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Fridge Brilliance

  • There’s a pretty good reason why Tony wanted Peter to be better than himself. Think about it, who else’s but Parker would want to be Tony Stark? The guy who created Ultron, who would go in and kill thousands of Sokovians, and recklessly tried to kill Bucky Barnes, not out of heroism, but vengeance. Tony’s still guilt-ridden over all of his mistakes, and having someone want to be him would give a chance for those mistakes to repeat. Tony knows his life sucks, so he’d want no one to go through what he did and went through.
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  • One possible reason behind the lack of Adaptational Angst Upgrade behind this Peter is probably because in this continuity, Uncle Ben’s death probably wasn’t his fault. He may have learned the Comes Great Responsibility lesson through Tony Stark’s mentoring.
  • Tony making the upgraded Spider-Man an actual onesie. While a funny nod to Captain America: Civil War when Stark thought Peter's old costume was a onesie, it could also be a reference to how Stark is used to being able to put on his armored suits in a couple of seconds. In addition, this would allow Peter to simply slip into it, unlike comics!Spidey who has his costume in pieces.
    • In addition, the vacuform function, allowing a suit and mask several sizes too big for Peter to fit him perfectly with the press of a button. It looks cool and par for the course for something made by Tony Stark. But why? Why not just make the suit to fit Peter like his Iron Man armors do himself? Because Peter is fifteen. He’s still going through puberty, with the attendant growth spurts. It’s a way to account for any change in measurements (note that the mask fits Ned, whose head is not only bigger than Peter’s but also has jowls) and not spend millions of dollars on a new suit every year.
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  • More like Fridge Heartwarming but Tony's speech to Peter about to not do anything he would do and not do anything he wouldn't is more than Tony just giving the kid confusing information, it's also his way of telling Peter that he can and will become a better hero than he is and to essentially not follow in his footsteps.
  • The first supervillain that Spider-Man fought in the comics was the Chameleon, who appeared in the 1st issue of the Amazing Spider-Man in 1963. Chameleon's gimmick was disguises and masks, sometimes even disguising himself as other superheroes. Now, who does Spider-Man fight first in the trailer, right before he fights the Vulture? Guys wearing disguises and masks, disguising themselves as superheroes! Whether intentional or not, it's a nice little shout-out.
    • Homecoming deals with Spider-Man's attempt to prove his worth enough to join the Avengers. Amazing Spider-Man #1 involves Spidey trying to land a spot on a superhero team too.
  • The second trailer brings up how Peter wants to fight the Vulture on his own and how he doesn't want anyone else's help. This could be a metaphor for how in every Spider-Man movie before this, Spider-Man has been the only superhero in his world and is always the only one who can stop the bad guy, but now that he's in a shared universe with other heroes, he needs to be able to work with them in order to do better.
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  • In the hierarchy of the Marvel Universe, Spider-Man is considered the top of the "street level" heroes, meaning his adventures are largely limited to New York itself rather than the globetrotting and sometimes galactic exploits of the likes of the Avengers. Here Spidey wants to leave his niche and expand his scope much like Tony Stark, forgetting that at his age being the top of the street level heroes is already pretty damn impressive.
  • Tony demands the Spider-Man costume back from Peter after the ferry debacle, telling him point-blank that if he's nothing without the suit, then he shouldn't have it. While it sounds harsh, Tony Stark knows more than anybody how damaging it is to wrap your entire sense of identity around the technological benefits of a suit.
    • It may also be a bit of a Call Back to what Captain America asks Tony, in the first Avengers Film; "Big man in a suit of Armour. Take that off, what are you?". It is kind of heartwarming, in a way, as it does imply that Tony does genuinely take what Captain America ask him, to heart, despite what may have recently happen, between the two?
      • Especially considering that Peter & Tony just mention Captain America in the Scene, which may be what brings that though to Tony's mind?
    • Remember when Tony said he is Iron Man and not the suit? He wants Peter to know the same thing, the suit isn’t Spider-Man, Peter is. Had Tony not confiscated the suit, Peter would’ve gotten down at a terrible path.
