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    Examples where the character did not die in the source: 
  • Joshua Speed in Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
  • The Red King from Alice in Wonderland (2010). It's implied that his wife, the Red Queen (who is the film's Big Bad) killed him prior to the events of the film.
  • In Anne of Green Gables: A New Beginning, it's revealed that Gilbert died while serving as a medical doctor overseas during World War II. In the books Anne and Gilbert's sons Jem, Walter, and Shirely serve in World War I so this is a major generational time shift.
  • In Attack on Titan (2015), Jean Kirstein gets killed by the Colossal Titan. In the original Attack on Titan, Jean got to see the Colossal Titan die.
  • Thanks to The Hays Code, Rhonda in The Bad Seed is struck by lightning at the side of a pond. Her mother, on the other hand, survives.
  • Barbarella: The movie has Professor Ping and the other prisoners of the labyrinth get hit by the Positronic Ray, disintegrating them. In the comics the ray didn't exist and all the prisoners managed to escape the labyrinth before the Mathmos flooded it.
  • The Joker and the Penguin in Tim Burton's Batman (1989) and Batman Returns, respectively. Two-Face in Joel Schumacher's Batman Forever. Jason Woodrue dies after a brief appearance in Batman & Robin, but all the other heavies survive. The same can't be said for the series.
  • Cee Cee Bloom's father is said to have died offscreen in the 1988 film of Beaches, while her mother lives. In the novel, Mr. Bloom outlives his wife but is estranged from his daughter. He would later feature more heavily in the unadapted sequel I'll Be There.
  • In the monster film The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, the title dinosaur is destroyed to end its rampage in New York City. However, in "The Fog Horn", the Ray Bradbury short story that the movie is partly inspired by, the dinosaur is more sympathetic, less destructive, and returns to the ocean in peace instead of being killed.
  • In the 1988 adaptation of The Bourne Identity, Alexander Conklin is killed at the beginning of the fight between Bourne and Gillette, where he survived the book and appeared in the sequels.
  • In the film Brest Fortress, the narrator in the end says that "Anya Kizhevatova was executed along with all families of the Fortress' defenders." Anya was indeed executed, but most of the families (including other girls Anya's age) actually survived.
  • In the Bunny Drop manga Kouki's parents are divorced. In the film his mother tells him they're divorced but he believes his father is dead. After scaring his mom by running away with Rin to find his dads grave, his mother reveals she really did lie about the divorce and his father died.
  • Inspector Legrasse in the 2005 silent film adaptation of The Call of Cthulhu.
  • The gym teacher, renamed Mrs. Collins, in the first movie version of Carrie. Ditto for Norma who gets this by virtue of Adaptational Villainy and Fire Hose-Guided Karma. The book implies there are a good few survivors of the prom who got out through the fire doors before Carrie closed them, but in the film all of the students at the prom appear to die in the fire.
    • And the TV remake gives us, Tina who survived in the book. Amusingly enough she and Norma escaped together in the book, and in both cases the girl that was given Adaptational Villainy would fall victim to this trope, depending on the version.
  • In the 1939 version of The Cat and the Canary, Charlie Wilder kills his accomplice, Hendricks and is killed himself by Miss Lu. The original stage play ends with both characters arrested.
  • Theo Faron from Children of Men.
  • Cinderella (2015):
    • The prince's mother is flat-out said to be dead here and his father eventually dies too. While the original film implies that the King is a widower, it never directly specifies it either, and the King himself survives to the end.
    • As the animated film and most other modern adaptations, Cinderella's father is killed off, while in the original Perrault and Brothers Grimm versions he's alive but too governed by the stepmother to do anything.
  • Meg Ryan's character in City of Angels - the angel's girlfriend in the film Wings of Desire does not die.
  • Cloud Atlas: Dr. Henry Goose gets bludgeoned over the head with the money he was trying to steal..
  • In Congo, Kahega dies early on, despite being a much more important character in the book, and the survivor from the first expedition the heroes find in a tribal village.
  • In The Dark Knight Saga, Ra's al Ghul and Two-Face.
    • Oddly enough, Carmine Falcone is still alive in this universe while dead in the comics.
    • The third film has Talia al Ghul and Bane.
  • DC Extended Universe:
    • Man of Steel:
      • Possibly Jor-El's digital avatar as well. Zod seems to delete it when Jor-El tries to convince him not to go through with his plan.
      • This is another adaptation where Jonathan Kent dies (not always in Superman media).
      • Emil Hamilton dies helping stop the Kryptonians.
      • Superman kills Zod in the heat of battle and out of desperation, and he regrets it deeply.
      • Kara Zor-El. In the prequel comic, we learn that she's Kal-El's distant ancestor rather than his first cousin in this continuity, and that she was one of the Kryptonian explorers who came to Earth and landed in the Arctic. It's possible that the corpse in the Kryptonian spacecraft is hers; though even if it isn't, she's definitely long-dead by the time Kal-El makes it to Earth. However, note that while one sleeper capsule had a corpse, another was open and empty...
    • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice
      • Word of God is the undercover agent with Lois in her first scene is Jimmy Olsen. He doesn't make it past that scene.
      • Mercy Graves is shown dying in an explosion at the capital building.
      • Superman himself dies in the second movie in this canon. Probably the earliest any continuity had ever done a nod to the Death of Superman story.
    • Wonder Woman:
      • It is stated by Hippolyta that Ares killed all of the Gods of Olympus except for Zeus. In the comics, the Gods still survived to the present day, playing significant roles in many of the modern runs (such as the New 52 Wonder Woman series).
      • During the final battle, Steve Trevor pulls a Heroic Sacrifice. This is a somewhat complex example, since while the Pre-Crisis version of Steve was killed off and revived at least twice, all of the Post-Crisis version of the character were not. Regardless, this is at the very least a Type 2 version of this trope, as even the versions of Steve that did die only did so after having many adventures with Wonder Woman.
  • In Infernal Affairs, Lau Kin-ming survives the story without anyone realizing him to be the Triad mole. His counterpart in The Departed, Colin Sullivan almost gets away with it, but he's shot in the head by Dignam.
  • Mogi in the live-action Death Note movies.
  • In Dick Tracy, Lips Manlis gets the bath under orders of Big Boy Caprice. His comic strip counterpart made a Heel–Face Turn early on and lived, renaming himself Bob Honor. Two more reformed baddies, Littleface Finney and Influence, are also killed. The former dies in the opening massacre by Flattop, the latter by Tracy in the final shootout.
    • In the novelization, Frank Redrum is mentioned to have died in an escape attempt from prison. His comic strip counterpart was the villain The Blank, who was arrested at the end of his arc. The Blank identity, meanwhile, was used in the movie by Breathless Mahoney, who dies in the strip, who is shot and killed by Big Boy.
  • In Donnie Brasco, Mobster and friend, Lefty, is killed for bringing Donnie Brasco, who turns out to be an undercover FBI agent, into the crime family. The movie is based on a true story, but in reality, Joe Pistone, who the movie based on, was able to get Lefty out before he was killed and put into police protection. It was Lefty's boss, who was always disrespectful to him, who ends up getting killed after the fallout of the arrest happens.
  • In Dr. Strangelove Stanley Kubrick takes it to the extreme in his satirical adaptation of the Cold War novel Red Alert. In the novel, nuclear catastrophe is averted; in the film, it's The End of the World as We Know It for mankind.
  • Dracula had a few, which is not surprising when the main story been done so many times and they want to spice it up.
    • In Horror of Dracula Harker stakes the vampire bride but the sun goes down before he can get to Dracula himself and is killed and turned, leaving it to Helsing to stake him.
    • In Dan Curtis's version of Dracula, Harker is caught while trying to escape the castle and thrown into the vampire brides' chambers where they make a meal of him. Not surprisingly near the end of the movie when Helsing and Holmwood are tracking Drac through the castle. They find an undead Harker in the same area. He nearly succeeds in trying to bite Helsing but is knocked into a spike pit by Holmwood and killed for real.
    • In the 1979 movie, Mina trades places with Lucy. Becoming Dracula's first victim, being turned into a vampire, and having to be staked by her father (albeit accidental). Helsing also dies during the final battle against Dracula. He uses his final strength to kill him, however.
    • Harker again in the 2012 Italian adaption. He gets bitten not once, but three times. Once by Dracula's bride, Tania. And twice by Dracula himself. Helsing comes across his coffin while chasing after Dracula and there's a bit of a Hope Spot as he seems to climb out of it weakly...before he hisses, barring his fangs. Helsing promptly stakes him.
  • James "Thunder" Early in Dreamgirls dies of a drug overdose in the film, while he just disappears in the stage show.
  • The Ra'zac in Eragon, despite the fact that them surviving is a major plot point in later Inheritance Cycle books.
  • Sir Lancelot dies in the final battle of Excalibur, reconciled with King Arthur. In the legends and specifically Le Morte D Arthur which the film claims it's based on, he retires to a monastery as The Atoner.
  • Bat in the Fist of the North Star movie.
  • Maggio dies after being tortured in From Here to Eternity, even though he survives in the novel. This is because he was made into a Composite Character with a minor character named Blues Berry, who did die in the book.
  • Mike Enslin in the director's cut of 1408.
  • Anita Vanger in The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo becomes a Posthumous Character in both film versions. Her cousin, Harriet, lives under her name in both of them.
  • Berger in Hair, in a rare film example of death by military draft. He was impersonating The Hero Claude, who dies in the play. More interestingly, the big finale song in both versions is a Dark Reprise about the character's death.
  • Offred kills Fred in the film version of The Handmaid's Tale. She doesn't in the book.
  • Harry Potter: most especially Deathly Hallows: Part 2
    • Draco's friend/lackey Goyle is the one to use Fiendfyre and burn himself to death with it, while in the book it was Crabbe. This is because Crabbe's actor got in legal trouble and thus was unable to play in the movie.
