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Fan Nickname / Super Smash Bros.

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The Super Smash Bros. fanbase has a tendency to create Fan Nicknames.


  • Masahiro Sakurai has recieved the moniker of "Daddy Sakurai" from some fans that are... enthusiastic, shall we say.
  • "Shine" refers to the down-special move of Fox and Falco. This term is often used more than the official name (Reflector) in the community because it implies its usage as an offensive move, rather than a defensive one.
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  • Strong attacks note  are generally referred to as tilts, owing to the fact that the control stick is merely tilted rather than pushed hard (as for a Smash attack). The term is so frequently used among players that it's even used in Prima's official strategy guide for the fourth game. Ultimate is the first game to officially use the term "tilt attack" in-game.
  • Meteor Smashes are occasionally referred to as "spikes." This is something of a holdover from the Melee community; spikes in that game were similar to Meteor Smashes bar a technicality with the launch angle that prevents the target from cancelling the knockback/momentum of the move (unlike with Meteor Smashes, which can be cancelled). In later games actual spikes do not exist due to the angle of what the game considers to be a Meteor Smash being enlarged, but the name has persisted regardless.
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  • Blast zones on the left or right sides of the screen that can be reached just by walking to them are typically known as "walkoffs".
  • Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U is often referred to as "Sm4sh" or "Smash 4" for ease of recognition or to just refer to them collectively. Before the reveal of the actual title, /v/ called the Wii U/3DS game's subtitle "Kerfuffle", and due to the somewhat confusing subtitle, it's often still referred to as that. Indeed, the nickname became so popular, Googling "Super Smash Bros. Kerfuffle" will give you the official website and Wikipedia articles as the top results. The game's haters has also dismissively assigned it the nickname "Tr4sh".
  • Randall is the cloud from the Yoshi's Story stage in Melee. He's also considered the god of fate in competitive play, due to his presence (or lack thereof) causing a lot of incredible wins and defeats.
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  • Captain Falcon's forward aerial as of Melee is the Knee Smash (Striking Knee in Japanese) or the KNEE OF JUSTICE!!!
  • Related to the above, the "Sacred Combo" is an incredibly difficult to pull off (to the point of impractical) move combo involving using the Knee of Justice to launch a foe offstage, then attempting to hit them in mid-air with the Falcon Punch. Ganondorf can also do this, but it is much harder to pull off due to his speed.
  • The third hit of Captain Falcon's neutral attack (not the infinite jab, but the knee butt) is called the Gentleman. This name came about as a result of a bet between competitive smashers Isai and a Japanese player with the tag "gentleman"; in the NTSC version of Melee, the non-infinite jab ender for Falcon had a very strict and unintuitive requirement to perform, so they made a bet that whoever could pull off the attack the most consistently would have it named after them.
  • Ganondorf's forward tilt from Brawl onward, a straight kick, is commonly known as "Sparta Kick." His forward aerial is known as Skullcrusher. Also, his down-air is often called the "thunder stomp," due to how strong it is and its electrical damage property.
  • Peach's Vegetables are known as "turnips" in the competitive community.
  • Pokémon Trainer is referred to as Red heavily often due to various factors. The biggest one is that it's Red's design in FireRed/LeafGreen. Trainer's voice is also extremely similar to Ash's, giving him that natural nickname (this doesn't include the fact that he has the same Pokémon as Ash's outside of Ivysaur).
  • The Wii Fit Trainer is known as "Miss Fit," both to distinguish her from the other "trainer" and in reference to her being such a strange character. There's also Mr. Fit for the Male Trainer.
  • Immediately after the obese Little Mac from Captain Rainbow was announced as a trophy, a few fans already started calling him "Big Mac".
  • Greninja is either called "Frog Strider" by fighting game fans, or "Disco Ninja Frog." Also, Narutoad.
  • Kamehameha for Lucario's Final Smash in Brawl, and Hadouken for its Aura Sphere, due to looking like each respective non-Pokémon move. Comes back around in 3DS/Wii U, with Sean Schemmel reprising his role as Lucario from Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (though Lucario no longer sports Aura Storm as a Final Smash). Ultimate has Lucario (voiced again by Schemmel) using Aura Storm as Mega Lucario, who could be likened to Lucario going Super Saiyan.
  • Omnislash for Kirby's Ultra Sword Final Smash in 3DS/Wii U, due to both being rainbow-colored Spam Attacks using enormous swords.
