Follow TV Tropes

Following

Creator / Nitrome

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nes_6662.PNG
Advertisement:

Nitrome is an independent game developer founded in 2005 and known for its Flash games as well as mobile games, many of which are on Miniclip. Nitrome's games often have highly unusual gameplay that forces the player to think well outside the box. Combined with their games' quirky nature and appealing graphics, Nitrome's library has become quite popular with many Flash game players.

You can visit their website here.

    Nitrome's games 
  • Hot Air! (2005): Guide a hot-air balloon through various obstacles, using a fan to blow it away from danger.
  • Sandman (2006): Guide sleepwalkers through the land of Nod using sand to influence their direction.
  • Chick Flick (2006): Help two squirrels bounce baby birds back into their nest.
  • Roly Poly (2006): Help Poly the Hedgehog get through a maze by rotating the maze.
  • Feed Me!(2006): Control a Venus Flytrap escaping a greenhouse by using its mouth to move itself around.
  • Tanked Up (2006): Race tanks and avoid hazards, all while shooting at the competition.
  • Scribble (2006): Help the Blots get to safety in this Lemmings-like game.
  • Gift Wrapped (2006): Find a selected item in a pile of gifts as quickly as possible.
  • Frost Bite (2006): Control a mountaineer climbing up mountains using a grappling hook to get around and deal with monsters.
  • Skywire (2007): Guide a cable car of tiny people past out-of-control toy animals.
  • Space Hopper (2007): Help an astronaut collect stars and avoid enemies by hopping between planets.
  • Dangle (2007): Help a spider swing down his thread towards the bottom.
  • Hot Air 2: All Blown Up (2007): Help Hot Air save his girlfriend from the nefarious Baron Von Blimp.
  • Square Meal (2007): Guide a troll through a dungeon by swallowing blocks and spitting them at monsters to knock them out for eating.
  • Toxic (2007): Control a man bombing his way out a factory filled with rogue robots and toxic waste.
  • Magic Touch (2007): Play as a wizard who must stop invaders to his castle by drawing the magic symbols on their balloons.
  • Yin Yang (2007): Help the twins Yin and Yang navigate through their respective negative world environments.
  • Nanobots (2007): Control nanobots to destroy waves of enemy nanobots.
  • Off the Rails (2007): Control two cacti on a handcar making their way down a Mexican railroad.
  • Headcase (2007): Play as the superhero Norman Noggin as he makes his way through a wacky world where everyone walks on walls.
  • Pest Control (2007): Eliminate insects under a timer with your trusty flyswatter.
  • Twang (2007): Help Black Ball make his way across an ocean over controllable colored wires filled with hazards.
  • Thin Ice (2007): Skate around monsters to plunge them into lakes in this spinoff of Frost Bite.
  • Snow Drift (2007): Play as a yeti who can take out enemies by sliding down icy slopes.
  • Jack Frost (2007): Control Jack Frost as he works to cover each stage with ice while avoiding enemies.
  • Aquanaut (2008): Guide a minisub through an undersea world in search of treasure.
  • Go Go UFO (2008): Race aliens in tiny UFOs around an out-of-this-world racetrack.
  • Dirk Valentine and the Fortress of Steam (2008): Navigate a flying steampunk fortress with a chain cannon as Dirk Valentine.
  • Magneboy (2008): Control a boy robot who uses his magnetic powers to manipulate stages and reach the exit.
  • Cheese Dreams (2008): Bounce the Moon through a spaceship run by the giant alien mice who have abducted him.
  • Snot Put (2008): Toss droplets of snot as far as you can!
  • Knuckleheads (2008): Control two chain-linked heads as they work together to escape a dungeon.
  • Skywire 2 (2008): Guide cable cars of tiny people again past a new and improved plethora of toy animals.
  • Small Fry (2008): Guide four tiny creatures using each one's unique abilities to get them all to safety.
  • Mutiny (2008): Battle pirates in this turn-based strategy game.
  • Final Ninja (2008): Control Takeshi the last ninja as he navigates a cyberpunk metropolis to take down his old boss Akuma.
  • Onekey (2008): Guide a tribesman through ancient Aztec ruins with only the space bar to help him avoid danger.
  • Mallet Mania (2008): Use your mallet to guide a ball to a hole with a limited amount of shots.
  • In the Doghouse (2008)note : Guide a dog to his bone by moving rooms about to create a path.
  • Numbskull (2008): Rotate blocks in a haunted castle to reunite a skull with its body.
  • Bomba (2008): Guide Bomba through each stage with explosives, but avoid touching anything.
  • Flipside (2008): Race through topsy-turvy tracks against gravity-defying racecars.
  • Toxic 2 (2008): Bomb your way through another factory of rogue machines and toxic slime to destroy the Mother Robot.
  • Fat Cat (2008): Control a pudgy cat and an owl with laser vision to blast your way through various hazards.
  • Frost Bite 2 (2008): Scale some more mountains while avoiding more dangerous wildlife and icy hazards.
  • Ice Breaker (2008): Free Vikings from icy prisons, but make sure they land safely in their longboat.
  • Pixel Pop (2009): Chop fruit, smash tanks, and do much more in this beat-based game.
  • Flash Cat (2009): Control a cat riding a caterpillar as they rush through obstacle-laden courses.
  • Twin Shot (2009): Play as a kitty angel and slay the forces of evil with your bow and arrows.
