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Examples of Even Evil Has Loved Ones in video games.


  • Ace Attorney:
    • Manfred von Karma in the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney series is completely ruthless and will ruin your life in every way he can and/or murder you over the slightest insult, but as seen by the way he keeps making positive offhand remarks about her, he dotes on his wife.
    • In Spirit of Justice, Inga Karhuul Khura'in may be an unrepentant scumbag, but he genuinely loves his adopted daughter Rayfa quite a bit, to the point of keeping several mementos of her childhood in a safe in his room.
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  • In Alpha Protocol, Alan Parker is a cold and calculating person who considers everyone he works with as expendable and has no problems with eliminating them if he sees it as necessary. However, with enough research, Mike can find out that he's the father of Madison Saint James. If she is killed by Conrad Marburg, Mike can inform Parker of the man who killed his daughter, which will result in him trying to take revenge.
  • In Assassin's Creed III, Haytham Kenway genuinely loved Ziio and their son Connor. Sadly, his dedication to the Templars was stronger.
  • Baldur's Gate proffers a few examples of this trope.
    • Big Bad Sarevok loved his foster mother when he was a child, because she was genuinely good to him. His foster father strangled her with a garrotte in front of him over infidelity; years later, Sarevok would have him killed in the same manner.
    • Sarevok also has two lovers, Tamoko and Cythandria, both of whom are evil themselves. Cythandria loves him unconditionally because of his evil, but Tamoko wants him to end his Evil Plan to become a god to stay with her. When Sarevok discovers that Tamoko has been undermining his efforts, he sends her out to die in battle with the player. In the sequel, though, an unfinished quest from Throne of Bhaal shows that he felt remorse for it, and in his epilogue he takes her body back to Kara-Tur (her homeland) to bury her.
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    • Tamoko has a little brother, Yoshimo, who appears in the sequel because he came west looking for her.
    • It's implied Sarevok really did care about his Evil Mentor, Winksi Perorate. He ended up killing him for forcing him into a retreat, but in ToB he threatens to make a character "regret it" if they keep saying bad things about him.
    • The Player Character can choose an evil alignment and still genuinely care about others. They can have Villainous Friendships with the likes of Korgan Bloodaxe and Edwin Odesseiron, choose to keep their little sister Imoen around as a Morality Pet, and have a romance with one of three evil characters — Viconia DeVir, Dorn Il-Khan, or Hexxat.
    • Viconia had a Morality Pet herself — her brother, Valas. He ended up suffering for it when she escaped the Underdark for the surface, which haunts her to this day.
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    • Dorn was with an adventuring party before he joined the player, and even had a relationship with one of them. They betrayed him and left him to die or take all the blame for the crimes of the group, which stung Dorn badly. He eventually made a Deal with the Devil to become a blackguard, allowing him to break out of prison and take his revenge on them. He is noticeably bitter and angry when he fights each of them.
    • Hexxat notes that her mother was always away from home, which led to her being raised by her many aunts. Despite now being evil (and a vampire), she remembers them fondly, and admits they are not responsible for the woman she is now.
  • Shanath is one of the evilest characters (though not without a Freudian Excuse) in Baten Kaitos Origins, but he genuinely loves his daughter Savyna.
  • Throughout BioShock, it's implied that Andrew Ryan had an illegitimate child. Later, it's revealed that Jack himself is Ryan's illegitimate son. Fontaine kidnapped and brainwashed Jack to do his bidding precisely because he knew that as evil as Ryan was, even he couldn't bring himself to kill his own son.