  • There are two reasons why Tony doesn't want Peter to become an official Avenger:
    • 1) Peter is underage and a child. He also got badly concussed during the battle. Tony doesn't want to endanger Peter again, especially with foes like the Chitauri. Furthermore, Peter's immaturity, poor judgment and impulse control, and terrible track record when it comes to being able to see where he fucked up would all make him an absolute nightmare to work with, so Tony was also trying to save Peter from himself and the team from an absolutely massive headache.
    • 2) Thanks to the events of Civil War, the Avengers if they have survived are now a UN faction of superpowered "attack dogs". There are also only two Avengers in action: Iron Man and Vision. Ross was making it clear that he was only tolerating the Avengers that complied with the Accords and hinted at wanting to lock Tony up. Would anyone want to leave young Peter Parker with a Jerkass like Ross?
  • Pretty much everything about Peter, his motivations, and why he is who he is clicks into place once you realize he was the little boy at the Stark Expo all the way back in Iron Man 2.
  • The Vulture in this film salvages alien tech and reworks it for his own use. This scavenger nature is similar to how vultures actually live by. He has an even more Meaningful Name when you consider his motive is largely to supply his family and old employees with money; many species of vulture are highly social birds.
  • Take a look at Vulture's typical wardrobe when he's flying around and stealing the alien tech. This isn't the inexplicably gaudy green costume from the original comics, it basically amounts to a bomber jacket with a fur collar, pretty standard stuff. But when it's zipped up, coupled with Michael Keaton's now balding head, he looks just like a real vulture.
    • Aside from aesthetics, the bomber jacket also makes sense on a practical level, as flying through the night sky on wings that use two very large rotors, which would blow air right past you, is going to make it an extremely cold affair.
  • The fact that Spidey's Stark suit has so many little technical gadgets seems to be somewhat of a jab at how Spidey in various animated and action figure incarnations has had things like random Spider-Cycles and Spider-chutes made to obviously sell toys. Plus, Tony Stark is, at heart, still a big kid; of course he would fill Spidey's suit with lots of bells and whistles, because that's what he does with all of his toys!
    • Tony also likely took it as a challenge. "Okay, I've been building increasingly-advanced suits of Powered Armor for years now. . . how many gizmos can I squeeze into a unitard?"
  • Meta: Zendaya's comments saying she's not playing Mary Jane Watson and the rumors saying she was both ultimately turned out to be correct: She's not playing Mary Jane, but she's playing Michelle Jones - the MCU version of "MJ".
  • Peter and Star Wars:
    • Peter is shown to be a Star Wars fan when he gets excited about helping Ned assemble his Lego Death Star. At first this appears to contradict Peter's dialogue in Civil War where he didn't remember the name of The Empire Strikes Back, until one realizes that he was probably trolling the other Avengers to make them feel old. That, or the movie really does seem old to him; if it were a person, it would be old enough to be his father.
    • That or he was pretending to know little about SW in order to look cooler in front of the Avengers.
    • Alternatively, he could've simply had a casual knowledge of SW during Civil War and became a fan in the interim. With best friend Ned being a big enough fan to purchase a $500 Lego set, he could've been enticed to watch and found it enjoyable.
    • Another interpretation could be that while Peter is crazy about Star Wars, he's not expecting people like a billionaire inventor, an Air Force pilot or a century-old super soldier to have the necessary interest in something geeky like SW. Even though it's the most popular movie franchise in history.
    • Yet another alternative, normally he could list all the details, but in the middle of a high octane superhero brawl he just couldn't remember the details as clearly. Adrenaline can do that.
    • Obviously in Civil War he was speaking in codes to his teammates, so that Giant Man wouldn't know that they're going to do the AT-AT tripping trick on him.
    • Another possibility is that he is casually aware of the films through Ned who is clearly a fan but Peter himself is not. His enthusiasm at building the Lego Death Star is because he finds building complex things fun.
