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    The Fairly OddParents 
Various characters from The Fairly OddParents underwent this trope during it's run from the original Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts to its tenth and final season.
  • During the first few seasons of the show, Timmy was portrayed as essentially a good kid who occasionally gave into his selfishness. However, he was still very likeable. However, by about the fourth or fifth season, he became a jerkass along with all the other denizens of this hellish parody of sitcom America, including his Fairy Godparents who were summoned to help him in the first place. Timmy has returned to most of his original affable characterization by the sixth season onward but it still shows up every now and again. He relapses back into it in the tenth season upon the introduction of Chloe Carmichael to be a more blatant foil to her.
  • Cosmo was originally simply The Ditz and a bit of a Cloudcuckoolander, sometimes dim but still relatively normal, and perhaps strangest of all, he and Wanda seemed to be on an equal level of airheaded and careless intelligence ("We're two halves of a whole idiot!") Starting around Season 2, he started to become increasingly dumber with each season. Now he's just The Ditz. Just look back at his character in the original Oh Yeah! Cartoons pilot — he was actually a suave and sophisticated guy, barely resembling the character he became. Also, his relationship with Wanda in Seasons 4 and 5 was the foil for a lot of marriage jokes; in a couple of episodes, he claimed to be trapped in the marriage to Wanda and that she had tricked him into it. This characteristic was toned down in Season 6, when the birth of Poof turned them into loving parents.
  • Wanda was originally portrayed as being dimmer than Cosmo, believe it or not, then at around Season 1 they shared an equal amount of intelligence. From Season 2 onwards, Wanda became simply the wiser one who chastised Timmy and Cosmo whenever they did something wrong. Then, all her jokes tend to be that she's a total nag. It was even lampshade when. The sub-plot of "Nega Timmy" was when she had to prove to Cosmo she can resist her urge to call the two out when things go wrong. This reached its culmination when the Barbarian Hero episode had her become the whip cracking Nagules. Her marriage to Cosmo also became one of the biggest sources of humor on the show, to the point where Cosmo made it appear that he was trapped in the marriage to Wanda; however, this was toned down in Season 6, when the birth of Poof brought them closer together and they are currently revamped as loving parents.
  • Timmy's parents. They go from busy and clueless to extremely negligent parents who have hinted at times that they don't truly love Timmy, and see him as a burden. This was actually the plot catalyst in an episode guest starring the late Steve Irwin as 'The Bad Parent Hunter'.
  • Vicky was originally just a bully whose worst trick was blackmailing Timmy into doing chores by revealing false evidence that he cheated on a math test or wrecked the house while his parents were out, but otherwise was depicted as being apathetic to Timmy and more complacent with sitting around watching TV. Now, she wants to Take Over the World, is ferocious enough to intimidate and whip all the other villains into shape, and goes out of her way to harm Timmy and does little to cover up her actions because no one will stop her anyway. In the early episode "The Big Problem", Vicky freaks out when Timmy goes missing under her care; although this was only out of concern for herself, at least she intended to do her job correctly. In later episodes, she plots violence against him and doesn't care about his well-being at all.
  • Jorgen Von Strangle, like Cosmo, went through two Flanderizations. He begins as a stern Terminator parody, and had little real personality apart from brutally hurting other characters and destroying things whenever he is set to do a job. His first Flanderization comes somewhere in Season 1. He becomes the boss of all fairies (which was undetermined before, and he was only assumed to have every job a higher official could have), and has more of a personality. He now has a reason to brutally harm others; he's a sadist with monstrous power and a very well defined and muscular body compared to all the other fairies. See the connection. He then shows much more enjoyment in beating, humiliating, and gloating in front of all the fairies. But in Season 6, he goes through his second Flanderization. He becomes a Plucky Comic Relief character who never uses his power in dire times, only his body. It's as though he isn't even a fairy anymore, or the boss of fairies at that. If this weren't noticeable enough, he becomes a perfect ally and even a dear friend to Timmy. They were always his closest friends, but now he doesn't even punch Cosmo anymore.
  • Trixie Tang was always the Alpha Bitch, but her early appearances suggested she had a nice side to her, and that she had a tomboyish side. Now she's just a stereotypical Alpha Bitch.
  • Tootie at first only had a schoolboy crush on Timmy, now she wants to get a law made that would make him her property and when she's cheering him at one point mentions she stalks him every night. Her crush has now grown into an obsession and while not truly evil she's become almost as bad as her sister Vicky, and it does not have to be the violent way.
  • While Mr. Crocker was always a bit crazy, in the earlier episodes his usual demeanor was more stoic and grouchy, only veering into maniacal insane behaviour when there were fairies at work. A lot of his insanity was perceived by the other characters due to him being The Cassandra, and his fairy hunting tools were more grounded in reality (for this show, anyway). Now he has a huge lab underneath the school (to the point where it's lampshaded) and he's every bit as crazy as everyone perceives him to be. Sometimes these days it seems like he can't even form a sentence without "FAIRY GODPARENTS!" in it somewhere. He also became MUCH more fond of giving students failing grades. In his earliest appearance, he was either snarky or silent when he gave kids F's. Now he's flat-out sadistic about it and it's one of the only things that makes him happy. Hell, in his first appearance, he didn't even give out Fs, but Ds. In Season 10, he undergoes another Flanderization. While he's still as manic as ever, his obsession with Fairies, his defining trait since his debut, is completely gone (unless the episode's plot requires it) to the point that he doesn't even spaz out when he notices anything magical nor does he even say his Catchphrase anymore.
  • AJ was originally just the smartest kid in Timmy's class. Now he rivals Jimmy Neutron in terms of brains— a connection that was not lost in the third Jimmy/Timmy special.
  • Chester was originally just a lower-income kid who lived in a trailer and whose father was a disgraced baseball player. Now he eats garbage and such things with so much vigor you wonder what he would do if he were rich. Also, near the beginning he appeared more down to earth in comparison to AJ, but now he's just a Dumb Blonde.
  • Every character since Season 6 onward has been getting progressively dumber. In the Season 9 episode "Let Sleeper Dogs Lie", there's jokes that make even Wanda seem dumb. The characters become even dumber still in Season 10, including Wanda, and Chloe is usually the Only Sane Man and the one who ends up saving the day.
  • Newcomer Chloe Carmichael has also gone through Flanderization. In the Season 10 premiere, she was a relatively grounded and normal young girl with few negative traits (though some see her as a bit too perfect) who could get excitable at times. In subsequent episodes, her "perfect" traits are parodied and Played for Laughs, but she has also become downright crazy and hyperactive, getting excited over even the smallest thing. She also has a tendency to use 2010 slang and memes more often.
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    Futurama 
Like most long-running sitcoms, Futurama ended up Flanderizing most of its cast.
  • Fry has gone all over the place. He started out as an ordinary 20th-century delivery boy who was cryogenically frozen for a thousand years and is just trying to adjust to an unrecognizable sci-fi future where everyone he ever knew and loved was long dead. But the writers admitted that he adapted far faster than they had planned, so they retooled him into an Idiot Hero who got progressively stupider as the show went on. But he also became more of a soulful romantic who wins Leela's affection and occasionally shows insight as a Genius Ditz. Part of this stems from the fact that the show diminished his screen time in later seasons to showcase the other characters, meaning his character wouldn't develop unless the episode was focused on him specifically.
  • Amy started out as a somewhat ditzy engineering student who was working with Professor Farnsworth on her Ph.D (only to be roped into his profit-making delivery enterprise). Her shallowness and ditziness were emphasized as she was Flanderized. Later episodes would try to fix this by addressing her intelligence again, showing how she finally earned her Ph.D and helped the Professor with some of his inventions.
  • Bender has been Flanderized multiple times in different directions. He started out as an abrasive Robot Buddy who's not really into the whole "buddy" thing. When Fry moved in with him, they introduced a gag where he muttered "kill all humans" in his sleep, which was then spun into a complete disregard for human life. He got some Character Development, showing that he once lived with a human, cared for a race of tiny orphan aliens, fell in love and partially merged his programming with a female personality, and underwent a sex change and back (twice) — only for him to be re-Flanderized into a more jokey persona.
  • Dr. Zoidberg is the show's biggest victim of Flanderization. When he was first introduced, he was a one-joke character: an alien doctor who treats humans, despite being ignorant of their biology (and oblivious to the fact). Despite this, the rest of the cast treated him like a real, respected doctor — until season 2's "Why Must I Be a Crustacean in Love?", when it's revealed that Zoidberg is considered a loser even by the standard of his own species. From then on, he became the series' Butt-Monkey, and the jokes about his medical incompetence gave way to jokes about how he's poor,note  gross, and completely unpopular with the rest of the cast.
  • Hermes started out as an Obstructive Bureaucrat, only for his character to be Flanderized into The Stoner. Earlier pot jokes tended to be a lot more subtle — the kind of thing that only adults would get.note  In later seasons, he was openly a stoner and even seemed to be giving up on his beloved bureaucracy just to get high. The fact that he's Jamaican didn't help matters. He also picked up an Irrational Hatred at Zoidberg (irrational at least for the series' standards) in parallel with that character's own Flanderization.
  • Leela started out as the archetypal captain figure, the only sane Action Girl who despite her own quirks could run a crew comprised of the idiots who make up Planet Express. But she was Flanderized into a quirkier, but less competent character; in some ways, it even resembled outright Chickification, as she became more naive and sheltered, and more easily hurt or exploited by male characters. Simultaneously, she also became more impulsive and violent, which was particularly jarring because she was previously so calm and level-headed — indeed, one "Anthology of Interest" short explored what would happen if she was violent and impulsive.
  • Kif was originally presented as a straight man to the overbearing incompetence, loutishness, and immaturity of Zapp Brannigan — a far more competent second-mate who is forced to serve a nitwit in a completely unjust hierarchy. As the series progresses, however, and he moves out of Zapp's shadow, Kif becomes an increasingly pathetic figure who it's hard to imagine would be any better in a leadership position — completely weak and neurotic in every possible way.

    King of the Hill 
King of the Hill is unusual for giving flatter characters new aspects, then focusing too hard on them, thus creating the sense of Flanderization at the same time as they get Character Development.
  • Protagonist Hank Hill goes back and forth, as his characterization depends on the writer. According to this article, some of the writing staff (including creator Mike Judge) consider Hank the Only Sane Man who has a slight but open preference for the Good Old Ways, but others like a Flanderized version of him who is so uptight and resistant to change that in "Get Your Freak Off", he comes off as more Amish than the Amish. Oddly, both of these characterizations are departures from his portrayal in the series pilot, where Hank was polite but short-tempered (to the point that his other Catchphrase was "I'm gonna kick your ass!"), while the mainline series portrays him as a near pushover.
  • Peggy started out as reasonably competent but somewhat overconfident, only to be Flanderized into a total egomaniac who boasts about her "high" I.Q. and falls well short of that mark. The writers made a nominal attempt to fix this in "Peggy's Fan Fair", giving Hank an opportunity to call her out, but her egomania was also ramped Up to Eleven and never made it back down. She also picked up a propensity to take innumerable odd jobs; it made sense in small quantities in earlier episodes (she's a substitute teacher, so she has extra time and possibly a need for extra money), but her Flanderized version has gone through more jobs than Homer Simpson.
  • Bobby started out as a late bloomer but otherwise an ordinary kid: he was immature and impressionable, but in some ways wiser than his straitlaced family. His immaturity and impressionability eventually became the entirety of his character. He also went from a kid who regularly watched and played sports (football, baseball, soccer, wrestling) to being so bad at and ignorant of sports that Hank has to explain to him what a first down is (it's Texas, he should know this).
  • Luanne went through two. She started out as a dim bulb who grew up in a trailer park, but was a competent Wrench Wench who was going to community college to break free of her redneck roots. Not too long after, she suffered her first flanderization and Took a Level in Dumbass (while this is often blamed on Lucky, she got dumber years before Lucky's introduction). Then her second flanderization happened and she fell in love with and married Lucky and now she's basically Lucky's wife.
  • Joseph Gribble started out as an average kid, just a little more intelligent and athletic than Bobby. Then he hit puberty and became a bit awkward as he adjusted to his new body. Then he got Flanderized and not only became more awkward, but inexplicably became so dumb that he wouldn't have been out of place in Beavis and Butt-Head.
  • John Redcorn went back and forth. He started out as a one-note Chick Magnet (who's having sex with Dale's wife), but developed into a New Age healer with hidden musical depths. But when it became funny for his lyrics to be influenced by random mood swings, he was Flanderized into a total crybaby with no emotional control.
  • Dale Gribble started out as a rather paranoid Conspiracy Theorist. After a few seasons, he turned into a completely psychotic idiot who would be so afraid of some weird, outlandish danger, he would put himself and everyone around him in real danger. Lampshaded in one episode, where Dale admits that if not for Hank, he would have gotten himself killed long ago.

    My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic 
  • Even My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic has several examples:
    • In his first few appearances, Big Macintosh spoke normally but also said "eeyup" a couple times, sort of as a Catchphrase. As time went on, Big Mac morphed into The Quiet One, only saying "eeyup" or "nope," and virtually nothing else. The few times he does articulately talk past the third season or so are treated as a big deal.
    • "Too Many Pinkies" parodies this, as a bunch of clones of Pinkie Pie are extremely flanderized versions of Pinkie. The original Pinkie is the Life of the Party and would often get carried away, but made attempts to rein in her craziness out of respect for her friends, or if she has crossed some sort of line. The clones are mindless and hyperactive, only capable of wrecking Ponyville and chanting "FUN! FUN! FUN!". Pinkie was also originally written as a bit of a Cloudcuckoolander, often being airheaded and non-serious, but as the series progressed, these traits became more and more exaggerated, to the point where episodes often had her screeching at the top of her lungs and being completely wild and outrageous for no reason other than comic relief. Furthermore, episodes would occasionally bring the story to a complete halt, just to let Pinkie make a joke. This was most prominent in episodes that did not directly involve her in the story, such as "Filli Vanilli".
    • Fluttershy was originally quiet and timid, but was capable of showing moments of bravery and assertiveness when the situation called for it, like when she made a dragon break down crying in "Dragonshy". Later on, she became increasingly blunt and even outright Cruel to Be Kind when it came to helping her friends or standing up for herself, like when her Brutal Honesty made Rainbow Dash's depression over Tank's hibernation worse in "Tanks for the Memories".
