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  • Dexter's Laboratory:
    • Sometimes Dee Dee is insufferable and causes nothing but deliberate pain for Dexter, while other times she's a sweet girl who cares for her younger brother, and either helps him out or is innocently unaware of the trouble she causes him. In the same vein, she can run the gamut from being an incredibly dimwitted individual unable to comprehend the most rudimentary things to being a highly savvy person who counters the titular character's high IQ by having far more common sense.
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    • Mandark can either be a hammy and morally ambiguous rival to Dexter, or genuinely villainous.
    • Dexter can go from being a woobie to an Unsympathetic Comedy Protagonist, sometimes even within the same episode.
  • The Simpsons being such a long-running comedy show, it naturally has loads of examples.
    • Bart can be the most popular kid in school by a huge margin, have Milhouse as his only friend or anywhere in between depending on what best suits the story, though one episode did show that popularity can change rapidly as he went from the former to the latter after crying when hit with some mud. Also, he can range anywhere from a Jerk with a Heart of Gold who's more talented than people give him credit for, a hyperactive idiot, or a sociopathic troublemaker, and everywhere in between.
      • In some episodes Jimbo, Kearney, and Dolph respect Bart as a fellow delinquent and get along with him, while in others they bully him and beat him up like they would any other kid at Springfield Elementary.
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    • Though she is never popular, just how unpopular Lisa is varies from episode to episode. In some episodes, she hangs out with Janey Powell and some of the other girls (including her usual bullies Sherri and Terri) but in other episodes she says she has no friends with even Janey teasing her.
      • Her intelligence as well. It can range from her being a Child Prodigy, having above average intelligence for her age group, to only getting good grades because Springfield Elementary is a Sucky School with low standards.
      • Similarly, while they eventually settled on her being Buddhist, there was a time when Lisa could switch between a hard-nosed skeptic, Flanders v2.0, or a New Ager at the whim of the writing staff.
    • Homer's character varies with the plot's demands. He has been a well-meaning moron with selective common sense, so bored with life that he embraces any crazy idea he hears, and deliberately self-centered because he feels the rest of the world owes him. He's even lampshaded this:
    "Because that's the kind of guy I am this week!"
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    • His physical prowess is another aspect of his character that varies. In some episodes, he's so weak that his punches can't kill a fly, and leave him completely exhausted. In other episodes, he's strong enough to use a motorcycle like a sword without breaking a sweat.
    • His personality can range anywhere from easygoing, Kindhearted Simpleton to short-tempered Jerkass.
    • How religious is Homer? This can range from just disliking going to church to being an atheist.
    • Nelson Muntz varies in character over a very broad spectrum. In some episodes, he's an insidious bully to Bart and the other kids at the school and he has no real friends. In other episodes, he is Bart's second best friend. Sometimes he is friends with Jimbo, Kearney, and Dolph. In most episodes, he's just the brat who goes, "Haw haw!"
      • His friendship with Jimbo, Kearney, and Dolph also varies. In some episodes it seems like he's close friends with them, while others make it seem like he's only loosely affiliated with them. Either way though you'd think they would've at least attended his birthday party.
    • Professor Frink can either be a legitimate, well-respected scientist who's just a bit quirky or a crackpot nobody listens to. He also ranges from dangerously crazy to the Only Sane Man.
    • Discounting the trope he's named for, Ned Flanders can be a perfectly nice but boring guy in one episode, someone who can be pretty fun in another (he's been shown drinking and brewing beer, hosting BBQ parties, and even plays billiards in his house), or an obnoxious religious fundamentalist.
    • Mister Burns can be a senile old man who can't do anything on his own and still thinks it's the early 1900s, or an extremely conniving Corrupt Corporate Executive (often he's both). He can also be Affably Evil, Faux Affably Evil (more commonly) and even (albeit very rarely) a Jerk with a Heart of Gold.
    • The competence of the rest of the Power Plant (especially Lenny) can range between functioning fairly normally considering it's conditions or so imbecilic they almost make Homer look intelligent.
    • Rev. Lovejoy has run the gamut: He has been outright apathetic towards Christianity, a fire-and-brimstone preacher, a reasonable but boring minister, and an engaging preacher. On rare occasions, he has even been something of a Badass Preacher, such as rescuing Flanders from baboons.
    • Depending on what the situation requires, Chief Wiggum can be motivated but incompetent, competent but villainous, lazy/apathetic, or brutally harsh.
    • Depending on the episode, Snake can be anywhere from a petty thief to a legitimately dangerous armed criminal. Also, like Homer his strength and toughness varies. Sometimes he's able to restrain a man of similar size with one arm, but a few episodes had him being beaten up by Homer with little to no effort.
