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Fridge Brilliance
  • When Saitama begins to experience the thrill of a good fight in the first episode of the anime, you can hear his heart beating. What do we hear when Boros goes all out?

  • Garou decided to become a monster because he always figured the monsters try harder, and he was particularly angry because:
    Garou: The popular will win, the hated will lose. It's such a tragedy.
  • Many of the hero names are a little on the nose in describing a hero's defining physical characteristics or character. Many of them are hardly flattering and do not sound like something someone would choose to call themselves like "Rednose" or "Death Suspenders". The reason this is so is because the Hero Association assigns all hero names and many of their functionaries are hardly the most competent of people.
  • Even before he got his monstrous strength, Saitama was still the one punch man: when fighting the Crabman in his flashback, he only needed one attack to finish him off.
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    • Not counting the rock he threw at his head?
      • The rock clearly wasn't an attack to end the fight but a way for Saitama to turn Crablante's attention away from the kid to him
  • The relationship between King and Saitama is this somewhat. Saitama usually laments being someone who can never find a challenge, but with King he always loses at video games. King may not be the hero everyone thinks he is, but when it comes to games he's as good as Saitama is at being a hero. He may even be the Worthy Opponent Saitama was looking for, even if it's not at fighting.
  • The webcomic's artstyle might be intentional to evoke the same reaction as its protagonist. It's a good comic, but people who aren't interested (or outright avoiding it) just look at it and think "there's no way that this deserves this much attention" and might even doubt ONE's ability to draw. Which is exactly the kind of response Saitama gets In-Universe.
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  • The entire series is based around Saitama's incredible strength and his ability to destroy seemingly unkillable enemies with a single blow. His One Punch attack is clearly overpowered...you might even call it an OP attack...
  • King is touted as the World's Strongest Man, feared by most monsters, and even Tatsumaki is hesitant about confronting him. Yet he is ranked 7th among the S-class heroes. This is because he rarely does actual hero work, or to be more precise, he doesn't go out a lot to do hero stuff like slay monsters. And since hero rankings are based not only in strength, but also in accomplishments and popularity, King's rank is simply a testament of how popular he is and of the accomplishments he's done so far.
    • One of the first things that Saitama "teaches" Genos is the importance of mental fortitude and an indomitable will. In the anime, his source for this impromptu lesson is a book written by King, whose mental fortitude and indomitable will are the entire reasons why he can still be a considered a hero beyond his public status.
  • Saitama claims that the secret to his power was doing 100 push-ups, 100 sit-ups, 100 squats, and running 10 kilometers every single day for three years. This is actually a pretty moderate exercise for the average person and nothing compared to the training athletes and soldiers experience. Genos even points out that normal humans wouldn't be able to attain Saitama's level of strength through this method. However, remember that before Saitama became a hero, a man was able to transform into a crab monster just by eating a huge amount of crab. In the world of One-Punch Man, it seems that things like emotion, willpower, and desire are what grant someone their powers, not any specific training or outside forces. Suddenly, Saitama's story makes perfect sense.
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  • During the physical portion of the examination, a character remarks with horror that Saitama may have the power of a god residing in him. At first it seems like hyperbole, an exaggeration of the display he put on. Until Genos later explains that "God" is the most extreme ranking that can be given to a threat. A threat that can destroy the planet. Considering the others in the exam would have more knowledge on the workings of the Hero Association, they weren't just exaggerating. They were actually stating that Saitama has planet-busting strength and would be classified as a God-level threat if he went evil!
  • The Sky King being killed by Melzalgald and replaced with Boros might have been more than just a simple Bait-and-Switch. Since he was the conqueror of the universe, one could consider Boros the true "ruler of the skies".
  • Mumen Rider not advancing to B-Class can actually work in his favor seeing how C-Class heroes have to do some heroic deed or else they'll get kicked out of the Hero Association. It provides an incentive for Mumen Rider to continue being a hero since that restriction doesn't apply to the other ranks.
  • Why does Genos frequently use a older flip phone compared to the more impressive touch screens out there? It could have something to do with the fact that he has no fingerprints or human fingers anymore.
  • While used as a one off gag, the fact that Speed of Sound Sonic failed to become a monster proved a point. The comic takes a literal and figurative definition of the term "monster". Even though Sonic wants to become a monster, the fact that he cut apart and cooked the cell showed that he is too civilized to be a monster. He won't eat raw, living flesh like an animal. Anyone who has the characteristics of a monster will easily transition, but Sonic can never be that kind of person because he has a heart. This reflects the previous page where Bang wonders if Garou knows what it means to be a monster. This is all rather clever foreshadowing to the fact that Garou isn't and can never be a monster. As in the original Webcomic, Garou has too much humanity in him to be the monster he wants to be, just like Sonic.
  • The "Serious Series" might seem like a cop-out at first ... until you look at the animation for Saitama's normal punches. His form is completely wrong and he doesn't show any physical strain; for an ordinary person, it'd basically be the equivalent of slapping someone with a closed fist. By comparison, his "serious punch" is properly thrown and has real force behind it.
    • To further emphasize how different Saitama's regular punch is from his Serious Punch, every time Saitama punches something with his regular punch, it looks as if he's merely extending his arm and hitting the target with a closed fist without any visible effort behind it, like throwing a half-assed jab. His Serious Punch has the form of a properly thrown punch (slightly bent elbows before attacking, punching power coming from the hips and legs instead of just the arms) and seems to be one he practiced multiple times because its motions are smooth and precise.