    • Twilight Sparkle was initially a fairly lucid if prudish student who simply had poor social skills. As episodes passed, her geeky, finicky qualities are exaggerated more and more, giving her Super OCD qualities and a tendency for neurotic snit fits. Due to her acerbic qualities having faded, this makes her more naive and hammy. This eventually became so bad that the last season made it a specific point of an episode to de-flanderize her and bring her back down to her season 1 personality in order to rationalize why she was allowed to become the country's next monarch.
    • Inverted for Applejack, who was originally more a Hot-Blooded cowgirl, with most of her Aesops concerning her occasionally self-righteous or short-fused demeanor. Although she did mellow out into a more laid back Team Mom and has been the most likely to convey a "normal" point of view, she still does get occasional Character Checks to her original personality.

    South Park 
South Park has had several severe Flanderizations. In general, it quickly evolved from an irreverent adult show about kids to a biting political satire, with the adults taking as important a role as the kids. Season 12 is considered a particular turning point, marking Bill Hader's introduction to the writing team; nearly every episode became political and extremely topical, and yet somehow targeted more toward teenagers. The political element is reflected in some characters' Flanderizations as they start to voice different political viewpoints: Stan became the moderate liberal (like his creators), Kyle became the moderate conservative, Wendy became the hard-left militant feminist, and Cartman became the alt-right Politically Incorrect Villain.
  • Stan started out as the Only Sane Man, but still childlike and mean-spirited (compare his treatment of Butters between early and late seasons). Then his maturity and intelligence were exaggerated to the point that he outclasses most of the adults, but he also became bitter and cynical, griping at everything around him so much that fans are sharply divided on whether to agree with him. He's also become more wangsty and impulsive, looking disturbingly like his father Randy.
  • Kyle went from being the voice of reason and a contrast to Cartman's impulsive nastiness to a prudish, stuck-up genius defined by his rivalry with Cartman. He also became a Butt-Monkey, almost to Butters' level.
  • Cartman is an interesting case, as his Flanderization into a cartoonish villain led to his becoming a much more competent and cunning character than how he started out. He began as a selfish, impulsive kid who could never think beyond his momentary desires, but became The Chessmaster whose evil was entirely premeditated. He began as a whiny brat who could only sway his mother, but became a master manipulator who can play huge crowds like a fiddle. He began as Kyle's friend (well, in the sense that he's The Friend Nobody Likes) and became his mortal enemy. He began as a mild anti-Semite, making fun of Kyle for not celebrating Christmas just to get a rise out of him, but became a full-on neo-Nazi who admires Hitler and tries to instigate his own Holocaust.
  • Wendy Testaburger started out as little more than a prepubescent Hello Nurse character whom Stan had a mild crush on. The Movie exaggerated Stan's infatuation with her, and Wendy herself Took a Level in Badass and became the single most awesome person in the whole school, who could take down even Cartman. But the problem was that she also became a Soapbox Sadie, as the writers used her as a mouthpiece for their harder left-wing viewpoints.
  • Butters started out as just one of the many "weird" kids. He became an Unpopular Popular Character with occasional moments of brilliance. He also became the show's most extreme Butt-Monkey and in particular picked up a Hilariously Abusive Childhood, as his parents were themselves Flanderized into abusers who seem to punish Butters for merely existing.
  • Stan's father Randy started out as one of the smartest characters on the show, but with a "wild side" and an inability to catch up to fads or pop culture, both borne out of his desire to connect with his son. He was Flanderized into a Knight Templar Parent who would spearhead the other parents' hysteria of the episode, before becoming a hyperactive, paranoid, and idiotic Manchild (which is oddly some fans' favorite version of the character).
    • Season 23 Flanderized him again by upping all of his negative traits, such as his selfishness, cowardice, tendency to overreact and railroad his family into going along with his harebrained schemes, and other Jerkass tendencies, while jettisoning his love for his family and other positive traits, turning him into an emotionally abusive, sociopathic Corrupt Corporate Executive who would do anything to keep his hold on the town’s weed monopoly and is willing to murder people to weasel his way out of bad situations.
  • The show's fastest Flanderization happened in season 20 to the newly-introduced Member Berries, talking sentient fruits whose original gimmick was making people reminisce about the past by reciting innocuous (and some not-so-innocuous) pop culture trivia from The '80s. It took only a couple of episodes for them to be Flanderized into exclusively referencing Star Wars (possibly as a lead-up to the joke about bringing back "the real Stormtroopers"), before their plot line was abruptly dropped.
  • Kenny’s perverted tendencies shave also been upped, turning him from a mild Covert Pervert who was slightly more knowledgeable about sex than the other boys to a hedonistic Dirty Kid who collects mountains of porn and tries to have sex with women whenever he can. Kenny's an interesting case, considering that besides that he might be the one who went through the most Character Development otherwise. Also, his interest for sex has been towned down or not focused on as much over time.

    SpongeBob SquarePants 
SpongeBob SquarePants characters have been flanderized most noticably from its un-cancellation in 2005 to the release of the second movie. Some post-movie episodes still flanderize the characters, however.
  • In the pre-Season 4 episodes, SpongeBob was characterized as a playful, naive, eccentric and happy-go-lucky Manchild who was optimistic, energetic and childlike to a fault. He would make most decisions on a whim and was mostly oblivious to how annoying and at times disruptive his unorthodox shenanigans were to his nextdoor neighbour Squidward and the Bikini Bottom public at large. He always wanted to make friends with and help out everyone in Bikini Bottom - regardless of whether they liked it or not - with varying results. To some Bikini Bottom citizens, he came across as a caring and generous Nice Guy with a heart of gold, and to others an over-the-top, clownish nuisance. Despite his actions often having chaotic consequences, SpongeBob always had good intentions and was very eager to please.
    • And then came his Flanderization, which exaggerated every aspect of his personality and turned him into a gratuitously obnoxious, moronic, deranged toddler as opposed to the zany, enthusiastic Cloudcuckoolander he was in the first three seasons. He became extremely hyperactive and over-emotional, with a higher-pitched voice, a more shrill laugh and a tendency to burst into tears far more often, and for longer. His treatment of Squidward became stalker-level creepy, his antics crazier and more dangerous and his mindset considerably more ignorant and childish to the point where any remaining trace of his adulthood vanished entirely.
      • The reason he can't drive was changed as well. When it's first revealed that he failed the test 38 times, it's apparently because he gets nervous behind the wheel and panics. In newer episodes, he's a Giftedly Bad driver who puts everyone in danger behind the wheel to the point where he's a Sponge of Mass Destruction.
      • Furthermore, the number of driving tests he's failed was bumped up from 38 times in the first season to over a million later on; even the plot details have exhibited a strange combination of Flanderization and Retcon.
      • And then there are episodes like "A Pal for Gary" and "Choir Boys", where he's portrayed as actually cruel to Gary (due to his obliviousness) and Squidward (whom he attacked on purpose) respectively.
  • Patrick Star underwent two Flanderizations:
    • Patrick started out as an eccentric and fun-loving oddball who was slightly slow on the uptake but mostly intelligent (he even helped SpongeBob almost pass his boating test for the first time ever through radio; he immediately realized that Sandy's treedome was dangerous due to its lack of water; he was also able to pick up on Squidward's animosity towards him and SpongeBob, while SpongeBob was completely oblivious to it).
    • His first Flanderization, starting from the end of the first season, made him a lot more dim-witted and immature, sometimes stating bizarre non-sequiturs like "Is mayonnaise an instrument?". The animators accentuated his decrease in intelligence by giving him thicker, goofier eyebrows. In the second through fourth seasons his intelligence varies wildly; in one episode for example, he forgets he's eaten a chocolate bar only a few seconds after eating it, while in another he demonstrates the ability to pass a driving test after one try. He would also make an unusually intellectual statement once in a while, such as "The inner machinations of my mind are an enigma".
    • His second Flanderization, first noticable in the fifth season and really becoming apparent in the sixth, resulted in him becoming one of the dumbest characters on television, his actions even becoming dangerous sometimes. Recent seasons have also made Patrick take multiple levels of jerkassery; in older episodes, Patrick was dumb, but nice and kind to his friends, and occasionally acted like a jerk, but it was hinted that he was just too dumb to realize what he was doing is wrong, but his jerkassary became much worse and much more frequent, up to Fat Bastard territory, going by the way he treats SpongeBob and Squidward on several occasions, to the point where he arguably admits his stupidity is deliberate in "The Card" after walking through a whole bunch of dangerous places with a Mermaid Man trading card.
  • Mr. Krabs went from being a typical greedy yet usually well-intentioned boss to being borderline Faux Affably Evil with an over-exaggerated Money Fetish who would go through several kinds of hell just to retrieve a single penny. One newer episode portrayed him as more obsessed with money as an object rather than for its value. While his greed was always prominent, he had some feasible redeeming aspects and morals to balance it out, his fatherly role with SpongeBob and Pearl for example. In later episodes, aside from some Jerkass qualities, his money-lust seems to be his sole defining trait, though this depends on the writer. It's also worthwhile noting that in earlier seasons, Krabs usually did receive his comeuppance every now and then with his (sometimes morally questionable) schemes. In later seasons, this is the total opposite — Krabs is practically one of the biggest examples of Karma Houdini, considering that he somehow gets away scot-free with anything he does in those seasons (ranging from theft to poisoning his customers to even driving people to suicide), sometimes leaving someone to take the blame/pay the price. There are even times near the end of some episodes when it looks like Krabs is about to receive his comeuppance (or in rare cases, actually does), but something happens at the end that puts the situation in Krabs' favor, if not lets him escape punishment entirely. On the other hand, he's been punished for his crimes in episodes such as "Patty Caper" and "The Cent of Money", and SpongeBob even calls him out for it on one occasion.
  • Squidward's Butt-Monkey role was transformed from mere Laser-Guided Karma to a mix of outright Comedic Sociopathy and Kafka Komedy, with nearly every entity in Bikini Bottom genuinely out to make him miserable. This could be considered Character Development since it made his Jerkass (admittedly with a Heart of Gold) demeanor far more justified. Squidward's hatred of SpongeBob has also been Flanderized, though. For example, in "Christmas Who?", he gives away everything he owns so that SpongeBob won't cry. In a later-season episode, when SpongeBob bursts into tears after Squidward convinces him that he can no longer laugh or smile again, Squidward just walks away with a smirk, saying "Oh, I hate it when he's sad. But I hate it even MORE when he's happy" (Though in that episode, he takes it back when he decides SpongeBob 's crying is worse than his laughter and tells SpongeBob the truth to make at least make it stop). He also flies off the handle too easily and screams nearly every time he's on screen. Seriously, you'd be hard-pressed to find any post-movie episode where Squidward goes for more than 40 seconds without shouting his head off at SpongeBob or anything else that annoys him in the slightest.
  • Sandy, originally a science geek with Only Sane Man tendencies, eventually gained a self-awareness of her many talents and evolved into a rowdy Ted Baxter. They've also completely phased out her Texas Cowgirl tendencies for her scientist role, despite that her inventor traits were almost mute over the first few seasons.
    • While Sandy's strength was very prominent early on, post-movie episodes tend to put very little focus on her strength and concentrate more on her intelligence.
  • Plankton's Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain role, to the point where he is arguably more likeable than his nemesis. His sentient computer 'wife', Karen's Deadpan Snarker mannerisms have also been upped to eleven.
  • Originally, Mrs. Puff was just a No Respect Guy who didn't want to have to deal with SpongeBob's bad driving. Then she tried to murder SpongeBob in one episode after what she felt was the last straw (which apparently only lasted until the end).
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    Other 
  • Many of the characters in The Amazing World of Gumball began taking rather large levels of jerkass in season 2, with Darwin being the most notable offender. On the flip side, Darwin also showed an increase in intelligence, as he was sometimes the first one to call out Gumball whenever they were doing something they weren't supposed to. He isn't as bad as he was in season 3, but he still has he moments.
    • Gumball Watterson had his selfish moments in season 1, but he was still a nice and likable kid. However, he began showing signs of jerkass in season 2, and it seems to have become fully expressed in season 3 but toned down since Season 4 but it varies in Season 5 depending on writer. His intelligence is more moderate as seasons gone by to the point he aced an exam by studying.
    • Nicole always had an extremely short temper since the series started, but it's gotten to the point where she practically turns into the Incredible Hulk or portrays monstrous habits when she gets pushed too far as of season 2.
  • Roger's affinity for costumes and dress up acts in American Dad!, to the point some take over his personality. His Jerkass traits also initially just came with the quirkiness of his personality and were much more toned down. As time progressed, his callousness is canonically accepted as his defining trait (to the point he'll actually die without acting consistently cruel). Most of his complexities from early episodes such as his loneliness and the fact he is an extraterrestrial are barely referred to in favor of making him essentially a cross-dressing version of Peter Griffin.
    • This seems to be downplayed in the last season of the original run on FOX, as Roger is hardly shown and is seen joining in for the most part with the other characters and acting less like a sociopath (that is until the last episode before the move to TBS, in which Roger did nothing in that episode but be as loathsome and sociopathic as he could be).
    • The flanderization of Roger’s jerkassery and sociopathy became more and more obvious with each passing season but around seasons 7 through 9, the writers somehow decided to make Roger as despicable as possible and decided to have Roger flat out commit heinous crimes without any second thoughts in many episodes. In this case the flanderization on Roger’s jerkiness is so blatant in those seasons that it can’t possibly be seen as anything but intentional.
      • Klaus, while somewhat pitiful at first due to his transformation, was more upbeat and quite the Jerkass at times. As episodes progressed, his depression and loneliness kicked in more and more, along with becoming more and more a consistent Butt-Monkey from the Smiths' neglect and abuse. However, it should be noted he is still treated with a lot more respect and dignity by the family, the writers and the fans in comparison to say, Meg from Family Guy.
      • A big part of Klaus's character in early seasons was his sexual obsession with Francine, which has completely vanished over time. Two particular episodes seem to indicate where Klaus gave up and where Francine started disliking him: "Finances with Wolves", where Klaus gets a human body and tries to seduce Francine (and she finds out) and "Big Trouble in Little Langley" where Francine commits Snub by Omission after the house catches fire and, when she tries to correct her mistake, is told by an angry Klaus "Too fucking late." Admittedly this may have been for the best, as before then he was, like Roger above, a German version of Brian Griffin.
    • Early episodes have brief scenes that imply Principal Lewis had a checkered past, but overall he was shown as a responsible and respectable educator. Later episodes make him a wildly irresponsible drug addict who could never behave in an appropriate manner, even around students. Some saw it as a good thing, as he was a fairly generic character. But you'll likely see more people say that said change made him a far more annoying character (the increased number of appearances he got post-Flanderization didn't help either). Lampshaded in one episode post-Flanderization where Steve outright says "I have a hard time believing you're an educator, Brian."
