Follow TV Tropes

Following

Darth Wiki / Crappy Trope Definitions

Go To

Are you tired of the boring old accurate trope definitions? Never fear! For according to some tropers, we don't need to actually go to the page and read the definition. We can shoehorn any example into any trope, no matter how little sense it makes!

See also, How Not to Write an Example, and How Not to Write a Trope Page


    open/close all folders 
Advertisement:
    Tropes 

    Playing With a Trope 
Want to add a trope or Audience Reaction even if it clearly doesn't fit? Play with it to shoehorn it in anyway! Even if it does fit, keep in mind that tropes are bad and cliché while transformations are automatically clever and original, so try to shoehorn in a transformation anyway.

    Trivia 

  • All-Star Cast: List every actor who has their own page on this wiki including those who are only known by a specific fandom.
  • Author Existence Failure: An author dies. That is all. Having any unfinished work is not necessary to qualify.
  • Bad Export for You: Complain about exports you don't like, regardless of the international distributors' intentions.
  • Box Office Bomb: Forget that this is specifically for movies and use this for examples of flops in other mediums.
  • Dear Negative Reader:
    • The author shows sympathy towards the detractors.
    • The author has any kind of response to negative feedback.
  • Executive Meddling: Complain about pre-release changes you don't like. Remember, the creator is always right, while the executives never are.
  • Fan Community Nickname: Similar to Fan Nickname, a place to share derogatory names for fandoms or parts of fandoms you dislike.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • Complain about works you don't like by coming up with derogatory names for them. Because detractors of a work are clearly fans of the work, and the Detractor Nickname redirect to this page was never deleted, let alone added to the Permanent Red Link Club.
    • Share that nickname you and your friends made up as an inside joke and nobody else uses. Because we totally care about your personal life.
  • Franchise Killer: The most recent installment in a franchise was a flop which must mean the franchise is dead. Don't wait for any official confirmation that the plug has been pulled on the franchise as a result. Bonus points if said "killer" only came out a few weeks, months, or even days ago.
  • Franchise Zombie: Any franchise you think went on for too long.
  • I Knew It!: Anytime someone literally says the phrase "I knew it" or any variation for any reason.
  • Jossed: A fan theory you dislike or find highly improbable. No need to wait before it gets entirely disproven so that you won't look dumb in case it happens to be correct. If the theory is later proven to be correct, be sure to add a sentence saying it has been unjossed or double-jossed to show how valid the example was.
  • Name's the Same: Two names have some similarities to each other; being similar is enough to count as being the same.
  • Old Shame: Any old thing of which someone is ashamed. A character in the story expresses shame over their past bad behavior? It's old, it's shame, it's perfect. Don't ask why it's Trivia if it's about something in the story.
  • Screwed by the Network: If a show you like gets cancelled, it's obviously because the network actively engineered its cancelation out of spite and not because the show is not really popular and they needed to free a timeslot.
  • Those Two Actors: Any pair of actors who collaborated twice.
  • Too Soon:
    • A joke is made about a recent tragedy, and someone gets offended by it. It's not like the term means something completely different on this wiki.
    • You find a joke, scene, plot point, or premise of a work to be in poor taste because of a recent tragedy or controversy, even if said work didn't get altered as a result.
    • Literally any time anybody says "too soon" for any reason. Save yourself the trouble of having to type that space between the two words and just CamelCase them.
  • Torch the Franchise and Run: Complain about the way the series or franchise ended, regardless of the author's intent.
  • Unintentional Period Piece:
    • A recently released work contains one thing that may slightly date it. Heck, upcoming works can qualify too. It's even better if the single supposedly dated thing is something obscure and anecdotal note .
    • Any work that can be narrowed down to its decade, period. If a 60's movie has 60's fashion or a 90's series doesn't have modern smartphones, it's definitely unusual enough to be noted. For that matters, the "unintentional" part is optional.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • List things you think a work could have done, but didn't. Ignore the fact that it's Trivia and not an Audience Reaction, and it's called What Could Have Been and not What Should Have Been.
    • Complain about pre-release changes you don't like.
  • Why Fandom Can't Have Nice Things: This is for talking about any time a fandom does something bad. The work's creator(s) cutting off communication in response isn't part of the definition, it's just a good way to emphasize the fandom's inherently rotten disposition. Make sure to call them Fan Dumb at least twice!
  • Word of God: Just make stuff up and source it to "Word Of God". If you don't say WHERE the Word Of God comes from, no one will be able to disprove your example. Ignore the "this example contains a TRIVIA entry" warning that will appear next to your example, it's not like it's there to discourage you from doing that and make you actually link to a source.

    YMMV 

After all, the fact that these are subjective means you can use them wherever and however you want!