  • Borderlands 2:
    • There's a rather twisted example with Handsome Jack. Once you manage to reach Control Core Angel, it's revealed that Angel is not only a Siren, but Jack's daughter whom he's been using as both a power source for the Vault Key and as a living supercomputer. Despite being emotionally and verbally abusive towards her, as well as having kept her locked up for a large part of her life, he expresses genuine terror once you and your team begin trying to kill her at her request, even frantically begging you to not kill his baby girl. Once she dies, he starts going into a complete Villainous Breakdown and replaces his contempt for you with burning, murderous hatred now that he admits that he has nothing left to lose. In Tales from the Borderlands, when you're playing as Rhys in Jack's office, you can choose to examine the framed photo he has on his desk, only to see that it's of Angel as a little girl. If you bring it up with him (keep in mind this being an Artificial Intelligence version of himself) he becomes noticeably sullen and tells you that she's his daughter that he keeps secret from most everyone, and asks if you two can go visit her once the vault business is over with, completely unaware that she's long dead. After Helios crashes and he's contemplating everything that's led up to this point, he tells you that he checked the station's data and learned that she's been dead, and admits that he can't blame Angel for turning on him.
    • There's also Jack's girlfriend Nisha, who isn't a good person either, but it seems like they do care about each other. When you and your team kill her and Jack finds out about it, he's surprised that he's not necessarily sad, but he does say that he's pissed off that you killed her. In Tales from the Borderlands, when you're in Jack's office, you can look at his wall of prized possessions, and one of them is Nisha's cowboy hat. If you check it, and you have Jack (the Artificial Intelligence version of him) in your cybernetic system for him to insert his own thoughts and spice up your echo-eye's information about what you see, he says, "I miss my girlfriend."
  • The jocks are one of the most aggressive and unpleasant cliques in Bully, but they do look out for their own. When risqué photos of Mandy are posted around town, the rest of them immediately set out for blood.
  • Captive (RPG Maker): The protagonist may be the captor responsible for kidnapping, experimenting on, and killing several people, but she did it to find a cure for her ill father, and also seems fond of Cousin Mike, given that when recognizing his name from the file, the protagonist calls him "Mikey".
  • In Castle Crashers, after you defeat the Conehead Groom, a big, burly cyclops enters the scene, picks up the Groom's body, and cries. He then escapes with the Princess. When you finally catch up to him, he's holding a funeral for his pal. Whether the groom was his son, father, or just a good friend is unclear.
  • Castlevania's Dracula genuinely loved both of his wives; it was their deaths that prompted him to go evil. Twice. In Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, he expresses remorse upon finding out that his actions go against his second wife's last words. He is also rather fond of his son Alucard, even though Alucard has sworn to oppose him. In the Lords of Shadow continuity, Dracula's love for his wife and son is stated to be the only pure human emotion he has left.
  • Destiny:
    • The Taken King storyline is kicked off when the Guardians kill Crota, the son of Oryx, the God-Emperor of the Hive. Oryx is so utterly enraged by the death of his son that he ends his armchair leadership and heads towards Earth personally to destroy the Guardians in revenge. Further, it's revealed that Oryx also has two sisters (his co-rulers), two daughters, and an adopted son. He genuinely loves each and every one of them. However, it's important to remember that, to the Hive, "genuine love" is synonymous with "murderous intent", and they express their affection by cheerfully killing each other over and over and over.
    • The Scorned Barons may be psychotic death-worshippers, but they genuinely care about each other like family. When you start killing them in retaliation for Cayde-6's death, each gets more enraged and grief stricken at your slaughter of their comrades. This culminates in Fikkrul, furious and almost on the verge of tears, demanding to know if murdering his friends really made you feel any better.
  • In Devil May Cry, deep down, Vergil does care for his younger brother despite the resentment. After his time spent as V, he is less antagonistic towards Dante and even genuinely thanks Nero before realizing that Nero is actually his son, not his nephew like he initially thought. Vergil also genuinely loved his human mother Eva, though Vergil thought she had abandoned him to safeguard Dante, which kicked off his aforementioned resentment of his brother and made him shun his human side.
  • Do It For Me: Despite being willing to kill innocent students, the Villain Protagonist does it because his girlfriend pressured him into it, and he truly loves her (except in the "Psychopath" ending, where he kills her). Unfortunately for him, she does not return his affection.