  • Using Vulture as this movie's Big Bad is a clever Call-Back to the cancelled fourth movie of the first Spider-Man film series, where he was also going to be the main villain. In addition, it references the implication at the end of Amazing Spider-Man 2 that he was going to form the Sinister Six and be the main villain of the now-cancelled Amazing Spider-Man 3.
  • Spider-Man seems to have avoided his comics counterpart's Hero with Bad Publicity tendencies. When one thinks about it, one realizes this can be attributed to two factors:
    • J. Jonah Jameson and the Daily Bugle have been Adapted Out (being replaced with Mitchell Ellison and the New York Bulletin) so there's nobody to launch a smear campaign against the web-head.
    • This Spider-Man operates in a world where social media proliferates, instead of information flow being controlled by big news companies like the Bugle; all of the little heroic things that Spidey does daily are caught by countless amateur filmmakers and uploaded to YouTube. Even if Jameson was around to try his smear tactics, realistically, they wouldn't stick so hard, because there's so much readily accessible counter-evidence. Like the incident with the bank. People can see for themselves that Spider-Man was trying to help, whereas in the original comics of the 60s, there was no way to easily counter Jameson's steady flow of libel.
    • He also stays out of Manhattan, where major media presence is likely going to be a much more powerful force than Queens. Youtube may make him famous enough to get Tony's attention but it isn't enough for the classic News Mogul to pay attention beyond the 9 o'clock local news that probably won't even end up on the net. Why bother with that when you got Avengers messing up and the 24 Hour news channel debating on the aftermath of Cap becoming an outlaw?
  • At the end of the second act, Tony calls Peter and tries to check up on him, and says he hasn't been a good mentor. Why the sudden change of heart and attack of common se- Oh, right, he got back with Pepper.
  • The physics question that Peter answers despite only half paying attention? It was about objects swinging on a line.
  • The final stinger. The one with Captain America basically trolling the audience, talking about patience and waiting for something that, in the end, wasn't really worth waiting for? It actually plays straight into the film's main theme: patience. Peter wants to just skip over high school and go straight into a professional superhero career with the Avengers, while Tony and everyone else is telling him to wait until he's really ready for that responsibility, as well as to not gloss over this particular time in his life. It also references how Peter doesn't want to be an Avenger, i.e. it wasn't worth waiting for.
  • There is a subtle moment of foreshadowing by Toomes' men while they are looking for the Chitauri power source. In that scene, they comment about Toomes' reaction if he knew where they were. One would initially interpret it as them saying Toomes wouldn't believe that they found the power source in a high school. But later in the film, one would realize that Toomes would have a stronger reaction to his men being at his daughter's high school.
  • The scene with the criminals in the school plays with the theme of staying in school and not overlooking all the important lessons you can find there.
  • Of course Aaron Davis' story of being an uncle who wanted to keep his young nephew safe would strike a chord with Peter after what happened in his own life recently.
  • It makes perfect sense that Toomes would be able to deduce so quickly that Peter is living a double life and lying to Liz about where he is and what he's doing, since Toomes does the same thing all the time.
  • After Toomes deduces Spider-Man's civilian identity, he offers him the choice to just walk away. One chance to sit back and do nothing while Toomes goes about his business. If he doesn't, Toomes promises to kill him and everyone he loves. The problem is the choice Toomes offers isn't a choice at all. Peter already sat back and let a thief get away once, and that choice has haunted him ever since. It makes perfect sense why Peter doesn't consider the offer for an instant before running off to fight Toomes.
  • Why did Tony Stark send Peter his suit the original Stark one, not the Iron Spider? Because Peter is returning to being a local superhero rather than an Avenger and, like the Iron Man armors, the Iron Spider may contain weapons and functions too powerful/dangerous for a civilian environment.
  • Why did Midtown Science welcome Peter back to the decathlon team so eagerly after he'd blown them off along with all his other extra-curriculars?
