Follow TV Tropes

Following

Film / Prince Caspian

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MV5BMTIwOTA4NTE4Ml5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwOTI2NTg1MQ__V1__SY317_CR00214317__7241.jpg
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian is a 2008 epic fantasy film based on Prince Caspian, the second published, fourth chronological novel in C. S. Lewis' epic fantasy series, The Chronicles of Narnia. It is the second in The Chronicles of Narnia film series from Walden Media, following The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The four Pevensie children (William Moseley, Anna Popplewell, Skandar Keynes, and Georgie Henley) return to Narnia to aid Prince Caspian (Ben Barnes) in his struggle for the throne against his corrupt uncle, King Miraz (Sergio Castellitto). The film was released on May 16, 2008 in the United States and on June 26, 2008 in the United Kingdom. The screenplay based on the novel by C. S. Lewis was written by Stephen McFeely and Christopher Markus.
Advertisement:

This was notably the last Narnia film to be directed by Andrew Adamson, who held over the reins to Michael Apted for The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Disney opted to drop the franchise after this film and it was picked up by 20th Century Fox.


Tropes

  • Adaptation Expansion: In the book Nikkabrik, the hag and the werewolf only suggest resurrecting the White Witch and are stopped before they can go through with it. In the film they partially succeed.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: Trumpkin is more cynical and snarky than his book counterpart.
  • Adaptational Angst Upgrade: In spades. In the book, none of the Pevensies seemed too affected by abruptly leaving Narnia and becoming children again. In the film, both Peter and Susan have been affected badly - Peter getting into fights and Susan becoming anti-social. Peter and Caspian likewise have a rivalry that isn't in the book.
  • Adaptational Badass:
      Advertisement:
    • The River God. Goes from a minor spirit asking Aslan to free him from the Telmarine bridge to a powerful water deity that drowns the Telmarine army and swallows Lord Sopespian.
    • Susan. She was given the moniker "The Gentle" for a reason. Suddenly, she becomes a Xena wannabe killing the enemies with arrows just by throwing them and holding off a group of soldiers alone with her bow and quiver of arrows.
    • Miraz. In the book, he was a traditional evil yet cowardly monarch, whereas in the film he is cold-blooded, calculating, and seems unafraid of anything. He loses points though for calling a break when the duel went against him and using that to try and get the drop on Peter by attempting to stab him In the Back.
  • Adaptational Context Change: We find out that Miraz murdered Caspian's father earlier in the book, and it's a cause for Nightmare Fuel - so that Caspian knows what his uncle is capable of. In the film he finds out much later, and is prompted to try and take revenge for it.
  • Adaptational Heroism:
      Advertisement:
    • Queen Prunaprismia in the book is a harpy that despises Caspian. In the film she shows no ill-will towards him - and expresses horror at learning that Miraz murdered his brother.
    • Glozelle is also depicted as a reluctant follower to Miraz, with all his evil deeds given to Sopespian.
  • Adaptational Ugliness: The hag in the book is able to pass for an old woman, and the BBC adaptation had her as mostly humanoid. Here she has a far more alien appearance.
  • Age Lift: Caspian in the book is simply described as a boy as old as Peter - though the BBC adaptation depicted him as a young boy. The film ages him up considerably. This happens with the Pevensies too, although only a year has passed. They are much older than they were in the book.
  • As Long as It Sounds Foreign: The sinister magic words the hag uses in her ceremony to summon the White Witch? They're actually the lyrics to an Arabic love song! According to the director's commentary, the actress's grandmother used to sing her that song, which she then used for the chant.
  • Ascended Fridge Horror: The film decides to explore the psychological affects of living as an adult monarch for fifteen years and then being plonked back into a child's body.
  • Ass in Ambassador: With a few cutting remarks, Edmund gets Miraz to accept Peter's duel challenge.
  • Awesome Moment of Crowning: Miraz. And how! The soundtrack alone in that scene makes it worthy.
  • Badass Longcoat: Miraz sports one.
