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Film / Adventures in Babysitting (2016)

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Adventures in Babysitting (2016) is a Disney Channel Original Movie and a remake of the 1987 film of the same name. It stars Sabrina Carpenter as Jenny Parker and Sofia Carson as Lola Perez. The plot kicks off when Lola and Jenny accidentally swap phones with each other, resulting in Lola taking a babysitting job that was meant for Jenny (out of desperate need to pay a parking ticket). Unfortunately, babysitting turns out to be a tougher job than Lola anticipated.

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This film provides examples:

  • An Aesop: Both Jenny and Lola learn a couple:
    • Jenny: It's good to focus on school and be responsible, but you should allow yourself to have fun once in a while. Also, sometimes you have to take a risk to get what you want.
    • Lola: Having fun and being a "student of life" is all well and good, but you have to take into account how your actions affect the people around you. Also, just because you might fail at something is no reason not to try.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Well, Remake Name Change, but same principle: Chris Parker becomes Jenny Parker and the Anderson children go from Brad and Sara to Trey and AJ (and a third named Bobby is added).
  • Battle Rapping: Between Jenny and Lola in the rap club, as each points out how the other is responsible for their current predicament.
  • Book-Ends: "Wild Side" by Sabrina Carpenter and Sofia Carson plays over the opening intro and the end credits.
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  • Brick Joke: At the beginning of the film, Jenny criticizes Lola for drinking a smoothie at the internship interview. At the end of the movie, Jenny herself is drinking a smoothie when she comes to tell Lola she's backing out of the internship. It's used to indicate her more relaxed personality as a result of the events of the movie.
  • Camera Fiend: Lola is always taking pictures.
  • Character Development: Both Lola and Jenny rub off on each other throughout the film. Jenny learns to relax and not be a Control Freak, while Lola learns to be more responsible.
  • Chekhov's Skill: AJ meets her Roller Derby idol and learns to do her Signature Move. It comes in handy later when she has to evade the animal smugglers.
  • Didn't Think This Through: Lola didn't really consider what might have happened if she tried to scalp the concert ticket. As an officer points out to her, she could have easily had both the tickets and her wallet stolen, not to mention that she could have gotten hurt.
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  • Establishing Character Moment: In their first scene together, Jenny and Lola are sitting together, waiting to speak with a professional photographer. Jenny sits properly in her chair, while Lola lies back and drinks a smoothie, immediately establishing them as the proper, well-behaved girl and the more casual, rebellious one, respectively. However, see Hidden Depths below.
  • Extremely Short Timespan: With the exception of the epilogue, the whole movie is set over a 24-hour period, with most of the movie taking place at night.
  • Fanservice: An early scene has Lola walking around the house in a one-piece swimsuit, as she has just come out of a hot tub.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: Jenny and Lola spend most of the film as reluctant allies at best, but the events of the film eventually turn them into close friends.
  • Hidden Depths: Lola is initially presented as a cool, devil-may-care rebel who ditched the traditional path of college to be a "student of life" and make a living as a photographer. Not only is her rebellious behavior limited to the occasional parking violation, but she actually did want to go to art school. She just didn't bother trying because she figured her grades weren't good enough.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: Lola isn't nearly as uncaring as she acts. Her screwing up Jenny's date was done out of carelessness rather than malice and at the end of the film, she trades away her most precious possession, her camera, to make it right.
  • Honor Before Reason: Lola risks her life, Jenny's life, and the lives of the kids in their care all because she won't give up her camera. The reason for this is that she won the camera in her first ever photography contest and considers it proof that she has talent.
  • Ironic Echo: "There are moments in life when you just have to take a risk and go for it. This is one of those moments." Lola uses this to convince Jenny to try and steal money from her employers to pay the garage. Jenny throws it back in her face when Lola needs to pose as a socialite in order to help with the scheme.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • During the opening, Jenny can be seen briefly singing along to the song playing over the scenes. This mirrors the opening of the original film, where Chris does the same while waiting for Mike to show up.
    • Before leaving, the Coopers' mother says she left money in case Jenny wants to take the kids for ice cream. "Going out for ice cream" was the cover story Chris used for the events of the original film. Later, Jenny also uses it this way.
    • This exchange mirrors one from the original film:
    Mrs. Cooper: Take care of our babies.
    Jenny: I'll guard them with my life.
    • As does this one:
    Bobby: They'll kill you when they find out a total stranger is watching us!
    Jenny: And who's gonna tell them?
    (the kids give her a look)
    Jenny: Does anyone have to go to the bathroom?
    • And this one:
    Jenny: Your parents are never gonna ask me to babysit again.
    Trey: If they do, I'd ask for ten bucks more an hour.
    • The "singing the blues" scene from the original gets recreated, this time as an improvised rap number.
    • Jenny's "Don't mess with the babysitter" line is a G-rated version of Chris's "Don't fuck with the babysitter" line from the original.
    • The scene of the Love Interest showing up at the house to return an item belonging to one of the children is recreated, but with a twist: Zac specifically asked to borrow Emily's headphones so he could return them.
  • Odd Couple: Jenny and Lola are pretty much polar opposites. Jenny is proper and well-behaved, will Lola is a bit more rebellious. Their first scene together highlights this difference.
  • One Crazy Night: Much like the original, what should be a simple trip into the city quickly descends into chaos.
  • Reality Ensues: In order to get money to get the Coopers' car back from the garage, Lola attempts to scalp Trey's concert ticket. She gets caught by the police and arrested.
  • Setting Update: The film is set in 2016 Chicago (indicated by a reference to an Ogden Avenue address) rather than 1987 Chicago. Tablets and cell phones exist and a mix-up involving the latter is what kicks off the plot.
  • The Stinger: As the end credits roll the children are looking the pictures that Lola has sent them of their adventures that night. The last shot is one of Mrs. Anderson looking in horror at a picture she was sent by mistake of the Andersons' dog Lady Marmalade being hurriedly cleaned up by two of the kids during their (successful) attempt to clean up the house/their new car before the Andersons got home...
  • Witch with a Capital B: Jenny's opening rap verse makes it plain that she wants to substitute something else for the last word:
    See, it all started
    When our phones made a switch
    Lola lied to the parents
    She's been a real witch.
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