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Are you tired of the boring old accurate trope definitions? Never fear! For according to some tropers, we don't need to actually go to the page and read the definition. We can shoehorn any example into any trope, no matter how little sense it makes!

See also, How Not to Write an Example, and How Not To Write A Trope Page


Tropes

  • A Boy and His X: Any work featuring a human(oid) main character and a non-human companion, regardless of the strength of their bond or any effect it has. Remember to use pothole markup to replace "Boy" and "X" with more precise descriptions of the characters.
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  • Actor Allusion: Two roles played by the same actor have coincidental and superficial similarities.
  • Actually Pretty Funny: When talking about a work you hate, use this to describe the one joke you thought was good.
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: Use alliteration when writing examples, then pothole it to this page.
  • Adorkable: A character you like. Alternately, any Moe girl. Having dorky traits is optional.
  • Adult Fear: A child is put in any kind of danger.
  • All Love Is Unrequited: A single character has an unrequited crush on someone else.
  • All Men Are Perverts: A single or a few male characters are perverted, even if other male characters within the same work aren't.
  • Ambiguous Disorder: If a character is the slightest bit introverted or shy, they must be autistic! If they get nervous sometimes, they must have PTSD or an anxiety disorder! If they're sometimes happy and sometimes sad, it must be bipolar disorder! Cloudcuckoolander? Schizophrenia!
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  • Ambiguously Gay: You ship this character with someone of the same sex, even if nothing in canon hints that they might be homosexual.
  • And I Must Scream: Any extremely bad, scary, and inescapable situation, regardless of how long it lasts until the character dies or is freed.note 
  • And That's Terrible:
    • A character calls something terrible, bad, awful, etc.
    • A statement to use in your TVTropes explanations to emphasize how bad something is.
  • Animal Wrongs Group: You dislike the protagonist of a pro-animal rights work.
  • Annoying Laugh: Anytime a character you hate laughs.
  • Anyone Can Die: One or two main characters die.
  • Arc Words: If the trailers and promotional material for an upcoming work emphasize a certain line, list it as this trope. Don't bother cutting the example once the work is released and the words turns out to be mentioned only once or twice while having little to do with the actual plot.
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  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: When you're Complaining About Shows You Don't Like, save the weakest complaint you have for the end, and pothole it to this trope.
  • Artistic License: Obviously, the author is a giant idiot. They couldn't have known that something about their work is unrealistic, but included it anyway to make the story more entertaining.
  • Asshole Victim:
    • Something bad happens to a character you don't like.
    • The hero defeats the villain in order to stop his evil plans. Because the villain is totally the victim in that scenario.
  • Author Tract: Any work that includes any reference, no matter how minor, to the author's personal views.
  • Back Stab: Ignore that this is specifically about attacks from the back being more effective in a game, and use this for characters getting stabbed in the back as part of the story, including non-game examples.
  • Berserk Button:
    • A character gets angry for legitimate and sympathetic reasons like when the villain hurts their loved ones.
    • Something that slightly annoyed a character once.
  • Beyond the Impossible: Anytime something impressive happens. Being impossible according to the setting's rules is not required; being really, really cool and hard to do is the sole criteria.
  • Big Bad: The most important antagonist in the show, even if most of the problems the main characters face have nothing to do with them. For example, the most frequently recurring jerk character in a Slice of Life show.
  • Big Beautiful Man: Any fat male character you like, even if he's not portrayed as being particularly attractive.
  • Big Beautiful Woman: Any fat female character you like, even if she's not portrayed as being particularly attractive.
  • Big Damn Heroes: Really badass heroes.
  • Big "NO!": Pothole to this trope whenever talking about something that you really didn't like.
  • Black Best Friend: A character who is black and also someone's best friend. Being a Satellite Character or Token Minority is optional.
  • Body Horror: Any gory scene. Ignore that the horror has to not be the direct result of violence in order to qualify.
  • Broken Aesop: Complain about works that give "wrong" morals. The "broken" in the title refers to the aesop being bad, not the aesop being contradicted by the narrative.
  • Buffy Speak: Pothole to this page every time you use "thing" or the suffix "-y" to describe something.
  • Bullet Hell:
    • This term can be used interchangeably with Shoot 'em Up. Even if the difficulty comes from the speed of the bullets rather than their patterns, it can still qualify.
    • Also, use this trope to refer to any time a large amount of bullets are fired in any media. It's not like we have another trope for that.
  • Bury Your Gays: Any LGBT character who dies even if Anyone Can Die on the show or if there're plenty other LGBT characters who survive.
  • The Bus Came Back: Anytime a character who hasn't made an appearance in a while returns, even if they were never Put on a Bus.
  • But Wait, There's More!: Marks the point where a list or explanation you are writing becomes long.
  • Captain Obvious: Pothole to this page when you make an obvious statement as a joke.
  • Casting Gag: Just like Actor Allusion, make flimsy connections between two roles played by the same actor even if it's to say that they play a different kind of character.
  • Cloning Blues: Cloning technology exists in this story, even if the ethics of cloning aren't really explored.
  • Comically Missing the Point: Pothole to this trope to accuse real-life people of being too stupid to understand something. It's not like it was renamed because of this issue.
  • Crapsack World: Bad things happen sometimes, therefore clearly this whole fictional world must suck! A work can qualify for this trope even if we only see bad stuff happening to one person or a small group of people, and nothing indicates that the whole population of the world is as miserable as them.
  • A Date with Rosie Palms: If a character has one arm that's much bigger and more muscular than the other for whatever reason, throw in a link to this trope. That joke is so funny, original, and relevant to the trope at hand.
  • Deadpan Snarker: A character snarks once or twice.
  • Deconstruction:
    • A dark, edgy awesome show!
    • A trope causes bad things to happen.
  • Deus ex Machina: You don't like how a situation was solved.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • Any instance when a video game gives attention to detail, even if it's for a situation that's not unlikely for the player to run into.