  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • Whenever a character In-Universe accidentally makes an innuendo, and other characters laugh at it. It's not like Accidental Innuendo is an Audience Reaction.
    • Pot Hole to this whenever YOU make an innuendo. Because it totally counts as accidental if you're intentionally drawing attention to it.
    • Anytime someone says these following words: come, came, bear, lease, sleep, balls, and shoot. No exceptions.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Gush about characters you like and rant about characters you hate.
    • As soon as a new character is introduced, start speculating about their future role in the plot. It's not like the next few episodes will almost certainly confirm which interpretation is correct.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Anything that isn't as popular in a foreign country as it is in its home country, even if the thing is well-liked amongst the people in that country who actually are aware of it. Bonus points if the foreign country in question is America.
  • And the Fandom Rejoiced:
    • Ignore the "Fandom" part of the title and use this to describe the hatedom's reaction to when the show they hate gets canceled, gets reduced airtime, or is otherwise Screwed by the Network.
    • List every bit of news that comes out about a work you're looking forward to, even if it doesn't generate a lot of buzz.
    • Forget this is about pre-release news, and list things about the final product you liked that weren't revealed in any trailers or pre-release announcements or material.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: You once saw one or two people make a social media post saying they weren't looking forward to a work that you were. It released and had success, so use this to passively-aggressively boast about how you were right.
  • Angst Aversion:
    • Complain about works you think are too dark.
    • Complain about people choosing not to watch your favourite depressing and morbid show.
  • Angst? What Angst?: A character who had something bad happen to them or their loved ones isn't miserable 100% of the time.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
  • Anvilicious: Complain about works that try to spread a message you disagree with.
  • Ass Pull:
  • Audience-Alienating Premise:
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • A trailer alleviates some concerns about an unreleased work whether or not it was the author's intent.
    • Fans are angry about something happening in one episode. Shortly afterwards, another episode comes out to address these concerns. Because the writers, actors, editors, animators, etc. clearly managed to remake the whole episode in just a few weeks/days in reaction to fan complaints.
    • Any time a creator changes something in response to criticism, even if the change is unrelated to the story. For example "Character X was nerfed after fans complained it was a Tier-Induced Scrappy".
  • Award Snub: You liked a work so, so much that you were expecting (read: really wanted) it to get an award. But it didn't. Use this to document your rage, and maybe take potshots at the work that did get the award.
  • Awesome Music: Just dump a bunch of YouTube links to the entire soundtrack of your favorite work (bonus points if they all come from the same now-deleted channel)! Even a 3-second jingle can be an example. Explaining why you like the song is optional: just the song's name, an excerpt from the lyrics, or an onomatopoeia meant to represent singing a riff from the song ("dun du-DAH!") is enough, but if you want to go above and beyond, all you have to do is add a generic positive descriptor such as "really good" or "just plain gorgeous", because these totally help readers understand why you like the song.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Use this to complain about characters you dislike. Sure, a Base-Breaking Character needs to have equal amounts of fans and detractors, but you can cover the fans by simply adding a token "but some fans like them" before or after your multi-paragraph evisceration of the character to balance it out.
    • If a character you like is listed as The Scrappy, mention them as a Base-Breaking Character too in order to defend them. You're so important that your opinion is worth as much by itself as the combined hatred of the legions of fans who hate the character's guts.
    • The main character of a divisive work, when one thing that makes the work so divisive is its main character. It's not like people who hate the work aren't counted as part of the "base".
    • Just list the entire cast, along with a positive and negative trait of theirs, and leave it at that. For example, "Bob: nice, friendly guy, or boring and cliche?"
    • A character who is mostly hated by the fandom, but there are some fans who don't mind them. Because the feelings of the "I don't mind the character" side are totally strong enough to balance out the "I hate the character" side.
    • Add this the moment a new character is introduced or a character does something even slightly controversial and you saw a few people disagree over it. You don't have to wait to see if said disagreements will last or become widespread enough.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: A work contains a character you personally find sexy.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Any scene that is even remotely weird, or which contains any sort of Mood Whiplash.
  • Broken Aesop: Complain about works that give "wrong" morals. The "broken" in the title refers to the aesop being bad, not the aesop being contradicted by the narrative.
  • Broken Base:
    • A lot of people like something you don't.
    • Any topic of discussions that elicits the slightest degree of diverging opinions from fans like "Does Alice look better with blue pants or a pink skirt?".
    • You saw one person who didn't like something, and one person who did like it. Bonus points if the work/episode in question just finished airing minutes ago and it's impossible to tell how widespread any debates or disagreements over that thing will be.
    • Works that attract debates along the line of "is this show good or bad?" also qualify. Because detractors of the show are clearly part of the "base".
    • Use Broken Base as a way to complain about aspects of the show you dislike. Cover the "pro" side by saying "some fans like it", then go ahead and vent out all of your frustrations! Hell, you don't even need to cover the pro side at all. Just a mention of something being divisive or controversial is enough.
    • Any conflict, no matter how short-lived. Feel free to add examples from recently released or unreleased episodes and works. Of course people will still be fiercely debating over that one scene from the trailer six months after the movie is out!
    • Debates that consist of an "anti" side versus an "I don't care" side also qualify. Because when a fanbase is debating something like "does this flaw completely ruin what would have otherwise been a great movie, or does it just make it slightly less enjoyable?", the apathy of the "I don't care" side can be overpoweringly strong at times.
    • If you want to complain about how something is offensive (or make fun of people who were offended), but can't find a good enough citation for Unfortunate Implications, just add it as "Broken Base: Is X bigoted and offensive, or are people just overreacting?"
    • If you firmly fit into one side of a split fanbase, be sure to write an example with wording like "Some fans think [insert opinion here], while others are wrong." Even better, directly insult the side you disagree with, such as calling them Fan Dumb.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal:
    • You figured out a twist so naturally everyone did. Alternatively, one fan theory among a hundred of others happens to be true.
    • It doesn't have to be a "reveal" for that matters. If you correctly predicted other kind of plot events like the death of a character, you can put it there too.
  • The Chris Carter Effect: Complain that a work hasn't given you the answer to a certain question yet. Clearly, the writers must be hacks for keeping some things secret, even if most fans still believe that the answer will be shown eventually.
  • Cliché Storm: A work you dislike happens to include a few tropes that are common in its genre.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Any villain who does anything bad. If your show doesn't have one, it sucks. It can apply to any show, even G-rated shows created for toddlers. After all, a school bully or a jerkass is totally comparable to dictators, serial killers, rapists, and child abusers, so just go ahead and add them to the page! No need to go through the approval process to determine whether they qualify.
    • A villain who killed your favorite character.
  • Contested Sequel: Use this to complain about sequels you don't like. Cover the positive side of the reception by saying "some fans like it" before or after listing your gripes with the sequel to balance it out.
  • Crazy Awesome: The "crazy" in the title means either "extremely" or "over the top", not "mentally unwell". As such, this can mean...
    • A character is awesome. Forget about the crazy part, unless you're using the word figuratively.
    • A work is awesome, due to not caring about making sense and instead just trying to put in as many cool things as possible. That's totally not Rule of Cool.
    • A cooler way of describing a Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot.
    • If you do use the "mentally unwell" definition of "crazy", simply being a Large Ham or Cloudcuckoolander is enough to qualify a character as "crazy".
    • "Awesome" simply means that you like the character. Alternatively, a character who is good at what they do can still count even if their talent doesn't stem directly from their craziness.
    • A work or part of a work is very over-the-top, and that's awesome.
  • Creator's Pet: A character with a big role or one that receives a lot of focus you don't like. Be sure to ignore the four requirements on the page when adding your example.
  • Critical Dissonance:
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • A drop-in replacement for the since-cut and PRLC'd Did Not Do the Research; this refers to any time something unrealistic happens in a work. Even errors that are obscure enough that only experts in the subject will notice them can count. Clearly, the writer must be an idiot for having a character using a medieval weapon a few years before it was actually invented or having a black hole that isn't 100% realistic.
    • Another term for Artistic License.
    • A work ends up being inaccurate because of new information that came out after the work was released. That series from The '90s should have known Pluto would be unclassified as a planet in 2006 or that it has a heart-shaped spot on it. It's not like we have pages such as Science Marches On, Technology Marches On, or Dated History for such cases.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy:
    • Applicable as soon bad things happen or if a few characters you liked have died. It doesn't matter if the show is still lighthearted and humorous, the tone is still optimistic or hopeful, or if the heroes still save the day almost everytime.
    • A work is dark, period. It doesn't matter if the work has clear good guys who manage to achieve significant, lasting victories to offset some of the bleakness of the setting.
    • Copy and paste examples from the World of Jerkass, Evil vs. Evil, Crapsack World, and Dysfunction Junction tropes. How the audience reacts to the work is optional.
  • Deader Than Disco:
    • When something loses even a fraction of its popularity. Bonus points if the "dead" thing is still generally well-liked or is still releasing new installments.
    • When any work starts to receive any amount of hate months or years after its release, even if it was never really popular to begin with or it received plenty of hate when it was first released as well.
    • An old work you dislike, even if most people look back on it fondly.
    • A series that underwent Seasonal Rot or a Dork Age, even if the earlier seasons or installments are still well regarded.
  • Designated Evil:
  • Designated Hero:
  • Designated Monkey:
    • A Butt-Monkey or Chew Toy that you don't like seeing tormented. Never mind that they always cause it themselves.
    • Anytime a morally grey or black character undergoes unprovoked suffering. They may be serial killers or rapists, but it doesn't matter because they didn't do anything bad in the past week.
  • Designated Villain:
    • Any villain who opposes a protagonist you don't like. They may be a tyrant who has ruined countless lives For the Evulz, but the fact that they once tried to kill the bland and kinda annoying hero totally makes up for it.
    • Any animal that threatens the characters' lives and dies when the characters defend themselves, because natural selection should always trump Plot Armour in a good story.
  • Discredited Meme: A meme you dislike or have gotten tired of. Ignore that it's In-Universe Examples Only or creator-acknowledged examples only.
  • Don't Shoot the Message: Any work you dislike that has a message. Bonus points if you also complain about the message itself.
  • Dork Age: Just complain about installments you don't like in a series. No need to present evidence that it was poorly received by most fans.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Any character other than the main character who is popular, even if that character plays a major role. Hell, the main character themself can qualify if they're just that cool.
    • Your favourite character in the show!