  • In King of the Hill:
    • Hank hill veers between the Only Sane Man standing up to obnoxious twig boys and bureaucrats, and a hopelessly outdated man completely adrift dealing with the modern world, almost between episodes. In fairness, the writers seem aware of this and often try to find a middle ground.
    • Depending on the episode, the trailer park is either Shady Pines or Shiny Pines.
    • The circumstances surrounding Bill's divorce seem to change details - this could be chalked up to Unreliable Narrator.
    • Boomhauer. Whenever Dale and Bill are doing something stupid, Boomhauer is either the Only Sane Man (When Hank isn't around), Locked Out of the Loop, or is going along with it. It's rather notable in a few episodes - one in which Dale and Bill get stuck in a hole for almost an entire day whereas Boomhauer is nowhere near, and another wherein Boomhauer is shown to be just as almost life-threateningly stupid as Dale and Bill. (Removing the propeller for no apparent reason)
    • Bobby's maturity level varies considerably in later seasons in some he behaves like a normal teen in his age group and in others he acts like a young child around 7 years old.
  • All the characters on Kaeloo.
  • In Revenge of the Sith, General Grievous was written as a mustache-twirling coward. However, when developing Star Wars: Clone Wars, the writers were only given Grievous' concept design and a basic outline of his character as the "machine general", and they ended up writing him as a terrifying Hero Killer and a legitimate threat. Needless to say, one version is more popular than the other; comparing the two is like comparing Snidely Whiplash and the Predator.
    • The 2008 series splits the difference, making Grievous a powerful enough warrior, but his skills as a general go no further than “crush opponents with overwhelming force.”
  • In Code Lyoko, Sissi went from being an Alpha Bitch in the first season (albeit with a handful of Pet the Dog moments that got undone by the Reset Button) to being a sympathetic and nice character in Season 2, getting Character Development to the point where many speculated she'd become the sixth Lyoko warrior. Enter Season 3 and she's just as much of a bitch as she was in Season 1. In Season 4, she barely shows up and fluctuates between the Alpha Bitch and Jerk with a Heart of Gold whenever she does show up. She only becomes fully nice at the very end when the characters offer their hands in friendship (at which point she's a bitch to Nicolas and Hervé).
    • The Season 4 fluctuation is justified in that XANA has become such a big threat that the heroes' actions in fighting it have made them seem more suspicious than ever before to Sissi, and given the nature of her character, she can't just let that go even if she's striving to be a nicer person. No explanation for the Season 3 writing though, other than Seasonal Rot.
  • Looney Tunes:
    • Looney Tunes characters were shared between various writers and directors: Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck under Bob Clampett and Tex Avery were manic antagonists. As portrayed by Chuck Jones' writer Michael Maltese, they were almost platonic opposites, Bugs being the cool winner to Daffy's jealous loser. Warren Foster, writer for directors Bob Mc Kimson and Friz Freleng, portrayed Bugs as a more proactive version of the Jones-Maltese model and Daffy as a toned down screwball. The Daffy Duck example caused some problems during the making of Who Framed Roger Rabbit?. Robert Zemeckis wanted to do the Bob Clampett version of Daffy, but he was working with Chuck Jones. Jones wanted to do his version of Daffy and had very personally disliked Clampett. Zemeckis had his way and this was one of the main factors in Jones' Creator Backlash against the film.
    • Tweetie Pie can be either be a completely innocent bird just trying to protect himself and only hurting Sylvester by accident or he can be a sadist torturing Sylvester intentionally.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants:
    • Depending on who's writing, the titular character goes from being sweet and stupid to being aggressive and possibly violently insane. He also can go from being very stupid and somewhat childish but with some common sense, to being fairly normal and intelligent, if a bit eccentric, to being worse than a hyperactive five-year-old on a sugar rush.
      • SpongeBob's popularity in town varies depending on the episode. In some, he's beloved by everyone for his Nice Guy attitude and helpful nature, while in others he's hated to the point where the town actively tries to avoid him due to how obnoxious he is. In others, nobody has any idea who he is.
      • How good of a fry cook is Spongebob? In some episodes he has people treating him like he's a celebrity chef but other times he's treated as a low level fast food cook.
      • The same goes for his karate skills. Sometimes he's good enough to hold his own against (or even beat) Sandy, in other episodes she beats him in less than a Curb-Stomp Battle.
      • How dedicated an employee is SpongeBob, and just how well does he fit in at the Krusty Krab? He's usually a workaholic who's been honored as Employee of the Month dozens of times, provides top-quality customer service, and is openly favored by Mr. Krabs over Squidward, who's lazy and shiftless. But in episodes that center on his unpopularity or his more annoying qualities, he's a gibbering goof-off indistinguishable from Patrick who frightens the customers and gets on Mr. Krabs' nerves, which has the effect of making Squidward look at least reliably mediocre.