    • A synonym of Easter Egg.
  • Don't Explain the Joke: Pothole to this trope whenever you're explaining a joke.
  • Downer Ending:
    • Something bad or tragic happens at the end, even if good things happen as well.
    • An episode ends with a Cliffhanger, even if the next episode sets everything right. Because that totally counts as an "ending".
  • The Dreaded: In video games, use this for characters you dread having to fight against. Bonus points if it's a multiplayer game so you can essentially accuse a character of being a high-tier Tier-Induced Scrappy on the objective tropes list.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him:
    • Complain about the way a character died even if the scene was climactic and impactful on the story.
    • Someone dies by having something fall on them, even if it's not anticlimactic.
  • Dude, Not Funny!:
    • Pothole to this page when you want to complain about jokes you found offensive or in poor taste. Disregard the In-Universe Examples Only warning on the page.
    • Any attempt at Black Comedy that you didn't like. If a show you hate has plenty of dark jokes, feel free to accuse every single one of them of this trope.
  • Easier Than Easy: Any video game that is too easy for you, regardless of its difficulty options. You should use this to get away with complaining about games being too easy on objective trope pages.
  • Eldritch Abomination: A catch-all term for any big, scary monster!
  • Epic Fail: Want to complain about something you don't like? Just pothole it to this page. Don't care that it violates the In-Universe Examples Only warning on the page.
  • Everything's Better with Penguins: Every single work that has ever shown a penguin or references to penguins should have this trope.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: A work's title gives some information about its contents. Saying that JoJo's Bizarre Adventure is about a character nicknamed JoJo who has an adventure that is bizarre is descriptive enough to qualifynote .
  • Excuse Plot: Any relatively simplistic plot, even if it's used as more than justification for the gameplay or action onscreen and it receives focus.
  • Expy: This character is kind of like this character, and we'll pretend it's not a coincidence. Bonus points if the "copied" character is extremely obscure.
  • Eyepatch of Power: A character you like that wears an eyepatch.
  • Facepalm: Pothole to this trope whenever you're talking about something you dislike or think is stupid.
  • Five-Bad Band: Like Five-Man Band, you can shoehorn any group of villains here, even if they aren't a group of five. Feel free to include villains who never interact with each other, include extra tropes such as The Man Behind the Man or Token Good Teammate, and ignore the characterization for the roles just like Five-Man Band.
  • Five-Man Band: Any group of people, even if it's not five people, can be shoehorned here. You can also pick people who never interact or are not even aware of each other's existence. If two of the roles are duplicated, you add extra tropes like Tagalong Kid and Team Pet or the characterization is ignored for the role (for example, putting a male character in the role of The Chick), don't fret. You're doing it right! No matter what, please ignore the Example Indentation in Trope Lists and put the tropes in sub-bullets beneath the main Five Man Band entry.
  • Flat "What.": Pothole to this trope whenever you're talking about something confusing (which includes insulting a work's creator for making something so awful that you can't understand why they would make it)
  • Four Is Death: This doesn't have to be an intentional reference to the superstition. If there are four bad guys in a team, a bad thing happens four times, or the fourth character we see ends up dying, it's an example, even if it was most likely a coincidence. Even works made in the West and that have little or no Eastern influence can qualify.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble: Like Five-Man Band, any group of people can qualify as this, no matter how many people there are. So long as each member has acted kinda like a certain temperament once, they can qualify. Feel free to wage an Edit War with other fans over which character falls into which role, because it's not like this is a sign that they fall into none of them.
  • Frickin' Laser Beams: Throw in a link to this trope whenever you're talking about any kind of laser weapon, even if the beams move at the speed of light.
  • From Bad to Worse:
    • When you are complaining about something you don't like, pothole to this page to emphasize just how many flaws there are with that thing.
    • If you just finished complaining about something and are about to start complaining about something else, throw in a pothole to this trope so people will know just how much worse the second thing is compared to the first.
  • The Fundamentalist: You hate the protagonist of a work that pushes an opinion you don't like.
  • Gamer Chick: A girl who plays video games.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: A villain who sucks.
  • Genre Blindness: Any character who doesn't magically know the work's genre and common tropes associated with it. Obviously, if a car breaks down in the middle of the woods at night, the first thing any remotely sane and intelligent person would think is "I must be in a horror movie. I'd better stay in the car with the lights on and the doors locked until morning."
  • Genre Savvy: A character does something smart (or uses common sense).
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar:
    • Any dialogue or imagery that could possibly be interpreted as sexual if you make a lot of flimsy connections.
    • Any instance of swearing, fanservice, or violence, regardless of blatantness or the show's target audience/rating. If a character manages to clearly say "asshole" in your show, it's totally because the censors failed to notice the word, and not because thew knew it was there but decided it was acceptable given the show's rating.
    • A kid-friendly work references a not-so-kid-friendly work. It doesn't matter if the reference itself contains no objectionable content, kids could still be encouraged to go watch the source material and see some inappropriate stuff.
  • Girls with Guns: A trope that describes a girl that uses guns. Ignore the description, it's not a genre: so long as one female character uses firearms, it qualifies for the trope, even if said girl is not the main character or her getting into gunfights isn't the main focus of the work.
  • Guide Dang It!: Every puzzle or game mechanic you couldn't figure out on your own. There's no way the game actually gave you enough hints to figure them out yourself and you just weren't intelligent enough to notice them.
  • Harder Than Hard: Any video game (or part of one) that is too hard for you, regardless of its difficulty options. You should use this to get away with complaining about games being too hard on objective trope pages.
  • Hell Is That Noise: Since Most Annoying Sound is specifically about video games and toys, use this trope to complain about annoying sounds in other media.
  • Here We Go Again!: A work you dislike gets a sequel.
  • Holier Than Thou: You dislike the protagonist of a work that pushes an opinion you don't like, but don't hate them enough to accuse them of being The Fundamentalist.
  • Hollywood Atheist: You dislike the protagonist of a pro-atheism work.