    • Steve's obsession with losing his virginity as well as his bratty nature became his main defining traits in the show's later seasons.
    • Hayley seems to have suffered an almost reverse-Flanderization: In the beginning, she was always expressing her leftist views; as the series went on, she was seen less and less, and when she was seen, she would just be used to deliver exposition, or as the butt of jokes with her husband Jeff. However, in exchange for her being less obnoxiously vocal about her liberal ideals, she's also become more of an emotionally unstable hypocrite. Her mood-swings are so massive that she terrified Stan and Francine throughout her teenage years, and whenever a boy breaks up with her (as opposed to her breaking up with him), she goes into such a rampage that she needs to be tranquilized to avoid destroying the immediate area.
    • Stan was always something of a bumbling sociopath, but it originated more from his ego and right wing extremities, and at times he diverged from Seth MacFarlane's traditional Bumbling Dad role by proving to have Hidden Depths and some amount of tact (to the point of having spaced moments he was actually right about something). As time passed however, the necessity for Stan to learn An Aesop every episode led to him becoming increasingly moronic and childish, and his Badass CIA agent qualities have been increasingly degraded in favor of making him a borderline Straw Loser for the rest of the Smiths. Basically Stan evolved from a slightly smarter right wing Peter Griffin to just being another Peter Griffin.
  • Haley Long in American Dragon: Jake Long went from being a slightly above average intelligence, slightly precocious, generally well behaved 8 year old girl in season 1, to an absolute Child Prodigy Attention Whore Annoying Younger Sibling who loves rubbing her brother's nose in her achievements by season 2. She also has almost physical revulsion to the idea of misbehavior in season 2 whereas by contrast in season 1 she didn't bat a eye lid at sneaking out with Jake to go to a rock concert.
  • The characters in An American Tail don't get too flanderized in the movies, except maybe for Tiger becoming a dim-witted coward throughout the sequels, but this may be forgiven because he wasn't given much screentime to develop in the first movie. However in the TV series Fievel's American Tails, flanderization affects nearly all of the characters. Fievel's fascination with the wild west becomes a complete obsession that nearly defines his entire character, Tiger becomes cowardly and a complete imbecile (amped up much further than in any of the movies), Cat R. Waul goes from being Affably Evil to the Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain, the list goes on.
  • Norbert and Daggett of The Angry Beavers. Daggett was always the less intelligent of the two, even in season 1, but he still sometimes had moments of brilliance such as in the episode Bug-A-Boo, or Euro Beavers. However, by the show's final season, Daggett devolved into a complete hulking moron. In the episode The Loogie Hawk, he can't even locate the elusive hawk even after reading a sign that says, "LOOGIE HAWK: RIGHT THIS WAY". Norbert, on the other hand, being the older brother regularly picked on Daggett throughout the series, but usually in a playful way. By season 5, Norb had become downright mean towards Dag. In the episode Specs Appeal, he actually cons Dag out of his own money, even though Norb has his own stash of billions of dollars in a secret vault.
  • Angry Birds Toons:
  • Yakko, Wakko, and Dot Warner of Animaniacs started out as Karmic Tricksters who only torment and harm those who have been rude or cruel to them, but several of the later episodes have them bother and harm people unprovoked and be pests just for shits and giggles. One example that stands out is in "Back in Style", where they are loaned out to guest star in parodies of other cartoons and are complete jerkasses to the cartoons' main characters when their only conceivable crime is being made by studios other than Warner Bros.
  • In the first half of Season 1 of Archer Cheryl goes from being unstable and mildly neurotic to insane and psychopathic. She's actually funnier and more endearing post-Flanderization.
    • Another positive example happened with Pam: she goes from complete lonely and pathetic sad sack to the biggest badass in the cast.
    • ISIS itself was Flanderized: in early seasons, they were a somewhat dysfunctional but still competent organization. As the series progressed, they became a full blown Incompetence, Inc. with all their missions ending in complete failure and resorting to increasingly harebrained schemes to stay afloat.
  • Arthur:
    • In the later seasons Arthur went from being an average kid with an active imagination, to becoming a super serious character with almost no personality. Barely any episodes of his own show focus on him now because of this, and when they do, he often acts even more out of character. He is now often used as a voice of reason for his friends.
    • D.W. has gotten a similar treatment, with many of her personality traits being downplayed in later episodes.
    • The Brain went from being an incredibly smart kid who still liked things other kids did, to being someone who can't accept almost anything unrealistic.
    • Sue Ellen went from being a tough, but friendly, kind, and the only student capable of intimidating Binky, to being someone unable to stand up for herself when bullied.
  • In Aqua Teen Hunger Force Master Shake’s laziness, ego, and delusional view of the world were upped as the series went on. The first season had him as the only Aqua Teen to try to get things done in spite of his own laziness and, while he did have a big ego, much of it seemed to stem from him viewing being a detective as a serious job even if he often jumped to conclusions, while later seasons have him as a lazy bum who lounges around the house and refuses to do even the most minor of tasks, believes in things that are utterly nonsensical even by the standards of the series, and can’t go a second without bragging about non-existent achievements.
  • In the first season of Ballmastrz: 9009, Duleena "D.D." Duneeda had a violent temper, but it was only triggered by at least some level of anger. Come season 2, she's freaking out every other sentence with no negative triggers (in the third episode, she goes into rage mode over a hug and ice cream).
  • In the transition from Barnyard to Back at the Barnyard, Freddy's attempts to suppress his urges to eat his friend Peck (as Freddy is a ferret and Peck is a rooster) evolved from a minor gag in the film to a recurring trait.
  • In Beast Wars, Silverbolt began as an idealistic, over-the-top Paladin-type who followed chivalry and loyalty to often comedic extremes. His relationship with Blackarachnia nearly took over his character by the third season, though it was written with some level of competency. More egregious is Blackarachnia's overnight transformation from Dark Action Girl who, oh, had a boyfriend into a romantic who would stop at nothing, including disloyalty and downright foolishness to get her lover back in Beast Machines. For that matter everybody in Beast Machines underwent some Flanderization as compared to Beast Wars.
  • Beavis and Butt-Head started out as immature, Jerkass, not-particularly-bright teenage delinquents. Eventually the "not particularly bright" part of their characters consumed them—Beavis became The Ditz, while Butt-Head was only The Smart Guy compared to Beavis. They both go through life completely oblivious to the world around them and ignore important things said to them to point out sexual innuendoes. This made them much funnier. In the revival, there's a case of a De-Flanderized trait; Beavis and Butt-Head, while their stupidity remains, are genuinely seen as smarter and more self-aware of the world.
    • The 2011 revival, however, did have one Flanderization; B&B's metalhead roots have been downplayed a lot. While the original incarnations were prone to burst into random Air Guitar sessions at times, the newer incarnations do not go far beyond the AC/DC and Metallica shirts they wear. However, this is pretty much justified by comparing how relevant Heavy Metal was in 1993 against 2011.
  • Ben 10 has an unusual case of an inanimate object being flanderized over the course of the show's run. The Omnitrix's tendency to turn Ben into the wrong alien or time out at exactly the wrong moment is slowly exaggerated over the course of the show's run; in early episodes, it's fairly reliable, only doing this once every few episodes, with the implication being that Ben's inexperience with and ignorance of a mysterious and complex alien device is the culprit. In later seasons, the watch screws him over so many times in a single episode that one can't help but wonder if it hasn't developed both sentience and a malicious sense of humor. It could even be a case of Fridge Brilliance if the device has indeed gained a mind of its own. The Omnitrix could be subtly training him, thinking "Yes, I'm sure that powerset would be the perfect way to get you out of this mess. However, let's see how creative you can be if I instead, hand you this powerset." Doesn't hurt for Ben to not become too set in his ways of thinking how to use these powers, after all.
    • In the first two seasons of Alien Force, Gwen was initially a calm, soft-spoken and responsible person who is less snarky, but has occasional Tsundere outbursts. By the third season onwards she more consistently acts as an sternly serious, moody, headstrong, hot-headed, stubborn, snarky and occasionally aggressive person who becomes easily irritated.
    • Kevin changed a lot with time. At first he was a delinquent that stole Ben's powers but then, by Alien Force, he becomes completely the opposite. He is overly responsible after recovering from his dark past, falls in love with Gwen on the first scene and is ready to give his life for any minimal chance to help Ben find his grandpa. In other words, he became a very nice dude, trying to be with the good guys and become a Plumber. This, of course, is all forgotten by season 3. Right on the first episode, Kevin tries to hack the Omnitrix (both he and Ben should've known better), he keeps self-loathing about his form and blames it on Gwen, and he sells weapons on war and never tells Ben and Gwen about it.
      • He was flanderized again in Omniverse. Kevin loves cars, but in this iteration, it is just ridiculous; he talks about machines and cars almost the time. It is even revealed in a flashback sequence that he even agreed to marry a female Thanagarian princess just to get the perfect engine for his car.
    • Ben himself was Flanderized in an Ultimate Alien episode where his ten-year-old self appeared. Somehow, ten-year-old Ben is even less well behaved than how he was back in the original series.
    • Indeed, in later episodes of Ultimate Alien, his teenage self has turned into a Brilliant, but Lazy, Attention Whore, It's All About Me Jerkass, who only gets serious in the last ten minutes of the episode.
    • Amazingly, Ben 10: Omniverse put it even further by flanderizing his younger incarnation again. 10 year old Ben back in the original series was an immature brat, sure, but he would get serious when actual danger showed up and show a more mature, softer side on occasion. Omniverse portrays Ben (who is 11 years old) in the flashback sequences as more obnoxious, bumbling, immature, and even more of a Jerkass than he was in Ultimate Alien.
      • Omniverse slowly pushed Ben out of the flanderizing traits he developed in Ultimate Alien, as evidenced with the episode "Malefactor." Ben used to be all about fame, but here, he calls out a fan for not realizing that his job involves a very real sense of danger.
      • This sadly wasn't permanent; in later episodes, his flanderization comes back especially in the third story arc: he neglects the danger represented by his own Arch-Enemy in "Vilgax Must Croak", starts acting cocky again, and his Character Rerailment is generally undone. Even the Omnitrix is flanderized further when it turns out it has an entire function to cause Ben to turn randomly into various aliens without any control.
  • Grandpa, and several other characters, get this bad in The Boondocks. While Huey was always the reasonable one in the show, seasons 1 and 2 saw the Idiot and Smart Ball passed around fairly evenly. Grandpa was a hard working, well-meaning person who occasionally did stupid things due to lack of foresight and bad luck. However his character was solid enough that he could drop anvils on shady characters like Uncle Ruckus and A Pimp Named Slickback, and words of wisdom to Huey believably. By season 3, it's clear he's an idiot, and by season 4, he's the worst regularly occurring black person on the show and only a handful of steps away from being a black Homer Simpson. (By that time however, creator Aaron McGruder was no longer attached to the program, so it could be argued that everyone's writing suffered.)
  • Cat from CatDog went from being a rough-skinned but overall friendly brother who genuinely cared about Dog whenever he's been humiliated to a greedy Jerk with a Heart of Jerk who often abuses the poor guy just for shits and giggles. Conversely, Dog went from a Kindhearted Simpleton who was oblivious to the torment he caused Cat to a Psychopathic Manchild who often puts his brother through hell without any second thoughts.
  • Scoutmaster Lumpus from Camp Lazlo was initially characterized as something akin to Squidward; a stern and grouchy but amiable fellow who just wanted peace and quiet from Lazlo's antics. In later episodes, he became a selfish, dull-witted, and irresponsible Jerkass Psychopathic Man Child who couldn't care less about Camp Kidney's outstandingly poor quality. It got to the point where Joe Murray said Slinkman was the real scoutmaster of the later seasons in all but job title. This made Lumpus a lot funnier though.
    • As Lumpus took levels in Jerkass and Dumbass, Lazlo Took a Level in Kindness. He was initially a SpongeBob-like character; optimistic, eccentric, and often annoying to everyone but his friends. Later episodes played up his optimism making him an almost hippie-like All-Loving Hero with his Idiot Hero tendencies being a smaller part of him. Weirdly, this may be because Lazlo became less of the main character over time and more of The Face of the show as later episodes tended to focus on the rest of the cast with Lazlo either not appearing at all or only having a few lines.
  • Panini from Chowder — yeah, you wouldn't think it judging from the short run, but... compare her actions towards Chowder in "Chowder's Girlfriend", where she was just simply clingy and overeager about her love, to the 2nd season episode "Panini for President", where she practically goes insane and flatout admits that she wanted to be president so she can pass laws making Chowder "her property." This is lampshaded by Panini saying "I need a new hobby." after being rejected by Chowder in an episode. In her first appearance, she actually rejects Chowder when he asks her out, saying that "I need my space." Yet the Panini seen in later episodes seems determined to be around Chowder at all times.
    • Chowder himself too, having transformed from a typical naive little boy to a flat-out dumbass.
    • Mung's wife Truffles became much more abrasive and mean in the second season to the point where CH Greenblatt himself felt she had virtually no redeeming qualities. This might be because she made less significant appearances in those seasons as Greenblatt felt there was little entertainment to come out of such an unlikeable character.
  • Clarence:
    • The titular character being naive and clueless was always his sole deeming personality, but earlier episodes had him being a rather naive imaginative child with few standards. Overtime, though, his naivety became over exaggerated in later episodes of the second half of first season (depending on the episode) where he became more ostensibly stupid, becomes over saturated with Karma Houdini and Idiot Houdini, where he gets into trouble-making, especially with Sumo as sole subject, and will often get away without facing any consequences or some type of punishment to start with. However, a small amount of episodes can be easily taken back on the actions he made.
    • Jeff went from being an OCD, yet a well intented boy with a few set of standards and morals to lay upon, to being a borderline self-centered narcissistic, egotistic jerk that would use Clarence as pawn just to being desperate to attention to all of the other kids, to whom they don't find him cool or that interesting at all. However, the second and third seasons made him less of a jerk, sticking to his original roots of being moral to subjects, and had gotten used to Clarence and Sumo, based on their hijinks.
    • Sumo originally started off as well intentioned streetwise kid who had no intention of being a troublemaker (depending on the episode). He later becomes a borderline insane freak and a troublemaker who, along with Clarence, will go through all kinds of hell just the shill to start trouble with nearly everyone around, although his over exaggerated insane instincts were always his sole defining trait that he has until at least recently.
