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Fridge Logic

  • "Love Trouble" outright manages to make its Jerkass antagonist look pleasant in comparison to the mess the protagonists make of the situation. Okay, so Montmorency is not a good person. He's conceited, flaunts with his employer's riches while he is away, likes to humiliate Mickey, and the list goes on. But there's nothing in the story to suggest that his interest in Minnie is not sincere. But her interest in him is insincere, as she only dated him to get back at Mickey for always leaving her. Whatever the truth about him - that she didn't know when she started her Operation: Jealousy - she used him. Mickey and Madeline aren't any better either. Fake-dating each other so that Mickey can manipulate his girlfriend back to him is off to begin with, but once they learn Montmorency's secret, they weaponize it. They could've had a private conversation about this with Montmorency and possibly Minnie to see how that would work out, but no, they decide to turn the knowledge into a public humiliation at one of the most prestige parties of the year. Because treating your ex's new partner badly is sure to have the ex come running back to you. Which, okay, Minnie did, but either the two took a huge risk publically humiliating her by proxy (which they had the nerve to be surprised by upset her) or they knew she wasn't actually interested in him and they chose to be complicit in using him. It's not difficult to imagine that from Montmorency's perspective, he's some sort of Gatsby and the other trio the equivalent of Tom and Daisy as members of a world that'll make certain he never belongs to.
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Fridge Horror

  • The Italian saga Once Upon a Time in America shows that Mickey's father was a billionaire who retired from business and sold his empire, and gives the exact date of the sale: October 23, 1929 (the exact words being "the day before the Crash"). Mickey Mouse's father may have triggered The Great Depression. Thankfully, the same characters that mention it (two former billionaires reduced to hobos by the Crash) imply it was still coming and that he gave a large part of his gains to charity...
  • In "The Terrible Tsunami", Enji gets his power from a genetic match with the "water genie". He himself doesn't get changed to establish the connection; it is the water that undergoes a chemical reaction. So how is feeding Enji a pill supposed to take away his powers? The only way for that to make sense is if the pill altered Enji's DNA. Slipping anyone drugs without their knowledge or consent is a whole heap of moral issues to start with, but messing with their genetic structure (and then laughing about it) is a whole 'nother level.
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  • "The Town That Hated Mickey" also features a questionable use of drugs on a villain. Mickey takes pity on Meanie for his loneliness and secretly has him drink his own Love Potion, which will make him smell in a way that people will respond with nothing but overbearing kindness to him. For one, Meanie never gave his consent and is shown to not enjoy the new attention at all, which is Played for Laughs. Secondly, and Mickey should know this from his own experience with Eau de Hate, the potions work by altering the behavior of nearby people by means of pheromones. They do nothing to change the wearer of the smell. It isn't that different from brainwashing innocent bystanders for Meanie's sake (and/or to get one over on him) and ignores the potential danger in forcing kindness from people regardless of how they are treated in return.
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  • Of course, Mickey's idealism being at odds with free will goes back all the way to "Blaggard Castle", where he was fine brainwashing Professors Ecks, Doublex, and Triplex into being good people. Certainly better than how they intended to use their invention against the rest of humankind, but still not okay. "Perils of Mickey" blasts fuel onto the fire by specifying that while the incident made the professors "good", it did not make them "sane", and so they still ended up in jail.
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