  • Mirror Image (2009): Guide a warlock through demon-infested ruins using the power of teleportation.
  • The Glassworks (2009): Help Glassworks employee, Kapowski, navigate glass panes with his new climbing gloves.
  • Ice Breaker: The Red Clan (2009): Free more Vikings from the ice with new helpers and hazards.
  • Rustyard (2009): Guide a robot through a scrapyard by manipulating the environment around him.
  • Final Ninja Zero (2009): Guide Taskeshi through the facility of a mad corporate executive in this prequel to Final Ninja.
  • Powerup (2009): Create a circuit between two transformers using the provided boxes and crates.
  • Cosmic Cannon! (2009): Launch cannonballs and keep them in the air as long as possible by firing more balls at them.
  • Droplets (2009): Safely deploy the Bunny Droplets onto point boxes to reach the target score.
  • Double Edged (2009): Play as a Spartan warrior in this beat'em-up based on Greek mythology.
  • Castle Corp: Castlewear for All Occasions (2009): Command knights and buy items to take down a rival company in this strategy game.
  • Parasite (2009): Play as a villainous alien conqueror who possesses the ability to mind control creatures he infests.
  • Twin Shot 2: Good and Evil (2009): Continue the battle against the forces of evil, but now you can bring it to their doorstep.
  • Rockitty (2009): Guide the alien feline Rockitty by bounding him towards his spaceship.
  • Nebula (2009): Guide a newborn sun using a trail of stars through cosmic obstacles.
  • Cave Chaos (2009): Help a miner escape a collapsing cavern, keeping ahead of the unstable floor.
  • Graveyard Shift (2009): Blast zombies that pass by your screen in this take on the Light Gun Shooter genre.
  • B.C. Bow Contest (2009): Compete in a prehistoric archery contest.
  • Cold Storage (2009): Help a yeti escape from a giant's freezer by swinging on poles.
  • Ice Breaker: The Gathering (2009): Help Viking clans free their frozen brethren once more.
  • Avalanche: A Penguin Adventure (2009): Control a penguin as she flees from a massive avalanche.
  • Rubble Trouble New Yorknote  (2010): Demolish buildings with the provided tools to earn cash.
  • Skywire VIP (2010): Guess the names of famous folks (real and ficional) in this quiz spinoff of Skywire.
  • Blast RPG (2010): Launch a young warrior from a cannon to slay monsters and gain experience in Nitrome's twist on the RPG genre.
  • Tiny Castle (2010): Play as a knight navigating a castle that shifts form as his quest for the princess progresses.
  • Chisel (2010): Control the robot Chiseller as he drills planets down to size while avoiding enemies.
  • Bullethead (2010): Battle alien invaders coming down from the sky and shoot them down with your cannon helmet.
  • Fault Line (2010): Help the robot Zapo navigate by merging and un-merging walls with his rocket hands.
  • Ribbit (2010): Bounce your way through enemies and terrain as a frog-rabbit hybrid chasing after the deranged Dr. Siamese.
  • Worm Food (2010): Devour as many people as possible as quickly as you can as a monster worm.
  • Squawk (2010): Direct a parrot ball around a pirate ship using steering pegs.
  • Temple Glider (2010): Help an Ancient Egyptian bird navigate a pyramid and get back to its sarcophagus.
  • Sky Serpents (2010): Slay massive aerial dragons by stabbing at their joints while you avoid getting thrown off.
  • Enemy 585: The Last Henchman (2010): Guide an A.I.-controlled enemy as Turner the Block in this parody of Super Mario Bros..
  • Super Treadmill (2010): Help Billy lose weight on his uncle's Super Treadmill in this retro-styled game.
  • Bad Ice-Cream (2010): Play as Ice Cream trying to collect fruit while obstructing enemies with blocks of ice.
  • Rush (2011): Race as fast as you can with gravity-flipping dynamics.
  • The Bucket (2011): Control a magic flying fish carrying a bucket to guide a raccoon to safety in this retro-styled game.
  • Canary (2011): Control the mining robot Canary 214-LE as he navigates an asteroid mining colony with his rock-cutting laser cannon.
  • Test Subject Blue (2011): Help Blue the lab enzyme navigate tests in this Portal-influenced game.
  • Chisel 2 (2011): Help Chiseller with drilling up planets again, but now with the ability to jump between planets.
  • Knight Trap (2011): Guide knights through a platformed castle loaded with traps.
  • Steamlands (2011): Command an upgrade a tank to battle enemies tanks in this stampunk strategy game.
  • Test Subject Green (2011): Guide Blue through a new series of experiments by the sinister Dr. Nastidious.
  • Silly Sausage (2011): Help a super-stretchy wiener dog navigate through mazes in another pseudo-retro game.
  • Test Subject Arena (2011): Battle your friends as Blue and Green in this spinoff of the Test Subject series.
  • Office Trap (2011): Guide your office workers to safety in this modernized version of Knight Trap.
  • Rubble Trouble Tokyo (2011): Demolish buildings with the provided tools to earn cash in the capital of Japan.
  • Canopy (2011): Swing your way through a monster-infested jungle to find delicious fruit.
  • Mega Mash (2011): Navigate through a damaged NES console, facing multiple genres at once.
  • Steamlands: Player Pack (2011): Battle, command, and upgrade stampunk tanks once more in this compilation of fan-designed levels.