  • Hypocrite: Accuse characters you don't like of being poorly-written and having inconsistent motivations. And if you hate the work badly enough, accuse the creator of being a hypocrite as well (after all, work creators are totally exempt from the No Real Life Examples, Please! rule).
  • In the Back: Ignore that this is about characters getting hit from behind as part of the plot, and use this for games where attacking from behind deals bonus damage.
  • Informed Attribute: Any character that you don't like whose competence is described as anything other than completely nonexistent.
  • Insane Troll Logic: Any argument that you personally disagree with, even if it was meant to be taken seriously.
  • It Makes Sense in Context: Intentionally describe a scene in a confusing way, then pothole it to this trope.
  • Joke Character:
    • Any silly-looking character in a video game, even if they're as strong as the more serious characters. No, there's no such trope as Fighting Clown.
    • Any weak character, even if they're presented seriously and are only weak because the developers didn't balance them properly.
  • Karma Houdini:
    • A villain whose story arc is still ongoing.
    • Complain about a character not receiving the amount of comeuppance you think they deserve.
  • Killed Off for Real: Any character dies, even if it's a work in which All Deaths Are Final. Bonus points for adding this trope immediately after the character dies, and they come back to life later.
  • Kill 'em All: A character kills lots of people or orders a massacre.
  • Kill It with Fire:
    • A cooler way to say Playing with Fire.
    • Pothole to this trope whenever you're talking about something disgusting.
  • Kill It with Ice: A cooler way to say An Ice Person.
  • Kill It with Water: A cooler way to say Making a Splash.
  • Knight of Cerebus: The coolest, edgiest villain in a work. Feel free to add as many as you want.
  • The Last of These Is Not Like the Others: Forget this is a dialogue trope, and list examples for any broken trend.
  • Lethal Joke Character:
    • A synonym of Fighting Clown, a humorous video game character that's as powerful as the more serious ones.
    • If you want to be boring and use the correct definition (a normally weak character that has a secretly powerful skill), be sure to disregard Example Indentation in Trope Lists and list it as "Joke Character / Lethal Joke Character" or put it on a second-level bullet point below the Joke Character entry.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: If a work doesn't have this trope, it sucks because it means the writer is too lazy and uncreative to come up with more characters. To remedy this, pad out the character sheet with every single minor character that shows up in one episode, because it's not like the trope is specifically about having a large amount of recurring characters.
  • Mad Scientist's Beautiful Daughter: Female character's father is a scientist.
  • Made Out to Be a Jerkass: The episode portrays a character as a jerkass, but you think they were right to act this way. That's totally not Informed Wrongness.
  • Mind Screw: Anything that you find confusing, including any work that involves Time Travel, Parallel Universes, Or Was It a Dream?, and/or generally trippy imagery.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Any male character you find attractive.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Any female character you find attractive.
  • Mythology Gag: This part of this work is kind of like this other installment from the same franchise.
  • N-Word Privileges: Every single reference to the N-word should be potholed to this trope, regardless of who's saying it or whether they're discussing how only black people can use that word.
  • Never Say "Die": Any work where defeated characters are not explicitly referred to as dead. Remember to also list aversions every time death is mentioned.
  • Nice Hat: Any character who wear any sort of headwear.
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: Anything that can be described with three or more adjectives.
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer: Pothole to this trope to emphasize how weird and unbelievable something is. It's not like this trope has already been renamed before to prevent it.
  • Obvious Beta:
    • Any game that has a bug in it.
    • A game you feel is lacking in content, even if it doesn't contain any major bugs or technical problems.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • Scary and shocking things in general
    • Anytime a character says "Oh Crap!"
    • Any moment which might make the audience briefly panic.
    • Pothole to this page to emphasize how scary something is.
  • Political Correctness Gone Mad: Ignore the No Real Life Examples, Please! warning, and use this to complain about the political left, whether by accusing the work of being a propaganda piece or decrying that a work you like was ruined by their censorship.
  • Precision F-Strike: Any instance of the word "fuck" that isn't being said multiple times in a short timeframe or at a high volume. For extra fun, insert gratuitous swearing into your fucking examples for emphasis and then pothole the swear to this trope.
  • Pun: Pothole to this page whenever you make a pun.
  • Purple Is Powerful: A character you like wears purple.
  • Reality Ensues: Any action or plot point that is slightly realistic.
  • Reconstruction: Like the opposite of a Deconstruction but even more awesome!
  • Recycled In Space:
    • A work takes place in space. Heck, it doesn't even have to be the whole work. As long as at least one thing is IN SPACE!, it counts.
    • A work has a few similarities to another work But with a whole bunch of other differences! As long as you use that special font to explain the differences, it counts.
    • Use this to accuse a work of ripping off another work on objective trope pages.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Any duo where one character wears red and the other wears blue.
  • Rule of Three: Any time there is three of something.
  • Sarcasm Mode: Pothole to this page when you make a sarcastic comment.
  • Scarf Of Asskicking: A character you like wears a scarf.
  • Shout-Out:
    • This part of this show is kind of like this other show. Bonus points if the other show wasn't released while the episode was being written.
    • Remember to also list any Shout-Outs the show has received. It's not like we have Referenced by... for that. note 
  • Straw Character: A character who pushes an opinion you don't like, even if they're portrayed as right or the author was going for Both Sides Have a Point.
  • Stuffed into the Fridge: A female character dies in any scenario.
  • Suicidal Overconfidence: Ignore that this is specifically about mooks in video games, and link to this whenever someone dies due to being overconfident.
  • This Is for Emphasis, Bitch!: Any sentence that ends with "bitch", even if the speaker is actually calling someone else a bitch and not just adding that word there for emphasis.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: A character is seen enjoying a certain food a few times.
  • Trainwreck Episode: The "trainwreck" can be taken figuratively, so things such as an episode of Let's Play where the player keeps screwing up a level or section of a game or a Web Video where the creator ran into technical problems can count.