    • Sandy goes from being a genius obviously in her right mind, but somewhat crazy, to being such an idiot she must have invented all her fabulous machines by accident. She can also either be a scientist or a jock.
    • This is even lampshaded in one episode, regarding Patrick's stupidity.
    Squidward: Patrick, just how dumb are you?
    Patrick: It varies.
    • The Krusty Krab is either highly successful or always on the brink of bankruptcy. The former is convenient for episodes with Plankton while the latter is convenient for episodes dealing with Mr. Krabs' greed.
    • Another notable example of Patrick lampshading his own stupidity.
    Patrick: You can't just expect my usual brand of stupidity. I like to mix it up. Keeps you on your toes.
    • Mr. Krabs can, in any given episode, be a true Benevolent Boss, a money-obsessed Corrupt Corporate Executive, and anything in between the two. For example, in the episode "Pickles", Mr. Krabs orders SpongeBob to take some time off to get his act together after a humiliating encounter with a critical customer. Krabs even goes to help SpongeBob rehabilitate himself, showing great compassion for his employee's plight. Yet, in "Born Again Krabs", Mr. Krabs does not hesitate when he sells SpongeBob to the Flying Dutchman for sixty-two cents, an act that even Squidward openly finds shocking and detestable.
      • Then there's the Flying Dutchman himself, who can be a morally neutral Grim Reaper figure (as in the above episode), a sadist who enjoys scaring people and stealing their souls For the Evulz, or a scary-but-benevolent ghost.
    • Squidward has been a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, a complete narcissist, a plain old Jerkass, The Woobie, a Jerkass Woobie, and a Butt-Monkey, sometimes more than one in a single episode. However, this can be blamed on Flanderization of the show's characters. He can also be completely apathetic towards everyone and everything, or be highly emotional, and freak out when things go seriously wrong.
      • His clarinet playing has also ranged from being abysmal to...actually pretty good.
      • His feelings toward SpongeBob and Patrick also tend to vary. Depending on the episode, he can be a Jerk with a Heart of Gold who actually cares about them deep down, or a sadistic Jerk with a Heart of Jerk who thrives on any pain and embarrassment they suffer, sometimes to the point of actually wanting them dead.
    • How evil Plankton is seems to very from episode to episode. In some, he's a pretty effective villain (not to mention, a Large Ham one at that). In others, though, he's practically incapable of succeeding in anything evil. Look at his debut episode Plankton and then The Krusty Krab Training Video to see what we mean.
    • Pearl can either have a Precocious Crush on Spongebob or hate his guts and find him annoying depending on the episode.
  • Similar to Squidward, Regular Show's Benson can be a Jerkass, a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, or a Jerkass Woobie.
    • Rigby is sometimes written as more childish than usual for Rule of Funny. Examples include "Meat Your Maker" and "Wall Buddy".
    • Mordecai can range from being the Only Sane Man to being just as stupid and immature as Rigby.
  • Every character in 6teen changes depending on the writer. In one episode, they'll make witty pop culture references and act their age, if not older, and then act like eight-years-olds the next episode, complete with five straight minutes of fart jokes.
  • My Life as a Teenage Robot: Tuck can be an brat who makes everything worse and takes advantage of his friends and brother, to being a nice kid who is quite crafty.
  • American Dad!:
    • Stan's attitude towards his family varies from "A Jerkass because he doesn't understand what he's doing wrong, and tries to fix it when he finds out" to "Manipulative Bastard who's so callous that he'll often put them through some horrible Evil Plan for some incredibly trivial/stupid reason".
    • His attitude towards his family is dependent on who he's interacting with at the time: Hayley is either daddy's wayward grownup daughter who he tries to keep on the right (his) path, or the displaced trouble child he simply gives up on because they have nothing in common. Steve is both his school-stud son who has hidden geek qualities (in his mind's eye), and simply a shake of the head as to where he went wrong raising that boy. Francine is possibly his air-headed housewife who is slightly clueless as to what goes on in front of her, or his air-headed housewife whose rager past is contained by the suburban shell around her.
    • Stan's competence also varies from episode to episode. In some episodes he is something of a Bunny-Ears Lawyer, and despite his shortcomings is a somewhat competent agent whose stunts ultimately prove his worth, or a completely hopeless excess of a human being who is actually far less capable of surviving than his family.
    • Roger's Jerkass attitude can shift anywhere between a Jerk with a Heart of Gold that ultimately cares about his adoptive family or an Faux Affably Evil Psychopathic Manchild that Crosses the Line Twice repeatedly for laughs.
    • Francine can either be a woman of average intelligence (if she sleeps at least eight hours, according to herself), or a full blown Dumb Blonde. She also shifts between a genuinely loving family woman who can scare Stan himself if she's pushed beyond ethical limits, or a psychotic Bitch in Sheep's Clothing (however, not quite as erratically as Lois Griffin). In the episode "Live and Let It Fry", she was insane.