  • Stumped (2011): Guide a severed monster's foot that can only move in one direction through a haunted house.
  • Nitrome Must Die! (2011): Mow down hordes of Nitrome characters as an angry fan on a quest to destroy Nitrome in their 100th game. invoked
  • Lockehorn (2011)
  • Rubble Trouble Moscow (2011)
  • Rainbogeddon (2012)
  • Swindler (2012)
  • Skywire VIP Extended (2012)
  • Gunbrick (2012)
  • Cave Chaos 2 (2012)
  • Super Snotput (2012)
  • Hot Air Jr (2012)
  • J-J-Jump (2012)
  • Skywire VIP Shuffle (2012)
  • Calamari (2012)
  • Turnament (2012)
  • Swindler 2 (2012)
  • Ice Beak (2012)
  • Bad Ice Cream 2 (2012)
  • Plunger (2013)
  • Super Stock Take (2013)
  • Test Subject Complete (2013)
  • Colourblind (2013)note 
  • Icebreaker: A Viking Voyage (2013)
  • Oodlegobs (2013)
  • Test Subject Arena 2 (2013)
  • Cheese Dreams: New Moon (2013)
  • Bad Ice Cream 3 (2013)
  • changeType() (2014)
  • Ditto (2014)
  • Flue (2014)
  • Bump Battle Royale (2014)
  • 8bit Doves (2014)
  • Coil (2014)
  • Turn-Undead (2014)note 
  • Endless Doves (2014)
  • Submolok (2014)
  • Roller Polar (2014)
  • Platform Panic (2014)
  • Gunbrick SD (2015)
  • Magic Touch: Wizard for Hire (2015)
  • Silly Sausage in Meat Land (2015)
  • Cooped Up (2015)
  • Green Ninja (2015)
  • Vault! (2015)
  • Beneath The Lighthouse (2015)
  • Gopogo (2015)
  • Rust Bucket (2015)
  • Ultimate Briefcasenote  (2016)
  • Leap Day (2016)
  • Redungeonnote  (2016)
  • Magic Mansionnote  (2016)
  • Stretch Dungeon (2016)
  • Hop Swap (2016)
  • Silly Sausage: Doggy Dessert (2016)
  • Drop Wizard Towernote  (2017)
  • Tower Fortress (2017)''note  (2017)
  • Slime Pizzanote  (2018)
  • Nano Golfnote  (2018)
  • Spike Citynote  (2018)


Advertisement:

Nitrome's games contain examples of:

  • Absurdly High-Stakes Game: "Flipside" is a fun racing game... that determines whether the protagonist stays in prison or not.
  • Advancing Boss of Doom: Present in both "Ribbit" (as a hybrid of a rhinoceros and a beetle) and "Off the Rails" (as a train.) The final level of the latter has two such bosses, one in front of you and one behind, preventing you from going too fast or too slow unless you do a jump and manage to get over it, in which case you can reach the level's end quickly and without impediment.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: "Avalanche" has a straight one. "Cave Chaos" uses an odd variant: the scenery constantly assembles in front of you and disassembles behind you, forcing you to keep up or fall to your doom. "Super Treadmill" takes place on a treadmill, and you lose if you fall off either side.
  • Affectionate Parody: Happy Jump Land in "Enemy 585".
      Advertisement:
    • In "Mega Mash", There's a game called Nitrometris.
  • After the End:
    • Rustyard, starring a robot that wanders the ruins in search of places to recharge its batteries. And he finds a girlfriend.
    • The second game in the Toxic series takes place in a world where the robots took over.
    • The setting of Steamlands takes place during a war.
  • All There in the Manual: Some of the plots are only mentioned in the game descriptions.
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us: In Test Subject Green: Xeno Industries gets raided by Dr Nastidious. He later destroys it in Complete.
  • Always a Bigger Fish: In "Cheese Dreams", the ending has you escaping the ship... only for you and the ship to be promptly eaten by a ship shaped like a cat.
  • An Ice Person: "Jack Frost".
    • Also Bad Ice Cream and its sequel.
      • And the sequel to that as well.
  • Amusement Park of Doom: "Skywire".
  • And Now for Someone Completely Different: In Test Subject Complete: After Blue digests himself in the professor's system to revive him, you're playing as him from that point on.
  • And the Adventure Continues: In Test Subject Complete: After deciding to never work on enzymes again, the revived professor continues to live out his life via the second chance granted by Blue.
  • Anti-Hero: Often, the people who are fighting you are perfectly reasonable, such as in "Worm Food", when you're terrorizing floating islands with people living on them simply for food.
  • Armless Biped: The troll protagonist of "Square Meal".
    • Also the titular character of "Lockehorn" and his tribe.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: From "Tiny Castle": "[...]And also subletting to your grandad was the final straw!"
  • A Winner Is You: Rarely, but "Bullethead" stands out in this regard.
  • Babies Ever After: The ending of Hot Air 2. You can even play as the protagonist's son in Hot Air Jr.
  • Badass Adorable: Hot Air Jr. from... guess!
    • Also, Left Eye from "Colorblind".
    • The main characters in "Twin Shot". Kittens! Kittens with bows that destroyed hell!
  • Bad Boss:
    • The Big Bad of "Office Trap". He forces prospective employees to make their way through an office building riddled with death traps and agrees to give a temporary work contract to all the survivors.