  • Bottomless Magazines: A variation. Susan never seems to lose any arrows from her quiver. And they're all the same red-tipped arrows, so she can't be taking strays up from the battlefield. Presumably part of the magic.
  • Chronic Backstabbing Disorder / The Starscream: Miraz falls victim to treacherous Telmarine lords who don't like to be ordered around by a king.
  • Combat Pragmatist: In the second round of their duel, both Peter and Miraz are not above using some dirty moves (like punching the opponent in a wounded knee).
  • Combat Tentacles: The walking Trees.
  • Composite Character:
    • In the film Lord Glozelle and the unnamed Telmarine who takes up Aslan's offer of going back into the island from whence the Telmarines first came are combined. This is achieved by giving Glozelle Adaptational Heroism, portraying him as a reluctant follower of Miraz.
    • Dr Cornelius is combined with Caspian's nurse (who is the one that first told him stories about Narnia's history).
  • Dark Is Not Evil: Minotaurs were portrayed as an evil race in the first film, but are now on the side of the protagonists in this one.
  • Darker and Edgier: Especially Prince Caspian. This was lampshaded in the trailer:
    You will find Narnia a more savage place than you remember...
  • Dashing Hispanic: The Telmarine culture in the second movie is very obviously based on Golden Age Spain, so Caspian qualifies as an example. Ben Barnes even based his characterization on Inigo Montoya).
  • Demoted to Extra: Pattertwig the squirrel and Bulgy Bear have only a handful of lines between them. Bulgy Bear had a bigger scene but it was cut.
  • Expecting Someone Taller: Prince Caspian meeting Peter for the first time. Justified, given the time difference. Played for laughs by Reepicheep later on.
  • Faceless Goons: Telmarine soldiers, wearing face-concealing Rage Helms.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: Telmarine culture is stylized to resemble Golden Age Spain. Much like in the book, Hand Waved by explaining that Telmar was founded by Earth pirates who accidentally found their way to Narnia. Likewise, Narnia itself has "Merry Old England" vibes.
  • Hollywood Tactics: Played straight with the Leeroy Jenkins approach to the castle raid (though granted that's only after Caspian deviates from the plan), but the final battle has both sides pulling various tricks, such as the Narnians leading the Telmarine cavalry into a trap, while the Telmarines have fire support in the form of trebuchets and surround the Narnians during the battle with the intent of crushing them between the advancing companies.
  • If You Kill Him, You Will Be Just Like Him: Caspian with Miraz.
  • Improbable Use of a Weapon: During the castle raid, Susan throwing an arrow at a soldier and having it sink in and kill him.
  • Made of Iron: Honourable mention goes to Asterius, the minotaur who led the Foe-Tossing Charge into the castle in, and held up the portcullis while getting shot several times as the others escaped.
  • Magical Negro: Glenstorm the centaur is notably the only member of the species portrayed by a black actor, and he's also the wisest and most moral of them.
  • Mask Power: The Telmarines now sport badass baroque metal masks with fearsome visages of bearded Conquistadors on them.
  • My Master, Right or Wrong: Glozelle.
  • Mythology Gag: In a deleted scene, the Pevensies would pass by a dryad dying as her tree was cut down. This is taken from something that happens in The Last Battle.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: If Caspian and his sailors are any indication, the whole Telmarine race apparently drops their vaguely-Spanish accents some time between Prince Caspian and The Voyage Of The Dawn Treader. Perhaps he took on an English accent so the native Narnians were more comfortable with him?
  • Ordinary High-School Student: Peter had a hard time becoming one again, after being High King. All of the Pevensies had a hard time of this.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: Caspian and Susan, sort of. They flirt and share a kiss, but don't end up together.
  • Putting on the Reich: Word of God states that Telmarine aesthetic was designed to give them a fascist feel.
  • Rage Helm: In the movie, the Telmarine armies. In the behind-the-scenes material, it is explained that the helmets were used to make the Telmarines look less human and thus make mowing down scores of them less morally questionable.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Trumpkin gets a short but effective one in the film; when he's brought before Miraz and Miraz hits him across the face for pretty much no reason, he gives the king a Death Glare and simply says "And you wonder why we don't like you?"