    • Griphook (massacred along with the rest of the Gringotts staff by Voldemort)
    • Scabior (falls to his doom when the bridge he is standing on blows up)
    • Pius Thicknesse (killed by Voldemort for being annoying)
    • Lavender Brown (killed by Fenrir Greyback) and Fenrir Greyback (defenestrated by Hermione in turn). Lavender is gravely injured in the books but her ultimate fate is left ambiguous, while Pottermore has her listed as "missing, presumed dead".
    • The way Amycus and Alecto Carrow lay on the ground after being defeated by McGonagall suggests that they're also dead (McGonagall used the same spell Harry later tries to kill Nagini with) while in the book they are imprisoned in a net by McGonagall at Ravenclaw Tower.
  • Luke Sanderson is killed by Hugh Crain's ghost in the 1999 remake of The Haunting. In the source material and the original movie, he survives.
  • In Heart of Darkness (1958), Kurtz's mistress (a very minor character in the original) is given an expanded arc which includes a death scene.
  • Jim Halsey and Lt. Esteridge in the 2007 remake of The Hitcher.
  • In The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, Katniss's prep team from the games didn't make it to District 13.
  • Vasili Borodin in The Hunt for Red October.
  • Helen and Barry both die in I Know What You Did Last Summer, but they survive the book.
  • In the film version of Into the Woods, Cinderella's father is said to be dead. In the stage version he is still alive, but a drunken layabout.
  • James Bond
  • Gennaro and Muldoon in Jurassic Park. In the former's case, it may be because he was effectively a Composite Character with someone who did die in the book. Interestingly, Gennaro is mentioned as having died in The Lost World novel, perhaps to get things more consistent between the novels and films. In Muldoons case it crosses over with Adaptational Dumbass, since the book version recognized and avoided the classical ambush strategy of the animal he's the world's only experienced expert at instead of blundering right into it.
  • In The Jungle Book (2016), Akela gets killed by Shere Khan from being flung off a cliff. Akela does not die in the original movie, but he does die in the book...in the dhole battle after Shere Khan's death.
  • Kamen Rider: The Next kills off Hayato Ichimonji when his cybernetic implants take their toll on him. He's still alive in the mainstream universe.
  • Captatin Dudley Smith is killed in a shootout with Ed Exley in the film version of L.A. Confidential. He survived the novel and its sequel, White Jazz, where the latter's Distant Finale reveals him to be in a nursing home.
  • In Lady Oscar, the Live-Action Adaptation of The Rose of Versailles, Oscar's mother Madame de Jarjayes dies giving birth to her. She's very much alive in the source material, and in fact, outlives Oscar herself.
  • Pretty much everyone in The Land That Time Forgot, but particularly Bradley, Whiteley, Sinclair, and Plesser. Other characters such as von Schoenvorts, Dietz and Benson die differently and at different points than they do in the novel, and under entirely different circumstances.
    • This also holds true for the sequel, The People That Time Forgot, a very loose adaptation of the middle portion of the novel. Lisa dies off-screen between films, and Bowen suffers a fatal arrow wound in the final battle, whereas in the book both of them survive and get married.
  • In The Last Airbender, Katara's narration explains that Yue has ruled the Northern Water Tribe since her father's death. In the show Chief Arnook was alive before and after the Fire Nation's attack.
  • Probably the protagonist of Layer Cake. While surviving and leaving England in the book, he is implied to die in the movie.
  • In the 1948 film of Les Misérables, M. Thenardier falls to his death down a trapdoor. His novel counterpart lived Happily Ever After as a slave trader in America.
  • The musical Little Shop of Horrors ends with the monster plant Audrey II surviving to conquer the world. When it came to the film version of the musical, test audiences took against the conquer-the-world ending, and it was replaced with one in which Audrey II was successfully killed off.
  • Haldir in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings. (In the book, the elves don't even show up at Helm's Deep.) Also the Mouth of Sauron, whose fate in the book is unknown.
    • Sauron himself doesn't technically die in the book, as he is said to be "maimed forever" when the ring is destroyed. In the movie, he is destroyed along with it. And how. Though his spirit could still be present.
  • Master and Commander kills off Mr. Allen, Joseph Nagle, and Peter Calamey in the final battle; since there isn't a Final Battle in the Aubrey-Maturin books, they all seem to live.
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe
  • At the end of My Side of the Mountain, Frightful the hawk gets shot and dies. In the book, she not only lives, but ends up with three sequels focusing on her.
  • The film of The Mist kills off Billy Drayton, Amanda Dunfrey and Mrs. Reppler in a Cruel Twist Ending that didn't happen in the book. The book ended with them and David safely driving off to an uncertain future.
    • Also, in the book Myron Lafleur, Ambrose Cornell and Sally the cashier were still alive back at the supermarket at stories end. In the film, Sally is killed during the store incursion on the first night, and Myron and Ambrose are killed by giant spiders while trying to run to David's car.