    • Belson. From time to time, in the second half of the first one, he came more over a jerkass mostly to Clarence and nearly everyone else, while in Season 2, he was slightly demoted into alone playing with with portable game console.
  • Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs: Baby/Chicken Brent has the catchphrase of "Uh-oh" from his time as the mascot of the Baby Brent Sardine company. In the first film, he says it pretty often. The sequel, on the other hand, he says it so much it's reached Verbal Tic levels.
  • Codename: Kids Next Door Flanderizes several characters:
    • Numbuh Three (Kuki Sanban)'s ditziness. Originally, she was at least as useful as the others (albeit scatterbrained), but soon became a hyperactive ditz who's only useful when Rainbow Monkey dolls are the case.
    • Numbuh Four (Wally Beetles)'s stupidity. Originally, he was actually somewhat smart, he'd only lose control of himself when angry or afraid, such as in "Operation P.I.A.N.O." or "Operation L.I.C.E.". By the second season, he's become so stupid that however he even managed to get past second grade is a mystery. Painfully obvious if you've seen the first few seasons of the show, in which he was slow-witted and aggressive, but not dumb, and a pretty decent fighter. As the series went on, he can't even spell now and his "fighting skills'' are all an Informed Ability. It was thankfully reverted in the Distant Finale where he's a very successful doctor.
  • Cosmic Quantum Ray uses this for pretty all much of their characters, but Robbie's school friends especially. Allison is probably the most blatant, as pretty much everything she says revolves around either her being a vegetarian or her love of animals. This is because the show relies on Status Quo Is God, so the characters rarely develop because they have their minds wiped since they can't learn about Robbie's job as hero for reasons, but you'd think a show about teaching scientific concepts would be a little better with this.
  • Courage the Cowardly Dog:
    • Katz is an odd example. In his early appearances ("A Night at the Katz Motel" and "Klub Katz") his evil misdeeds were completely For the Evulz and certainly came to be disturbing and solidly creepy, but later, with attempts to kill people certainly had reason to do so, and indeed in "Ball of Revenge" seems to have become a little more affable to ally with his old foe Eustace to eliminate Courage.
    • Speaking of Eustace, he might as well be the epitome of this trope in the whole show. While Eustace has always started off as a greedy, selfish jerk, he was mostly just annoyed and indifferent in the first season like the typical old man. Then in the later season, he became cruel and abusive, primarily towards Courage, and showed him no gratitude after the dog went through all that trouble to save his ass many times.
  • Elise in Dan Vs. has definitely suffered this as the show elapsed. During the first season, she was annoyed of Dan's petty revenge schemes yet still reluctantly tagged along with him and Chris on the quest. Also, she seemed to somewhat enjoy them in some circumstances and would fight along with Dan due to sharing his experiences with whomever he's declared vengeance against. By the second season, she became downright hostile and hateful towards Dan, only interacting with him because neither she nor Dan want to abandon Chris. To add on to this, Elise got more episodes focusing primarily on her, and most of Dan's schemes are solved through Deus ex Machina thanks to Elise, which is why the second season is considered the weakest of the series as a whole.
  • While there were a few characters in Daria who had this happen, the two most notable were probably Jake Morgendorffer and Tiffany Blum-Deckler. Jake went from being an ineffectual, easily-confused father with clear family issues to being an obsessive, infantile rageaholic Cloudcuckoolander and the show's Butt-Monkey. Tiffany, conversely, was initially portrayed as being a somewhat narcissistic yes-woman to either Sandi or Quinn, depending on which one she was speaking to at the time. By the time the third season came around, though, her self-absorbed nature and incredibly slow speech patterns has developed to the point where it's a miracle that she's even made it through elementary school without having to repeat a few grades.
    • Also subverted by the arc of Stacy Rowe, where her insecurity and panicky nature was initially Flanderized, but then over the course of the fifth season and series finale gained enough self-confidence that she became capable of standing up for herself and making her own decisions.
    • This was invoked in the episode "Psycho Therapy", where everyone is asked to imitate each other.
    • Ms. Barch (the man-hating science teacher) is an odd case. On the one hand, her simple hatred of men was Flanderized in later episodes to the point that she has used violence against her students and coworkers. On the other hand, she doesn't hate all men as she did in the early episodes. As of "The Daria Hunter" (from season two), Mr. O'Neill is the only man she loves (and brutally makes out with), even forgiving him when she sees him hold onto the waist of another woman (as seen in "Just Add Water"), abandoning her in the woods ("Anti-Social Climbers"), and falling for his allegedly assertive side after Mr. O'Neill is forced to break off his engagement to her ("Is It College Yet?").
    • Also visible with the friendship between Quinn and Sandi. Originally, the two were somewhat friends (though any viewer could sense the slight animosity behind their "friendly" compliments). by season two, Sandi begins to try to sabotage Quinn for no other reason but jealousy. In season three, she begins to succeed, but Quinn remains popular. In season four, the two's rivalry has reached a boiling point, to the point the two have nightmares about the other cutting and ruining each other's hair. Could count as character development, however, and the two become closer in season five (somewhat).
  • The entire DC Animated Universe could count.
    • Batman: The Animated Series: Somewhere between the early seasons and the later "new look" seasons, Batman went from a caring and compassionate man with some anger issues to the mostly cold grim vigilante most people recognize. It works mostly (unless he goes the full Jerkass route) but its a bit odd when you're rewatching the series. Some of the villains go from conflicted neurotics who seemed like they could be saved to simpler hardened criminals although this is usually justified as them giving up on a normal life after failed attempts at reform. This could be attributed to the growing number of youthful, idealistic foils introduced by Executive Meddling. The higher-ups became increasingly convinced that Batman was too old for the Target Audience to relate to, hence the addition of Robin, Batgirl, the other Robin and very nearly Creeper. Some of Batman's worst Jerkass moments resulted from his use as a foil for the sidekicks, as seen in the episodes "Old Wounds", "Never Fear" and "Growing Pains". This had the effect of making Batman considerably less likable and, ironically, less relatable, although it worked in Batman Beyond when he was 80. It's at least justified for "Never Fear" considering Batman was under the effects of Scarecrow's gas.
    • The animated portrayals of the villains remained more or less stable throughout the series' run, with two notable exceptions.
      • The Ventriloquist was always a milquetoast sissy-boy who could still be quite dangerous when the situation demanded it, but every time he appeared his wimpiness only seemed to increase until his puppet, Scarface, had virtually taken control of him. Eventually he became so frightened of Scarface that he was constantly trying to hide from him (from a wooden dummy). Somewhat justified by the fact that he's constantly being put down by Scarface, and so it's understandable his confidence would dwindle by the constant bullying until he became completely docile; this trajectory finally resulted in the Ventriloquist's Heel–Face Turn, so maybe it was just Character Development.
      • The Mad Hatter started out a quite menacing and fairly serious villain (at least by the standards of the show). He did grow more dangerous as time went on - but unfortunately he also got sillier, so that by the end of the series he was a ridiculous (if still sadistic) fruitcake constantly spouting Joker-like puns. He also physically shrunk, so in his last episode he looks barely taller than an Ewok.
    • With the aforementioned Batman: The Animated Series, it starts off as a more representative portrayal of the original comics, but beginning with Superman: The Animated Series, is later flanderized gradually into a Deconstruction of previous portrayals (including said original comics).
  • Mandark of Dexter's Laboratory in the post-finale seasons was pretty much defined by his hamminess and crush on Dee-Dee. Not to mention becoming much more ineffectual.
  • Bob from Dinofroz was physically the Fat Best Friend, but he hardly talked about food in Season 1. In Season 2, half of his dialogue consists of him talking about food, eating, or whining whenever he gets hungry.
  • In the Nickelodeon version of Doug, Doug was in love with Patti but always tried not to let that get in the way of their friendship. However, in Disney's Doug, his obsession with her goes through the roof to the point he even stalks her in episodes. It also seems like Doug can never get Patti off his mind with the majority of the episodes of this series involves him trying to impress Patti in some way. It doesn't help that in one episode, one of his fantasies is owing an entire planet of Patti look-a-likes. Even Doug's best friend Skeeter calls him out over this obsession over Patti.
  • The entire cast of Drawn Together, especially Princess Clara. One could argue that this was on purpose.
    • Toot was originally the show's "bitch", but as time went on and she kept being called "fat", Toot actually gained more and more sympathy, eventually becoming an Unpopular Popular Character.
    • Meanwhile, Princess Clara completely took over Toot's previous role, going from a kind hearted, easily lovable, yet naive, and unintentionally racist and homophobic Disney Princess to a cruel, god-fearing Alpha Bitch who flaunts her beauty every chance she gets and a outright Knight Templar fundamentalist Christian.
    • Spanky evolves from being a malicious, greedy sadist to a mischievous party animal whose worst antics are defecating on pizza.
    • Captain Hero went from a respected Super Hero with closeted gay tendencies and a frat boy personality to a completely disrespected loser who considers having sex with dead bodies better than coming out of the closet.
    • Foxxy went from being a mystery solving Sassy Black Girl who would occasionally display humorous racial stereotypes to the Token Minority who represented every black stereotype in the book.
  • Zigzagged for Rufus and Amberley of The Dreamstone, who started off with distinctive wackier personas (Cloud Cuckoo Lander and short fused Adorably Precocious Child respectively) in the pilot episode. Episodes after downplayed almost all their slapstick qualities, their personalities diluted into sometimes interchangeable Cheerful Children. The later half of the series started to revert them back however.
    • Rufus' incompetence in particular took a steep turn. In the pilot and some Season One episodes, he was a dippy but occasionally brilliant character. As time passed, his positive traits were quickly outshone by the other heroes, who were all more powerful and intelligent than him, thus by Season Two, he was near solely The Load, constantly getting the stone lost (which only happened once in Season One) and prone to doing and saying the wrong thing so Amberley or another could rebuke him. He gradually reverted back come Season Three, and by Season Four he is more or less back to his old characterization. Amberley suffered a similar evolution, though at least managed to look better against Rufus.
    • In addition, their Revenge Myopia for the Urpneys (which was originally more just self defensive apathy in the pilot) got exaggerated to relentless Unscrupulous Hero levels, with them frequently preaching how evil Blob's men were and taking much more sadistic pleasure tormenting them far beyond the means of defense than vise versa. This reached it's lowest point in "The Dream Beam Invasion" where they border Miles Gloriosus bullies who panic and opt out the moment Frizz and Nug become even slightly as malicious as they always claim them to be, thus costing them a victory. After that, the writers seemed to get the point and similarly reverted them back to more pragmatic characters.
    • Zordrak was simplified almost entirely to just his angry Bad Boss facets by Season Two, losing all his former competence and involvement and usually limited to one or two scenes growling at the Urpneys to hurry up getting the stone for him.
    • In contrast, The Dream Maker's Big Good qualities took over his personality, turning from a wise, kindly but somewhat crotchety and befuddled old wizard to a pious embodiment of good between the first and second season. The extent of his magic powers, though always fluctuating according to the plot, also became more god like and plot breaking as episodes passed.
    • Frizz and Nug, originally interchangeable dimwitted Cowardly Sidekicks in the pilot, got Flanderized to one different facet as part of their Divergent Character Evolution. Frizz became more cowardly and neurotic, while Nug became more dopey and vacuous. Hidden Depths prevented the trope oversimplifying their personalities however.
  • Droopy started out as having a milquetoast, fretful personality who could be capable of great strength when roused to anger. Later characterizations give him an almost flat and bored personality whose primary attributes were being The Cat Came Back and Offscreen Teleportation personified. And he never loses.
  • DuckTales (1987) has an in-universe case. When Scrooge winds up getting amnesia and going missing, Fenton attempts to pose as him to prevent his boss from losing a business deal regarding selling one of his factories. The only problem is, Fenton's portrayal of him is incredibly exaggerated: he's such a penny pincher the first thing he does is cut the allowance he gives the nephews. The real Scrooge has wound up getting a job at said factory and eventually winds up organizing a strike for the other workers. By the time he recovers his memory, Fenton's overly stingy version of him opens his eyes to some of his more rotten characteristics.
  • Ed, Edd n Eddy:
    • Ed went from a somewhat dim oaf with a love of comic books and horror movies to a non-sequitur-spouting Ditz who seems unable to differentiate fantasy from reality, Edd went from a somewhat obsessively organized boy genius who was the voice of reason protesting Eddy's crazier schemes to a borderline hypochondriac goody-two-shoes, and Eddy lost most of the "loveable" part of his Lovable Rogue personality and became more violent, manic, and surly. Again, that just covers the main characters. The writers seemed to have picked up on this and in Season Five, the Eds are tweaked to be slightly closer to their original personalities while still keeping the wacky energy of the later seasons.
    • The episode "All Eds Are Off!" had this exaggerated and/or played for laughs. The Eds, Kevin, Rolf and Jonny gave up their flanderized habits:
    • The "Truth or Dare" episode had in-universe Flanderization done by the Ed's when they were dared to act like each other. Ed lampshades this when commenting on Double D's impersonation of him.
    Edd (pretending to be Ed): Gravy!
    Ed: Come on Double D I don't say "gravy" all the time.
    Edd: Buttered toast then!
    • While Jimmy was never all that masculine (he's just a kid whose best friend is a girl), he became borderline Camp Gay by the end of the series.
    • During the first season, Jonny 2x4 was the slightly eccentric Tagalong Kid with his very own Companion Cube for a best friend who was an ally of The Eds, despite how they treated him. Come season two, he became an annoying, oddball loudmouth and a saboteur whom all the kids now disliked and he almost could not act or even function without Plank's input and presence. This is even lampshaded in the episode "Shoo Ed" and The Movie, where by the end of the film apparently he is now the odd kid out and decides to become the villain of the show. Fortunately, the show is over by then.
    • Nazz was known as the blonde, pretty girl who all the boys liked and who threw good parties in the first two seasons...and nothing else. Come season three, she devolved into the stereotypical Dumb Blonde and cheerleader type who was still pretty and liked by the boys but would also spout one-liners or make "deep" observations that seemed to defy all logic.
    • Though we don't see him until the Movie, this arguably applies to Eddy's brother, who was initially presented as merely kind of a con-artist and something of a bad influence, but as seasons went on and Eddy's own Jerkass behaviour increased, the implications of what Eddy's brother was actually like got worse and worse. This is a Justified Trope - the writers needed Eddy to have a suitable Freudian Excuse for all the crap he pulls over the series that will make the cul-de-sac kids forgive him, so his brother had to be as nasty as he was in order to justify why Eddy behaved how he did.