  • The Rest Shall Pass: Susan to Lucy in, when she stays behind to hold off the pursuing soldiers so that Lucy can find Aslan in time.
  • Running Gag
    Reepicheep: Choose your last words carefully, Telmarine.
    Caspian: You are a mouse.
    Reepicheep: I was hoping for something a little more original.
    • Later:
    Soldier: You're a —!
    Reepicheep: Yes, I'm a mouse.
    • And again:
    Soldier: You're a mouse.
    Reepicheep: You people have no imagination.
  • Shout-Out: Ben Barnes said his accent was essentially an imitation of Inigo Montaya.
  • So What Do We Do Now?: At the beginning of the film, Peter in particular is none too happy to be a young teen dealing with stupid schoolboys again, as opposed to a full-grown man and a king
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Glozelle.
  • The Starscream: Lord Sopespian and Lord Glozelle seek to overthrow King Miraz by provoking him into accepting Peter's challenge of a mano-a-mano sword fight in hopes that he'll be killed. When this doesn't happen, Sopespian stabs Miraz in the back. Glozelle gets a Heel–Face Turn, though.
  • Sugar Apocalypse: The film is set in the aftermath of one. Narnia at the end of the first movie was a magical utopia. Now it's been conquered by a pirate race, the majority of animals have lost their speech, fantasy creatures have been driven into hiding and the dryads have gone. One deleted scene would even show a dryad dying as her tree was cut down.
  • Tall, Dark, and Handsome: Caspian.
  • This Is Not My Life to Take: Miraz, Caspian's uncle, who murdered Caspian's father, and was planning to do the same to Caspian...is defeated in a duel by Peter. Miraz wonders why Peter won't kill him, Peter nearly saying the trope word for word, before handing his sword to Caspian.
    Miraz: What's the matter boy? Too cowardly to take a life?
    Peter: It's not mine to take.
  • Unhand Them, Villain!: When some Telmarines are about to dump Trumpkin, Bound and Gagged, into the river, Susan shoots an arrow and orders them to "drop him". They do so - unsurprisingly, into the river, and the boys jump in to save the dwarf while Susan dispatches the soldiers. Trumpkin is suitably unimpressed, and treats Susan to a bit of snark once they're all back on dry land.
  • What Measure Is a Mook?: The good-hearted prince of a rather evil empire is about to be disposed of by the evil uncle who killed his father and took his throne, so he organizes a daring night raid to infiltrate the castle, kill the usurper in his bed, and retake the kingdom in a matter of minutes. Just as he's about to pull the trigger, his uncle congratulates him on finally showing some spine, and being worthy of the throne he's about to take. Horrified, he aborts the entire operation, risking all of their lives with a fighting retreat and wasting countless man-, woman-, and minotaur-hours of preparation and execution. This also leads directly to the final showdown, the deaths of many of Caspian's allies, and the decimation of an opposing army that was, for better or worse, just following the orders of their king (and likely facing execution for any disobedience). The Rage Helm entry even mentions how they deliberately dehumanized the Telmarine army to make the protagonists seem justified in causing hundreds of deaths by the act of sparing one tyrant. This is presented as having been the honorable way for Caspian to reclaim his throne, with the opening of the next movie deliberately illustrating how seamlessly Caspian took the reins and pacified the realm.
    • Although see Decapitated Army above: There's no guarantee that assassinating Miraz will see everyone instantly accept Caspian and his Narnian allies as the new regime, especially with a couple of Dragons waiting to take his place. (It should be added all this only applies to the film: The book and BBC adaptation have a much simpler failed ambush where Caspian never has the opportunity to kill Miraz.)
  • When Trees Attack: Aslan rouses the trees to defeat the Telmarine army in the film. They prove especially useful by destroying the Telmarine trebuchets.
  • Xenafication: Susan. Justified in that she had been practicing her archery skills for 15 years, plus another year on Earth, just like her siblings. And since she's given a bit more angst than the book, she's bound to want to take her anger out on something.
  • Year Inside, Hour Outside: Susan jokes that this makes her 1300 years older than Caspian.
  • You Didn't Ask: Aslan summons an army of talking trees to defeat the Telmarines — after the Narnians send Lucy to ask for his help.
  • You Killed My Father: Miraz killed Caspian's father.

Top