  • Trope:
  • Tsundere: A jerkass character that you ship with someone.
  • Understatement: Pothole to this trope in order to emphasize how something is so great, your own words cannot do it justice.
  • Viewers Are Morons: Whenever something is explained in a work you don't like. Obviously, the writers are so terrible, they aren't above insulting the audience's intelligence. Or the fans are so stupid they wouldn't be able to understand anything without constant explanations.
  • Walking Spoiler: Any character that is involved in a plot twist, even if they do plenty of other stuff that isn't a spoiler.
  • Wham Episode: Any episode that progresses the plot. Or any episode that starts a new Story Arc, even if the arc ends with everything going back to normal. Any pilot with a First-Episode Spoiler also qualifies.
  • Wham Line:
    • Any line of dialogue that reveals any new information, even if it was heavily foreshadowed. Bonus points if the line is in a recently released trailer and is only surprising if you had no idea what the trailer was for before the line.
    • Any dramatic and memorable line that describes something that just blatantly happened onscreen (like announcing a character is dead right after they gets beheaded) also qualifies.
    • Things that aren't story related, like announcing the work's release date or a new entry in the series are also fair game for this trope.
  • Wham Shot:
    • Any shot that reveals new information in a recently released trailer like a character showing up even though it's common knowledge by the time of the release.
    • The moment in the first trailer for a work where an iconic character, item, or logo appears. Because we need to bog down our trope lists with every single little bit of information that has ever applied to a work, even if it's no longer relevant a few hours later.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: A character does something you disapprove of. Heck, it doesn't even have to be a character. Feel free to pothole to this trope to accuse the work's author of writing something you didn't like.
  • Who Wears Short Shorts?: A character wears short shorts.
  • Xanatos Gambit: A character has a complex plan.
  • You Bastard!:
    • A character calls somebody a bastard.
    • A character does something bad, and some people in the audience want to call the character "bastard" in response.

Trivia

  • Author Existence Failure: An author dies. That is all. Having any unfinished work is not necessary to qualify.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • Complain about works you don't like by coming up with derogatory names for them. Because detractors of a work are clearly fans of the work.
    • Share that nickname you and your friends made up as an inside joke and nobody else uses. Because we totally care about your personal life.
  • Franchise Killer: The most recent installment in a franchise was a flop which must mean the franchise is dead. Don't wait for any official confirmation that the plug has been pulled on the franchise as a result. Bonus points if said "killer" only came out a few weeks or months ago.
  • Jossed: A fan theory you dislike or find highly improbable. No need to wait before it gets entirely disproven so that you won't look dumb in case it happens to be correct.
  • Those Two Actors: Any pair of actors who collaborated twice.
  • Too Soon: A joke is made about a recent tragedy, and someone gets offended by it. It's not like the term means something completely different on this wiki.
  • Unintentional Period Piece:
    • A recently released work contains one thing that may slightly date it. Heck, upcoming works can qualify too. It's even better if the single supposedly dated thing is something obscure and anecdotal note .
    • Any work that can be narrowed down to its decade, period. If a 60's movie has 60's fashion or a 90's series doesn't have modern smartphones, it's definitely unusual enough to be noted.

YMMV: After all, the fact that these are subjective mean you can use them wherever and however you want!

  • Accidental Innuendo:
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Gush about characters you like and rant about characters you hate.
    • As soon as a new character is introduced, start speculating about their future role in the plot. It's not like the next few episodes will almost certainly confirm which interpretation is correct.
  • And the Fandom Rejoiced:
    • Ignore the "Fandom" part of the title and use this to describe the hatedom's reaction to when the show they hate gets canceled, gets reduced airtime, or is otherwise Screwed by the Network.
    • List every bit of news that comes out about a work you're looking forward to, even if it doesn't generate a lot of buzz.
    • Forget this is about pre-release news, and list things about the final product you liked that weren't revealed in any trailers or pre-release announcements or material.
  • Anticlimax Boss: Any boss that you didn't enjoy fighting.
  • Anvilicious: Complain about works that try to spread a message you disagree with.
  • Ass Pull: A plot twist you don't like, even if it was properly foreshadowed.
  • Audience-Alienating Premise:
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • A trailer alleviates some concerns about an unreleased work whether or not it was the author's intent.
    • Fans are angry about something happening in one episode. Shortly afterwards, another episode comes out to address these concerns. Because the writers, actors, editors, animators, etc. clearly managed to remake the whole episode in just a few weeks in reaction to fan complaints.
  • Awesome Moments:
    • A character accomplishes something, no matter how minor. Be sure to list a play-by-play description of everything the hero does whenever a new episode comes out, because every single blow he lands on the villain is noteworthy, and it's totally not just because it's still fresh in your mind due to being in the newest chapter.
    • Your favorite work does well commercially.
    • A new installment of your favorite series is announced.
    • Ignore the "moment" part of the title and list general facts about the work that you find awesome.
  • Awesome Music: Just dump a bunch of YouTube links to the entire soundtrack of your favorite work! Even a 3-second jingle can be an example. Explaining why you like the song is optional, but if you do feel like elaborating beyond just name-dropping the song, making the link's text into an excerpt from the song's lyrics is enough context.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Use this to complain about characters you dislike. Sure, a Base-Breaking Character needs to have equal amounts of fans and detractors, but you can cover the fans by simply adding a token "but some fans like them" before or after your multi-paragraph evisceration of the character to balance it out.
    • If a character you like is listed as The Scrappy, mention them as a Base-Breaking Character too in order to defend them. You're so important that your opinion is worth as much by itself as the combined hatred of the legions of fans who hate the character's guts.
    • The main character of a divisive work, when one thing that makes the work so divisive is its main character. It's not like people who hate the work aren't counted as part of the "base".
    • Just list the entire cast, along with a positive and negative trait of theirs, and leave it at that. For example, "Bob: nice, friendly guy, or boring and cliche?"
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Any scene that is even remotely weird.