  • Mega Man's Final Smash, calling forth his various incarnations to combine their Mega Busters in a single, powerful blast, has drawn a lot of comparisons to Power Rangers/Super Sentai; the general version is "Power Rangers, Fire!!" but Toku fans sometimes make more specific references like "Forever Blue," "Mega Legend Dream," or "It's Time for Final Buster!" It has also gained the nickname "Backstreet's Back" primarily thanks to this video. Greatest Five is infrequently tossed around, thanks in part to that Dual Crash summoning five of the Belmont Clan's all-time greats, not unlike Mega Man's Final Smash.
  • Maximum Greninja for Greninja's Final Smash, due to its similarities to Maximum Spider (particularly the MvC3 version).
    • In the vein of Marvel vs. Capcom references, Ragnarok is equally common, in line with the above "Frog Strider" nickname. Hilariously enough, Yuji Ueda is both the Japanese voice of Greninja (Gekkouga) and Strider Hiryuu himself in the Marvel crossovers, making him voice two different ninjas so far in Capcom crossovers.
    • To a much lesser extent, Zansei Roga, with the final attack of both moves actually resembling one another quite nicely. Lampshaded by D1 during the celebrity match at E3 2014's Smash Bros. Invitational when, after Zelda's Greninja successfully lands Night Slash, D1 yells out, "SLASH!" note , followed by "This ain't Guilty Gear!" soon after. (Sadly, as of this writing, Baiken's Tatami Gaeshi has only caught on for a few players in regards to the Mat Block leading into Night Slash, ironic because Tatami Gaeshi is the actual original name for Mat Block in Japanese.)
    • There are others who dub it Shouou Jin'eizan (helped by the fact that Bandai Namco themselves are co-developing the game) or Blut Vollmond.
  • One reporter dubbed Villager's Final Smash as the "Habitat for Inhumanity."
  • A few members of Nintendo's Treehouse refer to a Villager in the hands of a skilled player as "Killager." In the hands of Bill Trinen, he's known as the "Billager." "Pillager" is also used sometimes, which makes it a shame that Villager's iconic Viking hat didn't make it as an alt costume.
  • With the large amount of playable female characters in Super Smash Bros. for 3DS/Wii U, a few fans have started to refer to it as "Super Bash Sisters" after a line of Palutena's from Kid Icarus: Uprising. It also helped that Super Smash Bros. Ultimate added even more playable female characters.
  • The hunkiness of Ike, Little Mac, Ganondorf, Male Wii Fit Trainer, and Captain Falcon have lent the name "Super Smash Bara" to the fourth game. Roy's bulked-up physique and Ryu have only added to it.
  • With the addition of Shulk's swimsuit alt, Samus' Fusion alt, and Captain Falcon's prominent bulge and ass, the game's been gaining the nickname "Sexy Smash Bros." fairly quickly.
  • Color TV-Game 15 is almost always called "Pong," either due to the "Weird Al" Effect or easier pronunciation.
  • 360 No Scope for Robin's Thoron where Robin spins his/her body in a 360 degree motion prior to firing Thoron, which has one of the fastest muzzle velocities in the game for a projectile and is nearly impossible to block, dodge, or reflect/deflect unless done ahead of time. People have also begun calling Thoron Kamehameha because of how closely it resembles Goku's Kamehameha in Super Smash Flash 2, which has the same amount of range and damage (17% for Kamehameha and 18% for Thoron with the special button held down). The only differences are that Thoron takes less time to charge, can be stored, is capable of being reflected, and has a 10-second cooldown timer after three Thorons have been fired. It also helps that Lucario lost Aura Storm in 3DS/Wii U and the new Final Smash is now Mega Lucario. Shinkuu Hadoken and Ziodyne also work (the latter more so, due to Thoron being an electrical attack, while the former isn't as applicable since the actual attack is Ryu's Final Smash).
  • "Duck Hunt" is almost universally known as "the Duck Hunt dog," since the former doesn't really fit as a character name or description. Some fans have taken in calling the dog "Duck" and the Duck "Hunt." Apparently, the European localization team agreed that "Duck Hunt" didn't make a good name, since that version of the game renamed them the "Duck Hunt Duo." note 
  • Dr. Mario's Final Smash, which involves giant pills, is sometimes called "Lethal Dosage" or "Overdose". Its real name is "Doctor Finale".
  • Ganondorf's blue alternate costume seems to have gained the terms "Smurfendorf" and "Ganonsmurf." And his white-haired alt costume is often referred to as Old Manondorf or Grandpadorf.
  • Mega Man's Mega Buster shots are frequently called "lemons."