    • Stephanie Drayton's fate is left ambiguous in the book, but in the film they find her dead body.
  • The Mothman Prophecies: The character Gordon Smallwood dies of exposure in the forest while waiting for another meeting with Indrid Cold. The real life person he was based on, Woodrow Derenberger, did not die, but in fact went on to write his own book about the events.
  • Everybody except for Bastian and the Empress in The Neverending Story. They get better.
  • The Night Flier: In the original short story, Richard Dees survives the encounter with the vampire at the airport after giving him his camera footage. In the film, Dees is placed in a nightmarish trance by the vampire and is then shot and killed when he attacks two police officers.
  • Nina in Nosferatu and its remake.
  • The Old Maid: In the play, Clem simply leaves town after knocking up Charlotte. In the 1939 movie, Clem is killed in combat at Vicksburg, making him a more sympathetic character.
  • Uncle Pastuzo in Paddington. In the books he's very much alive (and very rich) and travelling the world.
  • Dial M for Murder and its original play end with Tony Wendice arrested for conspiring to murder his wife. In A Perfect Murder, his counterpart, Steven Taylor, is killed by his wife when he tries to kill her.
  • The 2019 remake of Pet Sematary switches the fates of the Creed children, so Ellie dies and comes back wrong instead of Gage. Their father, Louis, is killed by a resurrected Rachel and also comes back wrong. The book and first movie ended just as Louis encounters the resurrected Rachel.
  • Redd White is poisoned while in prison in the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney movie, but is never seen again after his arrest in the game. This is due to him being an accomplice of von Karma in this version, necessitating his death so he doesn't testify in the 4th case.
  • In Power Rangers (2017), Billy, the Blue Ranger, is drowned by Rita Repulsa. Though a Disney Death and one he comes back from, neither his original counterpart nor his Kyoryu Sentai Zyuranger counterpart died.
  • Angier in The Prestige; in the book, he actually became immortal.
  • Mia's father, Philippe, in the film version of The Princess Diaries. In the books, he is very much alive and only reveals to Mia that she's a princess because he has testicular cancer and can no longer have any kids, making the illegitimate Mia his only heir. In the film they kill him in order to brush past testicular cancer in a Disney movie.
  • In Queen of the Damned, Mael and Pandora were both killed, despite being rather important figures in the books (particularly Pandora, who was actually the protagonist of one of the sequels).
    • There wasn't much of a final battle in the book, with Maharet's twin sister (excluded from the film) Mekare pushing Akasha through a window, which gets Akasha beheaded.
  • In the novel Rebecca, Mrs. Danvers sets fire to Manderley and escapes. The film version has her stay in the house and perish in the fire.
  • In Red Dawn (2012) Danny is killed, in the Red Dawn (1984) original he is one of the few survivors.
  • In Reefer Madness: The Musical, Ralph goes insane, then kills and eats Sally (Blanche in the original), forcing Jack to shoot him. Jack is later beaten to death by Mae. In the original Reefer Madness, Ralph goes insane and beats Jack to death, then Blanche jumps out of a window to avoid having to testify against him, and Ralph is put into an asylum for the criminally insane. None of them benefited from the adaptation, least of all Ralph.
  • Dr. Frock in The Relic, particularly jarring as he plays a central role in the novel's sequel, Reliquary, as the Big Bad.
    • The same goes with scientist Greg Lee (Kawakita in the novel). Although he dies in between the events of the two books, his actions are actually what kick the sequel off and lead to Frock becoming a villain, as he begins recreating the plant the created the monster with the intention of selling it as a drug.
  • In Resident Evil: Apocalypse, a "Capt. Leon Kennedy" is reported to have been killed in a newspaper.
    • Not only was this a throwaway line from a promotional "newsletter" and wasn't even in the movie proper, but it's retconned away when Leon finally makes an appearance in Retribution.
    • In Resident Evil: Extinction, Carlos Oliveira is bitten and makes a Heroic Sacrifice. He survives in Resident Evil 3: Nemesis but is never mentioned again.
    • In Retribution, Barry Burton finally makes a appearance as well, but dies while trying to buy time for the other heroes to escape. In the games, he's still alive.
    • In the novelization for The Final Chapter, Jill, Leon and Ada are killed during the battle at Washington DC by Wesker betraying them during the battle. This is never revealed in the movie proper.
  • The Nome King is accidentally destroyed by a chicken egg in Return to Oz, a composite adaptation of The Marvelous Land of Oz and Ozma of Oz. In the books, he survived all his appearances only to get turned into a cactus in the later book, Handy Mandy in Oz.
  • Rampage (2018): Ralph and Lizzie are both alive and well in the original games, but died here.
  • In the comic version of Road to Perdition, John Looney is merely sent to prison. In the movie, John Rooney is gunned down by Michael Sullivan Sr.
  • Ryan's Daughter, a Setting Update of Madame Bovary, does this to Major Doryan. While both of Emma Bovary's lovers, Rodolphe and Leon, outlive her in the novel, Major Doryan blows himself up with dynamite in the movie.