    • The Nitrome Boss plays this straight. (No, not the real-life boss.)
  • Bee Afraid: Both "Skywire" and "Nitrome Must Die" has them as antagonists.
  • Be Yourself: By Day 17 of "Super Treadmill", Billy no longer cares about his weight or the competition, and if he decides to lose it, he'd rather eat healthily and exercise than use the Super Treadmill. Of course, his Uncle Rico is hell-bent on making Billy lose weight on the treadmill...
  • Bizarre Puzzle Game: Pretty much all of them, with "Flipside" being a notable exception.
  • Black Knight: The protagonist of "Tiny Castle", at least in terms of how he dresses.
  • Blob Monster: The enzymes in the Test Subject series.
  • Bloodless Carnage: So far, only "Graveyard Shift" and "Parasite" have used blood at all, and in those, it's been greenish gunk. "Nitrome Must Die" also uses blood, and its colour varies depending on the enemy.
    • Well, there's a bit of normal, red blood in the vampire level of Pixel Pop.
  • Body Horror: The worm transformation in Cave Chaos 2.
  • Boss Game: Sky Serpents.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: The main character of "Glassworks".
  • Bullfight Boss: The final level of "Super Treadmill".
  • Call-Back: "Nitrome Must Die" and "Super Stock Take" are made of them.
    • In "Small Fry", it's difficult to see, but in the background, you can see the protagonist of "Cheese Dreams" sitting in the sky.
  • The Cameo: So many of them.
    • Early-Bird Cameo: The zombies, plant, and maiden from "Graveyard Shift" debuted months before the game was released. In a similar vein, the creatures from "Rainbowgeddon" appeared in "Nitrome Must Die!" as enemies prior to the former game's release.
  • Cartoon Cheese: The protagonist of "Cheese Dreams" is made of it.
  • Cats Are Mean: "Doghouse", although the worst it does is block your way.
  • Chained Heat: Necessitates your awkward movements in "Knuckleheads."
  • Character Name and the Noun Phrase: "Dirk Valentine and the Fortress of Steam"
  • Character Title: "Enemy 585".
  • Colossus Climb: "Sky Serpents".
  • Continuity Cavalcade: "Nitrome Must Die" is loaded with characters from previous games.
  • Cool Tank:
    • "Steamlands" in a nutshell.
    • Tanked Up. No prizes for guessing what you're using.
    • In Rubble Trouble Moscow, the demolition team are given a tank at some points.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Your leader in "Castle Corp." He may also be a Pointy-Haired Boss, considering how cliche his idea of a pep talk is.
    • The Final Boss of "Nitrome Must Die", who also appears in "Super Stock Take".
  • Cranium Ride: The title character of "Parasite" uses a particularly brutal version, burrowing its tentacles into the heads of foes to control them and use their abilities. Creatures so controlled get a Sickly Green Glow in their eyes and a constant stream of green drool, and when abandoned explode into Ludicrous Gibs.
  • Crosshair Aware: "Final Ninja."
  • Cyberpunk: "Final Ninja" has a lot of elements of the genre.
  • Damsel in Distress:
    • Referred to as such in "Graveyard Shift". You've got a Hostage Spirit Link to them, and they die in a single hit from a zombie, so be careful.
    • Tiny Castle has the standard Save the Princess plot. Then it turns out you're trying to get her evicted.
  • Darker and Edgier: Test Subject Complete has an evil mastermind out for world domination, then the game outright states that he murdered the professor.
  • Dead Hat Shot: In Canary, your coworker at one point asks if you've seen Foreman White (the guy in the tutorial). At this exact point, you find his helmet on the floor.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: "Fault Line". You're merely sent back to the last checkpoint you accessed, and any fastened fault nodes that hid it are unfastened.
  • Deliberately Monochrome: Each level of "Yin Yang" is essentially two in one: one that's on a white background, with everything in black, and one that's on a black background, with everything in white. Everything that's empty air in one world is a solid block in the other. The two main characters can't directly interact, but can sometimes move crates around to open up holes in the other character's landscape.
  • Dem Bones: Seen in "Small Fry", "Mutiny", and "Numbskull".
  • Difficulty Spike: Practically their Signature Style. The first five to eight levels will be pretty easy tutorial levels, but then things get crazy. Averted by some games, though, like Tiny Castle (it's just one level) and Blast RPG (the level system is a bit different).
    • In Test Subject Complete, after recently learning that the professor was murdered, The Machine activates and is actively shooting lasers at you.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him: Used on zombies in "Graveyard Shift"... Oh, wait, you were using the phrase metaphorically?
  • Drop the Hammer: What happens if ice (or an unfortunate monster) lands on the ship's deck in "Ice Breaker".
  • Eldritch Abomination: The player character in "Worm Food".
  • Elimination Platformer: Twin Shot and Twin Shot 2.
  • Escort Mission: The owl in "Fat Cat" functions rather like a standard plane in a standard shmup, but is completely Immune to Bullets. The cat is slow and vulnerable, but must be kept alive so that it can smash down walls the owl can't damage. In later levels, this means deliberately moving the owl into hails of bullets to keep them from reaching the cat.
    • Enemy 585 is all about escorting a slow, fat mook escape.
  • Every Car Is a Pinto: Even if it's a hand-powered trolley car, as seen in "Off the Rails".