    • From their point of view, his fixation on the Stark internship was him throwing himself into work as a way of dealing with his grief over the loss of his uncle Ben. That he was willing to return would look to them like he was getting to the end of processing his grief and ready to rejoin the world and his classmates.
    • Let's also not forget that Peter developed all of his Spider-Man equipment on his own, including the incredibly strong spider-silk web fluid, something many professionally-equipped labs in both the real world and the MCU still can't quite replicate. Peter really is just that smart that he can walk out and back in to the team whenever he wants.
    • The issue of his replacement: Anytime Flash answers a question, he gets it wrong. During the decathlon itself, one of the students mentions that Flash didn't answer any questions at all. Peter was welcomed back so quickly because the team would rather have him than Flash.
  • A minor complaint from some reviewers who happen to be serious Spider-Man fans is that, while they were fine with the film not revisiting Spider-Man's complete origin again, the film did not really do anything to communicate that Spider-Man is in some way motivated by the guilt that he feels over Uncle Ben's death. However, Civil War already set that up by having Peter explain to Tony Stark his belief that if he does not act despite his powers he is responsible for the "bad things" that happen. This explains Peter's motivation throughout the film: he feels obligated to run into any danger, even when told not to by Stark and even when outright threatened by a villain who knows his identity. Peter also mentions when he insists that Ned keep his identity a secret that May has been through enough already, clearly intended as a nod to his uncle's death. Later May confronts Peter about sneaking out, cutting class, and lying to her but goes easy on him when he tells her he lost the Stark Internship. So many things in the movie point towards Ben's loss without outright needing to say it.
  • When fighting the fake Avengers at the bank, Spidey forces the robber in the Thor mask to punch the guy dressed like Hulk ("Thor, meet Hulk!") Fitting, since the next Marvel film in line, Thor: Ragnarok, does indeed include a fight between Thor and the Hulk.
  • We never actually hear anyone say Liz's last name in the entire movie, her first name and her role as love interest being the only things indicating to the audience that she was Liz Allan. While most superhero movies suffer from at least a little bit of Late-Arrival Spoiler (for instance, that Norman Osborn is the Green Goblin has been out for 40 years, so the original Spider-Man didn't bother hiding it), hiding her last name helps avert it, and even throw off those familiar with the Liz Allan character. Her last name isn't "Toomes," so knowing the comics wouldn't make one suspect the twist.
  • This film provides a possible answer to one of the most questioned plot holes in Civil War: how did Tony Stark finds out about Peter Parker being Spider-Man and track him down in such a short time? The answer is that Tony Stark knew about Peter for a long time, even before the events of Civil War took place. This film reveals that Tony has Peter's advanced suit made even before meeting Peter, and with it he added tons of gadgets and even a built-in AI in order to be useful for Peter as much as possible in order to train him into a full-fledged hero. Considering that Tony gives the advanced suit to Peter as soon as he gets back from the airport battle, and it stays with him until Tony takes it back himself after the ferry incident, it means that he already put everything into Peter's suit when he first built it, which implies that he must've known about Peter for a long time and is interested in the young hero's capabilities, and takes it upon himself to provide the tools and support Peter needed in order to, in Tony's own words, become a better hero than he was.
  • Vulture has an incredible level of control over his wings, even able to move individual "feathers," despite not having any hand controls. How? It's Chitauri technology, and as the very first episode of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. showed when Ward confiscated a Chitauri neural link, Chitauri tech is controlled by the mind.
  • There is an Instant Kill Protocol in the suit and "Karen" is quick to suggest using it.
    • The instant kill protocol was embedded into the training wheels protocol, and this was implied to eventually come off after Peter got more experience, a few years maybe and after he was older and officially joined the Avengers. The Avengers have killed people on screen, and Peter as an Avenger would probably be expected to kill as well. It could also be a protection thing. If things got really bad, it would activate if Peter's life was in serious danger—we see that Tony can remote access the suit when he turned the heating aspect on.