  • Dragon Age series:
    • Dragon Age: Origins:
      • Loghain Mac Tir may be ruthless and paranoid, but he loves his daughter Anora. Subverted when Loghain attempts to have her killed to prevent her from siding with the Warden, but that turns out to be a lie perpetrated by Anora as part of her plan to remain in power regardless of who wins the civil war. Also, when Shale asks Loghain (if he's in your party) if he'd do anything for power, why he doesn't simply Cut The Knot and kill Anora for power, Loghain makes it clear that he refuses to consider the idea even if it'd get him the power he needed.
      • Apparently, Arl Howe is this, too. When you meet his son Nathaniel in Awakening, he plans to kill your PC for murdering his dear dad. Nathaniel, though, didn't know exactly what his father was up to when he wasn't with his family.
    • Though you may debate whether anyone in Dragon Age II is really "evil" due to the omnipresent Grey-and-Gray Morality, even if you play Hawke as a dog-kicking madperson with a tendency to let dangerous blood mages go/sell out innocent mages to the Templars when all they wanted was a taste of freedom, he/she still cares about his/her family.
  • Towa from Dragon Ball Xenoverse has this with several characters.
    • The mother-son/husband-wife duo of Towa and Mira really do seem to care for each other. Subverted in Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2, as in Towa's ending it's revealed that she views Mira as a tool.
    • As for her older brother Dabura, it's implied that her focus on altering history involving Goku and the Z Fighters is mainly due to Goku and Majin Vegeta's fight freeing Innocent Buu, resulting in Dabura's death. She goes to great lengths, such as alternating timelines to resurrect Dabura.
    • In Dragon Ball Heroes, Towa shows great care for her son Fu (whom she had with Mira), even making sure he escapes the collapse of the Demon World so that he doesn't perish with her and Mira.
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • Mathieu Bellamont in Oblivion is a Dark Brotherhood assassin that his loved ones, as he's motivated to avenge his mother and also in love with a fellow assassin named Maria. He plans on abandoning the order and start a real family with her, but unfortunately, she refuses, leading to him snapping and brutally killing her. It's also implied that he might be in love with Antoiniette Marie, since she received an anonymous letter warning her to leave the Sanctuary before it can be purged and he's the only one who knows what will happen.
    • Astrid and Arnbjorn in Skyrim are Happily Married. They're also the effective leaders of The Remnant of the Dark Brotherhood.
    • In Online, Vaermina, the Daedric Prince of Nightmares, reveals that she is in love with her champion. Her reaction to his death (at your hands) backs this up, as she gleefully describes how she is going to spend the next century or so Mind Raping you for killing him.
  • Escape Until Friday has a kidnapper who wants to kill you. They once had a wife and daughter and clearly cared deeply for the latter.
  • Eternal Radiance: Eldareth, the leader of the Shadowborn criminal organization, is fond of his subordinates Kylia and Yvonne, which is why he sends them to look for fake artifacts while he enacts his plan to destroy the Shadowborn base.
  • Fallout:
  • Far Cry:
    • Pagan Min, the psychotic dictator of Kyrat in Far Cry 4, had his lover Ishwari and their daughter Lakshmana, both of whom he loves dearly and the deaths of whom he claims drove him to become what he is today (though he admits he probably would have ended up like that anyways). There's also Ajay, the main character, who is the son of Ishwari and whom Pagan wants to basically turn into a surrogate son. He even claims the torture Yuma is going to subject Ajay to in Durgesh Prison is "tough love" and needs to be done for his own good.
    • Joseph Seed, the Sinister Minister Big Bad of Far Cry 5 is, in spite of his psychotic behaviour and tendencies towards psychopathy, shown to genuinely love his siblings, and weep and swear gruesome vengeance whenever they are harmed by the player.
  • Some of the main antagonists of the Fatal Frame series never harm a protagonist due to said protagonist resembling someone that the respective antagonist fell in love with while still alive. This includes [[spoiler:Kirie to Mafuyu in the first game and Ouse to Ren in the fifth. Played with regarding Kyouka (a.k.a. Brushing Woman) to Kei in the third game, however, in that while Kyouka loved Akito, she thought that he had abandoned her (not knowing he was murdered for trying to take her away), and seeing the "return" of her "lover" angers her into attacking him.
