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  • In the numerous doujinshi works revolving around the Touhou video game series, the fans have almost unanimously turned several characters into chew toys (Alice Margatroid, Hong Meiling, Reisen, Youmu...) regardless of whether or not anything in the official works points to such a fate. In Alice's case, the fanon version is almost the complete opposite of the canon version.
    • Interestingly enough, some fanon aspects have been confirmed in canon. The character Keine, while originally only shown as a "protector of the human village" with some connection to history through her abilities, was almost always portrayed as a schoolteacher in doujinshi — and then was confirmed as being a teacher in the second book. The series' creator is extremely supportive of fanworks of all types, so it's very likely a case of fanon turning into canon.
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    • Fanon often posits Yuuka and Flandre to be insane mass murderers (or at least, the latter would be if unleashed), from Yuuka's genocide jokes in Mystic Square, to Flandre's stated-but-nebulous insanity and destructive power. Koishi also gets this treatment on occasion from doujin artists who believe reading a subconscious can drive one to insanity.
    • Two nameless mini-boss type fights from The Embodiment of Scarlet Devil were later named after their fanon nicknames by ZUN: Daiyousei (lit. "greater fairy") and Koakuma (lit. "little devil"). They haven't had any canon appearance since then but are used consistently as foils for related characters (Cirno and Patchouli, respectively) in fan-works.
    • There has been fan art that actually separated canon and fanon Sakuya into two distinct personalities (Flowering Sakuya and Luna Dial Sakuya, respectively). A lot of people on the forum he frequents mistook Luna for the canon personality.
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  • The cult classic NES game The Guardian Legend has a great example of Fanon. In the original Japanese game, the Guardian of Earth was apparently named Miria in the instruction manual, but the English language release left her unnamed. In the years after its release, the game saw a few fanfics put up online, one of which referred to the Guardian as Alyssa. For some reason, this caught on, and she's been referred to by that name by almost any fan of the game since. Look up TGL on almost any retro gaming site now and it will probably mention Alyssa.
  • Club Penguin:
  • The Warcraft setting of Blizzard fame has also been repeatedly subjected to fanon, and every game release (and now, every other patch release in the MMO World of Warcraft) was filled with wild speculation from fans — speculation that would often evolve into fully written documents on the subject, carefully doctored images, and even their own Wowpedia pages. Some of the least grounded and most fan-developed theories that took fire over the internet included naming the high elven gods (this has happened TWICE, despite many canon sources acknowledging that high elves follow the Holy Light, when they even care about religion), the new Alliance race in the Burning Crusade being night elf spirits possessing the bodies of demons, the second WoW expansion being focused around the Maelstrom with naga and pandaren as races (it proved to be Wrath of the Lich King instead). Blizzard forums also frequently suffers hostile reactions from fans when the company fails to meet fanon expectations — pretty much every patch, since the company has a history of surprising its players that predates WoW.
    • The fact that all night elves encountered in Warcraft III campaigns before the awakening of the druids are female has led the fans to assume that all night elven males were druids (save for a few who were demon hunters), and that all druids slept in the Emerald Dream for the entire duration of the Long Vigil (which was about seven thousand years).
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    • Perhaps the prime example of Fanon was the belief that the Forsaken were outright unable to use the Holy Light. Fans vehemently believed this was part of the games lore and was cited in the RPG books when in truth the citation didn't even exist in the RPG. How much they deal with it is another matter (the starting zones hinted at a darker religion that was spelled out in the non-canon RPG), but the point is that they can.
    • Speaking of the Forsaken, many fans outright assumed that they were Always Chaotic Evil (and the game itself is pretty ambiguous on the issue). The same was assumed of the blood elves (especially during The Burning Crusade). Even today, the topic of which races in the Warcraft setting are Always Chaotic Evil, and which are not, is a point of contention.
    • A particularly persistent bit of Fanon is that if the eredar weren't involved, the Nathrezim must therefore have been solely responsible for Sargeras's Face–Heel Turn. Although the Nathrezim were known to be involved, there were many other demon types there as well.
    • Appendix III, a section of the old Warcraft Tabletop RPG on thinking up ideas for players to use DnD monsters in the Warcraft setting had fans believing Forlarren and leprechauns were canon to Azeroth for years!
    • Another interesting bit of fanon is the Lich King's power. In canon, the Lich King has shown three major traits: The Chessmaster, a necromancer, powerful. Ask a Warcraft fan pre-WOTLK, and they would tell you the Lich King could one shot the Old Gods, Kil'jaeden, and probably the Titans themselves. His Fanon power was so legendary that the very thought that the players could even threaten his plans seemed like a sin against humanity. It's been guessed that by the end of the expansion, after Arthas spends much the war running and getting his strongest warriors killed, that Blizzard purposely made the Lich King fail so much was because the fans turned him into a god.