    • Tony Stark has been obsessed with another alien invasion since he entered the Wormhole and had his Near-Death Experience. Right through Ultron and Civil War, he has been fearful of another threat and it's clear that he wants to groom Peter to become an Avenger not only because he likes him, but because he needs as many super-powered people on standby and in fighting condition, especially should something happen to him. Being an Avenger means fighting aliens and killer robots and defending New York from a Chitauri-class threat, fighting evil -AI or HYDRA, not Small Steps Hero-work. Insta-kill mode would not only protect Peter against worse threats but enable him to protect others.
  • When Peter is in detention, Michelle is there too, and the teacher wonders what she's doing there, since she's not in trouble. While she claims she likes sketching people in despair, note that she's only ever there when Peter is. In fact, a lot of her behavior makes more sense when you realize she's trying to cover up her crush on Peter, like her refusal to join the rest of the Decathlon team on the Washington Monument tour: Peter wasn't there.
  • Some Meta Fridge Brilliance: the Race Lift of the main characters not only diversifies the cast, but it cleverly masks The Reveal that Liz's dad is the Vulture.
  • Never has the appellation (although it's never directly said onscreen) of the Vulture been more appropriate for the character. The movie's Vulture is a true scavenger, steeling discarded and confiscated tech for his own needs from the people who are supposed to be salvaging it.
  • At the end of his fitness video, Captain America's refers to the gym teacher while pointing in the opposite direction of where the teacher is standing. Immediately afterwards, the teacher expresses his reluctance to show the video in the first place, so he's obviously not interested in remembering where to stand to give it the full effect.
    • The reason why the school keeps using Captain America fitness videos makes sense when you consider that the Principal is a descendant of one of the Howling Commandos. He most likely keeps it going out of respect for his grandfather along with the fact he probably doesn't believe Captain America should be considered a criminal after all his previous heroics.
  • As pointed here by Cinema Wins, of course videos of Spider Man's sightings would only gain so little traction. In a world where Norse gods exist and a playboy billionaire is a superhero, a guy swinging around town in colorful clothes would be nothing compared to that, especially if it wasn't the first sighting.
    • Indeed, the fact that Peter is so new to the "superhero" thing is evidenced by how many such videos are out there. He couldn't do subtle if he tried, and usually doesn't try in the first place. Hence, there's a lot of footage of him swinging, helping, stumbling around, etc. It's no longer newsworthy because it's ubiquitous.
  • In addition to possibly feeling like he owes Peter one for saving him, there's a practical reason why Toomes would keep Spider-Man's true identity a secret: If you're a supervillain and you know who the local superhero really is, how would you get to them? Attacking them directly is risking, but you could draw them into a trap by going after the people they care about. And one of those people happens to be Toomes's daughter. By keeping quiet about Peter, he makes sure that no one like Gargan will go after Liz.
    • Toomes shows little regret in killing, but at no point does it appear he ever acts with murderous intent — even after Shocker threatens to expose him, it's clear he attempted to merely frighten him to keep him in line. As Toomes dotes on his daughter, and does truly admire Parker, he gives Parker a Scare 'em Straight speech, but may balk at actually killing Spidey if he can avoid it. After his arrest, he no longer has any reason to seek Parker's death — the damage has been done.
  • Tony admits he's acting like a Parental Substitute, as if it wasn't obvious. So of course they cast a guy who looks like he could actually be RDJ's kid.
  • The song that plays in Vulture's lair in the opening scene is called "Can't hear me knocking". How does Vulture steal his tech? Using his Phase Shifter, soundlessly, without them hearing him knocking.
  • Also, in Peter Parker's first scene, The Underdog by Spoon plays in the background. Fitting considering he is the most unlikely superhero.
  • The "Instant Kill" weapon is almost certainly just the Taser Webbing mode except cranked up a lot, which would stop a human heart and kill someone immediately.
  • Spider-Man’s story in Homecoming shares many similar elements from what made Tony, Iron Man.