  • Broken Base:
    • A lot of people like something you don't.
    • Any topic of discussions that elicits the slightest degree of diverging opinions from fans like "Does Alice look better with blue pants or a pink skirt?".
    • You saw one person who didn't like something, and one person who did like it. Bonus points if the work/episode in question just finished airing minutes ago and it's impossible to tell how widespread any debates or disagreements over that thing will be.
    • Works that attract debates along the line of "is this show good or bad?" also qualify. Because detractors of the show are clearly part of the "base".
    • Use Broken Base as a way to complain about aspects of the show you dislike. Cover the "pro" side by saying "some fans like it", then go ahead and vent out all of your frustrations! Hell, you don't even need to cover the pro side at all. Just a mention of something being divisive or controversial is enough.
    • Any conflict, no matter how short-lived. Feel free to add examples from recently released or unreleased episodes and works. Of course people will still be fiercely debating over that one scene from the trailer six months after the movie is out!
    • Debates that consist of an "anti" side versus an "I don't care" side also qualify. Because when a fanbase is debating something like "does this flaw completely ruin what would have otherwise been a great movie, or does it just make it slightly less enjoyable?", the apathy of the "I don't care" side can be overpoweringly strong at times.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: You figured out a twist so naturally everyone did. Alternatively, one fan theory among a hundred of others happens to be true.
  • Character Derailment: When a character you like has a change in characterization that you personally disapprove of, even if there's a clear or logical in-story reason or explanation why said character's characterization changed.
  • The Chris Carter Effect: Complain that a work hasn't given you the answer to a certain question yet. Clearly, the writers must be hacks for keeping some things secret, even if most fans still believe that the answer will be shown eventually.
  • Complete Monster: Any villain who does anything bad. If your show doesn't have one, it sucks. It can apply to any show, even G-rated shows created for toddlers. After all, a school bully or a jerkass is totally comparable to dictators, serial killers, rapists, and child abusers, so just go ahead and add them to the page! No need to go through the approval process to determine whether they qualify.
  • Contested Sequel: Use this to complain about sequels you don't like. Cover the positive side of the reception by saying "some fans like it" before or after listing your gripes with the sequel to balance it out.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
    • Compare two characters you know even if they only share some superficial similarities like hair color. It doesn't matter if you're the only one in the world who compares those characters, we don't have Surprisingly Similar Characters for that.
    • Compare two works with a mildly similar premise, plot, scene or setting no matter how common they are. Please ignore that this audience reaction is only limited to characters.
  • Crazy Awesome: The "crazy" in the title means "extremely", not "mentally unwell". As such, this can mean...
    • A character is awesome. Forget about the crazy part.
    • A work is awesome, due to not caring about making sense and instead just trying to put in as many cool things as possible. That's totally not Rule of Cool.
  • Creator's Pet: A character with a big role or one that receives a lot of focus you don't like. Be sure to ignore the four requirements on the page when adding your example.
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • Any time something unrealistic happens in a work. Even errors that are obscure enough that only experts in the subject will notice them can count. Clearly, the writer must be an idiot for having a character using a medieval weapon a few years before it was actually invented or having a black hole that isn't 100% realistic.
    • Another term for Artistic License.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy:
    • Applicable as soon bad things happen or if a few characters you liked have died. It doesn't matter if the show is still lighthearted and humorous, the tone is still optimistic or hopeful, or if the heroes still save the day almost everytime.
    • A work is dark, period. It doesn't matter if the work has clear good guys who manage to achieve significant, lasting victories to offset some of the bleakness of the setting.
  • Deader Than Disco:
    • When something loses even a fraction of its popularity. Bonus points if the "dead" thing is still generally well-liked or is still releasing new installments.
    • When any work starts to receive any amount of hate months or years after its release, even if it was never really popular to begin with or it received plenty of hate when it was first released as well.
  • Designated Hero: You don't like one of the main characters.
  • Designated Villain: Any villain who opposes a protagonist you don't like. They may be a tyrant who has ruined countless lives For the Evulz, but the fact that they once tried to kill the bland and kinda annoying hero totally makes up for it.
  • Dethroning Moment of Suck:
    • Anything that you don't like about a show, even if it isn't an actual moment.
    • Any moment that slightly annoys you.
    • Vent about Executive Meddling, something bad the creator said or did, or an unpleasant personal experience you had with the creator. Those totally don't count as real-life examples.
  • Don't Shoot the Message: Any work you dislike that has a message. Bonus points if you also complain about the message itself.
  • Dork Age: Just complain about installments you don't like in a series. No need to present evidence that it was poorly-received by most fans.
  • Ear Worm:
    • Just like Awesome Music, no explanation is needed aside from an excerpt of the song's lyrics, or an acapella rendition such as "dah dah dah DAH!" for instrumental tracks.
    • On top of gushing about music you like, you can also use this to complain about music you found annoying.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Any character other than the main character who is popular, even if that character plays a major role. Hell, the main character themself can qualify if they're just that cool.
    • Your favourite character in the show!
    • A character who was just introduced in the newest episode before we have any knowledge of their importance or role in the story.
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Any non-white character you don't like. Behaving like an offensive racial caricature or being disliked by most fans of the work aren't necessary.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop:
    • Complain about a work that gives "wrong" morals.
    • Jokingly make up a silly lesson based on the story. It's not like we have Warp That Aesop for that.
  • Fandom Berserk Button: Anything that might slightly annoy fans of a work or franchise. Examples include:
    • Saying you like an unpopular installment, season, or episode.
    • Saying you dislike the franchise's Sacred Cow.
    • Saying you like The Scrappy or dislike an Ensemble Dark Horse.
    • Saying you like a Base-Breaking Character or Contested Sequel.
    • Saying you dislike a Base-Breaking Character or Contested Sequel.
    • Saying everyone should just shut up about that stupid Base-Breaking Character or Contested Sequel and discuss something else.
    • Mentioning certain unpopular fanon theories.