    Kyouka/Brushing Woman: You said you'd come back!
  • Fire Emblem:
  • Five Nights at Freddy's: Sister Location reveals that Mr. Afton a.k.a the murderer has a daughter, whom he honestly cares for (given how he refused to let her see Circus Baby, knowing that he'd designed the animatronic as a secret child abduction/murder machine that would surely kill her). Sadly, she decided to visit Baby when he wasn't looking... Seems to be subverted in the game's custom night with his son, Michael Afton, though. From the way Michael tells it, his father sent him to deal with the homicidal ghosts possessing the animatronics... and it didn't go well for Mike.
  • Halo:
    • Your Covenant foes may be trying to kill you (and all humans), but their chatter makes it clear that even the oft-vicious Brutes do often care about their comrades. It's even incorporated into gameplay with Hunter pairs; kill one, and its bond-brother will go on a rampage.
    • Jul 'Mdama, even before becoming the Didact's Hand, is a Sangheili supremacist who wants to kill all humans. But Halo: Glasslands and Halo: The Thursday War make it clear that he does love his family. His wife's death is actually a big part of the reason why he hates humans so much.
    • Tartarus, The Dragon of Halo 2, is an arrogant and domineering brute of a Brute who began his ascension to power by killing his own uncle, but Halo: Contact Harvest shows that he will risk himself to look out for his pack-mates.
  • Cindy from Kindergarten is an Alpha Bitch who goes through boyfriends like tissues and relentlessly bullies Lily due to her brother Billy dumping Cindy. However, she seems to genuinely care for her dog Biscuit, to the point where she'll go into a homocidal rage if she finds out that he's dead.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • Not only does Ganon love his mortal mothers Twinrova, but the Oracle games show Twinrova to be equally devoted to him. When their intended sacrifice for a resurrection rite gets rescued, they choose to sacrifice themselves instead to complete the rite. It... almost works.
    • The Redeads and Gibdos from both The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask seem to have at least some level of affection for one another. In both games they will mourn their slain allies, not even bothering to attack you, until the corpse of the slain undead fades away, and in Majora's Mask they surround the Music Box House wanting their "friend", actually a cursed human being, to join them. They're even capable of conversing with you if you wear the Gibdo's Mask.
  • Yukari from Liar Liar is Axe-Crazy and a Serial Killer, but loves her girlfriend Miho and her little sister Minami. When Miho kills Minami to save Yukari, Yukari's love for Miho doesn't stop her from killing her for killing Minami.
  • In Mass Effect Renegade Shepard can be played this way (though it's more Anti-Hero than evil). S/he can kill civilians and hostages because it makes his/her job easier, backstab his/her allies, execute enemies on the spot (often in rather painful ways) and be a jerk. But at the same time s/he can be shown to care deeply about one or more of his/her squadmates and beat the shit out of people trying to harm them. In Mass Effect 2, you can be playing as a colossal jerkass for most of the game, but when the Collectors capture you crew, immediately go on a Roaring Rampage of Rescue.
  • Medal of Honor: Underground has the radio song "Er Lässt mich Niemals Allein" ("Each Night He Comes Home to Me"), which is apparently sung by a German war widow.
  • Metal Gear: Revolver Ocelot may be one of the worst of the lot, but every single thing he does is out of love for Big Boss.
  • In Middle-earth: Shadow of War, Orc Captains have blood brothers who will come after you in revenge if you take down one of them. During the story mode, Bruz the Chopper is Shamed into inconsolable misery by Talion and his blood brothers ambush him some time afterwards, seeking to avenge Bruz.
  • Mortal Kombat: Shao Kahn is in the running for worst asshole in the series, but he has a soft spot for his late (later resurrected) wife Sindel. Several of his intro dialogues in 11 reveal that his sort-of-daughter Mileena has a place in his heart as well.
  • Neverwinter Nights mostly averts this, as its villains are mostly the cackling Omnicidal Maniac sort, but the module-creating community does have some examples.
    • Alex in the Bastard of Kosigan series has definitely crossed the Moral Event Horizon, but her dialogue hints that she still loves the player.
    • Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer:
      • Akachi isn't technically a villain, but his love for the Red Woman and his brother do help bring him back to himself and end the curse that is killing your player.
      • Araman himself still loves his brother and has a tendency to not attack you when he really ought to.
  • Overlord:
    • Overlord I has the title character gain a mistress partway through the game. Rose is prim and a bit condescending... although even later in the game, you can dump Rose for her sultry sister Violet. It turns out that both girls are the daughters of the former Overlord and the one you didn't pick will betray you when her father returns. As the sequel shows, the Overlord stayed loyal to Rose.
    • Overlord II stars the son of the previous Overlord, after said Overlord vanished at the end of Overlord: Raising Hell (while his mistress was pregnant). He has one childhood friend, Kelda, who in turn becomes his first mistress. Even in the stage of the game when both are children, Kelda is the only character who likes the Witch-Boy and doesn't treat him like the Enfant Terrible he is, instead trying to protect him from bullying while developing a crush on him.
  • Persona 5 shows that while some people are rotten enough that the Phantom Thieves have to step in and steal their hearts, they have people they care about.
    • Played with in Madarame's case. While he takes in orphans in order to plagiarize their artistic works, Yusuke wonders if Madarame actually cared for him. At the end of Yusuke's Confidant, Yusuke hears from Kawanabe, an old friend of Madarame's, that many years ago, Madarame had called Kawanabe, desperate to find someone to treat a young Yusuke's fever (though it's also possible to interpret this as Pragmatic Villainy of not letting a potential asset die).
    • At the end of one Mementos request to deal with an abusive boss, the Treasure (the root of the person's distorted desires) turns out to be a magazine for amusement parks. Ryuji wonders if the man in question cared about his kids.
    • Hanae Oda is a Jerkass with a Hair-Trigger Temper who's a bad influence on her son Shinya, but despite being bitter about her plight as a single mother, she does care about her son. After her Shadow is defeated, you can get her to realize that her son matters most.
  • [PROTOTYPE]:
    • A Villain Protagonist version. Alex Mercer shows that he deeply cares for his sister Dana. Later it turns out that "Alex" is actually the virus using his body as a form, and the original Alex was in fact just a monster who was willing to sacrifice her along with the rest of New York out of spite. Needless to say, Virus Mercer doesn't take this revelation all that well.
    • In [PROTOTYPE 2], James Heller starts getting ready to kill Colonel Rooks but spares him when he finds out the man has a family he cares deeply about.
  • The Big Bad of Radiant Historia. The biggest obstacle stopping Heiss from completing his "destroy the world" objective is the fact that he really, truly cares about Stocke, and a large part of his plan is an effort to save his life and train him to take over. Right up until the end, Heiss is unwilling to seriously try to kill him because he's still holding out hope that he might change his mind, and in the True Ending, he ultimately decides that if one of them has to die, it's going to be him, not his nephew.
  • From the Resident Evil series:
    • William Birkin, creator of the G-Virus that instigates the events of Resident Evil 2, has a wife and daughter, both of whom he loves — until the circumstances of the game's events cause him to mutate into the Big Bad of the game and leave Sherry orphaned.
    • As evil as Alexia Ashford is in Resident Evil – Code: Veronica, she genuinely loves her brother Alfred and is pissed right off that Claire and Steve killed him. In Resident Evil: The Darkside Chronicles, though, not so much.
    • Big Bad Albert Wesker cared for one person, but it's not Excella his Number Two (who loves him) nor his son Jake's unnamed mother, it's actually his old colleague William Birkin. Despite betraying and murdering literally everyone else in his life, Wesker treated Birkin with legitimate respect and considered him a friend. In Wesker's Report, Albert loses his usual cold stoicism and apathy to express distaste towards HUNK William's killer and continues to praises his old friend's genius which is very uncharacteristic for him.