      • Her attitude towards her children (especially Steve) also varies from loving to downright resentful, sometimes bordering on hateful.
    • Hayley's Soapbox Sadie tendancies can switch between being genuinely passionate and well intentioned, or completely hypocritical and implied to be nothing more than a facade to irritate her father. Similar to Francine, she can switch between the most level headed of the family or as much a self-righteous Jerkass as Stan.
    • Steve is either a sweet Adorkable kid who looks up to his dad, a kid with serious issues, or hormonal and perverted.
      • His competency with girls varies wildly. Sometimes, he comes off as awkward, but funny and cute to girls. Sometimes he's a stuttering, nervous wreck when talking to one, but endearing to them anyway. Sometimes, he's an ultra charismatic smooth operator who comes just this close to losing his virginity, while in other cases he's a tactless pervert who earns the disgust of the object of his affection. And in this one particular episode (at a Wild Teen Party, no less) he couldn't even talk to a girl without curling up into a fetal position on the floor and hyperventilating.
      • His level of strength and fighting skills also varies; generally, he's a wuss, but in "Irregarding Steve," he beat Beauregard unconscious in a fit of rage. The former is taken Up to Eleven in "Bully for Steve," where he's so pathetically weak that, according to Francine, he can't even make a fist.
      • Just like with his mother, the extent of how much of a bratty jackass he's become thanks to his Flanderization also varies from episode to episode. Unlike with Francine however where she's more of a bitch in episodes where she isn't a main character, this example applies to any episode with Steve, main character or not.
    • In most episodes where the topic of religion comes up Stan is depicted as deeply and sincerely religious (albeit often with a comedic level of ignorance about his own faith) and the entire plot of "Dope and Faith" revolves around his fears that his atheist friend will go to Hell due to his lack of belief. In "May the Best Stan Win" on the other hand Stan appears to have no belief in any sort of spiritual afterlife, planning to be cryogenically frozen after death.
  • Family Guy:
  • The Fairly Oddparents:
    • The plot seems to dictate whether some characters will use their Flanderized personalities or their original personalities. Depending on the story, Crocker can be a competent fairy hunter (Formula for Disaster) or a delusional fool (Bad Heir Day), Tootie can be a sweet girl with a crush (Birthday Wish) or a Stalker with a Crush (Dread & Breakfast), Trixie Tang can be a pleasant and sweet girl (For Emergencies Only) or an arrogant Spoiled Brat (Movie Magic), Timmy's parents can simply be overworked (Momnipresent, Add-A-Dad) or the most neglectful parents in the world (Fly Boy, Birthday Bashed), Cosmo can either realize a wish might be potentially dangerous and attempt to talk Timmy out of it, or actively encourage absurd wishes and needlessly absurd ways to handle the fallout. Wanda can be either the Only Sane Man who puts out Timmy's and Cosmo's fires, or a doting godparent who doesn't think twice about the consequences.
    • Exactly how Da Rules works or what's really legit. There are those — usually, again — permanent rules (no interfering with true love, no revealing your faeries to anyone and the like) but others seem conveniently flexible. In one episode, a kid feared that Timmy would wish he was richer than him, when its sister episode established that poofing up money counts as counterfeiting. Glaringly, an early episode implies that a rule can be ignored if you simply tear the page out.
  • Ed, Edd n Eddy:
    • In some episodes, Kevin acts as a sort of Hero Antagonist towards the Eds, and merely mistrusts/dislikes them by default and will only actually start beating them up when he discovers them doing some sort of scam. However, in other episodes, he acts as a smug Bully to the Eds (and sometimes other kids in the cul-de-sac) and tends to just enjoy causing despair for them, whether they deserve it or not.
    • He sometimes seems to just really detest Eddy. At one point he just asked Double D the time of day, and that led to a cheerful and apparently-friendly conversation between the two of them. In others however, he seems to have a "one's as bad as the other" approach and punishes them all no matter which Ed opposed him. One episode however seems to hint to Kevin gaining Knight Templar traits, with him becoming outright paranoid and deluded upon their disappearance.
    • The majority of the cul-de-sac's behavior varies this way, either being benevolent characters who only despise the Eds upon provocation or being obnoxious bullies that generally abuse them for the sheer fun of it, provoked or not. Their treatment of each other also varies, particularly with Jimmy.
    • Sometimes Johnny is shown to be almost as unpopular as the Eds to the other kids, while other episodes have him interacting with the others without any sort of problem. Also he generally is the kid who's most willing to be friends with the Eds, though a few episodes show him to be one of the most vocal or suspicious of their scams.
    • How strong certain characters like Ed, Rolf, and Sarah are tend to vary from episode to episode. Some episodes show them struggling to lift things that a normal person would logically have trouble with, while other episodes tend to give them Super Strength for Rule of Funny, with one example being Ed lifting an entire house with ease.
