merely faster than the speed of sound, which is itself slower than light. In Sonic Colors, he was unable to outrun a black hole, so if he can't outrun its gravitational field, he can't outrun light.
  • Before Dark Pit is offed, it can be seen his wings glow in the same color as Pit, meaning Palutena is the one providing him with the Power of Flight and it's gone for both angels the moment she's disintegrated. Then one realizes that in gameplay, his version of it is provided by Viridi. While it's granted that her lack of a playable status means she can't be in the cutscene, it makes one wonder if she fell beforehand and what circumstances brought the characters together.
    • Spare a thought for Pit when Palutena is disintegrated. He probably knew what had happened the moment his wings stopped working: his patron goddess is dead, and he's next. And even if Galeem didn't hit them, they were quite a ways up in the air and likely would have died upon impact with the ground
    • Keep in mind that Palutena is the goddess of light. Not even a deity who controls light could do anything against Galeem's light beams.
    • Also, much like Bayonetta, Sakurai confirmed that Palutena was one of two other characters who could have survived Galeem's attack, but much like Sonic above, who would have had a somewhat better chance at surviving for longer had he not tried to save Pikachu too, Palutena chose to save Pit and Dark Pit in vain before she was vaporized. Palutena is the one responsible for controlling the angels' flight paths and she has to try and do that without getting them accidentally killed, thus splitting her focus. She was also already devastated seeing Pit's critical condition in Uprising following the Chaos Kin fiasco, and the thought of him dying horribly while she escaped would have broken her heart and haunted her forever. Ultimately, even if Palutena had the power to escape, there was no way she was doing so at Pit's expense.
  • Snake hiding inside his box before getting killed is probably the one death Played for Laughs the most, especially considering that he apparently never makes any attempt to evade or resist Galeem's attack. However, recall how much Snake and his relatives have obsessed over cardboard boxes, with Big Boss in particular describing being inside one as very peaceful. It's likely that seeing what happened to his allies made Snake realize that he was likely going to die within seconds, and chose the one place he was likely going to die happy in.
  • Assuming that there will be new spirits based on the Persona series, that means that there will be some pretty bad people or monsters that can cause some pretty big damage.
    • Then there is the fact that most of those spirits are Joker's fellow Phantom Thieves, which makes matters worse considering that they already experienced something similar towards their game's endgame...
    • Two of the spirits are Igor and Caroline & Justine. The latter two in particular being spirits implies that Galeem got them before they could fuse back into Lavenza and reveal "Igor" to actually be Yaldabaoth in disguise. Speaking of him, while Yaldabaoth himself is not a spirit, the artwork of Igor used in this game is based on him disguised as Igor, rather than Igor himself. This leaves open two possibilities: either Yaldabaoth is never outed and enslaves humanity with no resistance, or he, while disguised, was offed by Galeem and imprisoned as a spirit while the real Igor was spared; if the latter is true, then considering what it took to defeat him in his original context, one shivers to imagine how strong Galeem is if the God of Control can be "dusted" as casually as a Goomba.
  • Try to think about all of the raw emotion during that very moment. The apprehension and anticipation of the bang. And the determination, bravery, and resolve suddenly turning into fear, panic, desperation, and even resignation in the sheer face of chaos and annihilation. It's theorized that places like Gettysburg are haunted due to a deep footprint of collective emotional energy that was created by the intense feelings of everyone, from the young man that's afraid to die to the wounded elder breathing his last, that was involved in the battle. So the collective emotions of an entire planet being wiped out must be IMMEASURABLE.
    • "It is the Vietnamese belief that the dead must be buried in their homeland, or their soul will wander aimlessly in pain and suffering." If this case were to apply here, then being a spirit is a very grim fate.
  • Some of the spirits have themes with their abilities. Some are humorous, like Buzz Buzz being a small Mr. Game & Watch with 300% at the start of combat (and making you start with 30% when you equip him). However, one of the spirits included was Paz Ortega Andrarde from Metal Gear Solid V. Her effect? Fighters with her equipped start with a Bob-omb. Anyone who has played The Phantom Pain may wonder how this got past the Radar.