  • In Saints Row 2, the Boss looks like an amoral sociopath (and don't be fooled, s/he is), but God help you if you dare to touch any of the other Saints. You will be ended in some particularly gruesome ways. A Villain Protagonist to the hilt, yes, but one who cares about their people at least... Saints Row: The Third on the other hand leaves it up to the player to decide whether the Boss cares enough to prevent Saints from being killed or whether they're just a convenient excuse for the next rampage.
  • In Sengoku Basara 3 we have Otani Yoshitsugu, a leprous, Misanthrope Supreme psychic whose stated goal in life is to make every other human being just as miserable as he is. Yet, despite all this, he remains completely loyal and dedicated to Ishida Mitsunari, because Mitsunari is already miserable and very good at spreading said misery around. When Mori and Ieyasu make him realize that this means he has someone he actually cares for, Yoshitsugu suffers a Villainous Breakdown.
  • The Panda King from the Sly Cooper series has his daughter Jing-King, whose distress is the driving force of the third episode in Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves. He even joins up with the Cooper Gang for her sake.
  • Seiji from Spirit Hunter: NG is a two-faced sadist who delights in the torment of others, but he does genuinely like the Kijima family and goes out of his way to help them however he can.
  • In Star Stealing Prince, Edgar and Lina are both nasty pieces of work. But when you defeat either of them in the Dual Boss fight, the one still standing becomes very distraught, showing that at the very least their love for each other was genuine.
  • Star Wars Legends:
    • Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II introduces Sarriss and her apprentice Yun as two of the Dark Jedi antagonists. After swearing loyalty to Jerec, she met Yun when she became "engaged" to his father, then seduced him, taught him her interpretation of the Force, and convinced him to kill his own father. It seems like their relationship couldn't be genuine because of her manipulations, as she takes him as her apprentice. Later, when Kyle is captured and Sarris is about to execute him, Yun (whose life at this point has already been spared once by main protagonist Kyle Katarn) draws his blade and blocks the weapon — which causes Sarris killing blow to accidentally cut through him instead. She becomes visibly upset and asks why he did it, to which he replies "He's a Jedi — he deserves a battle" before dying. Rather than going ahead and executing the weakened Katarn right then and there, she honors Yun's request. Though it results in her death, it seems her love for Yun was genuine enough to respect his dying wish.
    • It's thought that Darth Vader thinks of Starkiller from The Force Unleashed as a son. Thank god he didn't raise Luke.
    • Star Wars: The Old Republic:
      • Present among Dark-Side characters who choose to partake in a Romance Sidequest, but it's especially notable for the Sith. Dark-sided Warriors are typically ruthless, bloodthirsty, intolerant of failure, and quite possibly cannibals; dark-sided Inquisitors are typically Magnificent Bastards and Social Darwinists who love electrocuting people and take sarcasm to Jerkass levels. This doesn't stop them from genuinely loving their chosen paramour.
      • It is noteworthy that love does not even have to be romantic. A Dark-Side character can develop a strong bond with his/her companions, to the point of treating them more as his/her friends or even as a surrogate family than as subordinates. For example, a female Sith warrior may end up becoming a surrogate sister for Vette.
      • Brutally subverted in the expansions, in this one a Dark Side player character can kill his romantic partners, without showing the slightest sign of regret or sadness.
      • Darth Malgus is shown in supplementary materials to have once had a wife named Eleena Daru, whom he loved with all his heart and vice versa. When Eleena was held hostage, Magus immediately surrendered to save her life. This incident leads to him forcing himself to remorsefully kill her, as the Sith code holds that all personal attachments must be severed and his enemies would use her against him.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
  • Taiko no Tatsujin: Tellu from Dodon~! to Nidaime! is one of the Waru Robots that wreak havoc on the festival by order of their creator, Dr. Waruru. When defeated, however, she seems glad to see her estranged sister, Alumi, alive.
  • Twisted Metal:
    • Calypso is both a Literal and a Jerkass Genie that will be more than willing to screw up your wish if he can find a loop-hole For the Evulz. And usually, he does. But he has a real soft spot for his deceased daughter, Krista. This shows in the second game and Head-On, where his love is exploited by the police into setting her body up to be a bomb (which works) and in the latter she chews him out for causing death and destruction just to have her back and demands that he make it so the accident that killed her never happened. Unfortunately, he is unable to grant her that wish and sadly laments having to keep her happy until she recovers from the comatose state he puts her in. One of the few times where he wants to grant a contestant their wish and can't.