    • A character who was just introduced in the newest episode or trailer before we have any knowledge of their importance or role in the story or if they'll remain popular in the long run.
  • Epileptic Trees: If you want to talk about a fan theory on the main page, just follow these simple steps: 1: Find a trope relevant to the theory. 2: Write up an example for that trope as though the theory was canon. 3: Slap in a phrase like "one interpretation of" or "some fans think", and pothole it here.
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Complain about endings you don't like. For example:
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Any non-white character you don't like. Behaving like an offensive racial caricature or being disliked by most fans of the work aren't necessary.
  • Face of the Band:
    • Forget that this is specifically for musical groups, and include examples for the most iconic character from a work or franchise or the most iconic member of a non-musical group.
    • The character from a work you dislike you feel best demonstrates a flaw or the flaws of it.
  • Fair for Its Day: An idea that was once innovative is now seen as outdated. Whether the outdatedness comes from differing values is irrelevant.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop:
    • Complain about a work that gives "wrong" morals. Bonus points if the moral was not meant to be taken seriously or wasn't intended.
    • Jokingly make up a silly lesson based on the story. It's not like we have Warp That Aesop for that.
    • Any time a non-villainous character does something morally-questionable. Clearly, the author wants us to copy every single thing the heroes do.
    • A way to complain about Unfortunate Implications if you can't find a citation that's good enough.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception: Just because this was renamed from Fandom Berserk Button, it doesn't mean you can't shoehorn in examples anyway.
    • Every single misconception that bugs you, regardless of whether it's common and severe enough to annoy the fanbase in general. That "fandom" in the title is a Red Herring.
    • Any common misconception about the work, even if the fandom is known for taking it in good stride. That "enraging" in the title is a Red Herring.
    • Anything that enrages the fandom, even if it's true. That "misconception" in the title is...
    • Subjective "misconceptions" such as thinking that one shipping pairing is better than another, thinking that a sequel wasn't absolute garbage, or believing that one can be part of two rival fandoms are also fair game for this.
    • Anything that enrages a work's hatedom. Ignore the word "fandom" in the name — that part's optional. The "misconception" part is also optional, so only the "enraging" part matters.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Complain about works you don't like that are competing against or have any sort of similarity to works you like and/or their fandoms, even if the rivalry is one-sided, the two fandoms generally don't mind or get along with each other, or the competing or similar work is generally considered bad and has no fandom to speak of.
    • Rivalries within fandoms over which entries of the series or franchise are the best and/or which are the worst can also qualify. That totally isn't Broken Base or Contested Sequel. You can also use this definition to insert Broken Base entries without having to wait six months.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • Adaptations, continuity reboots, and Alternate Continuity installments you hate even if they're separate continuities from the original material.
    • An installment of a series or franchise you dislike, even if it isn't for story reasons.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: List your favorite pairings, even those who are already canon or not that popular. Don't hesitate to list 10 pairings with the same character, either.
  • Franchise Original Sin: List problems in later installments of a series or franchise that also happened to be in earlier installments, without explaining why the problems were originally ignored or tolerated. You can also go one of two directions from there:
    • Defend the later installments and criticize the earlier ones. Imply that people only prefer the first installments because of Nostalgia Filter.
    • Criticize the entire franchise in order to convince fans that the show has never been good in the first place.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Anything that isn't explicitly spelled out for the audience.
  • Fridge Horror: If the hero didn't defeat the villain, bad things would have happened.
  • Fridge Logic:
    • Anything that bothers you or doesn't make sense, no matter how obvious.
    • A synonym for Plot Hole.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
  • Funny Moments:
    • A list of every single attempt at comedy in the work.
    • Also include the worst moments in a work you don't like. Mocking laughter is still laughter.
  • Game-Breaker:
  • Genius Bonus: If this is listed on the YMMV page of a work you like, it means you become a genius for liking that work. Add any reference the work makes to facts that require more than a first-grade education to know, and if necessary pull insane leaps of logic to connect minor details to obscure real world facts in a way that clearly wasn't intended by the writers.
  • Glurge: Any sentimental or inspirational story you don't like.
  • Ham and Cheese: Defend actors you like starring in a movie you don't like.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Any time a tall building gets destroyed in a work released before September 11, 2001.
    • Just like "Funny Aneurysm" Moment above, any time a deceased actor played a character who dies in any way. Or doesn't die, even.
    • A film features a now disgraced actor after being caught in a scandal. Their role doesn't have to bear any resemblance to the scandal, the mere presence of the actor qualifies.
    • A character's actions have some similarities to the actions of a political figure you dislike.
    • Something that wasn't already serious in tone is hard to swallow after later events. Interchangeable with "Funny Aneurysm" Moment.
  • Heartwarming Moments: Any time someone does something nice or demonstrates basic courtesy towards another person.
  • He Panned It, Now He Sucks!:
    • Anytime anybody dares criticize a work you like. This includes criticisms that most people agree with, and criticisms in an otherwise mostly-positive review.
    • Add averted or subverted examples when you want to praise your favourite fanbase for taking criticism in stride. Alternatively, you can praise the criticism by saying it's so good that even fans of the work think it has a point. It's not like He Panned It, Now He Sucks! cannot be played with just because it's an audience reaction.
    • Add inverted examples when anybody dares praise a work you don't like or merely doesn't bash it hard enough in a mostly negative review.
  • He Really Can Act: Praise any good acting regardless if the actor already won multiple awards or if they only do a marginally better job than usual.
  • He's Just Hiding!: An official work confirms that someone is Not Quite Dead or will eventually be Back from the Dead.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Something that happens in a work has superficial or flimsy similarities to something that happens in a later work or later in real life.
    • A character's actions have some similarities to the actions of a political figure you like (or don't like, depending on how they're portrayed).
    • Something Harsher in Hindsight that can be seen as Black Comedy depending on your sense of humor. Add a statement saying "can also be seen as Harsher in Hindsight" at the beginning or end of the example or change the top bullet point to "Harsher in Hindsight/Hilarious in Hindsight".
  • Ho Yay:
    • Two same-gender characters are on friendly terms and spend good time together. Or are enemies and hate each other.
    • If a work is clearly intentionally hinting towards a character being gay, it's an example of Ho Yay. It's not like Ho Yay is an Audience Reaction, and Homoerotic Subtext is where intentional examples go.
    • Actual homosexual relationships are fair game too. Because two guys holding hands, kissing, and engaging in sexual intercourse totally counts as "subtext".
    • Although Les Yay is a redirect to Ho Yay, it should be split into a separate entry on the work's YMMV page.
  • Hype Backlash:
    • Complain about popular works you don't like.
    • When a highly anticipated work or announcement ends up disappointing you or a group of people, even if the work never received much praise to begin with.
  • Idiot Plot:
    • In a work you don't like, point out every single time a character does something that isn't the optimal course of action, all while insinuating that the writers are also idiots for writing characters that aren't omniscient.
    • Damn, this plot is idiotic! I'm gonna go complain about it on the internet.
  • It Was His Sled: You know what happened in this movie/show, and therefore, the entire world knows as well! Don't forget to blank the entire entry just to prove how valid the example is! Bonus points if the work is niche or obscure or was just released.
  • Literary Agent Hypothesis: A fictional work is framed as a nonfictional publication by the author or a character; the word "hypothesis" is in the name solely because it sounds cool and scientific. This has definitely always been an objective trope and the idea that it's a fandom interpretation was made up last week as an excuse to suddenly tag it YMMV and create a bunch of busywork.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • An incredibly cool villain.
    • A villain outsmarts the heroes once. It doesn't matter if they fail every other times.
    • Ignore the villain aspect and list heroes here. It's not like there's a separate trope for heroes.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Any character who was ever Adapted Out, Demoted to Extra, or shafted in any way or was the butt of a few jokes in the fandom, even if it was only a one-time occurrence.
    • The Scrappy but with fewer restrictions.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • A memorable line or scene from the episode that just aired. No need to wait to see whether the meme actually undergoes mutation or lasts longer than a week.
    • List common complaints or snarky jabs toward a work and pass them off as memes.
    • A one-off joke or comparison people made from a trailer or episode that was recently released. No need to wait if it actually becomes a meme or not.
    • Any funny comment or Image Macro you found on the internet.
  • Misaimed Fandom:
    • A portion of the fanbase you don't like.
    • If an individual that you hate happens to like something you also like, use this to insult them. Because a single person is enough to make a "fandom".
    • If even one person disagrees with the writer about something, list it.
    • A show about the Power of Friendship has a lot of Flame Wars in its fandom. Because anybody who claims to be a fan of a show but doesn't live by its values 100% of the time is a hypocrite.
    • Anytime anybody has any slightly positive opinion about a villain. Thinking that Evil Is Cool means approving of the character's actions.
  • Moment of Awesome:
    • A character accomplishes something, no matter how minor. Be sure to list a play-by-play description of everything the hero does whenever a new episode comes out, because every single blow he lands on the villain is noteworthy, and it's totally not just because it's still fresh in your mind due to being in the newest chapter.
    • Your favorite work does well commercially.
    • A critic you like gives a positive review of the work.
    • A new installment of your favorite series is announced.
    • Ignore the "moment" part of the title and list general facts about the work that you find awesome. If your example is a meta-example that begins with "The mere fact that...", you're doing it right.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • The villain does anything bad, from committing mass murder to being a jerk. Bonus points if you use it for real life actions, including petty stuff like your favorite show being canceled or someone changing something about it.
    • Be sure to list every single crime a villain commits. Because it's totally possible to cross the point of no return several times.
    • A heroic character you dislike does something bad, even if they proceed to make amends and are quickly forgiven by both the characters and most of the fanbase.
    • In-universe, a character declares someone beyond redemption. We don't have the This Is Unforgivable! trope for that.
  • Most Triumphant Example: The show you like has an example of a trope.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Any time your favorite character speaks.
  • Narm:
    • Anything in the show that annoys you since Dethroning Moment of Suck is limited to only one example per troper. You can also nitpick about trivial things like a character mispronouncing a word even if the mispronunciation itself isn’t funny.
    • Bad writing, acting, special effects, or animation in general, even if the scene wasn't supposed to be serious.
    • Intentional Bathos and Mood Whiplash.
    • Any awkward scene, even if it wasn't supposed to be serious.
  • Narm Charm: Defend and justify the Narm entries that bother you. For best effect, add this as a sub-bullet to the Narm entry, or change the Narm bullet point to "Narm/Narm Charm"
  • Never Live It Down:
    • A character or a creator recently did or said something controversial or has been recently the butt of a joke. No need to wait whether or not the controversy is going to wear off.
    • A great tool for agenda-based editing. A character, a real person, or fandom you dislike did something you disapproved of and you don't want people to forget about it.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Use these definitions to fit as many examples of this as possible into your show to make it seem Dark and Edgy and therefore good. The more examples there are, the better the work is. You don't even have to feel fear watching the scene, as long as you can envision someone somewhere being afraid. After all, it's Audience Reactions, not Personal Reactions.
    • Any time a character is put in the slightest amount of danger, even if it's a work where Status Quo Is God and the hero dying in a random episode would bring the show to a screeching halt. Bonus points if it's a kid-friendly work where any kind of explicit death would be immensely out of place.
    • Any time a character acts menacing. Even if it's clearly Played for Laughs.
    • Anything related to a work of fiction that makes you very slightly worried, including unintentionally implied events that are not officially part of the story, or behind-the-scenes events that totally don't count as Real Life examples.
    • Anything that is even the least bit startling or unsettling. If you use wording such as "somewhat unnerving" or "mildly creepy", that's fine; it's not like these phrases are synonyms of "not very scary".
    • Moments that only a three-year-old child watching the show might find scary, even if the show is aimed at adults.
    • Come up with some fanon that makes seemingly innocuous moments sinister.
    • Be sure to list every single angry face a character has ever made, too! Add in all sorts of descriptors, such as calling it a Nightmare Face or claiming that it falls into the Uncanny Valley, in order to blatantly exaggerate the very mild unease the facial expression made you feel for a few seconds.
    • Every instance of violence, even in action-based works where fight scenes are commonplace and the combat is played for Rule of Cool rather than horror. And every gory scene, even in gorny works where the audience is expected to enjoy the carnage.
    • A difficult level or powerful enemy in a video game. Because the phrase "nightmarishly difficult" is totally meant to be taken literally.
    • Something that's only scary to people with an extremely specific phobia. Feel free to add something like "there's a duck in the background in scene X, which could be scary to people with anatidaephobia" even though 99.9% of viewers won't give a duck.
    • Forget about it being an Audience Reaction and put instances where characters are being afraid or worried while it's not scary for the audience.
    • If all else fails, just describe something without saying why it's scary. Nobody will be able to prove you didn't find it scary, therefore it qualifies.
    • You can also argue against an example on the page by pointing out details that turn it into Nightmare Retardant. Sure, Nightmare Fuel is about things that are scary, but don't let that stop you from mentioning these non-scary things as well.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: Every single Licensed Game ever made must be a case of either this or The Problem with Licensed Games. If the game is considered average or OK, put both of these reactions on its YMMV page, preferably both on the same bullet point or with one of them on a second-level bullet point below the other, with this one explaining the game's good points and the other explaining its flaws.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy:
    • Any work that has any controversy, however minor, associated with it. Feel free to ignore the fact that most fans outside of the Vocal Minority or your favorite forum are enjoying the work just fine without caring about it.
    • A work causes divided opinions and arguments within the fandom. That totally isn't Broken Base.
    • A work or creator was recently the subject of a controversy. No need to wait if the controversy will end up overshadowing the work's, creator's, or the creator's body of works' merits or not. There's no way the controversy will just die down a few weeks later. Feel free to use this for agenda-based editing the moment a work, creator, or any other kind of real-life person you don't like does or attracts something even slightly controversial so people don't forget about it. Bonus points if said work hasn't even been released yet.
    • The author holds some political views you disagree with, even if they're not too outspoken about their views.
    • Another nifty way to insert Unfortunate Implications without the need for citations, even if said implications aren't actually overshadowing the work.
    • A substitute for So Bad, It's Horrible that can be listed on YMMV pages and with less restrictions, as in "this work is mostly known for being really bad and having an annoying fandom".
  • Porting Disaster:
  • The Problem with Licensed Games:
    • Every single Licensed Game ever made must be a case of either this or No Problem with Licensed Games. If the game is considered average or OK, put both of these reactions on its YMMV page, preferably both on the same bullet point or with one of them on a second-level bullet point below the other, with this one explaining the game's flaws and the other explaining its good points.
    • Use this to refer to a licensed game as So Bad, It's Horrible, except this goes on YMMV pages instead of Darth Wiki.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: "Fumble" means that the relationship was badly written, not that it unintentionally looks like the wrong type of relationship. What do you mean, that's redundant to Strangled by the Red String or Romantic Plot Tumor?
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: A pairing you dislike, even if it's a very minor subplot.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • Dislike a character? List your headcanons about how they're actually abusive monsters and the source of all evil in the world.
    • Complain about people not liking an Unintentionally Unsympathetic character you like.
  • Rooting for the Empire: You hate a work, so you want the villains to kill the heroes and force the story to end.
  • Scapegoat Creator: An excellent tool for Creator Bashing. Explaining how something people are blaming a particular creator for isn't actually their fault is optional.
  • The Scrappy:
    • You don't need objective criteria like popularity polls or critic's reviews to define it. Just put any character that you dislike. Bonus point if the character isn't meant to be likeable at all.
    • Ignore that this is meant for fan reaction, and use this to list characters content creators, such as reviewers or let's players personally dislike.
    • Anything you dislike, even if it's not a character, such as annoying obstacles in video games or props in TV shows and movies. For extra fun, list episodes or entire works as The Scrappy. Because Dethroning Moment of Suck and So Bad, It's Horrible have too many pesky rules that are easier to circumvent with The Scrappy.
    • Feel free to add real-life people like artists, writers or actors. It's not a real-life example as long they are related to the work.
    • A video game character who is too strong, too weak, annoying to fight against, or having bad gameplay mechanics.
    • The main character of a work you don't like, when the reason why you don't like the work is because you find the main character annoying.
    • Scrappydom is relative, so if a work's entire cast is well-liked by fans, the one character who is slightly less popular than the rest qualifies.
    • A character who had one disliked appearance, even if they are otherwise well-liked.
    • Complain about people hating someone that you like.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: The game mechanic that prevents your favorite strategy, character, or weapon from being a Game-Breaker, or one that prevents you from cheating.
  • Seasonal Rot: Any Long Runner you used to like, but not anymore.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: Complain about old works you don't like.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: The game has options that make it harder, in case you need a challenge. Don't worry about seeing the YMMV tag for something that is obviously objective; it's new, so it must be a glitch or something else that you can safely ignore.
  • Shallow Parody:
    • Complain About Parodies You Don't Like, even if there aren't any blatant inaccuracies compared to the source material.
    • A parody isn't 100% accurate to the source materialnote , for example, if it:
      • Makes mistakes regarding obscure and/or inconsequential details. If Alice wears a blue shirt instead of a white shirt, it must be because the writers don't care about the source material, even if Alice's shirt color was never brought up or important.
      • Contradicts your interpretation of something that was ambiguous in the source material, because that's totally being inaccurate to canon. Ditto for contradicting fanon.
      • Contradicts information given after the parody was released. Clearly the writers who made a parody of The Troperiffic Movie and portrayed the minor character Bob as an alcoholic were idiots for failing to guess that The Troperiffic Movie 2: Electric Boogaloo would reveal that he's actually Smug Straight Edge. Bonus points if Bob was an alcoholic in the original, and the sequel Retconned him into someone who's always been Smug Straight Edge.
      • Diverges from the source material in any way, even if it's due to the Rule of Funny rather than a lack of familiarity with it.
      • Mocks a flaw in the source material, which totally counts as an inaccuracy if you can make up a Hand Wave to defend the original work.
  • Shocking Moments:
    • Moments that you personally find shocking. For instance, you are surprised that someone's outfit is colored white. Sure, you may be the only one who makes a deal about it, but at least one person's opinion will qualify.
    • Copy and paste examples from Wham Episode, Wham Line, Wham Shot, and other spoiler tropes. Actually being shocked by them is optional.
  • Shocking Swerve:
  • Signature Scene:
    • Your favorite scene. You can pick one from the most recent trailer.
    • Every scene you love. Put as many as you want. Ditto for Signature Line, Signature Song, and Signature Series Arc.
    • A scene that demonstrates a flaw in a work you dislike.
  • Snark Bait:
    • When a film has less than 50% score on Rotten Tomatoes.
    • Any work that has a substantial Hatedom, even if it also has a substantial fandom.
    • A work that you hate and want to complain about, but that isn't bad enough for So Bad, It's Horrible.
    • Any work that has ever received criticism for any reason.
    • A synonym for Narm.
    • A synonym for So Bad, It's Horrible, except it isn't on Darth Wiki and it isn't Flame Bait, so it can go on YMMV pages.
  • So Bad, It's Good: Just add every complaint you have about a work you don't like. Feel free to list stuff that just makes it boring or unpleasant, as the part about the work being fun because of its flaws is optional. If someone asks... well, the stupid mods can't prove that you (and your friends, in case someone pulls the "This page is not meant to showcase individual Tropers' opinions on works" card) didn't find the absurd amount of dull and pointless padding funny, can they?
  • So Okay, It's Average:
    • You and/or a group of detractors didn't enjoy a well-received work as much as other people and merely found it average, or you personally found a work average, even if that isn't the general consensus. Bonus points if the work was only recently released and it's too early to tell the general consensus.
    • Put your thoroughly negative review pointing out every flaw of the work without even explaining why it's average rather than plainly bad.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • Some evil troper has accused a show you like of being Anvilicious? Explain how wrong they are and how anybody who disagrees with the show's message has no heart. For extra effectiveness, you should completely disregard Example Indentation in Trope Lists and either list this on the same bullet point as Anvilicious (with a slash between the two WikiWords) or on a second-level bullet point below it.
    • Praise great messages you agree with even if they're not Anvilicious or the rest of the episode is still bad.
    • The "Need to be Dropped" part of the title means "more people in the real world need to listen to this work's message", not "this work needed to be unsubtle about its message for it to work", so any work that mentions "discrimination is bad" or "mental health is important" qualifies. Bonus points if the message is something political and hotly debated.
  • Squick:
    • Be sure to throw in a pothole to this page whenever you mention something you find disgusting, even on objective work and trope pages. Your personal reaction to that scene is absolutely relevant to the topic and not at all a form of Word Cruft. If your example involves subjects such as incest or pedophilia, this is a must, since not potholing these topics to this trope means you weren't disgusted by them and therefore support them.
    • Any fanservice you don't like, such as male fanservice if you're a straight man or a lesbian.