  • Everything's Better with Penguins: A penguin is the protagonist in "Avalanche". "Snow Drift", however, has penguins with an almost identical design as antagonists.
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows: Rainbogeddon.
  • Evil Laugh:
  • Excuse Plot: Very, very common. However, games that descend into Plot What Plot often have The Reveal at the end explaining what you've been doing the whole time.
  • Expansion Pack: "Ice Breaker: The Red Clan" and "Ice Breaker: The Gathering".
  • Eyepatch of Power: Both the title character in "Dirk Valentine" and Akuma in "Final Ninja Zero".
  • Faceless Goons: "Castle Corp", "Double Edged", and "Dirk Valentine and the Fortress of Steam". Note that the former two also have faceless protagonists — apparently, helmets are sometimes antiheroic.
  • Fake Difficulty: Nitrome's specialty is to take things that would usually be considered such, particularly Interface Screws, and try to make them reasonable and enjoyable limitations.
  • For the Evulz: The main character of "Parasite".
  • Foreshadowing: Plenty amounts in Test Subject Complete, such as the mention of the "orange goo pie" and The Machine.
  • Fungus Humongous: A common background element in "Small Fry".
    • Also appears in the background of "Swindler".
    • One level in Canopy is full of these.
  • Going Commando: Judging by the intro of "Toxic 2", the protagonist isn't wearing anything under that radiation suit.
  • Goomba Stomp: Your alternate attack in "Frost Bite." "Ribbit" is an interesting variation in that you can only do this if you've charged up for a high jump — standard jumps just result in Collision Damage.
  • Gorn: "Sky Serpents" has LOTS of (blue-ish) blood, especially when you win a level.
  • Grappling-Hook Pistol: Your way of getting up the mountain in "Frost Bite," as well as your primary weapon.
  • Gravity Screw: "Rush" has as its gimmick the ability to flip your character from floor to ceiling, not unlike VVVVVV. You can also flip your opponents' tracks, causing them to get screwed over as well!
    • "Swindler" is based around being able to rotate rooms/levels.
  • Have a Nice Death: It's worthwhile to lose intentionally in "Mutiny" just to see the unique messages for every battle.
  • Healing Potion:
    • "Graveyard Shift". Somehow, it works by shooting it.
    • In the Test Subject series, it's revealed that the Blue enzymes can cure death in Complete.
  • He Knows About Timed Hits: Usually, the necessary information is on signposts scattered around the level. "Cheese Dreams" gives these from the main character's perspective, with the inevitable lampshading of "Why are my thoughts appearing on these signs?"
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Blue in Test Subject Complete digests himself in the professor's system to resurrect him.
  • Hope Spot: The first half of Test Subject Complete is built up suggesting that the professor is being held as a prisoner. It's later revealed that Dr Nastidious killed him earlier.
  • Hourglass Plot: The ending of Super Treadmill shows Billy having finally lost weight, while Uncle Rico becomes obese.
  • Human Cannonball: "Blast RPG."
  • Human Popsicle: Your objective in "Ice Breaker" is to liberate them. Don't worry, a good whack with a hammer and they'll be perfectly fine.
  • 100% Completion: There's a fuse in each level of "Rustyard," and several vials of acid in each level of "Toxic 2." In each case, you're encouraged to collect them all, though neither explains whether anything special happens if you do (a screen in the former says "Have you been collecting those fuses? What for?"). Of note is that these are among the few Nitrome games that have no leaderboard for Scoring Points or completing a level in the smallest possible time.
  • Husky Russkie: One of the protagonists of "Rubble Trouble." He has a tendency to provide powerful explosives with only vague explanations of where he got them.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Sushi in "Final Ninja" and a Spot of Tea in "Dirk Valentine".
  • Hypocritical Humor: The ending of Nitrome Must Die has Austin and Justin decide to start their own games studio, having recently destroyed Nitrome, taken their site offline and stole tons of money from the recently-deceased Nitrome Boss.
  • Interface Screw: "Super Treadmill" and supposedly its Spiritual Successors are based on old NES games, so Nitrome has put in occasional TV static and glitches into AV mode.
  • Invisible Monsters: The levitating swords in "Tiny Castle" aren't actually levitating — they're held by invisible swordsmen, who flash when struck.
  • It Has Been an Honor: In Test Subject Complete: Rex209 says this to Blue before she shuts down, knowing what Blue has to do next..
  • Just Toying with Them: Your Sarcastic Devotee in "Toxic 2" is certain the robot leader is doing this — you can't possibly have gotten this far without her wanting you to. It's never entirely clear whether he's right about this, though either way, a good player is being underestimated.
  • Killer Rabbit: The final boss in "Hot Air Jr". No, really!
  • Knight in Shining Armor: The protagonist of "Blast RPG", though he's a little young for the role. If his HP drops to zero, the armor breaks and shows off his Goofy Print Underwear as he cries a river of tears.
    • Subverted in "Tiny Castle". At first, it seems like this trope applies as you try to save a princess. It turns out you were just evicting her.
  • L33t L1ng0: A very mild example in "Super Stock Take" — in the ending, the Corrupt Corporate Executive says two sentences (one of which, of course, being a Big "WHAT?!") filled with exclaimation points capped with an "11"
  • Larynx Dissonance: In Icebreaker.
  • Last of His Kind: "Final Ninja".
  • Legions of Hell: They wander the village in "Mirror Image". Don't get too close.