    • Then there's how the neighbourhood kids interact with each other. Are Sarah and Jimmy almost completely separate as "little kids" or part of the whole? Nazz can be the stunning beauty of the neighbourhood able to make every boy fawn over her presence, or just another one of the kids. One of the biggest instances of this is the Urban Rangers, the characters of Rolf, Johnny and Jimmy are rarely seen interacting or if they are they seem to only be annoyed by each other. However whenever they're shown as the Urban Rangers they're always a tight and cohesive unit and never seem to disagree about anything.
  • Candace from Phineas and Ferb. Her obsession for busting the titular brothers varies wildly. She's either a strict disciplinarian who is capable of showing restraint, a Jerkass killjoy who is doing it out of spite, or because she has a psychological need to do so. Her relationship with them varies between loving them deep down to acting like she hates their guts.
  • Jem is made of this:
    • The rules of hologram projection change between almost every episode. A common one is whether the holograms can be touched or not. On a Jem mailing list, head writer Christy Marx bemoans this. She finally became sick of it and became story editor in the third season to avoid inconsistencies.
    • How popular are The Misfits and The Holograms? Many episodes imply both are international sensations while others have them as only really popular in America.
    • The closeness of The Misfits sways with every episode. Jetta and Roxy always loathe each other but whether the others are honest friends or are only together because they're a band changes often.
    • Stormer is the Token Good Teammate of The Misfits and how bad she can be differs often.
    • Are Rio and Jerrica dating or not? In several episodes they seem to have been a couple for years however others have them in a pre-dating stage.
    • Eric's willingness to hurt or kill others. He has been fine with incidents that almost murder Holograms but in others he's against them.
  • Batman: The Animated Series:
    • Batman himself can be anything from a gritty, gothic, never-smiling character to a Spider-Man-esque wise-cracker depending on the episode's writer.
    • Robin can either be the Deus ex Machina for Batman or the Designated Victim who does little else but get taken out of action by the villain in the first act. Batman is also more likely to be the never-smiling character described above when Robin's around to provide the sarcasm.
  • TaleSpin:
    • The characterizations are somewhat erratic, particularly the extent of Baloo and Rebecca's Not So Different aspects. Baloo can switch anywhere between a slovenly but well intentioned Ace Pilot or a brainless egotist. Rebecca can be a plausible Straight Man with subtle Not So Above It All tendacies or even ditzier than Baloo, she can also switch anywhere between a Benevolent Boss and a Mean Boss.
    • Rebecca is usually a fairly no-nonsense businesswoman, while Baloo is willing to cut corners due to impatience or laziness. Sometimes though, to facilitate the plot Rebecca will suddenly latch onto some hair brained get rich quick scheme, with Baloo trying to talk her out of it the whole time.
      • Additionally, the two may be equal forces that refuse to back down to each other or there may be a visible dominant side (even this is inconsistant, as sometimes Rebecca may be recessive to Baloo impudence and exploitation, naively holding onto the belief he will eventually take to her routine, or she will take no nonsense from him whatsoever, with Baloo acting as something of a surrogate Henpecked Husband that caves in or outright cowers before her overbearing attitude).
    • Kit can range between something of an Only Sane Man and jarringly mature and perceptive for his age, or a naive Bratty Half-Pint (usually when neither Baloo or Rebecca are holding the Idiot Ball).
    • Shere Khan is mostly a Affably Evil Anti-Villain interested in gaining wealth and power, but is a Noble Demon who won't cross the line and is a Friendly Enemy to Baloo. In other episodes he's a Ambiguously Evil Anti-Hero who teams up with Baloo, but usually for his own gain. In one episode he's a Faux Affably Evil villain largely responsible for the troubles.
  • Shego's capacity for evil in Kim Possible varies widely between episodes. She's chastised Dr. Drakken for wanting to steal Felix Renton's wheelchair in one episode, and was worried about the fish in a lake he wanted to drain in another. Her helping out in Graduation. On the other end of the spectrum, in that very same episode regarding Felix, she was more than happy to try and blow him to bits later on. We also have the episode Car Alarm, in which she and Motor Ed stole a rocket car. Ed wanted to simply cruise around with her, while Shego effectively wanted to destroy the planet with it. And while it had a Reset Button ending, A Sitch In Time shows us what she's really capable of.
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars has some rather wild personality swings amongst the cast, often completely reversing opinions and personality between different episodes. In "Hostage Crisis" (written by Eoghan Mahony), Anakin makes a large speech about how Padme is the single most important thing in his life, whereas she seems preoccupied by the duties and responsibilities of her office and their obligations to the Republic. However, in "Senate Spy" (written by Melinda Hsu), their positions are diametrically reversed, and Padme becomes upset when Anakin lectures her on the nature of responsibility and the duties they have that supersede their personal desires. Neither seems to recall that they were ever on opposite sides of the debate.