  • While in the Scott Pilgrim comics, Crash and The Boys help out against third-ex Todd Ingram, they get flash-fried by first-ex Matthew Patel in Scott Pilgrim vs. The World.
  • The Secret Garden 1987: Dickon is killed in World War I at the end, in a postscript invented for the movie. (The original novel was written before the War.)
  • Tommy and Warden Norton in The Shawshank Redemption.
  • She: In the book, Billali is a trusted friend who helps the heroes throughout and survives to farewell them at the end. In the 1965 film, he's the main antagonist, who tries to take the big prize for himself and gets stabbed for his trouble.
  • Irene Adler in Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows. Although, there's some debate about her status in the canon. She's referred to, at the beginning of the one story she appears in, as "the late Irene Adler", but this could simply allude to the fact that she changes her name. At the very least, the way she dies was invented for the movie.
  • Dick Halloran in The Shining. In the novel he takes a beating with a roque club, but makes it out alive with a broken jaw. In the film, he is killed by an axe to the chest.
  • Cybil in Silent Hill. She can die in the games, but her survival is hinted to be canon.
  • Senator Roark in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For.
  • Brom Bomes in Tim Burton's version of Sleepy Hollow.
  • Amanda Grayson, Spock's human mother as well as the entire planet of Vulcan in Star Trek (2009).
  • Starship Troopers has Johnny's father, who is one of the few characters to survive to the end of the book, and actually becomes Johnny's second in command once he gets his own squadron. In the film, he dies alongside Johnny's mother (who, incidentally, does die the same way in both book and film) in the attack on Buenos Aires, relatively early on.
  • The besiegers in Straw Dogs.
  • Witt, who gets a Heroic Sacrifice of sorts in The Thin Red Line.
    • Also, Nellie Coombs.
    • Welsh in the 1964 adaptation.
  • Dr. Copper and Norris survive the events of Who Goes There?. In The Thing (1982), Norris is replaced by the titular monster and Cooper is killed by said duplicate.
  • Poor old Tufty Thesinger in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.
  • Arthur in the 2005 movie of Tom Brown's Schooldays.
  • Captain Walker in the 1975 adaptation of The Who's Tommy. Also Nora Walker (Tommy's mother) at the end of the film.
  • In The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Cody dies fighting the banditos, leaving a widow and a farm behind. Curtin is implied to go there at the end of movie, in hopes of taking his place. In the book, Lacaud is last seen in perfect health, and never gives any indication that he's married or has any other trade than prospecting.
  • Menelaus in Troy is killed by Hector to save Paris near the start of the siege, while in the original Paris is saved by Aphrodite, and Menelaus actually ends up going home with Helen. Ajax is also killed in battle rather than his ignominious end after the death of Achilles.
  • LaBoeuf lived through the original novel True Grit, but died pulling Mattie and Cogburn out of the pit in the 1969 movie version. In the 2010 movie version he survives again.
  • Captain Nemo as well as most of his crew in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
  • Max Brailovsky in 2010: The Year We Make Contact.
  • * Utøya: July 22, by Erik Poppe is a reenactment of the Breivik Massacre (which happened on the island Utøya on 22. July 2011) from the perspective of the victims. Out of respect for the victims, the film features fictional characters instead of people actually being there. Among other changes, some of the survivor's stories are attributed to those who die - understandable, since the dead couldn't tell their stories and would be just abstract corpses otherwise. This includes Kaja, the main heroine.
  • Vampire Academy:
    • Oscar the cat. He appears briefly in the first novel, as the pet of a human housemate of Lissa and Rose. In the film, Oscar is Lissa's pet. The discovery of his corpse traumatizes her.
    • The character Ray (the film's rename of Ralf Sarcozy) is killed by Natalie Dashkov. The kill she needed to transform to a Strigoi. In the book nothing happens to him. He goes on to become one of the founding members of the Mână in Shadow Kiss.
  • General Count Cambronne in Waterloo; the fact that he actually was taken prisoner after allegedly refusing to surrender (and lived on until 1842) did not make the kind of story the makers of the film wanted to tell. That the film shows all of the guardsmen in his square being killed also involves this trope.
  • In What Dreams May Come, Chris and Annie's children don't die in the book.
  • Where Eagles Dare: Weissner dies in a car crash whereas he survives in the novel. Colonel Kramer, General Rosemeyer, Anne-Marie Kernister and Major von Hapen are all gunned down by Smith and Schaffer in the dining room along with a guard, unlike in Alistair MacLean's book where they're injected with nembutal (including the guard), which puts them to sleep for several hours. The same holds true for other Nazi characters. Except for the three traitors Thomas, Christiansen and Berkeley, almost all of the Nazis who die in the film survived in MacLean's original novel.