  • In the Pilot Movie for Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, Bloo was only slightly mischievous and showed at multiple points he had a very good heart underneath his occasional mean exterior. As the series progressed, some fans have complained that Bloo became progressively more anarchic, selfish, and obnoxious while showing far fewer genuinely nice moments, reaching Jerkass levels in later seasons.
    • As well as Wilt being changed from an overly polite but perfectly sane and approachable nice guy to a total neurotic who's about five seconds away from a nervous breakdown, Edwardo going from a mere scaredy cat who can still stand up for himself at times to an extreme Cloudcuckoolander who acts like a toddler and obsesses over potatoesnote , and Herriman changing from the usual "uptight British butler" to a tyrannical sadist. And that's not even getting into his carrot addiction...
    • Cheese went from "four-year-old with special needs" to "barely sentient baby" by his second appearance.
  • In Gargoyles, the Eye of Odin causes this In-Universe. It amplifies the wearer’s nature, making them more powerful, but also makes their defining personality traits go to extremes and consume everything else about them. Goliath, a kindhearted gargoyle who desires to protect the weak, becomes a possessive maniac who fakes danger and keeps the people he has decided to protect trapped inside a cave to protect them from the outside world, and the Archmage, a petty, selfish, egomaniacal sorcerer, becomes a Card-Carrying Villain who toys with his victims out of spite for inconveniencing him centuries ago when he could easily have destroyed them and wants to Take Over the World.
  • Shipwreck from G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero was originally a confident sailor with a Deadpan Snarker side. Though he did have a lazy (and occasionally bumbling) side, he also cared deeply about the Joe team and stopping Cobra, while his emotional side could be seen in episodes like "Memories of Mara" and "There's No Place like Springfield". By Season 2 though, he became completely incompetent and his laziness became his main trait (in one episode it was stated that he had no ambition or ability, by Hawk of all people).
  • The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy:
    • Mandy started off as an apathetic Anti-Hero with Deadpan Snarker tendencies; she was always mean and bossy, but not truly evil, as well as being surprisingly clever for her age. By the end of the series, she had become a sadistic and sociopathic Enfante Terrible plotting world domination and an Invincible Villain who could instantly solve any conflict in an episode just by showing up; her apathy also became outright emotionlessness, to the point where her smiling happily was considered a Reality-Breaking Paradox by the show's universe.
    • Billy went from being a cheerful and energetic Kindhearted Simpleton to becoming a completely Ax-Crazy and emotionally unstable maniac with his niceness becoming an Informed Attribute and his idiocy being taken Up to Eleven.
    • Grim's Butt-Monkey qualities were considerably amplified as the show progressed, making him more pathetic with every season (especially after the transition from Grim & Evil to Grim Adventures). Initially presented as a dark and dour figure comedically placed in a humiliating position by Billy and Mandy, he was quickly flanderized into a Cosmic Plaything — an ineffectual manchild who could barely handle anything the show threw at him, was deemed a loser even by his fellow supernatural beings, and actually more sympathetic than his child masters. However, he did still occasionally get his Let's Get Dangerous! moments.
    • Irwin's crush on Mandy became a more dominant trait in later episodes to the point where it often reached stalker levels. In fact, his lust for Mandy evolved from a mere schoolboy crush to being outright sexual in its presentation.
    • Billy's parents too. his mother Gladys changed from a Properly Paranoid but loving mother with the occasional nervous tendencies to a Ax-Crazy Stepford Smiler permanently on the verge of a mental breakdown while his father Harold went from merely being oblivious and/or apathetic to the fact The Grim Reaper was living in his house and hanging out with his son to a complete idiot who's pretty much just an older, fatter Billy.
  • Grojband: Trina was very quickly flanderized by the series from a standard bossy, dramatic, and overbearing Bratty Teenage Daughter and Alpha Bitch to a hateful and monstrous psychopath who would go as far as to attempt to kill her brother and let the world be destroyed just to make Nick Mallory love her and see Grojband's dreams get destroyed.
  • Hey Arnold!:
    • Arnold was conspicuously Flanderized toward the end of the series. In the beginning of the series, he was an honest but down-to-earth, regular kid who did the right thing at the end despite sometimes letting himself get carried away occasionally (sometimes even to the point of being a Jerkass briefly, just like regular children). However, in later seasons he becomes a completely incorruptible real-life incarnation of Confucius (and possibly a fortune cookie), whose friends always consult his deep ethical wisdom in whatever subject was discussed and was willing to "do the right thing" no matter what the consequences would bring. Rather than being just another one of the neighborhood kids, he became the ultimate source for all children for advice, practically raising him into Jesus status with his deep, analytical advice and extreme consideration for ethics. The fact that this is a 4th grader we're talking about makes his Flanderization all the more blatant.
    • On a similar note, Helga went from being a Loving Bully who harassed Arnold to hide her feelings for him to an outright Stalker with a Crush in later seasons.
  • In Ice Age: A Mammoth Christmas, the main trio was pretty much flanderized beyond belief. Sid was so stupid that he pretty much said and did things that only a complete asshole would do, no matter how smart they were, but literally did not know any better because he was that stupid, Diego did nothing but make sarcastic remarks, and Manny is pretty much seen as always in the wrong, even when he doesn't really do anything wrong like not believe in Santa Claus.
  • Inspector Gadget, mainly his intelligence. It's different in each episode. For example, he's smarter than usual in "Haunted Castle". And his main problem in "The Boat", where he actually almost pulled off an Obfuscating Stupidity-esque stunt but got caught at the last second, was that he suspected everyone and thus didn't find the real bad guys in time. But the trend is as follows: He started off as Inspector Oblivious, then progressed to The Ditz. His pride and vanity are exaggerated as the series progresses, too. Gadget's stupidity and obliviousness were taken Up to Eleven where spin-offs like Gadget and the Gadgetinis were concerned.
    • The dynamic of the show got Flanderized after the first handful of episodes, within which Gadget was somewhat semi-competent, with Penny and Brain only filling in when Gadget's bumbling got too extreme, but in other situations were Tagalong Kids who needed his help (in the pilot in fact, Brain was Gadget's Bumbling Sidekick). Shortly in, the former premise took over, with Penny and Brian regularly solving the entire case with Gadget barely contributing at all besides by accidental buffoonery. There were sporadic Character Checks where Gadget was briefly competent again in the first season, though these even these dwindled in the second season and most revival cartoons.
  • Invader Zim:
    • Gaz was originally just a Creepy Child who would occasionally act overly-dramatic over minor inconveniences: for example, in the first episode she declares that her brother "will pay!" for drinking the last soda, but then gets some orange juice and acts perfectly calm when he enters the room a moment later. Later episodes make her far more violent, beating him up numerous times for perceived slights. And that's not even going into how creepy the fanfiction can make her. Enter the Florpus made her less awfully violent and more of a Deadpan Snarker who did show genuine concern for her family.
    • Also Dib, who was always something of the Straight Man (at least compared to Zim) but who still seemed a bit manic and gullible in early episodes. By the end he seemed far saner (though still a bit naive), as well as far less optimistic that anyone will ever believe him about Zim. Arguably counts as Character Development, however, since a lot of this would fit with his experiences fighting Zim throughout the series. As well as Dib's (an everyone else's) awareness/obsession/neurosis about the size of his head. This is all somewhat justified, as Dib was initially not considered funny enough by the higher-ups, resulting in drastic changes to his character and design to make him more wacky and cartoony.
  • Jimmy Two-Shoes: The entire main cast was hit by this in Season 2.
    • Jimmy's Idiot Hero and Cloud Cuckoolander qualities were heavily flanderized during the second season, turning him from a naive and childish yet surprisingly clever and sensible Pollyanna to an extremely erratic and hyperactive Ditz who was completely incapable of saying or doing anything that could even be remotely considered sane.
    • Beezy had a tendency to hold the Jerkass Ball in the first season, but he was generally more of a laidback Jerk with a Heart of Gold who would never be anywhere near as evil as his father, Lucius. In Season 2, he transformed outright into a completely obnoxious Jerkass who would do things like casually break up with his girlfriend just to chase the Girl of the Week or make starving children play "Simon Says" for cake and have the losers beat up by Lucius' thugs for his amusement.
    • Heloise's crush on Jimmy became an increasingly emphasized part of her character as the series went on, reaching ridiculously blatant levels in Season 2. Almost all of her appearances in that season revolved around her trying to woo Jimmy or bring up her crush on Jimmy in some way. That said, the Jimmy/Heloise shippers didn't mind this one bit for obvious reasons. However, Season 2 also made her moments as a victim of slapstick much more frequent than before, reaching Butt-Monkey levels.
    • Much like what happened to Plankton in Spongebob, Lucius Heinous VII's Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain status was taken Up to Eleven in the second season, reaching to the point where he could not be considered evil or even a mere jerkass in many episodes and is instead written as more of a fun-hating Grumpy Bear, with his love of causing misery and Caligula tendencies getting significantly downplayed and his Butt-Monkey qualities also being consequently taken Up to Eleven.
    • Even the setting was flanderized! Miseryville transformed from what was meant to be a wacky, kid-friendly version of Hell populated by weird and cartoony demons and monsters where any random weirdness was just meant to be one-off gags, to a nonsensical Cloudcuckooland where Funny Animals and Animate Inanimate Objects were a normal part of the setting alongside The Legions of Hell. The Crapsack World aspect of the setting also became more of an Informed Attribute due to Lucius' aforementioned flanderization.
  • The title character of Johnny Bravo got hit with this hard. While Johnny was hardly MENSA material in the first season, he still had some common sense-his main character flaws were overconfidence and cluelessness on how to deal with women. His stupidity and immaturity were greatly exaggerated in seasons two and three to the point where he was even named as the village idiot by the townspeople in at least one episode. These elements were downplayed after Van Partible (the show's creator who was absent during those seasons) came back onto the show's staff, and Johnny was returned to his more well-adjusted season 1 personality.
  • Allison "Allie" Underhill's Tsundere traits in Kaijudo. Initially, Allie was simply a sweet rich girl, but with an occasionally haughty attitude. By the second season, she becomes more consistently short-tempered and moody towards Ray, getting in arguments with him, endangering their friendship.
  • Kim Possible:
    • Dr. Drakken was introduced in the first season as a super villain underdog who, despite some quirks, was threatening to the world and Kim. From Season 2 and onwards, the creators took his quirks and made him a full-blown General Failure. And yet, he was still able to seriously threaten Kim and, indeed, the world, in So the Drama.
    • Ron, concerning his competence. Ron went from fairly competent Plucky Comic Relief at the beginning of the series to Bumbling Sidekick / Butt-Monkey by the end of the end of the third season. In the fourth season, he began to go through Character Development that came with his Relationship Upgrade with Kim that culminated in a moment of Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass in the last episode. True, he had a few instances of his bumbling self throughout the fourth season, though it was most likely done for comedy.
  • Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness does this to Po and company. Po's lazy and obnoxious tendencies are blown way out of proportion in several episodes, and any flak he receives from Shifu and the Furious Five is unjustified at best.
  • The Land Before Time:
    • Petrie was initially cowardly and could be a bit of a jerk from time to time. As the series progressed, however, his cowardice has been increased to the point of full blown superstition. In the TV series he refuses to fly over a volcano based on the theory that it would make said volcano angry and cause it to erupt.
    • Subverted with Cera. In the early films she disagrees with Littlefoot simply out of pride and wanting to be the leader. As the series goes on her dissents become increasingly rational and thought out.
  • The Legend of Korra:
    • The main character Korra underwent this in Book 2. She started out as an assertive and brave girl, prone to action, although not without her insecure moments. The second season played up her assertiveness to the point of being headstrong, leading her to make rash decisions fairly frequently. She gets better by the end of the season, when her character development starts to get into full swing.
    • Lin Beifong also got this a bit in Book 2, where her no-nonsense, stubborn traits were exaggerated to the point of not being willing to hear Mako out at all, even as he brings forth perfectly-reasonable ideas and evidence. She also gets better by the end of the season.
    • Bolin is also subject to this in the same season, shifting from a well-meaning but naive and somewhat immature character to a full-blown Idiot Hero. As with the other examples, this is thankfully rectified by the end of the season.
  • In the original Lilo & Stitch movie, after seeing Stitch build a model of San Francisco out of bits and bobs from Lilo's room and then proceeding to wreck it, she tells him she's never going to give him any more caffeine. Lilo & Stitch: The Series amplifies this side note into "give Stitch coffee, and he goes completely berserk".
    • They did this to Pleakley as well. There was a short joke in the original movie about him secretly putting on his wig when he was alone "because it made him feel pretty", but in The Series, he lost all pretense of masculinity and was even called "Aunt Pleakley".
    • Both Pelekai sisters. Lilo, compared to her TV counterpart, was a bit more mature for her age despite her weirdness, which also got a bit of the boost. Nani, on the other hand, has this problem with her anger. In the movies, this was because of being pressured to find a job to support herself and her sister. The Series made her come off as a bit of a bitch at times, like in "Bonnie & Clyde", where she grounds Lilo & Stitch for "running around the house and burping".
  • The Looney Tunes Show:
    • Bugs Bunny seemed to go through some reverse Flanderization, as he is now usually more down to earth to the point of sometimes being the Only Sane Man. But that got somewhat flanderized too.
    • Played sadly straight with Daffy Duck, who took levels in stupidity and jerkiness to the point of having almost no truly redeeming aspects (except for a very rare Jerk with a Heart of Gold moment every now and then), also being made the Straw Loser compared to Bugs.
      • In the classic shorts, this also happened to Daffy once he was paired with Speedy Gonzales in the mid-1960's. In the 1950's, he gradually transformed from a zany prankster to a greedy Jerkass. However, the Jerkass aspect of his character was amplified to ridiculous levels in his pairings with Speedy. To the point where, for example, one cartoon had him whipping impoverished mice simply for "starving on his property." While another had him holding up a radio DJ at gunpoint just so Speedy and his friends couldn't listen to music at his electronics store. Fortunately, in the later half of the Daffy-Speedy era, his Jerkass flanderization was toned down and he became more of a Straw Loser, even falling into Jerkass Woobie territory in some cartoons.
    • Lola Bunny is a particularly vexing example, being transformed from a tough-as-nails Action Girl to a hyperactive ditz who is a Stalker with a Crush to Bugs. However, for some people, this is an improvement.