  • It seems odd that Metal Bat began as a C-rank hero since his stats make him qualified to start out as a high B to A-rank at least. However you also notice that his intelligence is a 3. The second part of the hero exam is a written part to test your mind. Saitama broke every record in the physical test but barely passed the written one so it makes sense to conclude that Metal Bat had a similar situation.
  • Gyoro Gyoro reveals that for humans becoming monsters, being on the verge of death gives them an explosive boost in power if they can overcome it. This could possibly explain why Saitama is so unfathomably powerful because during his three years of training, he was on the verge of death almost every single day!
  • All S-Class heroes have varying degrees of Super Strength, Super Toughness, and even enhanced agility in some cases, as Required Secondary Powers, with the sole exception of Tornado, Metal Knight, and King. However, the reason why these are never brought up, beyond the fact that Saitama’s insane levels of strength, invincibility and speed overshadows them all, is because they are a byproduct of the training they endured to hone their specific skills, rather than as a result of getting stronger for the sake of getting stronger.
  • King's hero-name sound pretty on the nose at first, but once chess-motifs are applied, it goes one step deeper. The King-piece in chess is the most treasured one in a chess-game. Not only is it protected by all the other pieces, especially if the King is put in danger by the opponent's pieces. Also, if push comes to shove, it can eliminate the opponent's pieces from the game by itself, but only if the piece in question stands right in front of the King and not in a checkmate-square, while unprotected by other pieces. The opponent is always deathly-weary about going after the king-piece, due to the high risk of other pieces rushing in to take the assailant out or lose the piece to the King if put on a sacrificial spot. Marking how the King-piece is both the weakest and yet the strongest piece on the board, sans the queen.

Fridge Horror
  • During their battle Boros kicked Saitama so hard that he was sent flying to the moon. The odds of Saitama hitting the moon were extremely low (about one in 200,000), and if he hadn't, he'd just keep flying away from earth forever. And since Saitama does need to breathe, he would suffocate and die.
    • Space isn't complete vacuum. Someone as ridiculously overpowered as Saitama could literally swim in there.
    • On top of that, Saitama held his breath because he assumed he needed to. Given what actually happens if a person tries to hold their breath in a vacuum, it seems the laws of physics and biology don't really seem to actually apply to him. So maybe he doesn't need to...
  • The fact that Saitama walks into every fight knowing that he can tank planet-busting blows like light breeze across the cheek should terrify the audience, but the truly terrifying question is how does he know this?!
    • It's also terrifying thinking how strong his punches might be. His serious strike parted the sky. And that's only after it was used to stop a planet-bursting attack, meaning that it's power was considerably lessened. And, if Boros was right, Saitama didn't even strike as hard as he could. But that's not the worst, the worst is that this would still be just one punch, but his chain of punches is explicitly called "normal multiple punches", implying there's a serious version of that one too...
  • Saitama is one of (if not THE) most powerful beings on the planet. He can destroy anyone and anything with a single punch and he chooses to use this power for good. But what if he chose to be a villain instead...? You get another Boros, only this one can't be beaten.
    • Garou comes fairly close to this. He's one of the biggest parallels to Saitama the series has to offer but whereas Saitama wanted to be a hero when he was a kid, Garou wanted to be a monster. Prior to facing Saitama, he was able to defeat every hero he fought, which included more than half the S-Class, and that's without the use of his final transformation. The thing that's more "fridge" than just regular horror is that his Hero Killer title is hyperbole; he never actually killed anyone. If he had actually made an effort to finish off his targets, especially in his "unfair evil" form, every hero except for Saitama and Zombieman would probably be dead.
      • Garou isn't even comparable to Saitama, since he fights a fair fight with Metal Bat and team of S-Class heroes, especially the one including Tornado, could dispatch him
      • Troper was referring to webcomic, where Garou kicked ass and had a fair fight with Saitama.
  • Speaking of Zombieman, he has From a Single Cell regeneration with no apparent means of keeping him down for good like Melzalgald. So, much like the protagonist, he's functionally unstoppable. He could potentially have been one of the most nightmarish creatures ever conceived and being a product of the House of Evolution, it's a miracle he wasn't. Hell, had he not stopped when he did, Genus could have easily created another immortal being and made it a monster instead (he already had infinitely respawning octopi).
    • Word of God states, that if Zombieman were beaten to meat pulp, he would die.
  • The world One Punch Man takes place in is pretty horrifying once you really think about it. Monsters and villains emerge on a weekly basis, some of which have the power to destroy entire cities and kill thousands of people. In the very first episode (or chapter 3 of the manga), a giant monster appears and kills tens of thousands of people and destroys an entire city in a single blow and the incident is never mentioned again, save for a mention later in the series of slow and extensive repairs to the city. Considering how much destruction we see throughout the series, it seems pretty likely that hundreds of thousands — if not millions — of people die every year due to Demon- and Dragon-level threats. Of course, this being One Punch Man, the effects and implications of this are never really explored, but living in a world where you could get killed, lose loved ones, and/or have your city destroyed at any time seems pretty terrifying.
  • The Ninja Village is actually a facility that turns young children into emotionless killing machines for the Underworld. A single day consists of 72 hours, only 6 of which are allocated for sleeping. They were kept alive through special drugs, which also prevented them from committing suicide.
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