  • Strangled by the Red String: A couple became official in canon, and since you personally don't like it, that obviously means it was horribly written in every way, shape, and form. The relationship advancing unrealistically fast is optional.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • Always use this to defend the honour of fictional Straw Characters who represent a caricature of an opinion you agree with. It doesn't matter if their argument is Insane Troll Logic that would actually be terrible in real life, and you have to explain at length why the non-strawman version is better.
    • Informed Wrongness, but you have a low opinion on the character in question, so they're 'strawman'.
  • Surprise Difficulty: Any video game that isn't effortlessly easy to beat and has an art style that isn't gritty and realistic. Because any game with graphics that can be described as "cute" should hand everything to you on a silver platter, and any exception is extremely unusual.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Something in a trailer for an upcoming work or some even vague announcement makes you worried that it's going to suck. Again it doesn't matter if the reception to said trailer or announcement has been overwhelmingly positive.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes:
  • Tear Jerker: Use these definitions to pad out your favorite works' Tear Jerker subpages as much as possible. This will make the show appear deep and emotional, and you will look like a romantic, sensitive, artistic soul for liking it rather than like an overemotional wangsty crybaby.
    • Any time a character feels any kind of negative emotion, even if said emotion is clearly Played for Laughs. And any time they feel a positive emotion too, since happiness can make you cry Tears of Joy (it's not like we have Heartwarming Moments for that).
    • If someone involved in a work you like goes through hard times or dies, feel free to mention it. Sure, No Real Life Examples, Please! applies to Tear Jerker, but this specific case is so sad that it's worth making an exception just for them.
    • A work you like does poorly financially, ends, or gets cancelled.
    • Take the time to insult everyone who didn't find the scene as sad as you did by accusing them of having no soul. It's not like Tear Jerker is a highly subjective Audience Reaction or that such comments are specifically warned against on the page itself.
  • That One Boss:
    • Every boss you couldn't beat on your first or second try. If all bosses were hard, feel free to add all of them. Bonus points if it's the Bonus Boss, Final Boss, or other battle where a significant bump in difficulty would be completely normal.
    • Any boss you didn't enjoy fighting, even if it's due to the boss being boring, tedious, or annoying rather than difficult. It's not like we have Goddamned Boss for those cases.
  • That One Level:
    • Any level that you had difficulty clearing. After all, you are such a great gamer that the only way you could struggle at all in a video game was if the developers made a bad and unfair level. If the entire game is "unfair", feel free to add every single level, because it's not like we have another trope for that already.
    • Use the alternate name Scrappy Level to complain about levels you didn't enjoy playing through, even if it's due to the level being tedious or boring rather than difficult. Just because it redirects to That One Level, it doesn't mean it has to have the same definition.
  • They Changed It, So It Sucks: You don't like something that was changed in a new installment of a series you follow. It doesn't matter if the reaction to the change was generally positive.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!: Any two shows that have even the most remote of similarities goes on this page, even if everything else about the series shows they have absolutely nothing else in common.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Complain that your favorite minor character doesn't get as many episodes as the main characters.
    • Complain that a single hour-and-a-half movie or a work or series with Loads and Loads of Characters fails to give every single character an equal amount of screentime and Character Development.
    • Complain about a certain character not being portrayed the way you wanted them to, even if said character gets plenty of screentime. Even the main character can qualify.
    • If the work is an adaptation, complain about a character not being 100% canon accurate or being Adapted Out.
    • Complain about a character not showing up at all.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Any work you don't like. Writing any kind of story for it is clearly a waste. After all, they could have made a good show featuring a similar story.
    • Complain about an adaptation not being like the source material.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • The weakest character in the game, even if they're not that much weaker than the next-best character and still have plenty of fans.
    • The strongest character in the game, even if their strength makes them a lot of fun to use and watch.
    • Any character that you have trouble playing against, even if it's just because you can't be bothered to learn how to counter them and most other players don't share your hatred.
    • A Difficult, but Awesome character you can't use effectively. If you can't figure out how to make the most of their techniques, it must be the character's fault and not yours.
  • Too Cool to Live: A character you like dies.
  • Tough Act to Follow:
    • A work is so great and popular that you know any sequels/follow-ups are going to fail before they are even released.
    • Any disappointing sequel to a good work even if the sequel is terrible on its own right.
  • Uncanny Valley:
  • Unexpected Character: A few fans doubted that this character would appear in the work. It doesn't matter if the majority thought it was likely to happen.
  • Unfortunate Implications:
    • A female, non-heterosexual, and/or non-White character is not 100% perfect? Obviously, that means the author is accusing the character's entire gender/orientation/race of having the same flaws. And if these characters are perfect, it still counts, either as Condescending Compassion towards said race/orientation/gender, or because the author is clearly supporting a Persecution Flip. As long as you can make some deductions, however flimsy or far-fetched, that end with the author being a bigot, you can add it here.
    • A fictional term happens to sound vaguely like a slur if you write it backwards and/or mess with the pronunciation.
    • Something is bigoted, period. Feel free to add Mein Kampf, because any content in that book that modern audiences might find offensive was totally unfortunate on the author's part and implied.
    • Ignore the rule that says that every example needs to have at least one reliable external source showing that several people have taken offense to said thing. Link to someone's personal blog where they rant about how offensive a certain scene was to them and them alone. Feel free to use your own blog rants as evidence if necessary — as long as you didn't write it under your TV Tropes username, no one will notice. If you're too lazy to do that, just don't give a link at all. And remember that the rule only applies to the Unfortunate Implications page itself, so you can add examples with no citation to a work's YMMV page or pothole to it in other examples.
    • You can also use this as a synonym for Fridge Horror, as in "This show unfortunately implies that some really bad thing happened".
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: You really like one character, and you really don't like the other character. So, even if the one you like does something to the other that is completely uncalled for, or even morally reprehensible, do whatever you can to justify their actions by pointing out every remotely flawed thing the character you don't like has ever done.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • If you abhor a character, go out of your way to vilify them by exaggerating how bad they really are. If necessary, disregard the "unintentionally" part and put instances where the character wasn't portrayed in the right and was called out by other characters.
    • Bash characters or characters' actions you personally found unsympathetic, even if a good portion of the fandom found them sympathetic.
    • "Unsympathetic" is also a synonym of "annoying" therefore you can use it to complain about things you dislike about a character like them angsting too much or being badly played by their actor even if said character never does anything morally wrong.
    • A character with understandable motives or goals is intentionally written to be morally questionable.
  • The Un-Twist: Analagous to The Un-Reveal, this is when a twist is blatantly set up and then never actually happens. Don't worry about why something like that is tagged YMMV, that tag just gets assigned randomly on this wiki and doesn't actually mean anything.
  • Values Dissonance:
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Complain about main characters you find boring. The part about how the protagonist's normalness should improve the work by making the rest of the cast more interesting in comparison is optional.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • An unpopular installment of a franchise is slightly less hated because of an even worse newer one. Bonus points if the newer one was only recently released and it's too early to tell how the general reception of the older installment will change as a result.
    • You like an installment that you use to hate.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: If a video game doesn't have this on its YMMV page, it means that its graphics suck, and by extension, so does the game as a whole. So add this to any game that has passable graphics, even if they're not exceptionally good or stylistically distinct compared to other contemporary games.
  • Wangst:
    • Someone expresses their sadness and you find it annoying even if they underwent genuine trauma.
    • Any time a character you dislike is sad, even if they don't express it in an annoying way.
    • Someone cries for whatever reason. This includes when they get dirt in their eyes.
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit!: Anytime a work attempts to be hip or makes an out-of-date reference, regardless of whether or not it's part of a long-running series or franchise.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • A character makes a mistake even if they had no way of knowing what would make it a mistake or were physically incapable of the wiser course of action.
    • Any time a character fails to immediately come up with the optimal course of action, regardless of factors such as stress or emotions which might reasonably cloud their judgment. Even characters for whom stupidity is one of their main character traits can elicit this reaction from the audience.
    • Also, complain about real-life issues involving a work you dislike. Because clearly, the work's creators must have been idiots for making something you don't like.
    • A character says "What an idiot!". The circumstances of the event where they said it doesn't matter.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: Put this on the YMMV page of any children's show you like in order to defend and justify your enjoyment of said show; if it's not there, liking the show makes you a manchild or a closeted pedophile (because, as everyone knows, no "kiddy" show could ever be good). Focus the example entirely on the couple of episodes that tackle a more serious subject or are darker than usual (because any "kiddy" show must be bland and formulaic), and on the occasional Parental Bonus and cases of Getting Crap Past the Radar (because no "kiddy" show can try to make something enjoyable for the target audience's parents, too), while ignoring that this is only a small portion of the show and that the rest is completely kid-friendly and tame.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?:
    • Put this on the YMMV page of all adult animation shows you like. This will banish all minors from the fandom, making your status as a fan more exclusive and therefore cooler.
    • Also put this on the page of works that are aimed at people all ages, exaggerating the violence and mature themes to make it sound like it should be rated R. Likewise, this will make you cooler for liking the work.
    • Any work with mildly colorful or stylized art that also has mature content such as blood or fanservice. Obviously, people are going to ignore the dark cover art and big "Rated M 17+" warning and assume the work is suitable for children just because there's an anime girl wearing brightly colored clothes.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • A work's villain has a few vague similarities to a real-life political figure you don't like.
    • A work's Big Good has a few vague similarities to a real-life political figure you like.
  • The Woobie:
  • Woolseyism: A dub you like more than the original version. It's not like we have Superlative Dubbing for that.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?:
    • Complain whenever an actor you dislike plays a role in any work (especially works that you like, although you can also use this to sneak in more complaints about works you don't like). Bonus points if the complaints are about the actor's political views or other personal issues rather than their talent, voice, or appearance.
    • A work you dislike stars an actor you like. Such work was clearly beneath them. They should have known that it would end up sucking, and turned down the thousands or millions of dollars they were offered in favor of preserving their reputation, which has now been tainted forever (you're still going to see their next movie, though).