  • Dr. Mario is usually just called "Doc" or "the Doc".
  • Rosalina & Luma is often shortened to "Rosaluma."
  • Oil Panic, Mr. Game & Watch's down special, is usually referred to as the "Bucket."
  • Little Mac's punching barrage has been dubbed by some as ORAORAORAORAORA. Hokuto Hyakuretsu Ken/Hundred Crack Fist (lit. Hundred Rending Fists) is also a suitable name.
  • Due to similarities between StreetSmash and a certain token-based mini-game, it's been known in some circles as "Tin Pin Smash."
  • Captain Fabulous or Fancy Falcon for Pink Captain Falcon. For fans of Yo Videogames, there's Breast Cancer Awareness Captain Falcon.
  • Pink Dong for Pink Donkey Kong, as well as Grape Ape for purple Donkey Kong.
  • DIC Bowser for Green Bowser, which is more likely based on his sprite from Super Mario World.
  • Purple Yoshi is often referred to as Barney for reasons that should be obvious.
  • Before their official names were revealed, the five forms of Master Core were known as Sapient, Scorpio, Swords, Simulacrum, and Source. To keep with the theme, some call Master Fortress "Subterrane," "Stronghold," or just "Stage."
  • Almost everyone refers to the first game's starter cast note  collectively as the Original Eight (or the Original Twelve, if the secret characters note  are involved).
  • 5-Volt, 9-Volt's mother who's the creepy and primary hazard in the "Gamer" stage, is actually just called "Mom" by Sakurai himself.
  • Dr. Mario's black palette swap was called an "unlicensed doctor" on the Japanese Melee site. Some also call like to call it his Mad Doctor costume. In addition to that, the pink palette swap is known as "Gynecologist Mario", the light blue one is known as "Dentist Mario", and the green one is known as "Surgeon Mario".
  • Guts for Ike's Radiant Dawn-inspired redesign in 3DS/Wii U, due to both being extremely muscular swordsmen capable of wielding a two-handed weapon with a single hand.
  • The entirety of Bowser Jr. and the Koopalings are usually called "Koopa Kid" collectively.
  • The three rare Wave 1 amiibo, Marth, Villager, and Wii Fit Trainer, are dubbed the "Holy Trinity."
  • Falcondorf for Ganondorf's portrayal as a Moveset Clone of Captain Falcon, generally used by detractors who wish he had a different moveset.
  • Master Hand's infamous card attack in 3DS/Wii U is often referred to as "Kraft Singles."
  • Mewtwo and Lucas are known as "Psychic Bros." due to their 3DS/Wii U trailers coming out around the same time.
  • Mewtwo's blue color palette in 3DS/Wii Unote  has been dubbed "Bluetwo" by the fans.
  • The female Robin is sometimes called Reflet, the protagonist's name in the Japanese version of Fire Emblem Awakening, to distinguish the two gender counterparts. Ditto for Corrin/Kamui.
  • Donkey Kong's giant punch is often called either "the punch," the "Dong Punch," or "Donkey Punch." Yeah.... note 
  • Yoshi and Bowser's "Bomb" attacks are often called the "Ground Pound" in reference to Yoshi's move from Yoshi's Island and Mario's move from Super Mario 64. It is also referred to as the Butt Bounce.
  • Bowser's Flying Slam is known as the body slam by some people. The competitive scene often refers to it as the "Koopa Claw" since that's what Bowser's side special was in Melee and the two moves have the same opening animation as Bowser swiping at the opponent with his claws to grab them.
  • Donkey Kong with the custom specials of Kong Cyclone and Storm Punch is commonly known as the "Wind Kong." He's also been dubbed an Airbender.
    • Kong Cyclone itself is sometimes called "Dongcopter".
  • Down-throw to up-tilt combo is known as "The Mario." While Mario is not the only character to have this combo, he's the one most notorious for having it be really effective.
  • Mario, Luigi, and Dr. Mario's up-specials, Super Jump Punch, are commonly known as Shoryuken due to them being rising uppercuts.
  • [*character name*]cide, for any attack a character can use as a Suicide Attack (most famously, Ganondorf's "Ganoncide," and Bowser's "Bowsercide," both done by using their Side-B attacks to carry the opponent offstage). King Dedede's variation are split between being called Dededecide or the more punny Self-Dededestruct
  • Zero Skill Spamus, for people who consider Zero Suit Samus a High Tier-Induced Scrappy.