    • Vulture is similar to Obadiah Stane, both men were part of a war profiteering business who was more than miffed when something happens that costs them their job and uses a salvaged weapon to recoup their losses. They become the chief antagonist for their protagonists, likewise both of them have a side villain from a similar organization who ends up having someone depose them, namely Ten Rings and Shocker.
    • When he gets too reckless with his suit in a desire to do something right by taking on a force way more powerful than what he had faced. He loses the main source of his powers from his father figure, just like how Tony had his reactor taken by Stane. Likewise both were placed in a situation where they were basically helpless as they lift themselves out of the situation which cements their hero identity.
    • Ultimately though, Peter refuses to join the Avengers which made Tony realize that this was him almost 10 years ago where he went from a prodigy to a superhero.
  • Related to the above theory, one could easily see Vulture as an Evil Counterpart and even a Foil to Iron Man himself: Tony made his debut selling weapons as a business and became a rich and successful entrepreneur, and a superhero working under the government, essentially as a special forces leader. Adrian Toomes, on the other hand, sells weapons illegally to street criminals and smugglers and treats his new job precisely like that: a job. Toomes treats his time as the Vulture as a traditional blue-collar work, because he has to put food on the table for his family and provide for them, even if through illicit means.
    • Further exemplifying the contrast between the two is Vulture's Leitmotif. The main five notes sound eerily similar to the Avengers theme, almost like a Dark Reprise of it.
  • There are incredibly subtle hints as to when Tony is and isn't in the suit. When Iron Man pulls Peter out of the water after encountering the Vulture for the first time, the suit's body language is incredibly stiff and the repulsor gloves aren't wrapped around Peter's chest, instead positioned to be open-palmed. Tony presumably hasn't had the time to program human nuances into the suit or finds it unnecessary. When he is repairing the ferry, however, his movement is a lot more fluid, as seen when Iron Man's legs clearly wobble as he's pushing the ferry back together. This is a subtle indication that Tony decided to show up in person and tell Peter how much he screwed up.
  • Vulture may be using modified Chitauri technology, but he and Tinkerer are still blue collar workers, not scientists. This shows in the differences between Falcon's smaller, sleeker wings and goggles and Vulture's bulkier wings and full flight mask. The EXO-7 Falcon suit was military-designed for espionage, likely not even built until it was small enough to avoid notice. In contrast, Vulture's wings are so large he can't walk with them, but are functional enough in flight that Toomes' crew decided they were good enough and didn't bother (or couldn't afford) making them smaller.
  • Unlike most superhero movies, Homecoming puts forward an explanation why the villains couldn't simply sell their technology and retire: simply having the Chitauri technology makes them criminals anyway, and selling it would lead to their own arrest.
  • Just as Captain America: Civil War being the 13th MCU movie had its own special meaning, Spider-Man Homecoming is the 16th movie - and sixteen is a popular number to represent teenhood and coming of age in pop culture. Adding some weight to this, Peter is not yet 16, and the movie is about him embracing his incompleteness as a hero.
  • When being offered his spot on the team, Peter's expression changes subtly when he hears Tony mention him having a room at HQ. He doesn't want to leave his family and friends yet.
  • The Spider-Man suit has features from Tony's life threatening experiences that Peter may casually face in battle. Such a tracker as a callback to Iron Man when he was captured by terrorists and a heater function after Iron Man 3 when he nearly froze to death traveling to Tennessee.
  • Happy's final line — "I've been carrying this thing since 2008." — also works from a meta perspective if you think about it.
  • The design of the Vulture's wingsuit shows a lot of features that set it apart from Falcon's, and does so in ways that reflect the differences between Real Life birds of prey. Vultures tend to be a lot larger than falcons, and their wings' anatomy is specifically designed for soaring effortlessly on thermals, with individual flight feathers spread out separately at the wingtips to reduce drag. Not only is the movie Vulture's wingsuit much bigger than Sam Wilson's, but it exhibits those distinctively-splayed vultures' flight feathers: a feature which the film draws attention to, and utilizes to make the Vulture more dangerous, by allowing its sharp metal feathers to scissor across one another as cutting tools and weapons.