    • Admitting that you ship two characters who aren't the Fan-Preferred Couple.
    • Disliking the work/franchise for any reason.
    • Using a Discredited Meme.
    • Playing a game "wrong":
      • Using a disliked top tier character or allegedly cheap strategies to win. Clearly you have no skill and the overpowered character/strategy is carrying you.
      • Using a low-tier character. Either you have no idea what you're doing, or you're not taking the game seriously. You don't deserve to play either way.
      • Playing on the easiest difficulty (or, in particularly bad cases, playing on anything but Harder Than Hard). After all, challenge is the only valid reason to play a game.
      • Saying you think the game is too hard. People who want to enjoy a game without putting a ton of work into it are just entitled babies.
    • Liking the work around non-fans (because they're totally part of the fandom). Why would anyone skip over a chance to sneak in a Take That! towards fandoms that annoy them?
    • A genuine misconception that doesn't anger the fandom.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Complain about works you don't like that are competing against or have any sort of similarity to works you like and/or their fandoms, even if the rivalry is one-sided or the two fandoms generally don't mind or get along with each other.
    • Rivalries within fandoms over which entries of the series or franchise are the best and/or which are the worst can also qualify. That totally isn't Broken Base or Contested Sequel.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Adaptations and continuity reboots you hate even if they're separate continuities from the original material.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: List your favorite pairings even those who are already canon or not that popular.
  • Fridge Brilliance: Anything that isn't explicitly spelled out for the audience.
  • Fridge Horror: If the hero didn't defeat the villain, bad things would have happened.
  • Fridge Logic: Anything that bothers you or doesn't make sense, no matter how obvious.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: An actor died in real life, and also has played at least one character who died in-story. There is no need for any resemblance between the actor and character's deaths to qualify.
  • Funny Moments: A list of every single attempt at comedy in the work.
  • Game-Breaker: Every single character, item, or skill that you've lost to. Doesn't matter that it has loads of counters and is never seen in high-level play, since that would mean you're just too lazy to learn them and you wouldn't want that, do you?
  • God-Mode Sue: A powerful character you don't like.
  • He Really Can Act: Praise any good acting regardless if the actor already won multiple awards or if they only do a marginally better job than usual.
  • Heartwarming Moments: Any time someone does something nice or demonstrates basic courtesy towards another person.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Something that happens in a work has superficial or flimsy similarities to something that happens in a later work or later in real life.
  • Ho Yay: Two same-gender characters are on friendly terms and spend good time together. Actual homosexual relationships are fair game too.
  • Hype Backlash:
    • Complain about popular works you don't like.
    • When a highly anticipated work or announcement ends up disappointing you or a group of people, even if the work never received much praise to begin with.
  • Internet Backdraft: Something terrible just happened in the last episode of a show you follow or something you don't think you'll like was just announced. You don't need evidence of a massive negative response from the fandom. At worst, 2-3 people being upset on Tumblr or a forum is sufficient.
  • It Was His Sled: You know what happened in this movie/show, and therefore, the entire world knows as well! Don't forget to blank the entire entry just to prove how valid the example is!
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • An incredibly cool villain.
    • A villain outsmarts the heroes once. It doesn't matter if they fail every other times.
  • Mary Sue: Any character that is any bit special that you dislike. After all, we only want boring losers as protagonists! Bonus points if the character is female.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • A memorable line or scene from the episode that just aired. No need to wait to see whether the meme actually undergoes mutation or lasts longer than a week.
    • List common complaints about a work and pass them off as memes.
  • Misaimed Fandom: A portion of the fanbase you don't like.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • The villain does anything bad, from committing mass murder to being a jerk. Bonus points if you use it for real life actions, including petty stuff like your favorite show being canceled or someone changing something about it.
    • Be sure to list every single crime a villain commits. Because it's totally possible to cross the point of no return several times.
    • A heroic character you dislike does something bad, even if they proceed to make amends and are quickly forgiven by both the characters and most of the fanbase.
    • In-universe, a character declares someone beyond redemption. We don't have the This Is Unforgivable! trope for that.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • A TV show character's voice annoys you. Disregard the "video games and toys only" disclaimer. That only applies to the Most Annoying Sound page itself, not any work page that has a link to it.
    • Any time a character you hate speaks.
  • Most Triumphant Example: The show you like has an example of a trope.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Any time your favorite character speaks.
  • Narm:
    • Anything in the show that annoys you since Dethroning Moment of Suck is limited to only one example per troper.
    • Bad writing, acting, special effects, or animation in general, even if the scene was meant to be humorous.
  • Narm Charm: Defend and justify the Narm entries that bother you. For best effect, add this as a sub-bullet to the Narm entry, or change the Narm bullet point to "Narm/Narm Charm"
  • Never Live It Down: A character or a creator recently did or said something controversial. No need to wait whether or not the controversy is going to wear off.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Use these definitions to fit as many examples of this as possible into your show to make it seem Dark and Edgy and therefore good. You don't even have to feel fear watching the scene, as long as you can envision someone somewhere being afraid. After all, it's Audience Reactions, not Personal Reactions.
    • Any time a character is put in the slightest amount of danger, even if it's a work where Status Quo Is God and the hero dying in a random episode would bring the show to a screeching halt. Bonus points if it's a kid-friendly work where any kind of explicit death would be immensely out of place.
    • Any time character acts menacing. Even if it's clearly Played for Laughs.
    • Anything related to a work of fiction that makes you very slightly worried, including unintentionally implied events that are not officially part of the story, or behind-the-scenes events that totally don't count as Real Life examples.
    • Anything that is even the least bit startling or unsettling. If you use wording such as "somewhat unnerving" or "kinda scary", that's totally not a sign that it's not scary enough to qualify.
    • Be sure to list every single angry face a character has ever made, too! Add in all sorts of descriptors, such as calling it a Nightmare Face or claiming that it falls into the Uncanny Valley, in order to blatantly exaggerate the very mild unease the facial expression made you feel for a few seconds.