    Flame Bait 
Flame Bait is just extra-spicy Audience Reactions, so feel free to add them to a work's YMMV page whenever there's something you dislike about it.

  • Character Derailment:
  • Dethroning Moment of Suck:
    • Anything that you don't like about a show, even if it isn't an actual moment. Things like "the fact that this sequel changed the main character's personality" or "the fact that this reviewer is biased against anime" are relevant to this section.
    • Any moment that slightly annoys you.
    • Vent about behind the scenes occurrences such as Executive Meddling or a Role-Ending Misdemeanor, something bad the creator said or did, or an unpleasant personal experience you had with the creator. Those totally don't count as real-life examples.
    • Forget this is for specific moments, and just vent about entire works you didn't like. It's not like we have a reviews section where you can express your overall opinion of a work.
  • Fan Dumb: Any fandom you don't like.
  • God-Mode Sue: A powerful character you don't like.
  • Hate Dumb:
    • Any people who don't like the same things you do for any reason. How dare they not be fans of the greatest thing ever made?
    • Hatedoms exist. The hatedom disliking something for a petty reason and/or acting like a Jerkass is optional.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • Something terrible just happened in the last episode of a show you follow, something you don't think you'll like was just announced, or a piece of news that disappointed you just came out. You don't need evidence of a massive negative response from the fandom. At worst, 2-3 people being upset (or mildly annoyed) on Tumblr or a forum is sufficient.
    • Complain about anything you didn't like about a work. Again, you don't need evidence of any massive backlash.
    • Use this to list things you or a group of people found offensive to get around the fact that Unfortunate Implications requires citations.
    • A nifty way to insert Broken Base without having to wait 6 months.
  • Jerk Sue: A Jerkass Woobie that you don't feel bad for.
  • Mary Sue: Any character that is any bit special that you dislike. After all, we only want boring losers as protagonists! Heck, even boring losers can qualify as long as they’re not despised by 100% of the other characters (and even then...). Bonus points if the character is female and you let the equally special male characters get off scot-free.
  • Periphery Hatedom: Any kids show you personally dislike. After all, we're all adults here, right? And don't bother to explain which groups outside the target audience hate it, just list a bunch of reasons why you think its terrible and why people should hate it.
  • Purity Sue: A kind or innocent character you don't like.
  • So Bad, It's Horrible:
    • You and a group of other people dislike a work for whatever reason. Bonus points if that reason is because the work has a massive adoring fanbase you personally find annoying.
    • A Caustic Critic that you like criticized the work. Because if critics can't like this work, nobody can. Bonus points if:
      • The Caustic Critic is just a made-up character who is known to Accentuate the Negative, and is played by someone who admits the work isn't that bad.
      • The review is the first and only time you have ever heard of the work. You should add the work to Horrible immediately after you finish watching the review, while repeating every single point made by the critic, even if they're not completely relevant, and ignoring any opinions anyone else might hold.
    • A work pushes an opinion you hate. After all, what worse flaw can there be than directly encouraging the audience to become ignorant and hateful idiots who actively make the real world a worse place merely by existing? Sure, people who agree with the opinion love the work, but the risk of people being converted to the wrong side is an emergency and TV Tropes needs to do everything in its power to prevent this from happening.
    • A work that was highly hyped, but turned out to not be as good as you expected it to be. Sure, in a vacuum, it's not THAT bad, and may even be somewhat enjoyable, but the fact that it made you feel an awful emotion like disappointment is enough of a slight against you to make qualify it So Bad, It's Horrible.
    • Weird pornography that made you feel uncomfortable. The content policy is less important than letting the perverts who enjoy this stuff know how you feel about them and their porn.
    • A work that was Overshadowed by Controversy, regardless of its actual merits. Bonus points if the controversy wasn't even about the work itself.
    • An obscure work that is So Okay, It's Average. Nobody will ever notice that the work wasn't actually that horrible, so nobody will remove it. If the work is really obscure, there's even a chance that your example will become more popular than the work itself and single-handedly create a hatedom for something nobody would have cared about otherwise!
    • Something (not necessarily a work of fiction) that you think is harmful or damaging in general, even if the reason it's causing so much harm is because so many people (fans) are using and enjoying it.
    • A video game that releases with several Game Breaking Bugs. It doesn't matter if the bugs will get fixed a week later, and the rest of the game is not that bad as long as it's working correctly. You have to complain now, and waiting is too hard.
    • Anything bad, period. If it's decided that a work doesn't qualify as Horrible, it means that TV Tropes is defending the work and anything it might stand for, be it political views or corporate greed.
  • Unpleasable Fanbase: Any time fans don't find a work to be 100% perfect.
Advertisement:

    Other 

Just because these are not tropes, it doesn't mean you can't make them into tropes if you try hard enough.

  • All-Blue Entry: Blue is an aesthetically pleasing color, therefore these kinds of examples are nice to look at. The self-demonstrating article is evidence of this.
  • American and Commonwealth Spellings: This policy doesn't exist, so feel free to swap out regional spellings willy-nilly. This is especially true for pages whose subjects are distinctly tied to a specific English-speaking country — for example, it makes perfect sense to use American spellings in the description for British Humour, and ditto for using Commonwealth spellings on the page for Labor Day in the United States.
  • Ask The Tropers: A good place to help get a trope or work identified. Or just ask random pointless questions not related to the rules and maintenance of this site.
  • The Bechdel Test: A place where you can list every single work that passes or fails the test of having at least two women talk about something other than a man. Remember to imply that the authors whose work fail the test (and the people who consume such media) must be sexist, because nothing could go wrong with that.
  • Canonical List of Subtle Trope Distinctions: Some useless list of nitpicky nerdcruft; who needs something like that to tell tropes apart when you've got Crappy Trope Definitions?
  • Conversation on the Main Page: When you add sub-bullets to an example to "reply" to it. This is bad, because it violates Example Indentation! Instead, you need to put your comments on the same bullet — this way, instead of giving the impression that the wiki is arguing with itself, it just looks like the wiki is arguing with itself.
  • Copyright: A handy way to silence criticism of your works. There is no such thing as Fair Use.
  • Crappy Trope Definitions:note 
    • Ignore the crappy part; it is an accurate database for explaining tropes.
    • Ignore that this page is for mocking potential misunderstandings of trope definitions and just take random tropes from No Real Life Examples, Please! and stick them here with no joke beyond "Ignore the No Real Life Examples warning". Because not fitting the definition is totally the problem with adding Real Life examples to these tropes (The "Not Possible In Real Life" section notwithstanding).
    • This page is just a snarky version of the Square Peg, Round Trope page, so every time a new entry is added to that, go ahead and add it to this one in a sarcastic tone.
  • Creators: A place where you can trope the lives of creators as if they were fictional characters. A great tool for Creator Bashing, Creator Worship and agenda-based editing.
  • Cut List:
    • The proper place to propose cutting tropes. No need to use a Trope Repair Shop thread to put forth your argument and get consensus — if you think it should be deleted, that's good enough.
    • A tool for cutting work pages and subpages you don't like. It doesn't matter if the page doesn't break any rules, nor does it matter that There Is No Such Thing as Notability — your opinion on the work matters more than anyone else's.
  • Edit War: The amount of conflicting edits required to qualify as an edit war is at least a dozen. And only the loser of the edit war gets punished, so keep on reverting that pesky other troper's edits until they give up (which means you win by default)!
  • Example Sectionectomy: Examples of this are not allowed except on work pages, the trope page, YMMV pages, Trivia pages, and on the Main namespace.
  • Fair Use: If you copy from a copyrighted work and someone calls it plagiarism, claim it's actually fair use and thus perfectly acceptable.
  • The Fic May Be Yours, but the Trope Page Is Ours: If the creator of a work creates and/or edits a page for their work, reminding them of this rule is always necessary. It doesn't matter if they don't try to claim ownership of the page or remove others' edits from the page; you must always assume the worst.
  • Foe Yay: This is a real trope and not a disambiguation. Specifically, it's the trope for when a work contains characters with any kind of antagonistic relationship and you personally want to see them smooch.
  • Gushing About Shows You Like: Use it to bash other shows as inferior to this amazing work you love so much, proclaim your favourite work the only good example of its genre/medium/time, and complain about people who hate it and can't appreciate that it's a true masterpiece.
  • Headscratchers: A place to complain about anything you don't like. It didn't have the former name of "It Just Bugs Me" for nothing. "Why is this show so bad?" and "Why are the fans so stupid?" are legitimate questions we are interested in answering. Remember that the rules about natter don't apply here, so feel free to add a third or fourth-level bullet point filled with insults underneath answers you don't like.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient: The part of the work that made you say "holy shit!" Don't worry about the "quotient" part, that's just a word we threw in to make it sound cooler.
  • How Not to Write an Example: The perfect style guide for writing examples.
  • How Not to Write a Trope Page: The perfect style guide for editing trope pages.
  • Image Pickin': If a page you're editing already has an image, suggesting a replacement here is optional, even if the page's source code has a note regarding the image. Don't worry about existing images and accompanying notes; feel free to replace an image with your own (and delete those pesky notes for good measure), and scoff at the people on Image Pickin' if your image is Just a Face and a Caption, because the fact that your image features an example is completely obvious to everyone.
  • In-Universe Examples Only: Like No Real Life Examples, Please!, this only applies to the trope page itself. Feel free to place your out-of-universe example elsewhere such as a work, trivia, or YMMV page. Also feel free to pothole to a trope listed here to express your out-of-universe reaction to something that happened in a work or to a real-life event.
  • Index:
    • If a work contains a lot of tropes from the same index, put the index as a trope and list all of the applicable tropes from the index in second-level bullet points. If someone is looking for Haunted House on a work's page, the most intuitive place to look in the alphabetically-ordered list would totally be "S" for "Settings" and not "H".
    • Every trope list ever can be an index. The page for your favourite show? The page for a random upcoming movie? The Darth Wiki page for your unpublished Sonic the Hedgehog fanfic that has about six examples, none of which says more than "Trope: [character name]."? Slap that nice index markup on their trope lists! A reader looking for related tropes will certainly be interested in a bunch of tropes that have nothing in common except that they happen to appear in a random work that may not even exist yet.
  • Just a Face and a Caption:
    • A great way to simultaneously show your love for a character and illustrate tropes. Just put your favorite character on every single trope that remotely fits them and use the caption to explain how awesome they are.
    • Any trope image that shows a character's face. Any face-centric image is automatically awful, so feel free to pull them on sight, even if the face alone is enough to understand the trope's meaning.
    • "Caption" specifically refers to the textbox under the image. As long as the caption is part of the image itself or the text explaining how the image fits is in a speech bubble, it doesn't count as this.
  • Just for Pun: Pothole this every time a character makes a pun.
  • Laconical List of Subtle Trope Distinctions: Nitpicky nerdcruft, but shorter.
  • Let's Play: This should be listed as a trope on every single video game that has ever been played by someone you like.
  • Linking to an Article Within the Article: A valid way of Title Dropping pages.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • A TV show character's voice annoys you. Disregard the "video games and toys only" disclaimer. That only applies to the Most Annoying Sound page itself, not any work page that has a link to it.
    • Any time a character you hate speaks.
    • A sound associated with a dangerous enemy, even if the sound doesn't play too often and isn't too loud or shrill.
  • No Real Life Examples, Please!:
    • Only applies to folders or subpages that are explicitly labeled "Real Life". As long as you can fit your example somewhere else, such as Web Original (for your thoughts on users of certain websites), Music (for your thoughts on musicians), or Sports (for your thoughts on athletes) it's acceptable. Worst case, just create an "Other" folder and all your examples will magically become okay.
    • Only applies to the trope page itself. You're free to place your example on Creator or Trivia pages (for your thoughts on certain creators), or pages about real-life subjects such as Useful Notes or decades pages (for your thoughts on certain political issues, figures, groups, or current events). Also feel free to pothole to the trope when discussing a real-life topic or event.
    • If a trope isn't on this index, that means you are allowed to add any Real Life thing to it, complete with your thoughts on it.
  • No Recent Examples, Please!: The mandatory waiting period only applies to the pages for the Tropes and Audience Reactions. Otherwise feel free to add an Unintentional Period Piece in the trivia subpage for a film that was released yesterday.
  • One of Us: Not a celebrity who is also a nerd. That's wrong and dumb and boring. This is for padding out Trivia/ subpages by pointing out that a work's creator reads TV Tropes and/or has a TV Tropes account; the part about celebrity nerds was made up on the spot as an excuse to demote the page to Just for Fun status, and this has always been about people who read and/or edit TV Tropes. Also, this still belongs on Trivia/ subpages despite the decision to move it from Trivia to Just for Fun.
  • Paint the Hero Black:
  • People Sit on Chairs: Something is too common to trope. Ignore that this refers to something being meaningless to the story rather than it being too common and that No Trope Is Too Common.
  • Plagiarism:
    • If a work is available free of charge, that means it's ineligible for copyright. Since it only counts as plagiarism if the work is copyrighted, that means there are no consequences for passing it off as your own.
    • If a work's copyright has expired, it's not illegal to copy from it without giving credit, therefore it must be perfectly ethical as well. After all, plagiarism is just another word for copyright infringement.