    • On that note, some spirits possess fake Kirbys, i.e. the sole survivor of Galeem's attack while everyone else was captured and cloned. Since we do not rescue other Kirbys in the game (and honestly wouldn't need to from a gameplay perspective), it makes one wonder how Galeem got his feathers on whatever it is he uses for them and where they're being kept. Maybe's it's just Meta Knight who's being used to clone both himself and the fake Kirbys, or Galeem managed to snag some other Kirby elsewhere…note 
    • Also, some Spirits may be aware of the character they're possessing from the actual game the puppet fighter is from. Otacon, for example, possesses Dr. Mario, and given his indulgence in geek culture, as well as his Mario and Yoshi figures in Twin Snakes, he probably knows exactly whose body he's forced to fight in, and perhaps his opponent as well, depending on your choice. He knows they're real now... and is forced to fight them.
  • The shopkeeper spirits all sell spirits based on their general profession. This is kind of okay, as most of them typically sell inanimate object-like spirits, with the exception of Anna, who sells you spirits of living breathing people! Not helping her case is that her "stock" consists of overall nice and heroic people.
    • Mitigated by a loading screen tip that explains she specializes in weapon and equipment spirits. The wielders are just dragged into her fascination with their shiny gear, and how she can make a buck off it. This is perfectly in-character for more recent Annas.
  • Viridi's disgust towards Mewtwo being a man-made creation, to the point of wanting it to be destroyed, is already cruel, but it's even worse considering that Mewtwo is based on the one from the anime. That Mewtwo felt a lot of sorrow over its nature as a clone and struggled to find its purpose in life. The sheer callousness Viridi shows is even similar to how the scientists that created Mewtwo treated it, as if it were a lesser form of life because it's a clone.
    • On the subject of Viridi, there's also the Palutena's Guidance moment for the Inklings in which Viridi happily cheers the total annihilation of the human race. Get this though; humans were far from the only species eradicated when the world flooded — virtually every land-dwelling species had been subjected to possibly the largest mass extinction event in history, and with Antarctica having been nuked, there had to have been numerous aquatic casualties as well thanks to the water properties assuredly having changed drastically from what most in that kind of niche would be comfortable in — let alone able to survive in. The resulting fallout would also assuredly mutate survivors in potentially horrific ways if not outright killing them from the blast. How Viridi is not absolutely fuming at this, considering her intense hatred of humanity due to their activities rapidly depleting the natural world, could only be explained as her thinking that with the humans gone, the world will revert itself to its natural state — which shows a rather horribly callous aspect of her in that she'll condone mass destruction of the world so long as humans are ultimately wiped out by the end of it and that the world wasn't destroyed along with them (she is the creator of the Reset Bombs, which do restore a form of live to the environment… after obliterating everything else in its vicinity). She also ignores how overwhelmingly human-like the Inklings and Octarians are, not just in physique, but in mindset as well, especially concerning their turf wars, which are fought for at times more trivial reasons than most human wars (one thing that similar genocidal villain Commander Tartar pointedly cites as grounds for the planet's unavoidable destruction at its hands). Viridi at this point could only really be best summed up as a hypocritical and delusional goddess that's more of a personification of nature's wrath against humanity in lieu of the classical Greek Gods.
  • Many battles in World of Light can be potentially crushing for the characters depending on who you choose to awake certain fighters and your progression. Want to have Mario see his brother or Peach being out of their minds, who — in another universe — already had bad experiences with being possessed? Or Chrom having to forcibly beat his best friend and daughter to make them regain consciousness (the reverse also applies with Robin/Lucina fighting off their close friend/father depending on which order you rescued first)? How about making Pit relive flashbacks of when the Chaos Kin possessed Palutena? Maybe have Bowser see his son being brainwashed and attacking him? Possibly the Villager witnessing their sweet, innocent and loyal secretary having become a mindless killing machine trying to beat them within an inch of their life? You get the point.
    • You want to know what makes this even better? The puppet fighters are not silent like the false characters in the Subspace Emissary; they're fully voiced this time around, meaning that they will vocalize their attacks like regular fighters and whenever they're attacked. The spirits can feel the pain you're putting them through (even if only to save them).