    • Every instance of violence, even in action-based works where fight scenes are commonplace. And every gory scene, even in gorny works where the audience is expected to enjoy the carnage.
    • A difficult level or powerful enemy in a video game. Because the phrase "nightmarishly difficult" is totally meant to be taken literally.
    • Forget about it being an Audience Reaction and put instances where characters are being afraid or worried while it's not scary for the audience.
    • If all else fails, just describe the scene without saying why it's scary. Nobody will be able to prove you didn't find the scene scary, therefore it qualifies.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: Every single licensed game ever made must be a case of either this or The Problem with Licensed Games. If the game is considered average or OK, put both of these reactions on its YMMV page, preferably both on the same bullet point or with one of them on a second-level bullet point below the other, with this one explaining the game's good points and the other explaining its flaws.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy:
    • Any work that has any slightly controversial thing related to it. Feel free to ignore the fact that most fans outside of the Vocal Minority or your favorite forum are enjoying the work just fine without caring about it.
    • A work causes divided opinions and arguments within the fandom. That totally isn't Broken Base.
    • A work or creator was recently the subject of a controversy. No need to wait if the controversy will end up overshadowing the work's, creator's, or the creator's body of works' merits or not.
    • The author holds some political views you disagree with. Bonus points if they're not too outspoken about their views.
  • Porting Disaster: A port of a game has slightly lower resolution, minor glitches or changes you dislike.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: Every single licensed game ever made must be a case of either this or No Problem with Licensed Games. If the game is considered average or OK, put both of these reactions on its YMMV page, preferably both on the same bullet point or with one of them on a second-level bullet point below the other, with this one explaining the game's flaws and the other explaining its good points.
  • Purity Sue: A kind or innocent character you don't like.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: A pairing you dislike even if it's a very minor subplot.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Dislike a character? List your headcanons about how they're actually abusive monsters and the source of all evil in the world.
  • Rooting for the Empire: You hate a work, so you want the villains to kill the heroes and force the story to end.
  • The Scrappy:
    • You don't need objective criteria like popularity polls or critic's reviews to define it. Just put any character that you dislike. Bonus point if the character isn't meant to be likeable at all.
    • Ignore that this is meant for fan reaction, and use this to list characters content creators, such as reviewers or let's players personally dislike.
    • Ignore that a Scrappy is a disliked character, and use this to complain about anything you dislike, such as annoying obstacles in video games or props in TV shows and movies.
    • For extra fun, list episodes or entire works as The Scrappy. Because Dethroning Moment of Suck and So Bad, It's Horrible have too many pesky rules that are easier to circumvent with The Scrappy.
    • Feel free to add real-life people like artists, writers or actors. It's not a real life example as long they are related to the work.
    • When adding examples of video game characters, be sure include things such as them being overpowered or underpowered or the boss fight against them or one involving them being annoying as reasons for fans hating them. Because those totally have to do with their character, and it's not like we have Tier-Induced Scrappy or Goddamned Boss for those cases respectively.
    • The main character of a work you don't like, when the reason why you don't like the work is because you find the main character annoying.
    • Scrappydom is relative, so if a work's entire cast is well-liked by fans, the one character who is slightly less popular than the rest qualifies.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: The game mechanic that prevents your favorite strategy, character, or weapon from being a Game-Breaker, or one that prevents you from cheating.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Your favorite scene. You can pick one from the most recent trailer.
    • A scene that demonstrates a flaw in a work you dislike.
  • Snark Bait:
    • When a film has less than 50% score on Rotten Tomatoes.
    • Any work that has a substantial Hatedom, even if it also has a substantial fandom.
  • So Bad, It's Horrible:
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • Some evil troper has accused a show you like of being Anvilicious? Explain how wrong they are and how anybody who disagrees with the show's message has no heart. For extra effectiveness, you should completely disregard Example Indentation in Trope Lists and either list this on the same bullet point as Anvilicious (with a slash between the two WikiWords) or on a second-level bullet point below it.
    • Praise great lessons you agree with even if they're not Anvilicious.
  • Squick: Be sure to throw in a pothole to this page whenever you mention something you find disgusting, even on objective work and trope pages. Your personal reaction to that scene is absolutely relevant to the topic and not at all a form of Word Cruft.
  • Strawman Has a Point: Always use this to defend the honour of fictional Straw Characters who represent a caricature of an opinion you agree with. It doesn't matter if their argument is Insane Troll Logic that would actually be terrible in real life, and you have to explain at length why the non-strawman version is better.
  • Surprise Difficulty: Any video game that isn't effortlessly easy to beat and has an art style that isn't gritty and realistic. Because any game with graphics that can be described as "cute" should hand everything to you on a silver platter, and any exception is extremely unusual.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Something in a trailer for an upcoming work or some even vague announcement makes you worried that it's going to suck. Again it doesn't matter if the reception to said trailer or announcement has been overwhelmingly positive.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes:
  • Tear Jerker:
    • Any time a character feels any kind of negative emotion. And any time they feel a positive emotion too, since happiness can make you cry Tears of Joy (it's not like we have Heartwarming Moments for that).
    • If someone involved in a work you like goes through hard times or dies, feel free to mention it. Sure, No Real Life Examples, Please! applies to Tear Jerker, but this specific case is so sad that it's worth making an exception just for them.
    • A work you like ends or gets cancelled.
    • Take the time to insult everyone who didn't find the scene as sad as you did by accusing them of having no soul. It's not like Tear Jerker is a highly subjective Audience Reaction or that such comments are specifically warned against on the page itself.
  • That One Boss: Every boss you couldn't beat on your first or second try. If all bosses were hard, feel free to add all of them. Bonus points if it's the Bonus Boss, Final Boss, or other battle where a significant bump in difficulty would be completely normal.
  • That One Level:
    • Any level that you had difficulty clearing. After all, you are such a great gamer that the only way you could struggle at all in a video game was if the developers made a bad and unfair level. If the entire game is "unfair", feel free to add every single level, because it's not like we have another trope for that already.