  • Tony showing up at exactly the right moment to save the ferry seems awfully convenient. Then you remember he tipped off the FBI in the first place, thanks to Peter's messages, so was likely keeping an eye in case they did need Avengers-level backup. When he saw Peter getting involved in the sting, he probably suited up and headed over immediately, knowing Peter was out of his league here. He just wasn't expecting Peter to screw the pooch quite so dramatically.
  • When Peter is about to break the window to save his class, he stops, and Karen asks "Why are you hesitating?" At his experience level, it makes perfect sense to hesitate. But Karen was made for when he got more experienced, so she just assumes he is. Therefore, hesitation would seem weird to her!
    • Another comment from Karen, on the ferry, is "Would you like me to activate insta-kill mode?" This reflects Iron Man's goals: He wants Peter to be able to make the tough choices.
  • Some people gave said that Peter's summary of the situation in the prologue, Captain America's gone crazy is proof that Tony was lying to him or at least keeping secrets from Peter. But a key source of the conflict in Civil War was that Steve wouldn't call Tony, his side knew next to nothing about why Steve's side was doing what they were doing. What Tony knew was what he'd done (rampaged through an urban area and escaped from law enforcement), and Peter likely interpreted his statement as Cap going "Crazy", note that we only hear Peter's summarization not Tony actually briefing him.
  • Vulture left his phone behind in his gang's workshop. Of course he did; he couldn't afford to get caught off guard by ringtones when going on flights or when stealing tech.

Fridge Horror

  • It's probably a good thing Peter turned down the offer to join the Avengers which we soon see as Tony having been serious on the offer. It would now require signing the Accords and Peter signing his real name or rather his legal guardian Aunt May. Tony would have to suffer the consequences of bringing in an underage child especially since Tony implies his superiors know his Spider-Man is a teenager. Also recall that in the comics, after Peter revealed his identity, he ended up getting targeted with his Aunt May getting caught in the crossfire and almost dying had it not been for Peter making a deal with an actual devil. Needless to say, Peter and Tony dodged a huge bullet with the rejection.
  • Toomes has been dealing in exotic materials and alien-enhanced weapons practically since the Battle of New York, and he was able to go completely undetected by the Avengers, S.H.I.E.L.D. and all US law enforcement agencies. And his crew has been selling to street thugs(albeit without his permission). Just how many outfits are out there in the MCU channeling this dangerous stuff directly into the streets? Remember, S.H.I.E.L.D. was infected with HYDRA until a couple of years ago and they would have probably been fine with Toomes' activities. Heck, they were probably making it easy for him to steal, develop and sell because it would cause more chaos for them to exploit. And since S.H.I.E.L.D. fell they've had bigger problems to deal with than street crime. It's pretty clear that hijacking the Stark plane was the biggest heist Toomes had ever tried to pull. He's just not on their radar.
  • The fight on the ferry could have gotten worse for the FBI and the passengers. His gang was armed to the teeth, and Toomes himself had his suit. While Spider-Man made a mistake, at least there wasn't a firefight between men armed with guns and men armed with blasters and a man in power armor. By the time that Tony would have likely arrived, there would have been multiple casualties, and things would have been much worse if Toomes had gotten angry enough and had cut through them. Spider-Man screwed up, but Tony really didn't have any idea what he was dealing with and would have had multiple deaths and probably a fair bit of destruction on his hands if the original plan had been carried out.
  • While Toomes and, presumably, Shocker, were arrested in the end, we never saw what happened to Mason. As far as we know, he avoided capture, so he's still free, with a small supply of high-tech weaponry and gadgets, and with Toomes arrested, he's in need of a new income source. He'll probably end up working for a more dangerous villain, or sell his inventions to all kind of street-level criminals.