    • In post-1970s Looney Tunes productions, the characters can get this a lot. For example, Daffy tends to be reduced to little more than a Jerkass Straw Loser who exists to be humiliated and make Bugs look better by comparison (though he would return to his original Cloudcuckoolander self starting with Wabbit: A Looney Tunes Production).
  • Rico and Mort's one scene moments in the first Madagascar movie have been cranked Up to Eleven in the spin-off. In one scene in the first movie, the penguins were trapped in a cage, so Skipper commands Rico to break them out. Rico coughs up a hairpin and sets them free. This has been completely flanderized into making Rico regurgitate anything when given the chance. In another scene, the lemurs were hiding in the shrubbery, and at one point, Mort clings King Julien's feet for security. This evolves into a running gag, and an obsession. In fact, there was even an episode where Julien had it up to his crown with Mort's obsession of touching the former's feet that the latter was banished temporarily.
  • In the earlier Making Fiends original web cartoon, Charlotte was a very optimistic Naïve Newcomer who tried to see the best in everything and everyone, albeit with a scant sense of logic and a few realistic dislikes every little girl would have. Later in the web series and in the TV series, she is a virtually indestructible Pollyanna Idiot Houdini, and "Tee hee!" with other exclamations of joy have become her Verbal Tics instead of her catchphrases. The only thing that shuts off her smile is when she hears a poem about a cat in danger, for no reason other than to the inconvenience of Vendetta. Vendetta, the Villain Protagonist, had less of this than Charlotte, but she went from a narcissistic card-carrying bully with supernatural abilities to a stereotypical villain who abuses the Evil Laugh (which was originally an occasional giggle), and her obsession with clams goes all the way to the name of the town. However, this was probably all deliberate to make the girls bigger foils of each other.
  • Men in Black: The Series is spun-off from the film, Men in Black. Because of this, several traits chacrters exibited in that movie become exagerated. Agent J was a rookie in the film, but by the end of it, had grown as an agent. In the series he remained inexperience and needs thing sexplained to him even towards the end of the series. In the film, Agent K was a little on the stoic side, but had a dry wit, while in the series he is basically emotionless. The most egregious example however are the four worm guys. They had one scene in the film, but because they happened to be drinking coffee in that one scene, the animated series exagerated their love of the stuff to the point where it was all they could ever talk about.
  • Phineas and Ferb:
    • Phineas Flynn went from being an occasionally snarky genius Everykid trying to have some fun during summer vacation to being optimism and enthusiasm personified. It's gotten to the point that if the writers want to pull some OOC Is Serious Business, all they have to do is have him act mildly irritated.
    • Also happens In-Universe in "Split Personality", where Candace becomes split into two selves representing her biggest obsessions: busting Phineas and Ferb and Jeremy.
    • Dr. Doofenshmirtz, once able to take Perry in a fight or actually pose a credible threat, gets progressively more inept and silly, barely posing any sort of challenge whatsoever. His attachment and obsession with Perry is exaggerated to the point he cannot survive a single second without him.
    • Isabella's crush on Phineas became a bigger and bigger part of her character as the series progressed, with references to it growing more frequent and her desire to win Phineas' heart growing increasingly important to plots centered around her.
  • The Powerpuff Girls:
    • In the first season, the Mayor was a slightly absent-minded Nice Guy, then they switched to make him more stupid after that and continued increasing his stupidity in subsequent seasons. By the final two seasons, he'd become an idiotic Manchild. Additionally, his love for pickles went from being a one-shot joke in the first season to one of the things his life primarily revolved around in future episodes, and even The Movie.
    • Mojo Jojo is an interesting case. In The Movie, he was probably one of the biggest threats of the series, however, the first seasons prove otherwise, that he was just a Harmless Villain. Although seasons 4 and 5 seemed to show that he still remains an effective villain, as in the case of kidnapping and attempted murder in many cases to Professor Utonium.
    • Many fans of the original series feel this way about the reboot. Buttercup, who was once sweet and tough, is now willing to destroy a whole school just to prove to her sisters that she doesn't shoot "air balls". Bubbles is no longer sweet and gullible, but rather a little girl who loves unicorns with a crazy side that only appeared in one or two episodes from the original series; Blossom is barely the leader, instead always arguing with Buttercup. Blossom was originally a smart, intellectual girl, however she now has heavy Neat Freak traits on top of being more into grades than before. In comparison to the original characters, a lot of fans feel cheated by the new reboot. Along with that, when they need to fight someone, Buttercup usually does all of the fighting, showing very little teamwork. Ironically, the makers of the reboot said their intention was to flesh out their personalities.
  • In The Real Ghostbusters, the four Ghostbusters are based on the characters from the film, plus their exaggerated traits. Egon is even more scientifically minded, characterized with more "typical nerd" behavior.
  • Inverted on Regular Show, which has actually downplayed some of the cast's defining traits. Benson and Muscle Man have grown increasingly kind to Mordecai and Rigby (and have abandoned their respective catch phrases of "You're fired!" and "You know who else ____? MY MOM!"); Skips has gone from a stoic The Ace to showing actual emotion; and Margaret has evolved from the token female to a caring Women Are Wiser type.
    • That being said, Rigby has gone through flanderization, even venturing into Jerkass territory, with the way he treats Mordecai, Skips, Benson, etc., and especially the way he intervenes with Mordecai's attempts to get with Margaret. But let's admit it, he's way nicer in the newer seasons.
    • Rigby's dad, in the short time he's been on screen, took a colossal level in Jerkass. He went from being a kind and caring dad who's proud of his underachieving son in "The Thanksgiving Special", to being a deadbeat dad who often wanders around in his underpants and cares very little for Rigby, valuing his own car more than Rigby.
  • In the original John Kricfalusi episodes of The Ren & Stimpy Show, Ren was a Jerk with a Heart of Gold who despite his greedy and egotistical behavior and physical abuse towards Stimpy, deeply cared for his best friend. The episodes produced by Games Animation after John K's firing greatly reduced Ren's most sympathetic traits, turning him into a Jerk with a Heart of Jerk with no real affection towards Stimpy. Also, while Ren in the Spumco episodes would be only driven into psychotic rage in the most mentally taxing of situations (i.e. "Space Madness"), Games Ren would yell and scream at the slightest provocation.
    • Zig-zagged for Adult Party Cartoon. While Ren is still far more sociopathic than in the earlier Spumco episodes (and perhaps even the Games ones), he has at least some palpable softer or repentant moments like before.
  • Rick and Morty:
    • Beth started out in season 1 as the Only Sane Man who was doing her best to restrain the dysfunction in her family, with some Not So Above It All moments. In season 2, her egotism and selfishness were exaggerated to the point that she was more screwed-up than anyone else in the family apart from Rick, but she still genuinely loved her family deep down. By season 3, she's become a full-blown narcissist who would literally rather die than be bored, and who only cares about her children insofar as it would hurt her ego to be seen as a bad mother. Over the course of the season even she realizes this.
    • In the first few episodes, Jerry was a pretty typical sitcom Bumbling Dad type character, and Rick's disdain for him had more to do with Rick's standards being impossibly high than with Jerry being significantly dumber than average. By season 2 Jerry seems to be going out of his way to prove that Rick was right all along; he's barely capable of functioning in society. Though to be scrupulously fair, we must note that the Jerry from the early episodes got left behind in the Cronenberg dimension along with Original Beth and Original Summer in Episode 6 of Season 1; from the little we see of him, he seems pretty competent.
    • Rick in the early episodes was smart enough to build extremely advanced technologies, but was often not smart enough to control them or get them to work properly. His contraptions often backfired in unexpected ways, like his potion in "Rick Potion #9" unintentionally turning people into horrific mutant monsters. By season 3 his genius has been exaggerated to the point that he's effectively an omniscient god amongst men whose only limitation is that he's too apathetic to use his powers most of the time.
  • Rugrats (which is very strange for a Long Runner) cleverly avoided this trope for the most part with the exception of the baby speak, but Chuckie was flanderized, going back as far as season 2. In the first season, he was more of the cautious baby that occasionally got scared of certain things. But by season 2, this is amped up to 11 to the point where he is scared of Wilford Brimley and "the guy on the oatmeal box".
    • Angelica has actually suffered this twice. In the first season, she was more of a Jerkass who hardly had any sympathy for other characters but herself, but by seasons 2 and 3, she became more of a Jerk with a Heart of Gold with a Jerkass moment here and there.
    • By later seasons, Angelica was flanderized again to the point of her Jerk with a Heart of Gold status overshadowing her Jerkass status from earlier seasons, meaning that her Jerkass moments were only there occasionally and to a usually more petty and ineffectual degree.
  • Scooby-Doo:
    • Fred used to be somewhat intelligent (though not as much as Velma) and serious about the mysteries. However, beginning with A Pup Named Scooby-Doo, Fred was "dumbed down", and thus began to constantly use the "Let's Split Up, Gang!" catchphrase, believe in wild crazy theories about aliens and monsters, and blame the neighborhood bully Red Herring at the end of each mystery for being the monster (99% of the time, it wasn't Red.) This also carried over to What's New, Scooby-Doo?, when in addition to his trademark ascot, his seriousness and intelligence had also disappeared, and was now in love with the Mystery Machine, and was somewhat not very cool anymore (any attempts to impress the others usually failed miserably). Daphne wasn't immune to this either; she changed from the sexy "danger-prone" eye candy she originally was into a rich valley girl that was paranoid about messing up her hair and clothes, and would often be the one to get the gang out of trouble when Fred would fail to do so.
      • Fred's love of the Mystery Machine came to a head in Frankencreepy, when it gets destroyed during the first few minutes and sends him into a state of depression for the rest of the film until he tries to replace it with a wooden carriage.
    • In the 1980s series The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries and the The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, Fred and Velma were gone and Daphne became the leader of the Scooby Gang and was more intelligent and the one solving the mysteries. She retained her original hotness with Velma's brains added in.
    • While Daphne Took a Level in Badass in the live-action movies and is usually considered to have been Rescued from the Scrappy Heap, the same films arguably flanderized Velma from being "the smart one" into being a one-dimensional stereotype of intelligence, swapping actual characterization out for supplying whatever obscure knowledge was necessary to make a given puzzle click.
    • Scooby-Doo himself was originally just scared easily but ever since What's New, Scooby-Doo? he has been looked upon as a full-blown coward to the point just uttering the words "haunted" and "place" in the same sentence will make him run and hide for cover. The same with Shaggy as well.
    • Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated leaves Shaggy largely intact, but has taken a lot of flak for its alterations to everyone else. Fred's predominant trait has gone from choosing to be with the girls when the gang splits up to being obsessed with making traps, a small part of older Scooby plots, to the point that, quite contrary to his older role, he often ignores Daphne. Daphne herself has largely undergone re-Chickification thus far not displaying any Action Girl tendencies and being primarily focused on regaining Fred's attention. Velma, alas, may not be an exaggeration of her past persona but a completely changed character, having become a Clingy Jealous Girl to Shaggy with a Hair-Trigger Temper. Scooby also became more of a jerk, feuding with Velma for Shaggy's attention much of the time, rather jarring when one remembers that previous productions like A Pup Named Scooby-Doo and Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy? portrayed Velma as for all intents and purposes being Scooby's second best friend.
    • Daphne was never as intelligent as Velma, but she wasn't STUPID in the original show, just clumsy. This did not stop Be Cool, Scooby-Doo! from making her a ditzy Cloudcuckoolander a la Pinkie Pie or Mabel Pines.
  • Antoine of Sonic the Hedgehog (SatAM) was originally rather pompous and cowardly, but had some amount of lucidity and nobility. By Season Two however he is more or less a full time Straw Loser for Sonic, barely able to spend five seconds without saying or doing something stupid or narcissistic and acting like a full blown Dirty Coward. In retaliation Sonic's originally more playful rivalry towards Antoine evolved into flat out naked contempt (though the lengths of his other traits were usually more a case of Depending on the Writer).
    • Sonic did however become noticeably more cocky and incompetent in the Second Season. More than half the episodes are devoted to Sonic making some sort of error out of recklessness and needing to be bailed out by the rest of the team, compared to Season 1, where he made only a moderated amount of blunders, and could even play the Straight Man to Sally or others' own foolishness.
    • Sally in contrast had her positive aspects exaggerated, starting off as a smart but pompous Not So Different Foil for Sonic in season 1 who could occasionally hold the Idiot Ball depending on the circumstance. She is practically his Hyper-Competent Sidekick in season 2 to accommodate his increased recklessness. In addition her more specified intellect (hacking and strategics) became expanded into making her a full blown tech wiz, often rendering Rotor redundant.
  • Space Ghost in Space Ghost Coast to Coast had his Cloudcuckoolander tendencies, narcissism and occasional bouts of comedic sociopathy dialed up more and more as the series went on, until he went from a hero who's a bit of a Manchild to a Nominal Hero who's certifiably insane by the final season.
    • Moltar became more and more of a secondary Butt-Monkey in the later seasons, to the point that even Zorak would frequently trash-talk him.
  • Used deliberately in the Steven Universe Crossover "Say Uncle". Pearl has a tendency to become quite hysterical or very emotional, but the episode takes to a whole new level due to her Sanity Slippage from dealing with the oddness of Uncle Grandpa. This is completely Played for Laughs though (like most of the episode).
    • In a more straight example, Garnet may have undergone this. Prior to "Jailbreak", she was a blunt, powerful, stoic but caring gem who had a few episodes exploring her personality (such as her getting sucked into a video game or feeling guilty about causing Steven paranoia with her future vision). After The Reveal of her being a fusion, however, most of her personality revolves around being a fusion: she provides exposition about fusion, makes jokes about being a fusion, and didn't have an episode focused on her that didn't in some way deal with fusion until Pool Hopping. This is probably due to how incredibly popular Ruby and Sapphire became after their first appearance.
    • Lapis Lazuli started as a fairly mercurial figure with a lot of justified trust issues. Once she started appearing in episodes that didn't revolve around her story, the writers gave her some Deadpan Snarker moments for another comedic angle. Late into season three, she's become basically a full-on monotone robot, rarely inflecting and describing things completely bluntly and literally. Compare how she acts in "Ocean Gem" to how she acts in "Beta". She does dial it back for A Day in the Limelight episodes, though. It's implied heavily that she's become depressed, which can't have helped her mood either.