    • Troll Voodoo is often misunderstood. Several players think the Darkspear no longer practice voodoo because of one of the troll greetings being "stay way from the voodoo", but actually they still do practice it. Vol'jin, leader of the darkspear, is amongst its most notable users. Some players think it is related to warlock magic when actually it is more connected to Shamanism and priests (the former having received Witch Doctor and Shadow Hunter spells such as Hex and healing wave from Warcraft III). It is not evil either as often thought; instead it is more a neutral source of magic.
    • The idea that draenei have two hearts has cropped up in several fanfics by different authors.
    • The eredar spy Talgath has no official title. However, "Hand of the Deceiver" seems to have stuck so well that it was actually on his Wowpedia page for some time.
    • An example was a doctored (and supposedly leaked) image of Duskbringer, Risen Champion of the Forsaken, who was believed to be a famous champion of light and good Uther the Lightbringer, who was risen as one of the Undead Forsaken. This didn't sit well with most fans and numerous lore reason was brought up as to why Uther should simply stay dead. In the end the image was a fake, but still a good example of Fanon coming into play.
    • One bit of fanon that is often confused with canon: Deathwing attacking Stormwind to retrieve the severed heads of Nefarian and Onyxia. While it would explain how the two of them are suddenly back after being dead for several years, this has never actually been stated in lore. In fact, no official explanation for the attack on Stormwind beyond "The beast is insane!" has ever been offered.
  • Resident Evil in general has a lot of fanon, most of it left over from the pre-RE4 years when Capcom seemed allergic to explaining anything. They would make a game specifically to answer a question, which would then confuse several other issues further:
    • One notable and oddly widespread bit of fanon portrays Chris and Claire Redfield as being part American Indian, which seems to have its roots in George A. Romero's unused RE screenplay, as well as with the mistaken belief that the name Redfield is of American Indian origins (it's actually Scottish).
  • Golden Sun:
    • Aside from the shipping wars that dominated the Golden Sun fandom near the start, there were also a couple of random ideas that passed into fanon. For one, there was the idea that the Adepts were naturally averse to their opposite element: Mars (fire) Adepts were afraid of water, Jupiter (wind) Adepts hated the desert, and so on. Nothing in the game really supported this (Garet, the party's strongest Mars Adept, is excited to see the ocean, whereas no one liked trekking through the Lamakan Desert), but aside from the aforementioned, it didn't contradict too much and was a fun way to add personality to the characters, so it stuck.
    • Another idea that caught on for a while before it faded out was referring to Isaac as, for some reason, Isaac-chan.
    • Several fans have decided that Star Magician is female, due to its sprite having very wide hips.
  • NiGHTS into Dreams...:
    • The gender of NiGHTS is never stated in any of the games. The first game's manual refers to it as "he, she or it", the second game avoids gender pronouns and gives it a female voice, and Word of God has stated more than once that NiGHTS doesn't have a specific gender. While most fans picks a gender they see it as, it's still a generally agreed fanon that NiGHTS choose what gender it feels like being. This is opposite of the early days of fandom, where any opinion that wasn't "NiGHTS is male and that's canon!" led to condescending, implications that you weren't a true fan, and/or being banned. There are still a few fans like this, but thankfully they're a minority.
    • The character of all the other characters (excepting Reala and NiGHTS itself) is completely based in fanon, to the extent that some people complained when the second game was released, saying that the characters "weren't true to canon." This seems to have been remedied somewhat over time, however characters such as Jackle are still prone to this. NiGHTS and Reala are still prone to fanon-based characterization, since it was only in JoD they got obvious personalities... and even then not everyone sees it as canon.
  • Any discussion of Silent Hill tends to rely heavily on this, as much of the actual story elements are either widely open to interpretation or, if you live in Japan, it's all there in the manual.
  • Chrono Trigger:
    • It's long been stated by certain Chrono Trigger and Chrono Cross fans that the royal family of Zeal dye their hair blue. This is never stated in the games or by Word of God, though it's often told by fans that someone in Chronopolis says it (they don't) or was mistranslated in the U.S. (it wasn't) or it was in the PS1 remake (it wasn't) or again, that it was left out in the U.S. (it still wasn't). The theory mainly exists to explain why Schala has blond hair in Chrono Cross, because the game never explains why Kid, who is explicitly Schala's clone, is blond, as well as Schala herself in the closing scenes of the game. There are many that understand this to simply be fan theory, but internet legend sometimes elevates this to canon.