    • Use the alternate name Scrappy Level to complain about levels you didn't enjoy playing through, even if it's due to the level being tedious or boring rather than difficult. Just because it redirects to That One Level, it doesn't mean it has to have the same definition.
  • They Changed It, So It Sucks: You don't like something that was changed in a new installment of a series you follow. It doesn't matter if the reaction to the change was generally positive.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Complain that your favorite minor character doesn't get as many episodes as the main characters.
    • Complain that a single hour-and-a-half movie or a work or series with Loads and Loads of Characters fails to give every single character an equal amount of screentime and Character Development.
    • Complain about a certain character not being portrayed the way you wanted them to, even if said character gets plenty of screentime.
    • If the work is an adaptation, complain about a character not being 100% canon accurate or being Adapted Out.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Any work you don't like. Writing any kind of story for it is clearly a waste. After all, they could have made a good show featuring a similar story.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • The weakest character in the game, even if they're not that much weaker than the next-best character and still have plenty of fans.
    • The strongest character in the game, even if their strength makes them a lot of fun to use and watch.
    • Any character that you have trouble playing against, even if it's just because you can't be bothered to learn how to counter them and most other players don't share your hatred.
  • Too Cool to Live: A character you like dies.
  • Tough Act to Follow: A work is so great and popular that you know any sequels/follow-ups are going to fail before they are even released.
  • Uncanny Valley: Any creepy face.
  • Unexpected Character: A few fans doubted that this character would appear in the work. It doesn't matter if the majority thought it was likely to happen.
  • Unfortunate Implications:
    • A female, non-heterosexual, and/or non-White character is not 100% perfect? Obviously, that means the author is accusing the character's entire gender/orientation/race of having the same flaws. And if these characters are perfect, it still counts, either as Condescending Compassion towards said race/orientation/gender, or because the author is clearly supporting a Persecution Flip. As long as you can make some deductions, however flimsy or far-fetched, that end with the author being a bigot, you can add it here.
    • A fictional term happens to sound vaguely like a slur if you write it backwards and/or mess with the pronunciation.
    • Something is bigoted, period. Feel free to add Mein Kampf, because any content in that book that modern audiences might find offensive was totally unfortunate on the author's part and implied.
    • Ignore the rule that says that every example needs to have at least one reliable external source showing that several people have taken offense to said thing. Link to someone's personal blog where they rant about how offensive a certain scene was to them and them alone. Feel free to use your own blog rants as evidence if necessary — as long as you didn't write it under your TV Tropes username, no one will notice. If you're too lazy to do that, just don't give a link at all. And remember that the rule only applies to the Unfortunate Implications page itself, so you can add examples with no citation to a work's YMMV page or pothole to it in other examples.
    • You can also use this as a synonym for Fridge Horror, as in "This show unfortunately implies that some really bad thing happened".
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • If you abhor a character, go out of your way to vilify them by exaggerating how bad they really are. If necessary, disregard the "unintentionally" part and put instances where the character wasn't portrayed in the right and was called out by other characters.
    • Bash characters or characters' actions you personally found unsympathetic, even if a good portion of the fandom found them sympathetic.
  • Vindicated by History: An unpopular installment of a franchise is slightly less hated because of an even worse newer one. Bonus points if the newer one was only recently released and it's too early to tell how the general reception of the older installment will change as a result.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: If a video game doesn't have this on its YMMV page, it means that its graphics suck, and by extension, so does the game as a whole. So add this to any game that has passable graphics, even if they're not exceptionally good or stylistically distinct compared to other contemporary games.
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit!: Anytime a work attempts to be hip, regardless of whether or not it's part of a long running series or franchise.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Any time a character fails to immediately come up with the optimal course of action, regardless of factors such as stress or emotions which might reasonably cloud their judgment. Even characters for whom stupidity is one of their main character traits can elicit this reaction from the audience.
    • Also, complain about real-life issues involving a work you dislike. Because clearly, the work's creators must have been idiots for making something you don't like.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: Put this on the YMMV page of any children's show you like in order to defend and justify your enjoyment of said show; if it's not there, liking the show makes you a manchild or a closeted pedophile (because as everyone knows, no "kiddy" show could ever be good). Focus the example entirely on the couple of episodes that tackle a more serious subject or are darker than usual (because any "kiddy" show must be bland and formulaic), and on the occasional Parental Bonus and cases of Getting Crap Past the Radar (because no "kiddy" show can try to make something enjoyable for the target audience's parents, too), while ignoring that this is only a small portion of the show and that the rest is completely kid-friendly and tame.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • A work's villain has a few vague similarities to a real-life political figure you don't like.
    • A work's Big Good has a few vague similarities to a real-life political figure you like.
  • The Woobie:
    • Any character you like that has ever had something bad happen to them.
    • Ignore that this falls under No Real Life Examples, Please!, and use this to list creators who went through or are going through hard times.
  • Woolseyism: A dub you like more than the original version. It's not like we have Superlative Dubbing for that.

Other

Just because these are not tropes, it doesn't mean you can't make them into tropes if you try hard enough.

  • Let's Play: This should be listed as a trope on single video game that has ever been played by someone you like.
  • People Sit on Chairs: Something is too common to trope. Ignore that this refers to something being meaningless to the story rather than it being too common and that No Trope Is Too Common.
  • Rule of Cautious Editing Judgment: Throwing in a link to this page is the same thing as acknowledging and respecting the opinions of people you disagree with, so feel free to write anything you want about them afterwards.
  • This Troper: This very wiki's cooler, funner way of saying "I". Be sure to use this every time you want to talk about yourself.
  • Tropes Are Flexible: Your excuse for making any change to a trope's definition so it'll fit. This means that all definitions on this page are actually valid as long as you use this.
  • Tropes Are Not Bad: Every work that uses tropes needs to have this, otherwise it's a terrible Cliché Storm.


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