  • The Warden of Superjail! started off as a goofy yet crafty and sadistic type, and was considered a powerful force in the jail to the point where he took over the world in a possible future timeline. In season 2, his childish side became more of the focus than his sadism, with him winding up easily getting his jail taken over twice, getting beaten up by his own inmates and made to cower from them, and generally becoming more outgoing yet naive). These changes have been met with mixed reaction, while season 3 continued the emphasis on his man-child nature, showing him to drink grape juice and depicting him as clueless as to how sexual intercourse works.
    • Alice started out as being shown to abuse her power to force inmates to do humiliating things for her own pleasure. In season 2, her assertion of her femininity became more of the focal point, along with jokes about her bulge. Her initially one-time "date" from Superbar and his fear of her became a running gag, with her being shown to obsess over him and wanting to keep him hers.
    • While the Twins had been hinted to be something other than human, their limited screentime and characterization in season 2 ramped up their strangeness while confirming their alien status. Throughout their few appearances in the season, they were shown to consume all sorts of would-be toxic chemicals (including rat poison and bleach), depicted as having fangs, animated in a more stretchy fashion, and referring to blood as "human juice". Their status as troublemakers also seemed to be simplified to "Twins do something random" by the turn of season 3, save for an episode or two.
  • Teen Titans:
    • The HIVE kids were initially a competent villain team and the collective Evil Counterparts of the Titans, sliding into infighting and immaturity only when not "working". Later seasons flanderized them into being all incompetents (except for Jinx) who only won because they got lucky.
    • Their boss, Brother Blood, was in his first appearance a cool-headed, charismatic leader who only overacted when playing to an audience; later appearances made him a straight Large Ham.
    • Notably, the Titans themselves and Big Bad Slade inverted this trope; in the first few appearances they were defined by one or two traits (i.e. Robin was serious, Raven was a Goth, Beast Boy was an immature jokester, Slade was a Card-Carrying Villain, etc.), but later appearances added a lot more depth to all of them.
  • Teen Titans Go!, being a much less serious program, flanderized all the characters from the original Teen Titans into caricatures of their former versions.
    • Robin went from being a stern leader to a total killjoy with Small Name, Big Ego tendencies.
    • Starfire's naivety and Raven's snarkiness (alongside her hidden cute secrets) were upped, with Starfire adding "the" in a lot of her sentences.
    • Beast Boy became an immature, whiny, destructive couch potato; he and Cyborg had their jokester attitudes flanderized into being complete idiots.
  • While the 1980s animated version of the Ninja Turtles were always wisecracking heroes who would occasionally break the fourth wall, they overdid it a bit in Turtles Forever, much to the chagrin of their 2k3 counterparts. The movie even goes as far as to lampshade their version of April O'Neil's habit of getting kidnapped a lot to point that one of the turtles make the claim that they "save April at least once a day".
    • Turtles Forever flanderizes pretty much everything about the original show. In one scene the '80s Turtles (while in the 2k3 world) proceed to casually walk the streets in broad daylight, go to a pizzeria and order pizza. Predictably every person who sees them runs away in terror and yet the '80s Turtles have no idea why. While their 2k3 counterparts did spend much more effort hiding themselves from the public, in the '80s show the Turtles were aware that the average person would be scared by the sight of mutant, human-sized turtles and hence never went outside without at least a minimal attempt to disguise themselves. Also while many of the enemies of the '80s show might seem somewhat silly compared those of the 2k3 show, none of them are as absurd as the one shown in the film running around the world of the '80s Turtles: a walking, talking anthropomorphic banana.
    • '80s Shredder and Krang are flanderized in just a couple of scenes. In the first half when the '80s Shredder is seen, he seems to genuinely want to kill the Turtles and isn't afraid to use deadly force (incompetent maybe but still deadly in intent), and in frustration to kill them he summons his 2k3 counterpart. But by the second half he is whining over petty things and devolved into a Harmless Villain.
    • Baxter Stockman's amalgamation with a fly in the episode "Enter: The Fly" lowered his intelligence and put holes in his memory, but he was still able to perform fairly complex tasks, and put one of his previous inventions to use. Towards the end of the following season in "Bye Bye, Fly," he was even able to set an elaborate trap for Krang and Shredder. But his intelligence dropped in each of his appearances in Seasons 4-7. In "Son of Return of the Fly, Part II," he was easily distracted from his villainous plans by things like sugar. In "Landlord of the Flies," he sent a swarm of flies to engulf the Technodrome in Antarctica with obvious results. In his final appearance, "Revenge of the Fly," his distractions were so bad that he couldn't carry out the steps of his revenge scheme without getting constant reminders and pointers. This is actually Truth in Television when you realize that Baxter was part fly, and most insects have bad focus and terrible memories, so his extreme personification as an Absent-Minded Professor makes perfect sense when you think about it.
    • Slash also got stupider over time. Ironically, the first episode to do this, "Donatello Trashes Slash," was about him becoming a supergenius. It makes Slash's normal state noticeably stupider than in his début episode. His third and final appearance, as a supporting character in "Night of the Rogues," shows him barely even able to speak. Justified somewhat, because of the fact that he was a baby before he was mutated. Doesn't really explain his getting stupider, though.
    • Vernon Fenwick was introduced as April's foil, a professional rival with a play-it-safe attitude at odds with her bold determination. But he came through for her at the climax of the original miniseries, risking his job (and possibly his life) to help her cover the story of the Turtles fighting the giant android. He was also sometimes right to point out April's recklessness. The following seasons painted him as a Dirty Coward who only did anything brave if it meant stealing the spotlight. His cowardice, incompetence, egotism, and effeminacy (which wasn't even present at first) all got stronger and stronger, eliminating whatever redeeming qualities he once had.
    • Michaelangelo himself. When the series began, he was an incredibly ditzy and childish (but still likable) surfer boy who loved pizza with weird toppings. As the series continued, he became ridiculously stupid, his love for pizza became outright sexual, his taste in toppings became more and more disgusting and inedible, and his valley boy speak bordered on incomprehensible.
    • Raphael went from a grumpy Deadpan Snarker to a Jerkass Pungeon Master.
  • Many characters on Thomas the Tank Engine have been hit hard with this trope, but special mention goes to Percy and James. Percy was initially intelligent and mischievous, if a bit naive. Since season 7, he has been smacked upside the smokebox with Flanderization, becoming incredibly clueless and naive, and always needs help from someone else. James, similarly, started off the series as a cheerful and hard-working (if somewhat snobbish and conceited). As time went by, he gradually became a lazy, spoilt narcissist.
    • Gordon and Henry. In the earlier seasons, Gordon was somewhat pompous and would only occasionally brag about his importance. However, as the series went on, his ego increased to the point where he couldn't go for one minute without bragging about how great he is. Henry used to be somewhat depressed and timid, but could still stand up for himself. Since Season 8, he became an incredibly neurotic and miserable coward.
    • Edward started out as an old, sensible, and friendly engine. Around Series 6 the others suddenly lost all respect for him, and his old age led to him being portrayed as just feeble. More recently he's turned into sort of an Attention Whore who tries in vain to keep the others' respect.
    • Toby started out a Straight Man to the other engines, and was one of the most confident and efficient engines. As the show branched from the books, Toby gained a dorkier side, but aside from gaining his own token flawed moments, was still fairly competent. In later episodes, he is an outright Shrinking Violet, gaining similar feeble tendencies as Edward and frequently conveying self esteem issues or cowardice.
    • Thomas himself started out as a snarky trickster in the first two series. In Series 3 he started becoming more friendly, but still thick-skinned. Starting around Series 8, his universally good-natured side took over, and he suddenly needed validation every time another character said something mean to him. By Series 13, he's become a Cloud Cuckoo Lander who leaves disaster in his wake as he tries to do something he thinks will benefit someone else.
    • The Fat Controller/Sir Topham Hatt was originally a firm-but-fair authoritarian who was coyly aware of what his engines were up to most of the time. Later he became more of a background figure who only appears to give engines jobs and to tell them when they've done something wrong. Later seasons portray him as a clumsy oaf who's embarrassing himself in almost every scene he's in. It really makes you wonder just how this guy is running the NWR on top of everything else that happens on a seemingly daily basis...
    • 'Arry and Bert, the steelworks diesels, had an almost nightmarish first appearance, but by the time they showed up again, they were minor nuisances.
    • The narrow gauge engines have changed pretty drastically. Skarloey and Rheneas went from old and wise to a couple of juvenile pranksters. Sir Handel went from snobbish and self-centered to wise and helpful.
    • Rusty, who started off as a kind, helpful engine who rarely let personal gripes get in the way of work, turned much more careless and rude later on. A rather unfortunate example is Duncan, who started off as a selfish Jerkass, and after a while of showing more compassion towards the other engines, suddenly reverted back to his original personality, to the point where he always forgets everything he's supposed to learn.
    • Henry was always neurotic, but the newer episodes play up this trait. He can't do a job now without self doubting himself. Not to the extent of Toby, but he's still a far cry from the strong engine he used to be.
    • A lot of the Flanderization in later episodes can be attributed to the cast passing the Sanity Ball around. Whoever is the main focus is usually the one getting their shortcomings exaggerated while the others will be toned down and act as more rational foils. Thomas for example can range between a thoroughly competent best friend and source of advise to a SpongeBob-esque well intentioned Cloudcuckoolander. James also interchanges between being a brainless narcissist or even more toned down than his original persona.
      • The new writers for Season 17 and onwards though, have begun to restore the original personalities of the characters on the show. Some added facets from the newer series (such as Thomas' attention deficit and Henry's softer personality) still remain, though mercifully don't overtake their entire personality.
  • One of the problems with the Gene Deitch era of Tom and Jerry was that back in the original 1940-1958 era, Jerry only used extreme violence if he was protecting himself and when he was a Jerkass, he was a Jerk with a Heart of Gold. Even if he did attack for no good reason, he would at least get his comeuppannce. However, in the Gene Deitch era, he became a Jerk with a Heart of Jerk with almost no redeeming qualities, was a Karma Houdini in nearly every short, and liked to see Tom get pummeled by his owner and would never help him. Tom was originally a Jerk with a Heart of Gold but then got reduced to a huge punching bag and more of a Jerkass as well (he literally shoots Jerry in his head at the beginning of "Mouse Into Space"). Jerry won in any episode, though it could be argued that Tom wins in "Calypso Cat" because he still pursuits Jerry but that is what Jerry wanted all along.
    • During the Chuck Jones era, Tom and Jerry were restored to their original versions with their "heart of gold" level being raised as there are noticably more episodes where both Tom and Jerry win and several heartwarming endings.
    • Then there's The Tom and Jerry Show which flanderized the characters beyond recognition (they were made into friends. This is why this show is often receieved less positively compare to other shows and shorts.
    • The Tom and Jerry Comedy Show had their Jerkass levels raised but not to the point of the Gene Deitch era. The one-sideness rivalry was restored from the Gene Deitch era, however Jerry actually loses with Tom in a couple episodes and both Tom and Jerry win in "Most Wanted Cat".
    • Tom & Jerry Kids reverted Tom and Jerry to their original 1940-1958 shorts' status. This carried with the rest of the Tom and Jerry franchise.
  • Total Drama flanderized several cast members as it transitioned into Total Drama Action and Total Drama World Tour.
    • In Total Drama Island, Courtney was bossy and uptight, but still one of the more moral characters, and only threatened to sue when she was unfairly kicked off the show. In Total Drama Action, she's become a control-freak bitch who threatens to "call her lawyers" at any opportunity. Her aggressive competitiveness and reckless disregard for even her closest companions has only grown over the seasons, with her constantly oscillating between civil and well-meaning to downright ruthless in her quest to win, further isolating her from those she has at one point or another shown genuine concern for.
    • DJ starts as a genuinely nice guy and sensitive soul in season one; he was slow to anger, but could be mischievous (helping to prank Harold) or tough (throwing Owen off the cliff in the hunting challenge). By season three, he has become a complete Momma's Boy who is reduced to a blubbering wreck because the tundra reminds him of his mama's freezer. By season four, he must be tied down in order to fulfill his part in one of the challenges, and runs away out of sight screaming at the mere sight of a tainted pie.
    • Cody was originally a Casanova Wannabe who flirted with all the girls when he arrived on the island; he just eventually settled on Gwen as his preferred girlfriend. By season three, he's a Gwen-sexual who never seems to consider dating someone else as she continually rebuffs him.
    • Gwen is an especially perplexing case. Introduced as the Loner Goth Girl on the island, she is isolated and cynical about most everything before gradually opening up to the people around her, learning how to express herself and even developing a crush on Trent. From Action onward, she becomes increasingly entangled in her romantic life and much more impulsive, wrestling with her feelings for Duncan and making decisions that not only makes her an easy target for elimination but also drives a wedge between herself and her friends. It's this impulsiveness that leads to her hooking up with Duncan and destroying her new friendship with Courtney, eventually leading to her own elimination. It carries on through All-Stars, as she suddenly begins to lose interest in Duncan and acts increasingly girly in trying to make amends with Courtney, at one point dreaming about unicorns as the two become uncomfortably gushy between each other. And then she makes no effort to salvage this friendship when it's revealed Courtney backed out of their promise to go to the finale together, showing barely a hint of regret when the latter is eliminated. Finally, she gets herself eliminated right after when she resorts to using bear poop to repair a painting she was retrieving for Chris. It's hardly a surprise at how divisive she's become as time's gone on.
    • Justin is a weird example: first he was a Flat Character who apparently was really hot, but during the TDI special he suddenly showed a sneaky side, and the first few episodes of TDA hinted that he would be the new villain. However, that arc was aborted, and soon he was just too concerned about every split end or bruise on his precious face to possibly think about any schemes or trickery.
    • Duncan. In TDI he was a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, with Courtney as his Morality Pet. By season two, his bullying of Harold has gone Up to Eleven, to the point he kicks him in the testicles and nearly breaks his spine. By season three he suddenly is able to cheat on Courtney without a single twinge of his conscience and acts like a Jerkass when she finds out and breaks up with him. And then in All-Stars, the "heart of gold" part returns, but is exaggerated to the point where he can't stop himself from being nice.
    • Lindsay started out as your typical Dumb Blonde, then in All-Stars she became an exaggeration of the trope who doesn't even understand basic concepts such as the difference between pushing and pulling and also became one of the show's biggest liabilities to their teams. The Heroic Hamsters were lucky she was the first person to be eliminated.