    • Lucca as the Unlucky Childhood Friend of Crono's who was just unable to admit her feelings and then stood aside for Marle is such a common fan assumption that it's actually rarer to find portrayals of her that take her at her word that they're Platonic Life-Partners. Granted, the game canon itself doesn't totally rule out the possibility.
  • Knights of the Old Republic: Female Revan stories outnumber the "canonical" male by about a five-to-one margin. KOTOR has several bonuses for a female character anyway; Carth's dialogue tree being largest in-game (only half of it accessible to male players), a second romance option with Juhani, and a third ending where a Dark Side female could choose to sacrifice herself, and David Gaider made the whole thing clear as mud when he showed up on the fan site and submitted a female Revan story.
    • Apparently this fanbase for female Revans led to the Exile in KOTOR II being declared canonically female.
    • Another popular fan theory is that Carth Onasi is an untrained Force Sensitive. This is based on the character's uncanny intuition, bizarre luck, and the fact he came from a planet populated by Jedi washouts. It also doesn't hurt that he was able to see and understand a Force Ghost (something only Force Sensitives can do according to the d20 rulebook) and that his son was training as a Sith.
    • Likewise, it's also common to write Carth and Mission falling into a father and daughter dynamic, given that her brother (and only living family member) is a complete slimeball and that Carth's son is about Mission's age.
  • From the Wing Commander franchise:
    • Thanks to one scene between Admiral Tolwyn and Col. Devereaux, in Wing Commander II, it's widely believed by the fandom that the Phase Transit Cannon on the TCS Concordia has a tendency to blow up. All the actual scene says is that it's not safe to fire when at only 60% power, and that from a character known for being strictly "by the book", making it likely that Angel was thinking of technical documentation that errs on the side of caution.
    • Hobbes' betrayal in Wing Commander III is often said to be because he didn't want his homeworld blown up, but canonically he was a sleeper agent for the Kilrathi, established years prior to the third game. The video clip that explained this was present on the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer and PlayStation ports of the game, but cut from the PC version due to space limitations of PC CDs at the time.
  • None of the player-named heroes in the Suikoden games actually have canonical names, but fans often use the names that were given in the Japanese novelizations of each title (i.e.: the hero in the first Suikoden is known as Tir McDohl).
  • Amy from the Soul series is almost invariably called "Amy Sorel" in fandom due to her being adopted by Raphael, but officially she's never called anything but "Amy," and Raphael himself has no reasons to actually give her his last name, given the Sorel clan not only betrayed him to save face, but fell into obscurity shortly afterward, leaving no social or economical advantage to use it. Her age (which officially has always been "Unknown") is sometimes stated to be 14 thanks to someone editing it in in The Other Wiki, and people wrongly believing it came from the official site.
  • Team Fortress 2:
    • Pyro, whose gender is canonically unknown, is widely presumed to be female.
    • And that the Pyro is still Abraham Lincoln using the third Life-Extender Machine hinted on the last page of Loose Canon (where the name was never shown). This has been Jossed by the Mann vs. Machine update, showing the third machine (Gray).
    • Due to the Soldier's questionable sanity, fanon claims that he regularly takes advice from his shovel (an idea which Cuanta Vida perpetuates).
    • Heavy/Medic is one of the more popular pairings due to some of the Heavy's lines in-game.
    • Despite Word of God from Valve, some fans continue to believe that the Medic is an ex-Nazi (which would make the above example very confusing). Others believe he's Jewish.
    • A minor fanon is Scout's dogtags being a memento of his father or one of his brothers.
    • The Engineer either cut off his hand and replaced it with the gunslinger when he found the blueprints (most likely given the description), or according to some fanon always had a robot hand and just hid it under his glove (taking off his glove when he unlocks the item).
    • Pyro is often portrayed as the team cook, due to owning a toque blanche and his/her occasionally feminine behavior.
  • A relatively minor theory in Super Robot Wars Original Generation: because of her interactions with her female crewmates and friends, Excellen Browning is seen by the fandom as bisexual, given her teasing and flirtatiousness with both sexes; made more evident in the sequel during her scenes with Lamia Loveless. In fact, they take this further to Anything That Moves when monsters show up, some of them composed of Combat Tentacles. However, it's important to note she's only ever interested in getting the attention of her boyfriend, Kyosuke Nanbu, so this piece of Fanon is slight, and not hard evidenced enough. Still, many fanworks would rather pair of up with other girls than guys.
  • Within the world of Banjo-Kazooie, fandom makes much ado about the relationship between the two titular characters... even those who don't necessarily engage in Shipping. While in-series, they're Platonic Life-Partners (with a side order of Vitriolic Best Buds), they do live together, go everywhere together, and have the platonic equivalent of several Aw, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other moments. Thus, many fans assume that they're a Battle Couple. Whether this is a Crack Pairing or not depends on your tastes.