  • Lightning Can Do Anything:
    • It revives a skeleton in "Numbskull".
    • In "Headcase," it teleports the main character to "a world where everyone walked on walls" and turns him into a superhero.
  • Luckily, My Shield Will Protect Me: How you prevent zombie goop from killing you in "Graveyard Shift". Pieces break off it as it blocks more and more hits, but it never completely breaks, and you can replace it at some points.
  • Ludicrous Gibs: "Graveyard Shift" and "Parasite" are straight examples. "Off the Rails" has gore, but no blood, with dead bodies splitting into neatly sliced bits resembling steaks. "Final Ninja" has no blood or gore, just body parts flying every which way in a disturbing fashion.
  • Mad Scientist: The villain of "Ribbit".
    • Also, one created the protagonist of "Test Subject Blue", although he has purely benevolent intentions. In "Test Subject Green", Blue is captured by a different mad scientist that created Green enzymes to destroy him, as well as planning for world domination.
  • Malevolent Architecture:
    • Lampshaded in "Final Ninja Zero", and present without acknowledgement in too many games to list.
    • In Rubble Trouble Moscow, it's again lampshaded on why most of the structures you were sent to destroy were absolutely nuts. It's implied your boss was building them to avoid losing contracts.
  • Meaningful Name: Canary gets its name from the idiom "canary in a coal mine." Miners used to use canaries to detect carbon monoxide; due to the birds' faster breathing, they would inhale the gas quicker if it was there, and so if the canary died, a mine was unsafe. Fittingly enough, you play as a mining robot going into a mineral mine to fight an alien infestation.
  • Mind Rape: You perform them to different animals in "Parasite".
  • Mind Screw: "Tiny Castle" owes a lot to Braid, at least until The Reveal.
  • Minimalism: Gunbrick, J-J-Jump, Turnament, Ice Beak, and Flue. So much so, they are the size of the game thumbnails!
  • Mirror Boss: The Mimic enzyme introduced in Test Subject Green copies every single move you make except stand still.
  • Mix-and-Match Critters: The Mooks in "Ribbit" are standard versions of this, like a snake with porcupine quills. The title character is a variant, with a rabbit's head and a frog's head joined by their necks, lacking a torso or limbs. (Note that Ribbit is not a Multiple Head Case or Two Beings, One Body, referring to itself as "I.")
  • Money Spider:
    • Lampshaded in "Tiny Castle" at the end—the princess has so much money that she feeds it to the monsters.
    • In the ending of Nitrome Must Die, the Nitrome Boss turns into a huge pile of notes/bills after being killed. Austin and Justin later steal it.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: Many, many games.
    • "Pest Control" is exactly what it sounds like: you're an exterminator killing insects. And it's fucking awesome.
    • The "Frost Bite" series is about hiking, and "Thin Ice" is about ice skating.
  • My Brain Is Big: The protagonist of "Head Case". This has multiple applications.
  • My Little Panzer: In Rubble Trouble Tokyo, a Mecha-Godzilla Expy that is huge and can shoot huge lasers is legally sold as a toy.
  • Night of the Living Mooks: "Graveyard Shift".
  • Nintendo Hard: Hot Air and Nanobots. The former is very cramped, unforgiving and has strange controls, while the latter is mostly Marathon Levels (although downplayed).
    • This is the premise of Nitrome Must Die, where two irate gamers unable to beat most of the games decide to go destroy the company.
  • No Fourth Wall: In "Skywire VIP" the hosts speak directly to you, ponder why you're not pressing the play button, and even insult the programmer.
  • No OSHA Compliance:
    • The titular Glassworks is full of raving cleaning robots that hurt employees, and there are lasers everywhere.
    • The facility in the Toxic series is mostly full of acid.
    • The Nitrome building in Nitrome Must Die is depicted as an absolute hellhole, with executives whipping employees, spikes everywhere, working toilets seats being placed at desks and torturing being encouraged.
  • Odd Name Out: "changeType()" is the only game they have made which name starts with a lowercase letter.
  • One-Hit-Point Wonder: Applies in many of them, such as "Hot Air", "Hot Air 2", and "Parasite". Justified in the former two in that you're a hot air balloon.
  • Pacifist Run: You get bonus points for this in "Final Ninja." By "Final Ninja Zero" it's inverted: you get bonus points if you Leave No Survivors.
  • Pirate: All the main characters in "Mutiny."
  • Powered Armor:
    • The protagonist of "Final Ninja" wears some, though it's not quite as powerful as most fictional examples, being more focused on stealth.
    • The protagonist of the Test Subject Series uses the Proto-Suit, until it later uses the Rex209.
  • Precision F-Strike: Nitrome is notable for their games generally not having any profanity, though the opening and ending of "Nitrome Must Die" had Austin and Justin's chat screens peppered with Symbol Swearing, and the word "damn" is used early on in "Super Stock Take".
  • Prison Episode: "Flipside".
  • Production Foreshadowing: In the background of Nitrome Must Die, there's a whiteboard labelled 'New game ideas'. One of the ideas was a 'Game with blobs'. A month or two later, Swindler was released, in which the protagonist is a green blob. Later, Oodlegobs features blobs and cats, with the latter coming from the same board suggesting a game with cats in it.
  • Product Placement: In-Universe and out: The final minigame in Rubble Trouble Tokyo is Off the Rails, including two of the protagonists mentioning it's a Nitrome game and keep praising it due to being paid to do so and the fact they actually like it.