    • Dark Tooth from the first two games clearly cares for his son, Sweet Tooth, and in the second game specifically seeks revenge at the protagonist for killing him in the tournament.
  • This is an extremely important character trait of Flowey from Undertale — despite being incapable of truly feeling love due to his lack of a soul and thorough lack of morality, his mind is still obsessed with his adopted sibling who committed suicide in a failed Thanatos Gambit long before the game started, also killing him in the process (he Came Back Wrong). His eventual Heel–Face Turn requires him finally coming to terms with their death and finding peace.
    • The game also implies that the feeling may have been mutual, although this is far more debatable on both ends. It's left very open to interpretation if the Fallen Child/Chara was good, evil, or somewhere in between, and if their affection for their adopted brother was genuine, just a front to get him to cooperate, or a confused combination of the two, but the possibility for this trope to be in place is on the table regardless. They also may have cared about their parents to some extent, but this is even less definitive.
  • Until Dawn:
    • Depending on the player's choices, if Josh recognizes Wendigo!Hannah, the latter will take Josh away rather than kill him. Though what becomes of Josh isn't much better.
    • Hannah as a Wendigo will preserve Beth's head.
    • Mike is the only character that Wendigo!Hannah will not directly kill. There's a moment where Wendigo!Hannah pulls Mike underwater but quickly releases him unharmed offscreen, suggesting that Hannah still retains her feelings for him.
  • Chapter 8 of Valkyria Chronicles largely serves to humanize the imperials when the two leads are separated from The Squad. They attempt to nurse back to health an injured enemy Mook, who dies crying out for his mother, and later while thanking them for their mercy, his commander mentions the wife and daughter he has waiting back home.
  • Warcraft:
    • In Warcraft III and especially the addon The Frozen Throne, Illidan has long been over the fact that Tyrande ended up with his brother Malfurion. Even though he was imprisoned by Malfurion for 10,000 years, exiled from his homeland, and sentenced to death for his repeating dealings with demons, and their armies have often fought against each other, Malfurion more than once accepts Illidan's offers to ignore their own history when offered his help to save Tyrande. Though his title as a demon lord is The Betrayer, he never has any hidden motives in these situations.
    • In World of Warcraft, Sally Whitemane turned to extremism after losing her family to the Scourge. After she's defeated in the updated Scarlet Monastery instance, she calls out "Mograine...", the name of her comrade in arms and possible lover, who was killed in the Ashbringer comic series.
    • Arthas the Lich King of all people. When Arthas was young his horse Invincible was severely injured. Unable to heal him, Arthas killed him to end his pain. This event left a major impact on Arthas and inspired him to become a paladin. After losing his soul and killing his father, the first thing Arthas did was run to Invincible's grave and bring the horse back to life. When the Scourge attacked the Sunwell and Arthas did battle with Anasterian Sunstrider, Anasterian cut off Invincible's forelegs to dismount Arthas. Arthas was horrified at the sight of Invincible desperately trying to rise to his feet as it brought back memories of the wound that took Invincible from him the first time. This made Arthas go completely berserk. Even Sylvanas couldn't help but notice that it looked like that Arthas was human again for a brief moment. Even after becoming the Lich King he kept Invincible by his side. Make zero mistake about it, even after killing his own flesh and blood Arthas loved that horse. A straighter example is that he kept Tragic Keepsakes such as his old Training Sword, Silver Hand Badgenote , and Jaina's locket, as revealed from a special drop from him in 25-man Heroic.
    • Shannox, in the Firelands, gains a damage buff when you kill each of his hounds, and expresses his outrage toward the raid.
  • Yes, Your Grace: A character who will have committed one of the game's worst acts by the end of its plot turns out to care deeply about both his parents, to the point that they are the two people he'd never hurt.

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