  • Due to having a sequel trapped in Development Hell, Beyond Good & Evil fans have had to speculate for themselves about a lot of the game's backstory, character motives, and the results of the game's vague epilogue/The Stinger. Due to its location, many fans tend to assume that the effects of The Virus on lovable sidekick Pey'j were the direct result of heroine/local MacGuffin Turned Human Jade bringing him Back from the Dead. Due to the game's ending Photo Montage, fans also tend to assume that The Big Guy, Double H, moves in with Jade (and also tends to give him a Bodyguard Crush on her).
  • Animal Crossing fans tend to refer to Timmy and Tommy, the two Single-Minded Twins who come to work for Tom Nook, as Nook's "nephews." In-game, though, they're given no relation to him other than that. Fandom simply extrapolated based on the commonality of Chaste Toons. They call him "Uncle Nook" in later games, likely due to the Japanese versions using the word ojisan which is roughly translated to "uncle" but is often a way of hailing a man who's older than you, whom you know (think of a little kid calling a friend of his/her mom's "auntie").
  • The World Ends with You:
    • It is commonly assumed that Rhyme's entry fee was her dreams/ambitions, although it was only implied. It's also fairly agreed on that the main reason Shiki was in Eri's body for Another Day was that the artists were too lazy to draw new sprites for her. Joshua leans on the fourth wall in support of this theory.
    • The concept of a "Music of Shibuya" shows up in nearly any fanfic that focuses on the roles of Composer and/or Conductor. The word actually never came up in the game. Neku is also often given a sketchbook and a talent for drawing, even though all we actually know of his art sensibility is that he likes CAT — who is a tag artist, but also a designer and makes... ads about... stuff.
  • Metroid:
  • An incriminating letter found in King's Quest VI: Heir Today, Gone Tomorrow was meant to be "merely" a document implicating the game's Big Bad in the events of the fifth game. However, the way the letter was worded implied a much wider conspiracy at work. The fans started speculating about the Society of the Black Cloak, and have pretty much run with the idea that most (and possibly all), the enemies of Daventry's royal family belong to its ranks. The Fan Remake of King's Quest II: Romancing the Throne uses this assumption with the character of The Father, and the Fan Sequel has also introduced a member of the Black Cloak Society as the family's nemesis.
    • Speaking of, the AGD Interactive games are entirely fan-made works, and the Fan Remake of KQII wildly contradicts the original in several places, but has enough of a following to take on fanon status.
    • Another, more contested, bit of fanon states that Rosella will eventually marry Edgar and move to Etheria, leaving Graham to appoint Mask of Eternity's Connor MacLir as heir, the way Edward the Benevolent did for him. The controversy stems from Mask of Eternity's dubious standing in the fandom.
  • Persona 4:
    • There is some massive amounts of Les Yay between Yukiko and Chie, to the point one can be forgiven for interpreting them as gay for each other. It's to the point that fanfics recommended on This Very Wiki ship them together.
    • Roughly everyone's sexuality is up to fanon. Yosuke and Teddie flirt any girl they see but still share heavy Ho Yay moments with the protagonist. Kanji tries too hard to prove he is straight and still has many gay moments. While Naoto is a possible love interest, she isn't interested in anyone and everyone refers to her with male Japanese pronouns. Some believe Everyone Is Gay, others believe Everyone Is Bi.
    • There are exactly two moments when Naoto's bust is brought into question; one vague hospital scene where she's embarrassed to have her measurements read, and again during the Hot Springs Episode. Fanon decided to take this ball and run with it straight outta the stadium, and the grand bulk of her fan art depicts her with downright tremendous assets, easily surpassing D-cups. Meanwhile in canon, the hot springs character cut-out and the anime of the game show only a slight elevation, nothing more than a modest B-cup. However, in Persona 4: Arena, Akihiko states that she's keeping a lot hidden.
    • Adachi attempting to rape his victims appears quite often as well, despite this not being the case and newer adaptations showing that it didn't happen. While he was harassing his victims, he didn't go as far as to rape them. Even his character page on TV Tropes suffers from this fanon being taken as canon.
  • Persona 5:
    • The Protagonist's parents tend to get characterized as neglectful Hate Sink characters similar to the minor Mementos targets, considering they seemingly believed the very flimsy accusation laid against him, dumped him off on a guy whose cafe is mildly frequented by a friend of theirs, and apparently never so much as called or wrote him. Others tend to write them to be much more sympathetic, in that they obviously didn't believe the accusations against the protagonist, but were powerless to stop his probation from happening, and were forced to send him away. The ones who write them as the latter tend to point out that we don't exactly see every single aspect of the protagonist's life.