  • There is something disturbing about the Dark Realm; it vaguely seems to take inspiration from many worlds represented in the Super Smash Bros. series all melded together, much like the World of Trophies from Subspace Emissary and its light counterpart. Here's the thing: there exists a Sacred Land ala The Legend of Zelda, and the thing that is fridge horror comes in the form of the Sacred Land's boss — Ganon. Unlike fellow giant boss Giga Bowser from the Realm of Light, who is simply an empowered Bowser, however, you actually unlock Ganondorf literally right before the boss fight with Ganon rather than defeating his souped-up form to get him first. And topping it off, the boss fight has another Ganondorf transforming into said beast. Why is there another Ganondorf and where did he come from? How long has he been in the Sacred Land, and for that matter, why is the "Sacred Land" a part of the Dark Realm instead of the "Realm of Light"?
    • You don't have to look all that close, but while there is clearly an abundance of civilization present in the Realm of Light, there are also some houses (or at least similar-looking buildings) in the Dark Realm as well, which includes an entire city at the very least. This is the same dimension that is also home to Ganon(dorf), Dracula, and Marx. Seeing what Dharkon's attack did to the last remaining world (i.e. killing Mario for one), what other lifeforms out there could possibly survive in such a hellish domain?
    • The Sacred Land being in the Dark Realm is probably a reference to A Link to The Past, where that game’s Dark World is actually the Sacred Realm after being corrupted by Ganon’s evil intentions.
  • The battle with Marx is conventionally creepy, but from Kirby's perspective, it might be even worse. The last time we saw Marx, he was an ally of Kirby's who never objected to the pink puffballnote , so to see someone who had seemingly reformed suddenly attack him would likely be nerve-wracking for Kirby. It should be noted, however, that Marx's canonical reason for aiding Kirby in Star Allies is the threat of the Jamba Hearts being dangerous to Marx as well as Kirby, but the point still stands.
    • And even if you assume Marx had genuinely chosen to turn over a new leaf, that just makes things worse - after getting dusted, Galeem or Dharkon jammed the semi-reformed jester into a puppet body similar to his fully Nova-empowered self, only even more juiced up to the point his new attacks put him through Body Horror, and his defeat has his body painfully fall apart. Call it karmic for Milky Way Wishes, but that's still some pretty nasty trauma.
  • Porky Minch is nowhere to be seen as a Spirit. However, the Absolutely Safe Capsule — which Porky trapped himself inside in a careless attempt to save himself from death — shows up as a summonable Spirit, which could be interpreted as Porky being in the Capsule. If so, it would seem that even as a Spirit, Porky is unable to escape from the Absolutely Safe Capsule.
  • When you think about it, World of Light's true ending is not quite the Golden Ending it appears to be. Please keep in mind that Galeem's Apocalypse How was never reversed. Those Spirits are not going home, simply because they have no homes to go back to. "Shaggy Dog" Story does not begin to cover it.
    • Unless the "real world" they're trying to go back to is separate from the universe that Smash takes place, which can be considered the "world of imagination".
  • This game has a total of 1303 spirits as of the time of this writing, which is already a high confirmed death toll, but the more disturbing aspect of that is that this is nowhere near close to half of all the lifeforms wiped out by Galeem's attack; many more characters are simply unaccounted for. Considering how Galeem blindsided everyone with his attack, it's likely that absolutely nothing survived except for Kirby (only the playable one it seems as Galeem somehow got its wings on something else to spawn fake Kirbys), but the spirits we've seen are the only ones that have manifested in the last remaining world. The other Mario Baby characters not seen? The Kokiri sans Saria? Olimar's entire family? Even Jubileus and Sheba of Bayonetta renown, the closest equivalents to Galeem and Dharkon's power out of every franchise that made it into smash? They're all just…gone. No spirit. No references. No nothing. Absolutely and unequivocally gone.
    • Though there is the possibility they're still out there. Nothing says that some Spirits simply didn't take on a Puppet form.
    • Another thing; given the crossovers Nintendo has occasionally had with non-Video Game Intellectual Property such as Hello Kitty or even Shaun the Sheep, could Galeem’s attack have not been restricted to just Video Game universes? Perhaps even...