  • In the 2011 adaptation of The Whisperer in Darkness, Noyes and George Akeley are killed by the Mi-Go - Noyes when the ritual is disrupted, and George when he tries to deliver the Black Stone to Wilmarth on his father's request. Neither character dies in the original short story: George never leaves San Diego, and Noyes is a Karma Houdini. B-67 is unplugged and killed by Noyes in the film, which doesn't happen in the text. Although he doesn't strictly die, Albert Wilmarth is also captured and de-brained by the Mi-Go in the movie, while he escapes in the short story.
  • Ben in the 2003 version of Willard, whereas in the 1971 movie and the original proposed ending, he kills Willard and survives, injured, but shrugging it off.
  • In Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, Charlie's father is dead, leaving Charlie and his mother to support the family, whereas in the book, he was alive and well but struggling to make ends meet working in a toothpaste factory. Also in the film the fate of Veruca Salt and her father is left uncertain, the incinerator having a 50% chance to kill them, whereas in the book it is explicitly shown that they survived.
  • Sir John in The Wolfman (2010) is killed by Lawrence during their final battle. It's a reverse from the original film, where Sir John kills Lawrence.
  • X-Men Film Series
    • Cyclops dies off screen unglamourously in X-Men: The Last Stand. The characters who die by adaptation in the X-Men films could probably fill a whole damn page. Lady Deathstrike, Callisto, Psylocke, Kestrel, Agent Zero, and (apparently) Toad are notable examples.
    • Same with Sabretooth, who was fried by Cyclops in the original film.
      • The Wolverine prequel implies that you can't get rid of him that easily. He later turned up alive in the official prequel game to The Last Stand, but the game itself has since been rendered Canon Discontinuity by The Wolverine.
    • Henry Peter Gyrich, a longtime supporting character of The Avengers, falls victim to a Kill and Replace plot in the first X-Men movie.
    • Darwin and Sebastian Shaw in First Class.
    • The Wolverine:
      • Viper wasn't hanged in the comics.
      • Harada wasn't killed in the comics, who falls under Type 2 of this trope.
    • Large swaths of characters (including Storm, Bishop, Blink, Warpath, and Sunspot) die in the Bad Future segment of X-Men: Days of Future Past, but are all revived thanks to a Cosmic Retcon. Cyclops and Jean Grey, who died in previous movies, are resurrected as well.
      • In the original comic story (Uncanny X-Men #141-142) most X-Men in the alternate future except Rachel (not in the film version) and Kitty Pryde are either reported dead or killed in the course of the story (including Professor X, Magneto, Storm, and Wolverine); here they are not resurrected through Cosmic Retcon. Most of the X-Men killed in the film were only created after Uncanny X-Men #142 and thus were no part of the original story.
      • The 70's segment does not get the benefit of a Cosmic Retcon, however. Emma Frost, Angel Salvadore, Riptide, and Azazel are all stated to have died in a Bus Crash, while Banshee is also stated to have died in a Type 2 scenario.
    • Psylocke was one of the many mutants killed in The Last Stand. That movie was later rendered Canon Discontinuity by Days of Future Past, allowing an alternate version of Psylocke to appear in X-Men: Apocalypse.
    • Speaking of X-Men: Apocalypse, Havok and Archangel both die during the course of the movie.
  • Nanny McPhee is the story of Mr. Brown, a widower trying to raise his seven children. It is loosely adapted from the Nurse Matilda books, where Mrs. Brown is alive and well. (This makes the opening lines, where Mr. Brown says that "there would be no story" if not for his wife's death, rather ironic.)

    Examples where the character died a lot sooner in the adaptation than in the source: 
  • The Amazing Spider-Man Series:
    • In The Amazing Spider-Man, George Stacy is killed by the Lizard, rather than Doctor Octopus who has yet to appear (and won't given the plug on this series was pulled after the second movie).
    • In the sequel, Norman Osborn dies of a degenerative illness in the first half-hour of the movie, becoming a Posthumous Character rather than the main antagonist. Harry Osborn becomes the original Green Goblin instead.
  • In the 1945, 1965 and 1974 film versions of And Then There Were None, Lombard is a Posthumous Character who committed suicide upon receiving U.N. Owen's invite. His identity is taken on by a friend, Charles Morley, who survives. In the novel, Lombard is the second-to-last character to die.
  • In Avengers: Infinity War:
    • Spider-Man and Scarlet Witch are some of the heroes who perish when Thanos collects all six Infinity Stones and uses them to kill half of the sentient beings in the universe. In the original The Infinity Gauntlet mini-series, they actually survived Thanos' initial purge, and were only killed several issues later during the final battle with Thanos himself. Vision is also destroyed by Thanos during the battle in the comics, but is destroyed in the movie by Thanos in the act of acquiring the Mind Stone.
    • Gamora perished during the snap in the comics, but is killed in the movie by Thanos in the act of acquiring the Soul Stone.
  • In some versions of Batman (like Batman: Year Two), Joe Chill dies shortly after learning Batman's identity, usually at the hands of other criminals. In Batman Begins, Chill is gunned down by an assassin just as pre-Batman Bruce Wayne is about to do the same.