    • Thanks to Sae taking the revelation that Makoto is part of the Phantom Thieves rather bad, fans have taken to portraying her as something of a Knight Templar Big Sister, often doubling humorously with My Sister Is Off-Limits! since Joker and Makoto is such a popular ship. To the surprise of absolutely no one, this gave rise to stuff like this and this. Hilariously enough, this was partially confirmed in the fan data book released after the game. Much like Makoto, Sae also practices martial arts as a hobby, in her case kickboxing.
    • Theories have been starting up about Akechi and Futaba possibly being paternal half-siblings, since absolutely nothing is known about the latter's biological father, and Shido is shown to have been highly fixated on Wakaba's cognitive psience research. The release of the Maniax book spurred the theory further, as it reveals that Akechi has type AB Negative blood, the same blood type as Futaba's (which was revealed in the official art book beforehand); this becomes more significant knowing that 99% of the Japanese population is RH+.
    • It is a popular to theorize that Joker gets into politics after his time with the Phantom Thieves as well as Shido's corruption made him want to change society.
  • Castlevania:
  • F-Zero:
    • F-Zero is subjected to copious amounts of fanon, due in part to the (now defunct) North American website for F-Zero X, in which it included many character elements that would later be adopted by fans (the big one being Douglas Jay Falcon as Captain Falcon's name) several of these elements were roundly Jossed when F-Zero GX came out several years later and there was a more unified translation. But while it could be considered fanon in the basic sense of the word, a lot of the NA F-Zero X information is still treated like official canon despite its dubious source.
    • And while GP Legend is considered an Alternate Continuity series, a popular piece of fanon is that anime-only Lisa Brilliant (the wife of Samurai Goroh) is the mother of game-only Dai Goroh (Samurai Goroh's son, making his debut in F-Zero GX/AX).
  • Though there's not much evidence to support it other than somewhat similar appearances (and Etna's commitment to fanservice), many Disgaea fans have it that Etna, Hanako and Raspberyl are all adolescent succubi.
  • Mortal Kombat:
    • Among the Mortal Kombat fandom, while Shaolin Monks is regarded as a very good spin-off, the sheer amount of liberties taken in regards to the plot (and several contradictions to previous continuity, which did not go over well with the fans) made it hard for many to believe that the game (assumed to be a retelling of the first and second installments) is canon. However, since then, a somewhat prevalent fan theory has popped up, claiming Shaolin Monks might exist in the same timeline as MK vs. DC Universe (itself supposedly set between 3 and 4), explaining all of the odd changes in plot developments and thus creating another reality (the original canon being the first, the 2011 reboot being another, and these two games comprising the third).
    • Another fan theory involves Sheeva from 3, a member of the Shokan race much like Goro and Kintaro. Whereas Kintaro was explicitly said to be Goro's cousin, Sheeva's relation to the Shokan prince (if any, besides 9 stating that they hail from the same lineage of Shokan, the Draco tribe) has never been disclosed. Speculation commonly places her as either one of Goro's relatives (usually his sister or cousin) or his wife (of whom Goro is mentioned to have seven, according to the first game's official comic and instruction manual).
  • The Advancing Wall of Doom that appears on Worlds 3-4 and 6-6 of Eversion, especially the latter, is generally agreed by the fans to be The Lurker at the Threshold, avatar of Yog-Sothoth.
  • The Sims:
    • The Sims 2 has some fanon despite being a Wide Open Sandbox game. For example, the townie Meadow Thayer is often used to give a teen their first kiss (because she's one of the few female teenage townies), and there are certain Sims that are often played as gay like Frances Worhington or Nervous Subject.
    • There's a little bit of joke fanon that the muffins a child make in The Sims 3 have meat in them. This is because vegetarian Sims get sick from eating them.
  • Portal:
    • With the revelation in Portal 2 that GLaDOS is a brain uploaded human, it's become widely accepted that the personality cores were created the same way.
    • Further, Wheatley's theorized human self is almost universally described as resembling Stephen Merchant.
    • Virtually everybody assumes that Chell is the daughter of Aperture's founder Cave Johnson and his secretary Caroline. There is evidence to suggest she was the daughter of someone at Aperture (her apparent signature appears on a children's science project in the 'Bring Your Daughter to Work Day' display) and the assumption is sort of understandable since Cave and Caroline are the only other human characters named in-game and GLaDOS, who has Caroline's mind inside her, is obsessed with Chell to an almost mother-like degree, but nowhere does it imply she was anything near as important as the daughter of the founder. Plus, Cave Johnson died in the early 1980s and was already old man at that point (He looked like this circa 1943). In the first game, Chell looks like she could maybe be a young-looking forty-something at oldest, and in the higher-quality graphics of the second she doesn't look a day over 30. Cave could have invented something to keep his daughter young or himself and Caroline fertile, and he's crazy enough to force people to spend years in stasis or something, but you still have to be really trying to interpret him as Chell's father to make it work.