  • Toomes swore himself to secrecy regarding Spider-Man's identity since he saved both his and his daughter's life, but Shocker has the same knowledge but no reason to keep it to himself. Slightly alleviated, if Schultz ended up in the same prison as Toomes, as he's at least somewhat respectful of Toomes, unlike his predecessor Brice, so he might still respect Toomes' wish of not revealing Spider-Man's identity to anyone.
    • Although Shocker may have only been told Spider-Man was a student at the school, but not given the name.
  • After Spidey's save in Washington, Mr. Harrington says, "I couldn't bear to lose a student on a field trip... Not again..." Now, this could refer to anything. But think about it; what major event happened in New York, in the middle of the day, where and when a school field trip could've easily taken place...? The Stark Expo could be a candidate location too.
  • Karen giving Peter romantic advice. It's cute enough as Karen being a sort of big sister helping him out to a first date, but recall that Karen was built by Tony Stark, and wasn't intended to be activated until Peter was much older. Just what might this AI start leading him to...?
  • Peter never actually caught the four ATM robbers. He was too busy saving Mr. Delmar and his cat from the exploding deli. By the time he's done, the four robbers have already got away, along with the destructive reverse-engineered alien technology weapons they bought from Adrian's business.
  • It would have been an absolute catastrophe for everyone if Vulture would have succeeded in stealing/destroying the Avengers' technology, so shortly before Infinity War. Let's take the above up a notch When Vulture realizes he can only take ONE container with him, the one he picks? The one full of Arc Reactors for the Iron Man Armors. It's been noted that the biggest problem other groups have in replicating the armor is the power source to the point where Stane WAY back in the first Iron Man film has to resort to stealing it from Tony's chest. Those reactors on the black market? Would mean an explosion of copy cat armors across the world...
  • Speaking of Infinity War... We've seen how much Peter struggled to do heroics in this film due to his inexperience. The only reason he wins against The Vulture at all is because The Vulture grabs the Villain Ball at the last second. Adrian Toomes is just an ordinary man with access to high-tech weaponry, yet Peter struggles to beat him. The next Spider-Man appearance is in Infinity War, meaning that he'll have to go up agaisnt Thanos himself who is, quite frankly, way out of his league by several magnitudes. Unless Peter took several levels in badass between this movie and Infinity War, he'd be no match against the Galactic Conqueror himself.
  • Soo, Tony basically kept the truth about the Civil War from Peter, simply calling Cap crazy. We don't know if Peter ever learned about what happened during the War. Peter never got the full story and for all we know, if he knew about the reasoning for the War, he may have sided against Tony.
  • Remember how easily Tony seemed to have figured out Peter's identity? It's probably best if Peter did stay "close to the ground" since if he ever tried to get bigger fish like HYDRA, they would discover Peter's identity just as fast if not faster than Tony did.
  • More Fridge Pity than Fridge Horror, but consider the last we see of Aaron Davis; trapped to the trunk door of his car with groceries inside. Peter says the webbing will wear off in two hours, but a deleted scene shows the sun already starting to go down... and he's still stuck to his car. Even the closing credits show him trapped for days. Poor dude spent money on groceries, some of which would have most likely gone bad by the time he's finally free.
    • Even worse, the deleted scene shows Aaron making a call with his free hand to his nephew Miles. Specifically, telling him he won't be coming back for a while. Does Miles even have anyone else to take care of him?
  • Peter had better hope like hell that Toomes never learns why the Washington Monument elevator was damaged. If Liz should happen to tell her dad that something in Ned's backpack flared up and ruptured the metal, and likewise mentions that Ned and Peter are best friends, Toomes may realize that he doesn't owe Peter for saving his daughter's life after all, because the accident wouldn't have happened in the first place if Peter hadn't given Ned the power source to carry. Hence, no more need to conceal his knowledge of Spider-Man from others.
  • While Peter is successful in keeping Toomes from stealing Stark's jet, their fight ends up ripping it apart — at one point, a whole engine falls out of the plane. Which is flying right over New York City. It's far more likely than not that it did serious damage to whatever or whoever it hit in the streets below.

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