  • In Beaches, Hillary Whitney experienced her mother dying in her childhood. Her unseen father is the living parent providing for her (up until his off-screen death). In the original novel, Roberta White's father is said to have died when she was a baby, while her mother features in the plot until she dies of a stroke in her old age.
  • In the 1988 adaptation of The Bourne Identity, Carlos, the Big Bad, is shot and killed by Bourne at the end of their fight, while in the book he survives this fight and his death occurs two books later.
  • The film version of Christine turns Roland LeBay into a Posthumous Character. In the novel, he dies soon after selling Christine to Arnie Cunningham and later possess him. In the film, Roland's brother George is the one who sells Arnie Christine.
  • In Death Note: The Last Name, Light and Takada die far earlier than the manga due to the movie resolving its story at L's supposed death.
  • Mia Sutton the American Death Note (2017) remake. The ending of anime heavily implied Misa Amane's suicide, which was later confirmed in supplementary material. Meanwhile, in the Japanese movie series, Misa definitively killed herself in Death Note: Light Up the New World, which takes place many years after the events of the original story. In the American movie, Mia is killed by Light, despite outliving him in almost every other incarnation of the franchise.
  • In the book of A Dog's Purpose, Ellie's handler Jakob is shot, ends up with a Career-Ending Injury, and retires. Ellie herself lives a long life and dies of natural causes at an old age. In the film, Ellie is the one that's shot and she dies. As a result Ellie's second handler Maya is changed from being a cop to being a student. She adopts Ellie's completely original new incarnation.
  • In David Lynch's version of Dune, Duncan Idaho dies during the Battle of Arrakeen shortly after Paul and Jessica are captured. In the novel, he lives long enough to meet up with them during their trek in the desert. He dies saving them from a Sardaukar attack.
  • The Gemini Killer's father in The Exorcist III. Oddly enough, his death in the novel causes the killer to lose his motivation to murder. In the movie, his death does the opposite; The Gemini kills his father and then becomes a serial killer so he can (figuratively) continue to kill his father forever.
  • Both of the Llewelyn Davies parents in Finding Neverland. Arthur is Adapted Out, portrayed as having already died when Barrie meets the family, while Sylvia dies soon after the 1904 stage premiere of Peter Pan. The real Arthur died in 1907, well after the Peter Pan premiere, and Sylvia died in 1910.
  • Corrine Dollanganger in Flowers in the Attic. Oddly, the producers had planned on adapting the rest of the novels as films, but as Corrine plays instrumental roles in the second and third novels - the entire plot of Petals on the Wind is driven by Cathy seeking revenge on her - adapting them proved impossible. Corrine does die in the climax of the third novel, in a fire.
  • Mama and Jenny both die during Forrest Gump. While they both survived the original novel, they both die by the start of its sequel, Gump & Co.
  • In Fullmetal Alchemist, Maes Hughes leaves behind his pregnant wife, Gracia, when he's killed by Envy. In the manga, his daughter, Elicia, was three years old by the time of her father's death.
  • In Goldfinger, Tilly Masterson is killed by Oddjob only minutes after encountering James Bond during his infiltration of the titular villain's factory, while in the original novel she was held prisoner with Bond for a good while and dies during the climax at Fort Knox.
    • Oddjob himself also dies in the movie at Fort Knox. In the novel, he survives to help Goldfinger trap Bond aboard the airplane. He's eventually sucked out of the airplane, which happens to Goldfinger in the movie. (Goldfinger himself is strangled by the furious Bond.)
  • Because Scott Glenn refused to reprise the role of Jack Crawford for Hannibal note , a deleted scene revealed the character's death, which happened near the end of the the book, as having happened before the events of the adaptation.
  • Ruby dies in a Heroic Sacrifice to take down Lizard in The Hills Have Eyes (2006). Her counterpart in the original film was a main character in the sequel, where she dies.
  • In The Hunger Games film, the female tribute from District 4 dies in the Cornucopia bloodbath at the beginning of the games along with her male counterpart, while the book has her die alongside Glimmer when Katniss drops the tracker jacker nest on the Career Tributes. There is no mention of District 4 being a Career District in the films. The film also shows Cato killing the District 10 male during the bloodbath, but this is just a continuity error as it's later shown that he died on the morning of the eighth day as in the books.
  • Maya Hansen is killed in Iron Man 3, despite surviving the story the film was inspired by. At the time of filming, Hansen hadn't even been killed off during the Marvel NOW relaunch yet.
  • Judge Dredd: Judge Griffin dies at the hands of Rico. In the comics he lived past the story arc that the movie is mainly based on and didn't die until the Apocalypse War arc years later.
  • Gennaro from the Jurassic Park is arguably an example of Type II as well, as although he has the name of a character who survived in the book, his characterization and role are much closer to Jerkass PR guy Ed Regis, a character "removed" from the film. Said character died in the book as well, but a bit later — after the dinosaurs get out, he's caught off-guard and killed by the baby T-Rex, which was entirely removed from the film version.