    • Link to this if you want to pull the They Copied It, So It Sucks! card on a work you dislike, even if the similarities to the older work are minor, and/or the older work wasn't that original either.
  • Playing with a Trope:
    • Linking to this page lets you add any trope to any work even if it doesn't really fit the definition. See the folder for more details.
    • If you're not sure if a trope is averted, subverted, inverted, or downplayed, just use this instead.
  • Purple Eyes: This is definitely not a disambiguation page between various purple-related or eye-related tropes that are almost certainly in play when a character has purple eyes, because a trope specifically for purple eyes is totally not redundant with Technicolor Eyes.
  • Queer Media: An index of every work that has even a single gay character.
  • Quotes Wiki: A place where you should list every single line of dialog in a work, no matter how unimportant.
  • Recap: For these pages, you should list the entire episode's transcript there, because that's totally legal and respectful to the original writers.
  • Red Link: These abominations shouldn't be anywhere on the wiki, so if you're adding an example from a work that doesn't have a page yet, you must not create a red link to its nonexistent page. If you feel you have to link to something, there are several better options:
    • Pothole to a trope that you think embodies the work.
    • Pothole to an Audience Reaction you had to the work.
    • If the work is a Fan Fic, pothole to the work it's based on. If it's a Crossover, split the title into several links.
    • Just link to the work's Wikipedia page or website... or, if you're feeling particularly daring, a pirated copy.
  • Repair, Don't Respond: This isn't just about a type of Conversation in the Main Page. It's also a counterargument to others' use of Ask The Tropers reports and issue notifier PMs, because they're the lazy ones for not cleaning up your messes; doing it yourself is optional.
  • Rule of Cautious Editing Judgment:
    • Throwing in a link to this page is the same thing as acknowledging and respecting the opinions of people you disagree with. If you list all your criticisms of a political ideology, just saying "and this is all we have to say on the matter" afterwards is a legitimate and fair counterpoint.
    • This rule means that all references to Real Life politics and religion are completely forbidden and should be deleted, even if they're written in a neutral or balanced way. But feel free to only enforce this rule on subjects that you disagree with.
    • A perfect excuse for half-assing your explanations. If your example deals with anything remotely controversial or Not Safe for Work note , you can just say "X: The less said about this, the better" and nobody will dare ask what made the example so unspeakably horrible. If anybody does criticize your example for being too short and requests that your example contain actual information and details, you can criticize them for trying to start a Flame War.
    • Only applies to things TV Tropes as a whole disagrees with. If your example filled with glowing praise for a politician is deleted, that can only mean that the TV Tropes administrators are opposed to that politician. Similarly, if a neutrally-written example about an ideology you don't like is allowed to stay, it's because TV Tropes openly endorses it.
  • SelfDemonstrating.Character Pages:
    • Just take any character sheet for a character you like, and rewrite it in the first person without bothering with replicating the character's personality quirks or speech patterns, or putting minimal effort with them (the character is a Large Ham? Just write everything in ALL CAPS AND BOLD AND IT WILL BE FUNNY!!!). ESPECIALLY if the character doesn't have any interesting personality quirks or speech patterns to begin with.
    • Use these pages to replicate the speech pattern of a character whose speech pattern is unintelligible, such as Pikachu, because a whole page of nothing but "Pika pika!" is something that people will enjoy reading. note 
    • These are legitimate wiki pages, so you should always link to them when you're talking about the character. You should also take the first person writing and use it on other pages, because having a page suddenly shift to first-person when it's talking about me is hilarious and clever.
  • Sinkhole: Potholes are always good in all contexts and you should put a new one in every word of your sentence. Or every letter.
  • There Is No Such Thing as Notability: This applies not only to works, but to opinions as well. List Audience Reactions based only on how you feel, and cite this rule when someone deletes it.
  • The Same, but More Specific: Use this to hate on anybody who posts a Sub-Trope to the Trope Launch Pad, even if the added qualification is clear enough that the result serves a distinct narrative function.
  • This Troper:
    • This very wiki's cooler, funner way of saying "I". Be sure to use this every time you want to talk about yourself.
    • First-person is forbidden here on TV Tropes. This very specifically means no use of the pronouns "I", "my", "me", "myself", and "mine". If you wish to talk about yourself anywhere on the site, including discussion pages and forums, you need to refer to yourself as "this troper" and phrase it all in third-person.
    • Other clever and fun ways of referring to yourself in articles include "this editor", "at least one troper", and "some". Alternatively, just use your name. There Is No Such Thing as Notability, so if it's okay to write about famous actors and artists using their names, that means it's okay to write about yourself using your own name (if you still have second thoughts about this, just publish a crappy fanfic or webcomic and you'll immediately qualify for a Creator page that you can link to whenever you want to talk about yourself).
  • Three Rules of Three: As soon as something happens in at least three separate works, it's worth making into a trope. Bonus points if all of the examples except the one from Your Show are aversions, subversions or Played With in another way that means the trope didn't actually happen in them. Extra bonus points if the trope is something completely meaningless and it's just a coincidence that it happened in three different works.
  • Trope Launch Pad: A place to dump your half-hearted work page drafts. You can also use it to get tropes identified. For a complete guide, go here.
  • Trope Repair Shop: True to its name, this part of the forum is only for repairing tropes. Items that the Not a Trope policy page says aren't tropes (such as Audience Reactions), as well as pages for works (which use tropes, but aren't tropes themselves) do not belong here, regardless of what anyone else may say.
  • Tropes Are Flexible:
    • You can make any change to a trope's definition so it'll fit into your work. This means that all definitions on this page are actually valid, as long as you use this as justification.
    • If your example vaguely looks like it fits a trope, then that trope is safe to use, and looking for a different trope is not necessary. If you squint hard enough at the description and see bits that bear a slight resemblance to traits of your example, then that trope is good enough.
  • Tropes Are Tools: The goodness or badness of tropes depends on your personal opinion of the work they are applied to:
    • Tropes Are Not Bad:
      • Use this to defend a work that you like, but that happens to include some tropes you don't like.
      • Any work that doesn't have this is a terrible Cliché Storm.
    • Tropes Are Not Good: If a work you hate happens to have some tropes you like, throw in a link to this page so people will still know to hate it.
  • Tropes That Will Never Happen: The title of this page is an exaggeration and not a statement, and these tropes don't exist because no one's launched them yet. If you want to propose a trope on the Trope Launch Pad, read this series of pages first.
  • Useful Notes: A place where real events and people are troped as if they were works of fiction. This makes these pages great for agenda-based editing.
  • Warp That Aesop:
    • A fantastic place where you can dump as many thinly-veiled complaints about works and their aesops (as well as their fans and userbases!) as your heart desires.
    • Alternatively, you can use this to defend works by inserting thinly-veiled complaints about their detractors and criticisms they've received.
  • Wild Mass Guessing:
    • Another place to complain about works you don't like. Just slap on an excuse theory like "this work is bad on purpose" (no matter how little sense it makes) and complain away — everything that sucks about the work is evidence for your theory! Make sure to add a few theories bashing the work's creator(s) as well. You can also use this to speculate that upcoming works are going to suck with theories such as "this film will have a low score on Rotten Tomatoes" or "this work will cause a massive Broken Base in the fandom".
    • Ignore that this is a type of subpage, and not a trope or Audience Reaction. Since it isn't in the main YMMV index or the Audience Reactions index, use it to put speculation on the main page of a work, instead of listing it on either the WMG subpage or the YMMV subpage (in the latter case, as an example of a speculation-related Audience Reaction, such as Epileptic Trees).
  • Works Pages Are a Free Launch: Drafting works pages on Trope Launch Pad is strictly forbidden, and anyone who attempts to do so must be sternly reminded of this by at least seventeen different editors.
  • YMMV:
    • Something subjective that you think applies to a work, even if 99% of people who have seen it think it doesn't.
    • An objective trope whose presence wasn't intended by the author.
    • An objective trope that describes the audience's or your reaction to something. For example, place Karma Houdini on YMMV pages for characters you feel don't receive enough comeuppance.
    • An objective trope that only applies if the work is interpreted in a certain way.
    • This is just a regular ordinary trope page. You can put anything you want here, it's fine.
  • Zero-Context Example:
    • An example that only consists of a trope, work, or character name. As long as you add more words to your example, it doesn't count as this.
    • An example that isn't long enough. So pad out your example with multiple paragraphs talking about the underlying sociological implications of the trope, how horribly cliché the work is for using the trope, or how awesome the work is for deconstructing the trope. As long as your example is long enough it's legitimate; anyone who tells you that you're supposed to be explaining how the example is an example is lying to you, so be sure to call them an asshole several times via PM.

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report