    • There is also the fact that the Prima Donna Turret, who is most likely controlled by GLaDOS, explicitly calls Chell her daughter in one of the ending songs (in Italian). Whether that's metaphorical or not is up to you.
    • There is also a common belief that Chell has no memory of anything before Portal based purely on the fact that we are given no information on her backstory, and possibly the fact that she seemed to not know GLaDOS was evil.
    • Humanized interpretations of Glados usually have her with a Sci-Fi Bob Haircut.
  • Widespread Dragon Age II fanon has it that Merrill is a virgin (she usually fails to understand innuendo) and Anders is claustrophobic due to having spent a year locked in solitary confinement (he does comment in a frightened voice "I really need to stay out of the Deep Roads" if clicked there, though there might be other reasons for that). It's also generally agreed that Danarius sexually abused Fenris when he was a slave, though that was a case of Writer-Induced Fanon, and has since been confirmed by Word of God. Another bit of fanon is that Fenris is an alcoholic, and that he had dark brown or black hair before the lyrium ritual gave him Mystical White Hair (since his eyebrows are black while his hair is stark white).
  • Dragon Age: Inquisition: Though pale, bald, and cerebral, many Solas fans have taken some early concept art to mean that's what he looked like when he was younger (Word of God has placed him to be in his mid-forties apparently by ancient elven standards), including the smug/cocky disposition. (It helps that Solas has brown eyebrows and admits to being very "cocky and Hot-Blooded" when he was younger.)
    • Many Inquisition Elvhen fans have also generally agreed that Abelas has long silver hair under his hood (similarly tied to the upper back of his head and shaved to the sides of his head).
  • Story of Seasons:
    • Fanon has most male protagonists being called "Jack" despite the fact each design has its own name, and none of them are called "Jack". On the female side, the protagonist in Another Wonderful Life is officially named "Pony" but fans prefer "Jill".
    • In Harvest Moon 64 it's implied Gotz is abusive to Sasha but it's never confirmed. Fans often write him as an abusive husband. The games itself are a bit more explicit about him abusing his daughter, however it doesn't seem to be physical abuse like fans believe.
    • Certain Fan Preferred Couples are more or less so widely shipped they're considered the fanon Official Couples. Celia/Mark and Pony/Marlin from Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life are two examples. Gray/Claire and Skye/Pony in Harvest Moon: More Friends of Mineral Town and Harvest Moon DS Cute are two others.
    • Nina from Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life is Nina from the first game as a senior. This is due to her similar hairstyle, her love of flowers, and her similarities to Ellen in Harvest Moon 64.
    • Joe and Kurt as twins. Canonically, Joe is actually older than Kurt.
    • The protagonist of Harvest Moon: Grand Bazaar have no canon names however fans call them "Hansel" and "Gretel".
    • Doctor's name being "Tim". In Back To Nature, Friends of Mineral Town, and their Distaff Counterparts he is unnamed. In Harvest Moon DS, its Distaff Counterpart, Harvest Moon: Island of Happiness, and Harvest Moon: Sunshine Islands he is given the name of "Trent". Still, most insist that his name in BTN/FOMT is "Tim".
    • The Fictional Currency G is short for "Gold". It's a logical leap, especially since certain games depict it as a golden coin, but it's never canonically called anything besides "G".
  • It seemed to be agreed upon in the Dawn of War fandom that the Imperial Guard won the Kaurava campaign in Soulstorm even though the sequels never really revealed who won the conflict, only that the Space Marines lost.
  • May fans believe that Sly Cooper's dad's name is Connor Copper.
  • Spice in Spore is, from a gameplay perspective, merely a commodity to be bought and sold at a profit; while it's not elaborated on much, the descriptions suggest that it is seasoning for food (also floor polish). However, the general consensus among fans is that spice is actually drugs, due to how the word is used in Dune and the Star Wars Expanded Universe (and possibly some other Sci-Fi franchises as well). User-made levels for Spore Galactic Adventures have shown examples of spice dealers, spice smugglers, spice junkies, and even a campaign to ban spice.
  • Halo:
    • Quite a few fans consider Red vs. Blue to be a sort of "unofficial canon." Basically, they acknowledge that it isn't really canon, but still consider it to be just as much a part of the Halo universe as the actual games.
    • Since the launch of the Cortana app on Microsoft Windows, a common fan theory is that Halo's Cortana is descended from it in the future. Since the app was originally named for the game character, it makes it a case of a Stable Time Loop.