  • After completing World of Light's true ending, you get Galeem and Dharkon as spirits. You can now punish them by sending them out on mundane treasure hunting trips or whatever it is you like doing with spirits just to put them through what it's really like being spirits. Except, it's not as harmless at it may seem; first off, what did Galeem do to every other spirit in the game? Force them to take control of the puppet fighters. If weak spirits like Dan Hibiki can effectively control a body that's not his, Galeem and Dharkon can likely do the same to much greater effect. Also, several spirit battles show that multiple bodies can be controlled by a single spirit, and it sometimes goes up to somewhere around eleven completely separate fighters at once. As anyone knows from the spirit fights, the spirit battles often feature spirits with a team power higher than what you can raise that same spirit up to, and Galeem and Dharkon have the highest team power out of all playable spirits, meaning that as enemy spirits they'd be unmatched. And we've never seen exactly how Galeem created the puppet fighters in the first place, if the place where he did it is still standing, or if he doesn't have reserves lying around somewhere. All it'd take is for either Galeem or Dharkon to take control of a stray puppet fighter's body and they'd be running their schemes once again…
  • Yoshi's new final smash involves trampling characters under a stampede of Yoshis. This takes place in what looks like a deserted canyon...
  • When Galeem's and Dharkon's puppet fighters are in the same battle, they will focus almost exclusively on each other over the player. There is however one exception to the rule; the battle where Master Hand takes on 50 puppet fighters. Just how powerful and/or dangerous is Master Hand that Galeem and Dharkon genuinely sets their differences aside for the moment to take on Master Hand?
    • Powerful and dangerous enough that Galeem decided to find a way to strip Master Hand of his Master Core form (considered an SNK Boss by many and one of the toughest fights in Smash 4), condense it into a spirit, then shatter that spirit into more spirits representing all of its various forms before ever attempting to enact his plan. Given Master Fortress is a Kaiju-sized living dungeon, it probably could have snatched Galeem and Dharkon in one hand each and crushed them both into nothing. The pair could be deathly afraid that, if they let him have the chance and the Master Core spirit has been reassembled by this point, Master Hand will absorb that spirit and effectively regain his full power, then annihilate them in a Curbstomp Battle.
  • As shown in the final boss fight's boss gauntlet portion, some spirits such as Marx, Rathalos, and Ganon are strong enough to take physical forms without a clone to inhabit. Does this include Galeem and Dharkon?
  • Word of God had stated that Galeem and Dharkon analyzed Kirby enough to the point where they can make spirits out of him without even needing to capture him - but what if Kirby had been captured by Galeem before the others? Kirby had fought his fair share of Eldritch Abominations before, and is powerful enough to defeat or escape any one of them. There may be a bigger reason as to why Kirby fled on the Warp Star: he's been through this before. He knows what the beams of light were capable of, and something like the Warp Star is the only possible option to escape light itself. Galeem may have not analyzed Kirby without having to capture him - he could have managed to get Kirby first. And upon Kirby's escape, that would be when the other fighters become aware of the great threat.
  • King K. Rool meeting the same demise as Grunty may be funny, but there may be some unsettling implications on what happened to him. Unlike Grunty, K. Rool doesn't have magical beings to revive him, and while there may be his Kremling army that may help him with the rock, they probably don't know where exactly K. Rool is. It's possible that K. Rool might be dead for real if it wasn't for the trailer being non-canon.
  • The fact that there are Nintendo Labo spirits. From a story perspective, this means Galeem (and Dharkon) has the ability to reach beyond video games and into the real world. Fortunately, it seems he only has influence over video game peripherals, though, so your PS Move had better watch out.

    Fridge Horror: Classic Mode 
While many of the Classic Routes are pretty tame for the most part, some of the Classic Routes for the more villainous characters have some disturbing implications when you look beneath the surface.
  • The Classic Mode course for Dark Samus is titled, "The Great Poison Given Form". It starts off with you fighting Link with Zelda teamed-up alongside you. Later fights have you fighting groups or individuals, with one who should be from that group, helping you. Anyone who's played through Metroid Prime will immediately see the implications: you, as Dark Samus, are corrupting heroes with Phazon and are now using them to kill their friends.
    • One battle involves you and Robin versus Chrom and Lucina, which will give anyone who's finished Fire Emblem Awakening a shock: it means Dark Samus somehow managed to make Grima (or at least, Grima's vessel) into a mere puppet under her control.