  • Many episodes of South Park have this. Wendy, for example, can be the Only Sane Girl or a Clingy Jealous Girl of epic proportions based on the plot. Likewise Cartman's level of evil can range from Jerk with a Heart of Gold (rarely) to Jerkass (more common), while Kyle can either be naively convinced of some good in him deep down, or outright overzealous that the world be rid of him. Additionally he and Stan can be genuinely good natured and saner than the rest of South Park or jerkasses only toned down compared to Cartman and perfectly fine tormenting anyone lower on the chain than themselves (eg. Butters, Pip, Kenny).
    • Also, Craig can either be a callous Jerkass who bullies others and serve as an egotistical rival for the boys with his own gang ("South Park Is Gay"), an ordinary kid who hangs out with the boys along with the other kids and goes through crazy things with them ("Marjorine"), or a Deadpan Snarker who doesn't want to get involved in the ridiculous situations the boys go through ("Pandemic").
    • For more minor examples: recent episodes have the Mayor oscillating from Only Sane Woman to just as stupid as all the other adults. Priest Maxi, meanwhile, can be The Fundamentalist Straw Hypocrite ("Do the Handicapped Go to Hell?"), an extreme progressive fighting against Pedophile Priests ("Red Hot Catholic Love") or just a normal voice for religious opinion, sincere even if he's portrayed as misguided ("Cartman Sucks").
  • Futurama:
    • Done quite irritatingly in the sixth season of Futurama, which has the nerve to go back and forth not just on personality traits, but from Fry and Leela being an established couple to Fry and Leela having no hint of being a couple at all (even though they had declared their love for each other at the end of the fourth Big Damn Movie). Possibly the most egregious example — in "The Late Phillip J. Fry", they're blatantly a couple, dating, in love, and committed to their relationship. In the very next episode, "That Darn Katz", Leela says perfectly seriously (with intentional pathetic-ness) "Well, I may not have a man, but at least Nibbler loves me."
    • Leela still can be portrayed as being either the opposing poles of the token boring, buttoned-down, extremely unimpulsive character or the single most reckless, hot-tempered, and impulsive character in the show. The swings favored the latter more and more as the show went on, but trying to label it positive Flanderization would be misleading.
      • Speaking of Flanderization, Fry. People often accuse the show of Flanderizing an average joe into a near-Ralph Wiggum, but Fry was acting like a reckless idiot as early as episode two. If an episode references Fry's backstory (such as the Delta Brain Wave), Fry will be elevated to a more witty, intelligent characterization.
      • And rounding out the Power Trio, there's Bender, who can flip-flop between uncaring Jerk with a Heart of Jerk who's more than willing to go so far as to kill people in his way if it means getting what he wants to Jerk with a Heart of Gold who still shows some signs of guilt or remorse with occasional Pet the Dog moments.
  • The Dreamstone:
  • The Powerpuff Girls:
    • Mojo Jojo can be an ingenious, manipulative criminal mastermind who can come within an inch of defeating the girls, a complete joke who's too stupid to see the gaping flaws in his plans, or anything in between.
    • Similarly, HIM ranges from somewhat-effective but still buffoonish Flaming Devil to full-on terrifying Eldritch Abomination, though, in his case, it also depends on whether he's the episode's main villain.
    • Leaning between this and Series Continuity Error, Bubbles is sometimes depicted as vegetarian despite very often eating meat without issue.
    • The Powerpuff Girls themselves can range in skill level from being developing rookies to being in par with the world's greatest superheroes. This often depends on how relevant their skill level is to the current scene, with the girls appearing more powerful when it's deliberately brought into the spotlight.
    • The Powerpuff Girls can also range in intelligence, from being more like normal five year olds and having limited common sense to being able to solve complex riddles in less than a minute.
    • How dumb or smart Bubbles is seems to depend on the writer. Some episodes she's a complete moron, some episodes she's of average intelligence, and some episodes have her a Genius Ditz with Obfuscating Stupidity.
    • How much people respect Buttercup. Certain episodes have her with much less respect than her sisters, while other episodes have her with just as much respect as them.
  • Tom and Jerry:
    • The different ways in which these two were written is amazing. Most of the time, they're antagonistic towards each other, but sometimes they're best buddies, and sometimes, they enjoy their chase. Sometimes Tom is a sadistic jerk, sometimes he's painted as the villain for doing a cat's job, and sometimes he's a hapless victim. Sometimes Jerry is just fighting for his survival, sometimes he helps out others Tom is torturing, and sometimes he just torments Tom for fun.