  • In Xenogears, a Fan Translation of Perfect Works erroneously mentioned that Yui Uzuki, Citan's wife, beat him in a swordfight before they married. While this has since been debunked, it nonetheless makes Yui far more awesome (especially since Citan is otherwise The Ace), so the myth continues anyway.
  • It's unknown what the bond between the protagonists of Ice Climber are. The most common beliefs are either that they're siblings or that they're lovers. Sometimes they're both. Likewise their ages are ambiguous, but fans typically have them as children around 10-15.
  • Kantai Collection:
    • The idea that if a Fleet Girl dies (i.e. is sunk) because of her Admiral's carelessness or incompetence, she'll be brought back as a member of the enemy Abyssal Fleet by her grudge, has found strong foothold in the fandom, helped by the solid popularity of the Abyssal Fleet. There's even a Pixiv tag dedicated to the "corrupted" Fleet Girls.
    • A related idea is that members of the existing Abyssal Fleet were once Fleet Girls. This one sometimes comes up as a backstory for the Wo-class aircraft carrier in particular.
    • Both these ideas were canonized for the anime adaptation.
    • Another common fanon concept is giving the Abyssal Fleet a commanding officer as an Evil Counterpart of the player character’s Admiral, usually wearing a black uniform to contrast with the player’s white one.
  • The Elder Scrolls series of games has various out-of-game developer works, ranging from production commentaries to fanfiction.
  • The song "Hometown Domina" from Legend of Mana has widely accepted fanmade lyrics in a made-up language. You can check out one performance here.
  • Fans of Tales of Symphonia and Tales of Phantasia universally cite a four thousand-year gap between them. No definitive answer on the time gap between them has been given by the developers. Fans took the year given in Phantasia's In-Universe calendar and assumed that Symphonia's ending acted as Year Zero for a new calendar.
  • While the protagonists of CarnEvil were never given names, fans tend to call Player 1 Jacob and Player 2 Lisa. It seems that this came about when someone added the two names to Wikipedia in 2007, and the fandom ran with it. (The editor didn't even call Lisa Player 2; they gave the name to the innocent bystander, whose canon name is Betty.) In fan art, Jacob is depicted with a red jacket, a green t-shirt with blue jeans and carries a flashlight (which is close to how the protagonist appears in the very brief times we see him), while Lisa wears a blue crop-top jacket, jeans and a purple-and-white hat.
  • It's a popular idea among fans of Minecraft that items dropped on the ground de-spawn because Creepers steal them.
  • Danganronpa:
    • Almost every fan agrees on the theory that Ryouko Otonashi is Junko Enoshima's real name, and that both of the twins' names are fake names. While nothing in Danganronpa Zero says this to be true, it fits very well into what is shown.
    • Nearly every bit of artwork for after the events of Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair has Kuzuryu wearing his eyepatch, and being the one who transplanted Enoshima's right eye into himself, due to the person in the CG has a near identical hairstyle and is transplanted his right eye, the same one Kuzuryu lost.
    • Most artwork of the first game survivors as Future Foundation members depicts Hagakure with his hair in a ponytail. This was made canon in the design sketches included in the Danganronpa Another Episode: Ultra Despair Girls artbook.
  • Modern Warfare 2: A disproportionately high number of fans seem to believe that "Raptor," the VIP that you protect in the mission "Wolverines!", is the President of the United States—if only because it makes it seem so much more badass when you save his life. In the actual game, his identity and position in the government are never revealed and there are lots of people who would qualify for his level of protection. About the only evidence supporting the theory is that his callsign, "Raptor," alludes to a large bird of prey; the POTUS' traditional Secret Service callsign is "Eagle," another large bird of prey.
  • Ness' design from Earthbound is near-identical to Ninten from Earthbound Beginnings, however Ness is far more popular than Ninten due to Sequel Displacement. This has caused fans to almost always draw Ninten's design differently than it canonically is. This usually involves giving him the handkerchief that he wore in the live-action commercial for the game, but can also involve editing the stripes on his shirt to be red-blue-white like in the commercial. This is so commonplace that many think Ninten's canonical design has him wearing a handkerchief.
  • Undertale:
  • Overwatch:
    • Mei's snowsuit conceals her actual body shape, so fan art often portrays her as buxom and curvy, ranging from just hourglass-shaped to outright Big Beautiful Woman. Certain outfits hinted, then "Rise And Shine" finally confirmed she was curvy.
    • Fandom really likes the idea that Pharah is a biker when she's not flying, presumably as a reference to Top Gun. More on the Overwatch - Story and Lore page.
    • Pharah and Ana being Muslim. This is because they're Egyptian and most Egyptians are Muslim.