  • Puppeteer Parasite: The protagonist of "Parasite", of course.
  • The Power of Love: Twisted in "Parasite." Certain areas are covered in "happy gas," somehow related to an overwhelming force of positive feeling. The title character is unharmed for gameplay purposes, though he strongly dislikes the feeling. His mind-controlled minions explode.
    • The love arrows in Twin Shot make enemies completely harmless, explode into flowers and hearts, and the infection spreads to other monsters when they're contacted.
  • Rail Shooter: "Graveyard Shift".
  • Reality Warper: Zapo, the protagonist of "Fault Line" can fold the 2D levels in on themselves, causing everything in the folded area to temporarily vanish from existence—for instance, he can bypass walls by folding the space around the walls and leaving empty air behind.
  • Running Gag: Ever since "Cheese Dreams", every time the creators have shown a moon, it's been made of cheese.
  • Recycled In SPACE: "Office Trap" is basically "Knight Trap" set... in the office.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: The protagonist of "Tiny Castle".
  • Resignations Not Accepted: "Final Ninja". The best solution, of course, is to kill your employer.
  • Restraining Bolt: Your Mission Control in "Toxic 2" is an A.I. you've hacked and forced to aid you. It eventually decides it likes you and becomes your Sarcastic Devotee.
  • Retraux: EVERYTHING. Especially the "Nitrome Enjoyment System" series.
  • Rewarding Vandalism: "Rubble Trouble" is based around this — you're a demolition engineer.
    • Although, you lose money if you hit any other buildings besides the one you're trying to demolish, so this is pretty much an aversion.
    • Played straight in "Worm Food". You get extra points for eating buildings, although you get most of your food from eating people.
  • Rise to the Challenge: Several levels in "Knuckleheads".
  • Robot War: "Toxic".
  • RPG Elements: "Blast RPG", naturally.
  • Samus Is a Girl: The protagonist of "Frost Bite".
  • Sand Worm: "Worm Food."
  • Sapient Steed: Rex209 in Test Subject Complete. She gives info to Blue and acts as Ms. Exposition.
  • Save the Princess: "Tiny Castle". Actually, you're just trying to serve her an eviction notice.
    • In "Hot Air 2", you have to rescue your girlfriend.
    • In "Dirk Valentine", you have to rescue Queen Victoria.
  • Scarf Of Asskicking: The hero's scarf in Sky Serpents.
  • Scavenger World: This is the entire point of "Steamlands". It's imperative to steal your enemies' tank parts after your destroy their engine room.
  • Screen Tap:
    • In "Test Subject Blue", the scientist occasionally taps on the window in the test chamber.
      • In "Test Subject Complete," one of Dr Nastidious's soldiers takes it a bit farther and pounds the glass with his fist.
  • Secret Level: Several in "Toxic 2", accessed through blue teleporters in out-of-the-way areas.
  • Segmented Serpent: One of the nastier enemies in "Graveyard Shift", and the final boss in "Aquanauts". Naturally, you kill them bit by bit.
    • The ones in "Bullethead" can take relatively few shots, but are only hurt when shot in the tail. They move left-to-right and right-to-left, descending a little with each pass, and are long enough that you only have a small opening to shoot the tail before another part moves in front of it.
    • Sky Serpents is based entirely on killing these.
  • Self-Deprecation:
    • "Nitrome Must Die". It's even in the title!
      • Also, in the background of one of the level's, there's a whiteboard labelled 'New game ideas'. One idea that's circled and underlined is "Cheap Sequels".
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog:
    • Subverted in "Enemy 585" when it looks like the titular character will walk off the cliff to their doom (and the player is unable to help) but stops and turns around.
    • Played straight in "Cheese Dreams", which ends with both you and the ship you just escaped from gets eaten by a larger ship.
    • "Ditto" ends with the protagonist finally finding the exit to the cave they are trapped in, only for their reflection to go through it first. This not only traps the poor creature, but turns them into a reflection themselves. They then act as the reflection for the next person to get trapped, presumably starting the cycle all over again. Essentially, if you really want your character to escape, you'll have to play the game twice.
    • Test Subject Complete has the revelation that Dr Nastidious murdered the professor. He gets better, but Blue had to be digested because of this.
  • Shout-Out: Many in pixel form in "Skywire VIP". In fact, that's practically the whole point.
    • A tutorial box in a remote place in "Final Ninja" says, "The ninja must be like a snake, sneaking through the darkness, hiding from the light. To never be detected is the way of the solid snake.".
    • In "Chisel 2", a level set in an asteroid belt has the asteroids as green outlines. The Voice with an Internet Connection comments that it hasn't been used since 1979.
    • As explained below, the Uncle from Super Treadmill is named Uncle Rico.
    • Enemy 585 has many to Super Mario Bros., consider the layout of the "boss" room at the start.
      • "Mega Mash" has it's first level pretty much identical to the first level of Super Mario Bros, apart from the bit where you turn into a spaceship.
    • In Level 23 of Test Subject Blue, the professor clearly modelled the level after Space Invaders due to playing said game. He even mentions Galaxian in his notes.
    • The main protagonists (or antagonists) of Nitrome Must Die are named Austin Carter and Justin Bennet. Their first and second names have exactly 6 letters.
  • Spikes of Doom: Featured a lot.