  • Samus is sometimes referred to as "Regular Samus" or "Power Suit Samus" to distinguish her from Zero Suit Samus, especially since many of the latter's fanboys (particularly ones unfamiliar with Metroid) casually refer to her as just "Samus."
  • One of Ryu's alternate costumes has been known as "the Goku gi" due to its orange color, though it, like all of Ryu's colors in the game, is actually based on one of his palettes from the Street Fighter II series (specifically his LK palette in Super Turbo, which may or may not be a nod to Ryo Sakazaki).
  • Some refer to the Wii U bundle containing Smash and Splatoon, due to it being released near Black Friday, as the Brack Furaiday Banduru.
  • Corrin is sometimes referred to as Corn.
  • Bayonetta is affectionately referred to as Sarah Palin.
  • Some dub Bayonetta the Queen of Combos, being the most combo-centric character outside of Ryu (3DS/Wii U's officially-dubbed King of Combos).
  • Corrin is called Arceus due to the very close similarities between his/her dragon form and the creator god Pokémon. As with Robin/Reflet above, Kamui (Corrin's Japanese name) is often used to refer to the female alternate.
  • Of the Villager's alternate costumes, a few have nicknames based on what they're wearing: Pink for the pink-haired villager, Turnip or Green for the one in the dark green dress, Stoner for the one in the light blue shirt and Red or Number 1 for the red shirted Villager.
  • Suiside-B for Little Mac's Jolt Haymaker, due to it being a terrible recovery move and also an easy cause of accidental self-destructs.
  • The fourth game itself is sometimes known as Super Slash Bros. note  or Super Fire Emblem Bros.note .
  • Some Mortal Kombat fans have given Super Smash Bros. Ultimate the nickname of "Super Smash Bros. Armageddon", due to both games having every playable character in their series (at the time) all available at once.
  • α Form (Alpha Form) for the Battlefield variants of each stage, to complement the Final Destination variants being called their Ω forms (Omega Forms).
  • Ridley is being referred to as "Captain America" due to his popularity in the West being responsible for getting him to join the roster. It started as a fake rumor claiming the Japanese gave him the moniker, but it eventually caused enough interest overseas to become a genuine nickname.
  • Any Fire Emblem character who isn't Marth will inevitably get a nickname based on the Hero King: Red/Fire Marth (Roy), Buff/Manly/Bara Marth (Ike), Girl Marth (Lucina), Magic Marth (Robin), Dragon Marth (Corrin) and Dad Marth (Chrom).
  • Incineroar has gotten the nickname "Ejaculation Salt", which comes from a mistranslation of its Korean name, 어흥염 (Eoheungyeom), when translated with Google Translate. Its purple alternate color has also been nicknamed "Big the Cat". This has even been referenced in World of Light, where a purple Incineroar is possessed by a Big the Cat spirit.
  • The bottom level of Temple is known as "Hyrule Fight Club" due to the potential for bouncing opponents off the walls, likely for a "bank-shot" KO.
  • "Exploding Meme Kick" for Mii Brawler's Exploding Side Kick, due to many considering it a meme move.
  • In terms of Mii Fighter movesets, 3122 (Exploding Side Kick, Onslaught, Helicopter Kick, and Feint Kick) for Mii Brawler is known to some players as "Vincent", after Alpharad's Mii Brawler with this moveset who wears the Vince (from Art Academy) outfit. Alpharad himself has referred to the character as Vincent van Gogh, but the costume bears no resemblance to the real painter.
  • A certain part of the Japanese fandom has taken to nickname Palutena into "Oppalutena", having even its own tag on Pixiv.
  • "Jiggs", "Puff", or "the Puff" for Jigglypuff.
  • The use of the second part of K. Rool's Blunderbuss offstage is often called "the Suck n' Cuck" (a name shared with a similar tactic for Dedede) or "the Succ Gun".
  • Joker's downward aerial Gun attack (where he fires below him, perpendicular to the ground, while falling and spinning his body) quickly became known as the Rain Storm due to its uncanny resemblance to Dante's attack of the same name.
  • Ganondorf's forward smash in Ultimate is simply referred to as "Doriyah", due to his vocalization whenever he uses the move.
  • Due to a lot of pre-release discussion, many people refer to the Dragon Quest heroes as Erdrick, even though that name mainly applies to the hero of III.
    • Some also jokingly refer to them as Goku or Trunks, due to Akira Toriyama's art style.
    • Due to the fact that they have no canon name (except for the fourth game's hero), Japan often refers to them by their respective games' numbers. So in order of release, we have Three, Four, Eight and Eleven. This page follows that convention.
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