    • The last fight has a three-way match with you, Samus, and Ridley. Naturally, Samus and Ridley start battling each other, while you're off to the side, completely untouched. The game actually allows you to be an evil onlooker, watching the fight and just waiting to swoop in and clean up the pieces when the other two have worn each other down for you. Really does make a statement about how calculating and evil Dark Samus really is.
  • Bowser's Classic route, "The Red One. Every Red One!", has him gunning for all red-clad characters note , referencing Mario's usage of the color...which can bring very unsettling implications. After so many years of losing to Mario, and occasionally Luigi, so many times, it can only be assumed that Bowser has finally lost his goddamn mind; going on what seems to be a manhunt against every single person who just happens to wear red. Imagine a rampaging monster charging towards you, just because you remind him of someone he hates, someone you may not have even met. The worst part is that the final boss turns out to be Mario... which means that Bowser wins.
    • You know what's even scarier? Rathalos is one of Bowser's targets and is similarly pummeled into the ground, and this is considering that the fire-breathing wyvern being is as far removed from looking anything like Mario as one can get. Then it gets worse when you remember that Mario is wearing Cappy in this game; Bowser probably convinced himself that Mario was possessing the body of Rathalos and went after the beast despite the distinct lack of a mustache, blue eyes, and the obvious cap—but then you also remember that Bowser probably never actually saw Mario possess someone using Cappy, which means he'd have never actually known if this was the case.
  • Ganondorf's Classic route is called The Beginning of the End in Japanese. As one could suspect, this version of Classic pits you against heroes from various franchises, each seeming to stand on the way to stop him, culminating in that before the Hands, you have a battle against Link and Zelda where the player wins. The implications are more than obvious: You have given Ganondorf a free ticket to ravish and conquer the world of Smash, with nobody being left to stop him. And considering what this incarnation of Ganondorf did to his Hyrule, the remaining fighters will have a bleak future ahead of them. The fact that one of the opponents is Palutena makes the English title, Encroaching Darkness, even more poignant.
    • This isn't even the first time old 'Dorf has tricked the player into leading him to victory. He's already done it once in Hyrule Warriors, where he also smashed Link and Zelda into paste (and stole their Triforce pieces to boot) during his campaign. Let's hope he doesn't make this new and highly effective scheme a habit...
  • Remember the event in Super Smash Bros. Melee where you fought against Mewtwo and a mind-controlled Zelda? Well, Mewtwo's Classic Mode in this game, appropriately titled "Psychic Control", takes it further. At the beginning of each stage (except the first one), Mewtwo is partnered with an opponent it faced in the last stage, with the implication that Mewtwo is now mind-controlling that opponent into fighting for it. These opponents include Ken, Pikachu, and Cloud (which adds in some Fridge Horror if you remember the events of his home game). But the scariest one of all has to be when it controls what appears to be Lucas with a gray palette swap. But when you think about what happened in Lucas's home game, it suddenly hits you: that's not Lucas. It's Claus.
  • Ridley's Classic Mode, "It Can't Be! Space Pirates!", may not seem that scary at firstnote , but pay attention to the music selection used throughout it. After beating Samus, and you get to fight all of the non Metroid characters, every track used is either sinister, tense and/or dramatic in tone, as if an aura of dread accompanies him as he travels to other worlds to defeat their respective heroes. It gives the impression that, to anyone other than Samus, Ridley is a horrifying threat that should not be taken lightly. Worse still, there's the implication that, should Ridley ever defeat Samus, no other forces of good in the universe would be able to stop his bloodlust.
    • Worse still, is when you examine Ridley's personality and why he'd go around fighting people in other worlds: according to the manga, he's a twisted, sadistic Psycho for Hire who doesn't just pillage and kill for money or even just because it's under Mother Brain's orders, but for laughs. This beast is going around, killing innocent people and pillaging their resources, just for his own amusement. This is even more of a ghastly threat than Porky Minch could be; and now he's wreaking havoc, ripping apart the Smash world bit by bit, before slaughtering Master Hand and Crazy Hand themselves, leaving behind many bodies in the wake of it all. The dark music playing through the whole run pretty much signifies that you are playing as not just a formidable fighter, but the aptly named Cunning God of Death himself.


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