  • The Spiny: "Frost Bite" has a few.
  • Stealth Run: Another thing that gets you bonus points in "Final Ninja".
  • Steam Punk: "Dirk Valentine and the Fortress of Steam", not surprisingly.
    • There's also "Steamlands".
  • Stripped to the Bone: The death animation in "Toxic" is surprisingly gruesome.
  • Sugar Apocalypse: The technology-free garden world on which "Parasite" is set is full of cartoonishly happy animals and benevolent nature spirits. The titular parasite kills the animals, harvests the spirits, and turns the entire world into a barren waste.
  • Super-Deformed: The signature visual style in the more recent games.
  • Super Drowning Skills:
    • Explained as part of The Reveal in "Twang" — you bet a substantial amount of money that you could get from one side of the ocean to the other without using a vehicle and without getting wet.
    • Also present, with a handwave, in "Parasite".
    • Icebreaker requires you to get the Vikings in the boat lest they drown.
  • Surprise Creepy: Canary starts off fairly tame, with the invading aliens looking more like stuffed animals than monsters. And then they start infecting other Canaries...
  • Sword & Sandal: "Double Edged".
  • Tag Line: "changeType()" has "Rewire The Platformer!".
  • Teleporters and Transporters:
    • The one and only ability of the main character in "Mirror Image"—he can't even walk.
    • The main aspect of the Test Subject Series.
  • Theme Naming: The leads of "Nitrome Must Die" are named Austin Carter and Justin Bennet.
  • Theme Tune Cameo: The final battle in Test Subject Complete has the main theme playing.
  • Thinking Out Loud: Uncle Rico does in Day 24 of "Super Treadmill", summing up his true motive:
    Rico: That stupid boy is going to make me lose the bet! I can't afford to lose, the price is too high! I'll make that boy super thin, even if I have to get on that treadmill myself! HAHAHAHAHA!
  • Tomato Surprise: The end of "Tiny Castle", where your knight, bound to save the beautiful princess, turns out to be a debt collector chasing down the princess, who refuses to pay rent on the castle.
  • Trial-and-Error Gameplay: "Cave Chaos" manages to be Masocore without being Nintendo Hard, on the basis that you have to memorize how to avoid several deaths per level.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: We have "Test Subject Blue", which plays out like Mega Man meeting Portal, then "Test Subject Green", where it's still the same formula, but not long after that we get "Test Subject Arena", where instead of getting a food pill, the blue and green enzyme fight with proton/enzyme blasts.
    • There's a similar example in the "Skywire" series. The first sequel, "Skywire 2", is simply a bunch of additional levels to the original. "Skywire VIP", however, has you guessing who all the people you've been riding around are supposed to be.
    • There's also "Mega Mash", which is a gameplay roulette of seven different sub-games with an overall puzzle element. The premise is that you're playing a broken Nitrome Enjoyment System cartridge which is constantly glitching out.
  • Up to Eleven: Nitrome takes their small retraux games to new heights with Gunbrick. The entire game is played in the tiny 50p x 50p icon! They have a full screen option so you don't scream in pain from the eyestrain, thankfully.
  • Verbal Tic: Ribbit, Ribbit in "Ribbit" constantly says "ribbit", ribbit.
  • Villain Protagonist: "Parasite" is about as clear-cut as you can get — you destroy entire planets both for survival and because it's fun. "Worm Food" is another staring example. A few other games, like "Castle Corp", have protagonists who're Anti Heroes.
    • "Droplets" has a bizarre twist example. The bunnies you've been carefully stop from dying are an evil invading army.
    • Austin Carter and Justin Bennet from "Nitrome Must Die".
  • Viral Marketing: Nitrome Must Die.
  • The Virus: Canary and Cave Chaos 2 approach this in different ways.
    • In Canary, the protagonist is never infected, but his mission control is, urging him to "join us."
    • In Cave Chaos 2, worm-like enemies crawl into the protagonist's ear to reshape him into something halfway between his normal self and the standard enemies in the first game. (It's even more disgusting than it sounds.) This forces him to constantly move forward, just like those enemies, although he can still turn around. It also changes the level-complete animation—instead of dancing around happily, he'll stand in one place for a moment, then suddenly start vomiting (apparently purging the worm, since he's back to normal in the next level.)
    • Twin Shot has love arrows that act this way, any monster who comes in contact with the affected one (or its explosion of love) become affected as well.
  • Waddling Head: The vikings in the "Ice Breaker" series are a non-enemy example.
  • Wall Crawl: The protagonist of "Glassworks", due to the special gloves he wears.
  • Weird Sun: The sun in "Ribbit" has bulging eyes, a slightly downturned mouth, and clenched teeth, and appears to be in significant pain. This is never explained.
  • What Have I Become?: Ribbit's reaction to becoming a Mix and Match Critter, though it skips the Wangst stage and proceeds straight to Revenge.
  • Womb Level: The entire game in "Nanobots".
  • You Bastard!: The end of "Parasite", although it's Played for Laughs.
  • You Have Researched Breathing: In Nitrome Must Die, the Bullethead weapon is identical in almost every way to the regular pistol... except that it shoots up.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle!: "Tiny Castle" is pretty blatant about this—the princess is in a cage hanging by a rope, and several times you reach the cage just in time for the rope to be pulled and for her to get moved to another part of the castle.

Top

Example of:

/

Feedback