    • Spike the Bulldog can range between being a vicious guard dog who never talks, to a bipedal dog with a Jimmy Durante sounding voice. Sometimes he attacks Tom simply for being a cat, other times he only goes after Tom when he annoys or bothers him. He also ranges from being friends with Jerry, not noticing him, or attacking him as viciously as he would Tom (though admittingly this only really happened once).
    • Butch and Tom are either the best of buddies or the worst of enemies.
  • The Looney Tunes Show:
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic:
    • The characters and their various interactions with other characters vary from writer to writer. Pinkie Pie can either be an insane stalker-like lunatic or a hidden genius, Fluttershy can ranged from being mildly socially awkward to a nervous wreck, and Spike's crush on Rarity can be almost complete devotion to her, simply non-existent or anything in between. Even Scootaloo's idolization of Rainbow Dash can range from Fangirl to not treating her any differently from other adults.
    • As another result of the show’s inconsistent writing, Pinkie’s friends alternate between enjoying her company and trying to get away from her, both ignoring her when she tries to talk to them but doing things with her such as pulling pranks or playing buckball. All in the same season by the same characters.
    • The depiction of the cast often depends on who is in the main limelight, and thus most likely to have An Aesop concerning their defining flaws. For Twilight Sparkle for example, her bookworm ethics are usually tamed to make her down to earth and come in handy acting as an Only Sane Man when someone else is acting up, when she is in the main role however, she will be much more neurotic and arrogant, refusing obsessively to accept anyone else's opinion over her scientific logic. She and almost every other pony can also range between perfectly humble to completely full of themselves depending on what the situation needs. And despite characterizations shifts between writers, they all seem to have a steady stream of consistent Character Development between them.
    • Princess Luna is easily the worst offender, she will go from Large Ham with No Indoor Voice to stern stoic to Shrinking Violet whatever the writers want, might be as a result as being the O.C. Stand-in for much of Season 1's fanworks. On the other hand, many fans embraced these discrepancies, considering Luna a princess of paradox, full of inner conflicts and dualities - sweet and friendly, but easy to anger, covering social awkwardness with brash behavior, seeking escape from dark thoughts in common joys and being painfully naive about many common matters while possessing ageless wisdom.
    • Spike and Twilight's relationship is confusing due to this trope. Are they like siblings, mother and son, mentor and student, or what? The most obvious example of this dissonance is how season 8's "Father Knows Beast" implies that Twilight has a motherly bond with Spike, but the season 9 episode "Sparkle's Seven" shows that Spike was raised by Twilight's parents as her younger brother.
  • Scooby-Doo: Like the above page quote, Shaggy's vegetarianism varies from adaption to adaption. He definitely wasn't one in the early show, but became one after Casey Kasem did. He's one if Kasem is playing him, but if he's not, he usually won't be (specifically in Shaggy & Scooby-Doo Get a Clue!, where one of his favorite foods was "hot dog tacos"). In a Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated episode, Shaggy is actually disgusted at the idea of tofu burgers. In the first live action movie, his vegetarianism is forgotten halfway through the story. This may be a symptom of having three writers on board.
  • Some characters have bouts of this in Sonic Sat AM, especially in the first season which had multiple writers at the helm. Sally for example can range anywhere between a patient Team Mom with a subtle sarcastic wit to a stuck up brat who chastises Sonic over anything outside regulations. Antoine can also range anywhere between a comedic but somewhat relatably cowardly individual who has at least some nobilities, to a completely insane Dirty Coward with no real redeeming aspects whatsoever. Sonic himself can be somewhat egotistical and dizzy, but otherwise kind and thoroughly competent, or he can be a brainless Jerk Jock that constantly looks down on his friends and endangers them in his arrogant blundering.
  • Some of the engines' personalities waver in Thomas the Tank Engine, particularly due to alterations made from their counterparts in The Railway Series novels. James in particular, since his very first appearances, can range anywhere from being friendly and reliable if slightly boisterous and arrogant, to a narcissistic Jerkass who is rude to everyone and objects constantly to work of any kind.
  • In the Fleischer Studios Popeye cartoons, Bluto's character can vary judging by who's the head animator. At times he can be mean and ruthless under Willard Bowsky ("Be Kind to Aminals" and "Dizzy Divers"), while he's more comical and bumbling under Seymour Kneitel ("The Hyp-Nut-Tist" and "For Better or Worser"). Dave Tendlar was usually somewhere in the middle.
    • Speaking of Fleischer Studios, if Myron Waldman is the head animator, expect it to be more cute and sentimental (like many of the later Betty Boop cartoons or the more subtle Color Classics).
    • There's also a lot of disagreement as to how strong Bluto is compared to Popeye. Sometimes, Popeye is no match for him without spinach, while other times, Popeye can put up a good fight against him even without it. Still other times, Bluto has a terrible glass jaw, and even Olive Oyl can knock him out.
  • Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Frylock is either a) protective of Meatwad from Shake's pranks; or b) not really much better than Shake by trying to coax Meatwad into risky investigations just to save himself. Speaking of Meatwad, he can be a) Too Dumb to Live; b) actually pretty smart by seeing right through Shake's pranks or figuring stuff out that even Frylock had trouble with; or c) anywhere in between. And Carl will either a) hate the food items' guts and not want anything to do with them; or b) act as if he's great friends with them, sometimes even going along with their schemes (although sometimes, this one is him just using them for his own gain).
  • In Totally Spies!, the intelligence, competence, and hormone levels of the three protagonists tends to vary:
  • Jimmy Two-Shoes' Rule of Funny-based storytelling lends to this.
    • The title character can either be a childlike Kindhearted Simpleton of good intentions, a quirky (if somewhat naive) Straight Man, or a hyperactive Cloud Cuckoolander and Idiot Hero.
    • Beezy ranges from being a mellow idiot who would rather enjoy himself than inherit Miseryville to a selfish Jerkass who only cares about his own pleasure.
    • Heloise is either a complete sadist who even Jimmy is openly scared of at times or a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, with said heart only being shown around Jimmy.
    • Lucius can be an utter Caligula who sees Jimmy's contagious cheer as a threat to his rule, a petty Jerkass who just finds Jimmy a pain in his side, or a strict Jerk with a Heart of Gold who just wants to run Miseryville without Jimmy's interference.
  • Whether Miranda genuinely likes Courtney depends on the As Told by Ginger episode. Sometimes she's depicted as simply hanging around her in order to become popular however occasionally she shows signs of caring for Courtney. The former seems to be her default though and come high school Miranda has abandoned Courtney.
  • This happens mostly in the later episodes of The Angry Beavers . Norbert is either portrayed as being a laid back older brother and the voice of reason or he is portrayed as being a smug Jerkass who enjoys manipulating Daggett. Daggett on the other hand, is either portrayed as being irrational and having a hot temper or he is portrayed as being Too Dumb to Live and is The Woobie.
  • In Robin Hood: Mischief in Sherwood, the Sheriff will often switch between being the Corrupt Cop/Evil Debt Collector he is depicted as in most adaptations and being a Reasonable Authority Figure who is Just Following Orders.
  • The Powerpuff Girls (2016)
  • Adventure Time: Lumpy Space Princess is a character used for humor, and different writers use her as such.
  • Steven Universe: Lapis Lazuli suffers this trope quite nastily, with her infrequent appearances making it hard to tell if the character is just well-rounded or... well, this trope. Lapis can jump around from being horribly traumatized/depressed by her past and her actions, be completely indifferent to everything around her, or just be an awful bitch to everyone around her except Steven.
  • Animaniacs mostly does a good job of averting this, but still includes a few cases: for example, whether the Warners will drive people crazy just for fun or have a moral code against picking on anyone who doesn't provoke them, whether Hello Nurse is a Dumb Blonde or a smart woman whose looks distract everyone from her brain, whether Rita is tough yet sweet or a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, and Skippy Squirrel's Ping-Pong Naïveté (though since most of his more naive episodes are from earlier in the series, this could also be a case of Character Development).
  • Ready Jet Go!:
    • In some episodes, Mitchell can be a quiet yet obedient spy and in other episodes, he can be cold and anti-social.
    • Jet is either a naive alien, or completely stupid.
  • In Miraculous Ladybug, whether or not Sabrina has a nasty streak of her own or simply goes along with Chloe's schemes because she's an Extreme Doormat.
  • The Crumpets:
    • Li'l One Crumpet hates his father, but he also either hates all of his siblings or hate few if not none.
    • Caprice Crumpet either supports her family (e.g. finding missing members) or rebels them.
    • The Crumpets' neighbor Ms. McBrisk usually denounces the family for being immoral or disruptive. At other times she is a good neighbor to them.
  • CatDog: In some episodes, Cat and Dog are very close and consider each other their best friends. In others, they act like a Big Brother Bully and an Annoying Younger Sibling respectively and are constantly at each other's throats.
  • Xiaolin Showdown: The friendship between the four monks and their cohesion as a team varies throughout the show. The first season started off depicting them as contentious at best and poor teamwork but then gradually develop into friends. Come season two and three, the monks flip flop between close friends who got each other's backs and showcase brilliant teamwork to acting like jerks to each other, with teamwork so terrible that someone as feeble as Jack Spicer (particularly after his Villain Decay) can get the best of them.
  • In Arthur, how much of an Annoying Younger Sibling D.W. can be towards Arthur depends on the episode. She'll either be a typical annoying little sister who just wants Arthur's attention, or a borderline sociopath who seemingly makes Arthur's life more difficult just for the fun of it.

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