  • In King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, Mordred is the Starter Villain killed by Uther Pendragon in the film's prologue. His original counterpart is Pendragon's grandson, born long after his death, and died a mutual death with Arthur himself.
  • John Barton in Looking for Alibrandi, though not by much. The book death occurs in the second half, while the movie death occurs halfway through.
  • Gríma Wormtongue and Saruman in the extended cut of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, since the Scouring of the Shire, where they die in the books, was cut. In the theatrical cut, they don't die at all... although they remain locked in a tower and their fate is ambiguous.
  • In Man of Steel, Jor-El is killed by Zod before Krypton's destruction instead of perishing along with the planet per all other versions.
  • In the film of From Russia with Love, Rosa Klebb is shot dead during her final confrontation with Bond. In the book, she is merely taken into custody by the western intelligence services. The next book, Dr. No, casually mentions that "she died" (implicitly under interrogation).
  • Rurouni Kenshin: Kyoto Inferno turns Aoshi's Oniwabanshu comrades into Posthumous Characters who were executed at the dawn of the Meiji Era. Their anime counterparts were killed by Kanryuu's Gatling Gun in the Rescue Megumi Arc, which was adapted into the previous movie which saw them Adapted Out.
  • The burglar in Spider-Man Trilogy. In the film, after Peter discovers that the burglar is the same man that Peter lets him escape, the crook then winds up almost immediately falling to his death. In the comics, he was apprehended by the police and then he returned in a storyline over a decade later that culminates with Peter revealing his identity to him, which in turn leads to the burglar suffering a fatal heart attack from the fear that Spider-Man would kill him, even though the hero was intending to do otherwise.
  • If you consider The Force Awakens to be an adaptation of the Star Wars Legends continuity, then Han Solo's death is this. The reason it isn't type one is because while we don't actually see it, the Legacy comics set in the Legends continuity take place well after Han's natural lifespan would have come to an end anyways.
    • As of The Last Jedi, we can add Luke Skywalker to the list. Like Han above, we don't see him die in the Legends continuity, but his Force Ghost appears at points in the Legacy comics, confirming he did indeed die at some point. Again, the Legacy comics are set long after his natural lifespan would have ended.
  • Suicide Squad had Slipknot die from the detonation of the nano bombs when he tried to escape the moment they were deployed on the field after being convinced by Captain Boomerang that the bombs were a bluff. It was a throwback to the comics, where Slipknot also tried to escape and was also convinced by Captain Boomerang, but survived the detonation because the device was on his wrist, as opposed to being in his neck. However, it's an example of a Type 2, as Slipknot would ultimately be killed by the Tattooed Man in 2011.
  • The Three Musketeers has the Comte de Rochefort die in a duel with D'Artagnan at the end, though he survived the book and died in its sequel Twenty Years After.
  • Boris in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is knocked off in Istanbul instead of after being recalled to Russia. Conversely, Irina survives much longer just so Karla can shoot her in front of Jim Prideaux.
    • Jim Prideaux himself has - well, possibly the opposite of this version of the trope. It's implied at the beginning, and right up to the somewhere around the middle of the film that the shooting during the botched operation in Budapest left him dead. We then find out that he survived, to be tortured and interrogated by the Russians, and eventually returned to England. This is played more as a plot-point than in the book where it's more generally known, not least by the reader that he survived. Smiley discovering the truth of his fate in the film is the first big confirmation of his suspicions of who the mole is.
  • In the film of To Kill a Mockingbird, Tom Robinson is shot and killed by police on the night of his conviction. In the novel, he dies while trying to escape from prison several months later.
  • Agamemnon in the Troy is killed by Briseis during the final battle in the Trojan War, whereas in the original mythology he survives. He returns home, and is murdered by his wife... thus setting off the events of The Oresteia.
  • Terminator Genisys sees both the original Terminator and the T-1000 die much earlier than they did in their respective movies. While only Sarah's mother was only ever heard in the original movie, with no hint as to whether or not her father was also killed by the original Terminator or already dead before then, they also died while Sarah was nine in the Alternate Timeline.
  • Wonder Woman (2017): Steve Trevor goes out by way of Heroic Sacrifice after essentially one mission. He has died multiple times in the comics, but only after multiple adventures with Diana generally spanning decades.
  • X-Men Film Series:
    • X-Men: Senator Robert Kelly dies in the first film due to the unstable mutation Magneto inflicts on him. Initially a Type 1 example as he was still alive in the comics at the time the movie was released, it ended up turning into this months later when he was murdered by anti-mutant supremacists for changing his view on mutants.
    • Dark Phoenix sees Jean Grey's mother Elaine killed accidentally by Jean when her powers were first emerging and John is implied to have by killed by the D'Bari as part of their interrogation of him. In the comics, both lived to see Jean become an X-Man and the Phoenix, as sometime after Jean's death in New X-Men, the Shi'ar Death Commandos, fearing a repeat of Jean's time as the Dark Phoenix, decided to massacre her family, her parents being among the fatalities.
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