  • The gender of Kyros, the world-conquering Evil Overlord in Tyranny, is pointedly left ambiguous, with different characters giving conflicting reports or making assumptions according to cultural norms of leadership. However, fans who don't go for Gender-Neutral Writing when discussing them usually assume they're female rather than male. Especially given that the devs themselves typically prefer female pronouns.
  • Ultima: Ever since the reveal in Ultima VII that the Kilrathi exist in the same universe as Britannia, many fans have speculated that the "TIE-Fighters" you fought in Ultima I were actually Dralthi.
  • ARMS:
    • Ribbon Girl is canonically seventeen but fans are more likely to depict her as a few years older.
    • Twintelle as a Cool Big Sis towards Ribbon Girl, Min-Min, and Mechanica. This also often involves Mechanica or Ribbon Girl being infatuated with her.
    • Min-Min and Ribbon Girl are often depicted as friends (or more) due to their similar age.
    • Spring Man as being the son of Dr. Coyle and Max Brass. This is due to a resemblance between the characters, Coyle being in her 40s, and Coyle and Brass having been friends in the past.
  • In Stellaris, there are a number of massive crises that can cause massive havoc in the galaxy, and the fandom has a number of theories connecting them. Those which psionic abilities can communicate with the Prethyon and find that they are fleeing something they call "the Hunters", while it turns out the Contigency AI is trying to prevent something called a "class-30 singularity". And a psionically-adept player that prods too long into the Shroud can eventually find out about the End of the Cycle, a full-blown Cosmic Horror Story if the player takes the Schmuck Bait. The running popular theory is that threat the first and second factions are referring to is the third.
  • Professor Layton fans commonly believe that Clive Dove, villain of "Unwound Future", develops a Big Brother Instinct towards Luke and Flora, in stark contrast to his canon manipulation of the former and kidnapping of the latter. Though since it's heavily implied he's a decent sort once the Professor snaps him out of his madness, it's not totally out there.
  • Higurashi: When They Cry:
    • It's generally assumed that as adults Rena will be a detective, Keiichi will be a teacher, Shion will be a bodyguard, and Mion will be her clan's leader. The latter is canon, however the other three are not.
    • Rika is a direct descendant of Hanyuu. This is heavily implied but never confirmed.
    • Due to the popularity of the ship, Rika and Satoko as eventually becoming a couple is this.
  • Crash Bandicoot: Many fans believe that Cortex is Nina's father, not her uncle. This is due to a slip-up he has in Twinsanity.
  • In the StarCraft fandom, it was gendral consensus that the Overmind would transfer the minds of experienced Zerg into new bodies when they were inevitably killed.
  • Kirby: Before notes from a Japanese art book confirmed Ado and Adeline to be the same person, fans had a habit of drawing them as identical twin sisters. Western fandom used to consider the pair Half-Identical Twins before Ado's gender was confirmed.
  • It's honestly hard to sift between all the canon and fanon in the Five Nights at Freddy's franchise, due to so much lore and theories about what happened, but there's one thing most people can agree on: in the fake ending to Sister Location the reason Ennard shows up at Eggs's house is because Eggs decided to rescue them and adopt them. It certainly helps that Eggs is hinted to be Michael Afton, brother of Elizabeth Afton, who ends up possessing Baby, one of the components of Ennard.
    • Also, in cases where the above is true Ennard becomes a fan of The Immortal and the Restless like Eggs.
    • There are more than a few bits of Fanon attached to the Purple Guy.
      • The sprites used to depict him just show him as a purple figure with a badge. Fanartists often add a collared shirt, a necktie, and a baseball cap.
      • Before his official name (William Afton) was revealed, it was common to give him a simple name like “Vincent” or “Charles.”
      • Fanartists usually depict him as somewhat young-looking, even though he’s old enough to have an adult son.
  • In the first Slaves to Armok: God of Blood game, Armok is the creator and destroyer deity of the game, giving an in-lore explanation for this game's procedural creation of the world, and save deletion. In Slaves to Armok: God of Blood - Chapter II: Dwarf Fortress, he is completely absent of the game, no worship of him ever exist inside of in-game worlds, and Tarn Adams has no plans to implement him, saying the game's cumbersome name was mostly "for kicks." However, this doesn't prevent the players to reference him, make their dwarves swearing to Armok while telling their stories, or building obsidian cathedral dedicated to him (often with Human Sacrifice), because of the conspuous "Slaves to Armok: God of Blood" contained in the full game title. One of the most widespread interpretations says that Armok is actually the in-game representation of the player, in which case the sobriquet of "God of Blood" is well-earned.
  • Astral Chain: Since whichever member of the Sibling Team you don't pick is named "Akira Howard" regardless of gender, fans like to depict both siblings with the name. Their first names are typically written with different characters (such as katakana for one and hiragana for the other) to get around the One Steve Limit.
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