    • Much like Duncan, Leshawna's negative traits were heavily Flanderized in Action and World Tour, turning her from an Anti-Hero to an outright villain. In TDI, she introduced herself as being determined to win and unafraid to get physical, but nonetheless, she showed a kind side, as she was loyal and caring to her friends (like protecting Bridgette from Eva's bullying or comforting a heartbroken Gwen) and would not hesitate to oppose jerks and bullies like Heather. In TDA and TDWT, her aggressive tendencies and focus on winning the game were amped up and her positive traits were played down, resulting her in engaging in such actions as using a Wounded Gazelle Gambit to manipulate her teammates into giving her an award, trash-talking said teammates behind their back afterwards, becoming the Small Name, Big Ego leader of her team in TDWT, and showing no remorse for beating up Heather when she tried to warn her against Alejandro and was proven correct. Incidentally, she also became more and more Out of Focus during this time, with her friendship with Gwen being slowly abandoned as the latter increasingly interacted more with Duncan and Courtney through a Love Triangle.
    • Harold had a good number of Butt-Monkey moments during Island, thanks to being the favorite target of the mischief performed by the Power Trio of Duncan, Geoff, and DJ, but he nonetheless was capable of earning the respect and friendships of the other contestants with his "mad skills". However, his misfortunes were taken Up to Eleven in Total Drama Action, to the point where he became one of the season's resident "pain magnets", almost everyone finds him to be generally irritating and charmless, and Duncan's childish pranks on him transformed into sadistic bullying towards him (although that was somewhat justified by Duncan desiring to punish Harold for rigging the votes against Courtney in the previous season).
    • Owen's Big Eater and Gasshole tendencies were heavily flanderized in the transition from Island to Action, to the point of making him a nearly one-dimensional character in the latter season. It probably did not help that this was occurring around the same time his Creator's Pet qualities were becoming extremely blatant, making him all the more insufferable to his haters (to the point, where World Tour started putting effort into having Owen Rescued from the Scrappy Heap, such as giving him an Odd Friendship with Noah and having him break up with Izzy).
    • Sierra was introduced as the obsessive fangirl upon her debut in the Celebrity Manhunt TDA special, claiming to have vast personal knowledge about all things Total Drama. Once she properly debuted as a contestant on World Tour, all her knowledge about Total Drama seemed to revolve exclusively around Chris and especially Cody. Once Chris told her off in "Broadway Baby," she dropped her obsession with Chris (as well as the early indications that her knowledge of Total Drama would give her a strategic edge) and was prone to gushing excessively over Cody to the point where he tried to eliminate her due to her possessive tendencies. However, she gradually learns to accept her relationship with Cody as platonic as they spend more time together, and abandons her adoration of Chris as she sees him for what he really is. Upon her return in All-Stars, she snaps when Mal destroys her smartphone, taking away her means to talk to Cody and thus unable to focus on the game without him. She eventually begins hallucinating the other campers' heads replaced by Cody's, and latches onto Cameron thinking he is Cody. Even Chris is alarmed at how unhinged she's become by the time she is eliminated.
    • Zoey started out as socially awkward upon her debut in Revenge of the Island, hoping to make new friends by signing on for the fourth season. At first she starts out as naive and easily manipulated by more devious people like Scott, but eventually learns to be careful with her trust and starts to stand up for herself, even briefly taking on a much more aggressive persona as "Commando Zoey" before snapping back into reality. She is soon able to make friends with many of the campers and starts a relationship with Mike. Over the course of All-Stars however, she becomes hopelessly unobservant as Mike is slowly corrupted by his evil alter-ego Mal, and even after many warnings from the others does not recognize his changing nature until the eve of the finale. Mal himself mocks her for her gullibility throughout the season.
    • In Revenge of the Island, Scott was one of the season's most cunning contestants when it came to dealing with the competition, but he was also prone to being Book Dumb and making poor decisions. All-Stars flanderized his ignorant and thoughtless qualities significantly, transforming him into a complete dumbass without any of the stratetgic and manipulative ability he possessed during his career as Big Bad.
    • Dave from Pahkitew Island is arguably the most interesting example when it comes to this series as he underwent this in the very season he debuted in: His feelings for Sky and status as The Load on his team gets more exaggerated as the season goes on to the point where he's a complete wimp who will do anything to get Sky to love him by the time of the finale and his Deadpan Snarker Neat Freak qualities have been totally abandoned.
    • Chris's increasing sadism and lack of genuine empathy has grown since the first season, becoming worse and worse with each passing season. Originally presented as simply a smarmy jokester with a mean sense of humor, he had transformed into a sociopathic maniac obsessed with pain and suffering by the time of the show's cancellation. Even during the time of the fourth season, the original cast already wanted nothing to do with him and the show in any capacity whatsoever — only appearing in brief cameos due to their legally binding contracts. It's actually been lampshaded a few times, with Chris cheerfully blaming it on the time he spent in prison between the fourth and fifth season.
    • Geoff is another interesting example as he went through this when he was brought to compete in the spinoff series Total Drama Presents: The Ridonculous Race. He was never the smartest character on Total Drama, but when he was in the spinoff he seemed to lose most of the intelligence he had to the point where he believed that komodo dragons breathe fire because the word "Dragon" is a part of the name for their species.
      • His relationship with Bridgette was also hit by this for a while. In Island, we see the two making out in the hot tub when we visit the eliminated contestants in one episode for a single scene that was only there to make it clear the two had officially hooked up (since Bridgette's elimination had left it uncertain). During the special and the first few episodes of Action though, they literally do nothing but make out with each other to the point where they no longer have personalities and don't participate at all in the challenges. Fortunately, they regain most of their characterization (and a bit more in Geoff's case) when they become the hosts of the Aftermath segments, and their relationship becomes more like that of a normal (albeit somewhat drama-heavy) teenage couple.
    • Speaking of Bridgette, she underwent a Flanderization of her own comparable to that of Leela from Futurama mentioned above. She was presented in Island as one of the show's most mature and rational characters and a bit of a tomboy, with the occasional Not So Above It All moment (like making fun of Tyler's fear of chickens or her obliviousness to her own clumsiness). Gwen calls her one of the only sane contestants; she sees past Heather's attempts to manipulate her and wisely chooses to side with Gwen and Leshawna; she is turned off by Geoff's stupidity as he attempts to woo her; and Duncan even considered her a powerful player and thus convinced his alliance to vote her off. However, Action and World Tour flanderized her into a more dysfunctional, less intelligent, and more "girly" character, resulting in her doing things like being unable to stop herself from constantly making out with Geoff, frequently engaging in a Sickening Sweethearts routine with him, almost forgetting to vote due to being too busy putting on makeupnote  in the bathroom confessional in "Walk Like and Egyptian - Part 2", and falling completely head-over-heels for Alejandro when separated from Geoff in World Tour. Incidentally, this coincided with her becoming massively Out of Focus and the writers increasingly focusing her character around her relationship with Geoff (to the point where her friendships with Gwen and Courtney were abandoned despite the latter two's continued prominence). Her voice also became higher-pitched around this time, making her sound less collected and more girly.
  • Grimlock and his Dinobots from The Transformers went from being strong, but unintelligent wild cards in the first two seasons to comic relief in the movie and onward.
    • In The Movie, at least, the Dinobots were still pretty badass, though they were suddenly happy to take orders from Optimus Prime and work with the other Autobots (possibly intended as Character Development to show that the Dinobots had come to embrace the Autobots as friends, or maybe they just enjoyed any chance to fight the Decepticons, maybe both). In the third season their badassness evaporated entirely, and went from being Dumb Muscle to outright idiots.
    • Fortunately their final appearance in "Call of the Primitives" returned them to their brutish and freakishly-powerful standing.
  • Optimus Prime has arguably been Flanderized since his original incarnation in The Transformers. Originally depicted as a regular kind of guy (interested in ninjas and able to trash-talk with the best of them) with a slight John Wayne quality to his voice who leads the resistance on Cybertron, modern portrayals such as Transformers: Prime have amplified the reverence and seriousness - and the associated vocal gravitas - to almost godlike qualities, with characters falling silent when he walks into the room, while lighter qualities, such as playing basketball in the original series, have been replaced by the edict that "Primes don't party". Indeed, a retcon to the Prime character cast this version as an actual god, from the Thirteen Original Transformers.
    • On the other hand, the original Megatron's unrealistic aim to rule the universe has been significantly toned down, to the more obtainable desire to return his exiled Decepticons to Cybertron (Transformers Animated), or restore the broken planet to its former glory (Transformers: Prime).
  • Transformers Animated uses this in-universe with the various Starscream clones. Each one has a certain trait of Starscream's exaggerated to the point where it becomes their entire personality (so while Starscream is a cowardly, egotistical, lying suck-up, Skywarp is afraid of everything, Thundercracker has a massive ego, Ramjet is a perpetual liar, Sunstorm is a complete sycophant, and Slipstream's personality was intentionally left vague).
  • Twayne Boneraper from Ugly Americans went from being Mark's intimidating, competent boss to a ditzy Manchild barely tolerated by his fellow demons in just a few episodes. Later his naivety and submission to his huge mother were upped even more.
  • Ultimate Spider-Man has one in J. Jonah Jameson. In most versions he's simply a somewhat jerky newspaper man with a somewhat justified hatred to Spider-Man. Here all he does is go on for hours on various Bugle Jumbotrons about what a menace Spider-Man is despite knowing full well that he's now working for S.H.I.E.L.D. It's also shown that his negative PR campaign is working better then normal and has turned almost the whole city against him.
    • This is further shown in the series' sister show Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "All About Ego", Jameson says that Spider-Man's plan to destroy the world with Ego has failed. Keep in mind Spider-Man was not involved in the episode in any way.
    • Phil Coulson too; in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, he's established by The Avengers (2012) as being something of a fanboy of Captain America, and can be somewhat goofy. The series amped this up, making him both a massive Butt-Monkey who idolizes Cap, to the point of wearing a Captain America suit under his regular clothes.
    • Spider-Man himself; usually Spidey is a responsible Deadpan Snarker with an Inner Monologue and the occasional tendency of not thinking through his actions, who defaults to being 'the funny guy' when he teams up with others. The show amps up his comedic traits to the point he's a completely irresponsible Idiot Hero with No Fourth Wall who can't stop making extremely stupid jokes that are very irritating.
  • Winx Club: Diaspro started as a princess who Bloom attacked with very flimsy justification (she thought Diaspro was Icy in disguise) and only fought back to defend herself. She was also completely unaware her fiance Sky was seeing another woman, and so her anger at being attacked by a total stranger was quite reasonable. However, in her next appearance in the show she was derailed into a Jerkass Yandere who eagerly brainwashes Sky in order to marry him and wants to kill Bloom.
    • A reason Season 3 was viewed as Seasonal Rot at the time was due to the sudden Villain Decay of the Trix, who were once powerful and competent enough to defeat the entire campuses of two magical schools (and one Badass Normal one) and nearly defeated Lord Darkar when he betrayed them. Come season 3 they are easily dispatched over and over again, including by the Winx's pixie sidekicks at a point. This was received so negatively that when the Trix made a proper appearance again special effort was made to make them a credible threat again.
  • Xiaolin Showdown:
    • Somewhat inconsistent in Jack Spicer's case. He started off as a legit bad guy and an intelligent one at that. He built his own robots, and on several occasions kicks ass and takes names. Early in the series run, Jack was shown as being a skilled martial artist who could match and defeat the Xiaolin Warriors in combat. Hell, Jack has taken over the Earth in two alternate timelines and did a damn effective job at ruling it, in one of the timelines he was even said to be a threat to the entire universe. By the final two episodes, he's portrayed as so stupid he has to write "This way up" on his underwear, however in episodes leading up to the finale, he still had burst of competency, as he was able to hold his own against Omi in combat and even took over Chase Young's fortress overnight. Throughout most of Xiaolin Chronicles however, Jack was a complete joke lacking a threatening bone in his body. See Villain Decay.
    • The other villains were no stranger to this either. Chase Young was introduced as a crafty, cunning character until he devolved into being evil for evil's sake. This was especially upsetting because Chase was stated multiple times to have some goodness in his heart by Omi, yet this plot point has since been ignored by the rest of the series.
    • The protagonists had their fair share, too:
      • Omi began with his arrogance being mostly scarce and well-meaning, with it being implied that he wasn't so much egotistical, just eager to teach his friends everything he knew. Around the middle of Season 2, his ego started to get progressively bigger and bigger to the point where he would often insult Raimundo in the latter's presence and rub the previleges he recieved in the other monks' faces. Additionally, his sexism towards Kimiko was more of a sign of his cultural naivety in the first season and it should be noted that it never comes up again until his Flanderization, where he takes great pride in being a Straw Misogynist.
      • In the first season, Kimiko started out as a Genki Girl and a Deadpan Snarker who, while having the occasional Berserk Button, was mostly easy-going and acted as a Cool Big Sis to Omi and defended him from Raimundo's bullying. Come Season Two, where her only trait is having a Hair-Trigger Temper and constantly beat up Omi for his sexist remarks towards her. Her snarky tendencies were taken Up to Eleven, turning her into a flat-out cynical, violent girl who gets angry at the drop of a hat.
      • An interesting case with Raimundo. He starts out as a selfish, lazy Jerkass who loves messing with the others but gets Character Development and becomes more wise, competent and sensible while still retaining his mocking sense of humor.
      • Clay was the only character not to go through this in the original show due to mostly being a Flat Character. Xiaolin Chronicles, however, is a different story. In the former, he was known for being a soft, easy-going cowboy with a huge appetite and a realistic love for animals, which he cared for and was very knowledgeable about. In the latter, his interest in animals has become so exaggerated that it's literally outright shown that he's in a relationship with a goat named Molly and constantly waxes poetic about the butts of baboons that he "can't keep his eyes off of", baby goats' butts, the "soft, mushy lips" of his goat girlfriend "Molly", etc.
      • Dojo's close relationship with Master Fung started going in the direction of his being a servant of the latter until it grew almost to the point of Ho Yay.
  • Saranoia in Yin Yang Yo! Initially, she loathed Yang and men and loved Yin because she was The Un-Favourite compared to her brother Mark, and incorrectly projected that situation onto the siblings, even calling Yang "Mark". Over the course of the series... this backstory started to fade and her already over-the-top idolization of Yin and hatred of Yang was flanderized to the point that she started to come across more like a creepy pedophiliac lesbian Stalker with a Crush, peaking in one episode where she posed as a popular girl to become "Sweat Sisters" with Yin — everyone in the show even commented on how creepy that was. Since that episode, though, she's essentially reverted to her original characterization, in an unusual reversal of a Flanderization.
    • Master Yo himself. Around the titular rabbits, he would either be just your typical Grumpy Panda that taught them well at Woo Foo, or a lazy, selfish Jerkass.


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